Volkswagen

Volkswagen, [literally: "people's car"] (also known as VW) is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany.

It forms the core of Volkswagen AG (VWAG), one of the world's four largest car producers.

Origins in 1930s Germany

The Volkswagen main factory in Wolfsburg with its own power plant in the front.

Though the origins of the company date back to the 1930s, the design for the car that would become known as the Beetle / "Käfer" date back even further, as a pet project by car designer Ferdinand Porsche (1875–1951). Adolf Hitler's desire that almost anybody should be able to afford a car coincided with this design—although much of this design was inspired by the advanced Tatra cars of Hans Ledwinka.

Hitler's changes to the original design included better fuel efficiency (to make it more economical for the working man), reliability, ease of use, and economically efficient repairs and parts. The intention was that ordinary Germans would buy the car by means of a savings scheme ("Fünf Mark die Woche mußt Du sparen, willst Du im eigenen Wagen fahren" - "Save five Marks a week to drive in your own car"), which around 336,000 people eventually paid into. Volkswagen honored its savings agreements after World War II; Ford, which had a similar "coupon" savings system, reportedly did not. Prototypes of the car called the KdF-Wagen (German: Kraft durch Freude = "strength through joy"), appeared from 1936 onwards (the first cars had been produced in Stuttgart). The car already had its distinctive round shape and air-cooled, flat-four, rear-mounted engine, features similar to the Tatra. The VW car was just one of many KdF programs which included things such as tours and outings.

Erwin Komenda, the longstanding Porsche chief designer, developed the car body of the prototype, which was recognizably the Beetle we know today. It was one of the first to be designed with the aid of a wind tunnel; unlike the Chrysler Airflow, it would be a success.

The new factory in the new town of KdF-Stadt, now called Wolfsburg, purpose-built for the factory workers, only produced a handful of cars by the time war started in 1939. None were actually delivered to holders of the completed saving stamp books, though one Type 3 Cabriolet was presented to Hitler on his fiftieth birthday, in 1938.

War meant production turned to military vehicles, the Type 81 Kübelwagen utility vehicle (VW's most common wartime model) and the amphibious Schwimmwagen .

1945: British Army and Ivan Hirst, unclear future

The company owes its postwar existence largely to one man, British Army officer Major Ivan Hirst (1916–2000). In April 1945, KdF-Stadt and its heavily bombed factory were captured by the Americans, and handed to the British to administer. The factory was placed under the control of Oldham-born Hirst. At first, the plan was to use it for military vehicle maintenance. Since it had been used for military production, and had been a "political animal" (Hirst's words) rather than a commercial enterprise, the equipment was in time intended to be salvaged as war reparations. Hirst painted one of the factory's cars green and demonstrated it to British Army headquarters. Short of light transport, in September 1945 the British Army was persuaded to place a vital order for 20,000. The first few hundred cars went to personnel from the occupying forces, and to the German Post Office. By 1946 the factory was producing 1,000 cars a month, a remarkable feat considering the factory was still in disrepair: the damaged roof and windows meant rain stopped production; the steel to make the cars had to be bartered for new vehicles.

The car and its town changed their Second World War-era names to Volkswagen and Wolfsburg respectively, and production was increasing. It was still unclear what was to become of the factory. It was offered to representatives from the British, American and French motor industries. Famously, all rejected it. After an inspection of the plant, Sir William Rootes, head of the British Rootes Group, told Hirst the project would fail within two years, and that the car "is quite unattractive to the average motorcar buyer, is too ugly and too noisy ... If you think you're going to build cars in this place, you're a bloody fool, young man." (In a bizarre twist of fate, Volkswagen would manufacture a locally built version of Rootes' Hillman Avenger in Argentina in the 1980s, long after Rootes went bust at the hands of Chrysler in 1978—the Beetle outliving the Avenger by over 30 years)

Ford representatives were equally critical: the car was "not worth a damn". In France Citroën started the 2CV on a similar marketing concept. In Italy it was the Fiat 500.

1948–1974: Icon for German regeneration

An original and unmodified 1300 Deluxe dating from 1966

From 1948, Volkswagen became a very important element, symbolically and economically, of West German regeneration. Heinrich Nordhoff (1899–1968), a former senior manager at Opel who had overseen civilian and military vehicle production in the 1930s and 1940s, was recruited to run the factory in 1948. In 1949 Hirst left the company, now re-formed as a trust controlled by the West German government. Apart from the introduction of the Type 2 commercial vehicle (van, pickup and camper) and the Karmann Ghia sports car, Nordhoff pursued the one-model policy until shortly before his death in 1968.

On its entry to the U.S. market, the VW was briefly sold as a "Victory Wagon". Production of the Type 1 Volkswagen Beetle (German: 'Käfer', US: 'Bug', Mexican: 'Vocho', 'Vochito', French: 'Coccinelle', Portuguese: 'Carocha', Brazilian: 'Fusca', Danish: 'Boble, Folkevogn', Polish: 'Garbus') increased dramatically over the years, the total reaching one million in 1954. Despite the fact it was almost universally known as the Beetle, it was never officially known as such, instead referred to as the Type 1. Not until 1998 and the Golf-based New Beetle would the name be adopted by Wolfsburg.

During the 1960s and early 1970s, although the car was becoming outdated, American exports, innovative advertising and a growing reputation for reliability helped production figures to surpass the levels of the previous record holder, the Ford Model T. By 1973 total production was over 16 million.

VW expanded their product line in 1967 with the introduction of several Type 3 models, which were essentially body style variations (Fastback, Notchback, Squareback) based on Type 1 mechanical underpinnings, and again in 1969 with the relatively unpopular Type 4 (also known as the 411 and 412) models, which differed substantially from previous models with the notable introduction of unibody construction, a fully automatic transmission, electronic fuel injection, and a sturdier powerplant. In 1973, Volkswagen introduced the military-themed Thing (Type 181) in America, recalling the wartime Type 81. The military version was produced for the NATO-era German army (Bundeswehr) during the cold war years of 1970 to 1979. The US Thing version only lasted two years, 1973 and 1974, due at least in part to Ralph Nader's automobile safety campaigns.

1974: From Beetle to Golf

Volkswagen was in serious trouble by the end of the 1960s. The Type 3 and Type 4 models had been comparative flops, and the NSU-based K70 also failed to woo buyers. The company knew that Beetle production had to end one day, but the conundrum of replacing it had been a never ending nightmare. The key to the problem was the 1964 acquisition of Audi/Auto-Union. The Ingolstadt-based firm had the necessary expertise in front wheel drive and water-cooled engines that Volkswagen so desperately needed to produce a credible Beetle successor. Audi influences paved the way for this new generation of Volkswagens, known as the Polo, Golf and Passat.

Production of the Beetle at the Wolfsburg factory switched to the VW Golf in 1974, marketed in the United States as the Volkswagen Rabbit in the 1970s and as the Golf in the 1980s. This was a car unlike its predecessor in most significant ways, both mechanically as well as visually (its angular styling was designed by the Italian Giorgetto Giugiaro). Its design followed trends for small family cars set by the 1959 Mini and 1972 Renault 5—the Golf had a transversely mounted, water-cooled engine in the front, driving the front wheels, and had a hatchback, a format that has dominated the market segment ever since. Beetle production continued in smaller numbers at other German factories until 1978, but mainstream production shifted to Brazil and Mexico.

From 1970s to present

Volkswagen Polo 1990

While Volkswagen's range of cars soon became similar to that of other large European car-makers, the Golf has been the mainstay of the Volkswagen lineup since its introduction, and the mechanical basis for several other cars of the company. There have been five generations of the Volkswagen Golf, the first of which was produced from the summer of 1974 until the end of 1983, sold as the Rabbit in the United States. Its chassis also spawned the Scirocco coupe and Jetta sedan. The second generation Golf hatchback/Jetta sedan ran from late 1983 to late 1991. In 1991, Volkswagen launched the third-generation Golf and it was third time lucky when the Volkswagen Golf was voted European Car of the Year for 1992. The previous two versions had lost out to the Citroën CX in 1975 and the Fiat Uno in 1984. This time the sedan version of the Golf was badged Vento in Europe (but Jetta in the USA). The fourth incarnation of the Golf arrived in late 1997, its chassis spawned a host of other cars within the Volkswagen group—the Volkswagen Bora (the sedan, still called Jetta in the USA), Volkswagen New Beetle, Seat Toledo, Seat Leon, Audi A3, Audi TT and Skoda Octavia. However, it was beaten into third place for the 1998 European Car of the Year award by the winning Alfa Romeo 156 and runner-up Audi A6. The current Volkswagen Golf was launched in late 2003, came runner-up to the Fiat Panda in the 2004 European Car of the Year, and has so far spawned the new generation Seat Toledo, Skoda Octavia and Audi A3 hatchback ranges as well as a new mini-MPV, the Seat Altea. The fifth-generation Golf is now available in Europe, and the GTI boasts a 2.0 L Turbocharged direct injection engine. The fifth generation Jetta, and the performance version, the GLI, are currently available in the United States and Canada.

The other main models have been the Polo, a smaller car than the Golf, and the larger Passat for the segment above the Golf. As of 2005, there have been four incarnations of the Polo: Mk 1 (1976), Mk 2 (1981, facelifted 1990), Mk 3 (1994, facelifted 1999) and the current Mk 4 (2002). The Scirocco and Corrado were both Golf-based coupés.

Volkswagen Phaeton

In 1998, Volkswagen launched the J Mays-designed New Beetle, a "retro"-themed car with a resemblance to the original Beetle but based on the Golf. Its genesis was secret and in opposition to VW management, who felt it was too backward-looking. It has been popular in the USA, less so in Europe. In 2002, Volkswagen announced two models taking it into market segments new to the company: the Phaeton luxury car, and the Touareg ("tour regg") SUV. The Phaeton was critically acclaimed but not well received in the marketplace. In 2005 VW announced its discontinuance on the US market for fall 2006, mainly due to the disappointing sales there and the need for major investments in the cars line of engines (W12 and V8) to meet new emission requirements. Also, Volkswagen has faced harsh criticism that the Phaeton had used up money that was better invested in their smaller cars. Much of this criticism is due to the poor quality of the last generation Jetta/Golf and the preceived lack of performance in the new Jetta. Much of the criticism of the new Jetta was stated before the new GLI model came out.

Volkswagen currently offers a number of its vehicles with an advanced, light duty diesel engine known as the TDI. While extremely popular in the European market, light duty diesels do not yet enjoy the same wide acceptance in the American marketplace, despite increased fuel economy and performance comparable to gasoline engines due to turbocharging. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 4 of the 10 most fuel efficient vehicles available for sale in the U.S. in 2004 were powered by Volkswagen diesel engines. They were a three way tie for 8th (TDI Beetle, TDI Golf, TDI Jetta) and 9th, the TDI Jetta Wagon. Sales of light duty diesel engine technology are increasing as gasoline prices rise. Products such as the Toyota Prius might have highlighted the economy of non-gasoline engines, but in reality, a Volkswagen TDI engine is often found to be more efficient than the Prius on the highway (although not so when driving in the city). In addition, all VAG TDI diesel engines produced since 1996 can be driven on 100% biodiesel.

Cult status of the Beetle

Beetles used as restaurant taxis

Like its competitors, the Mini and the Citroën 2CV, the original-shape Beetle long outlasted predictions of its lifespan. More so than those cars, it maintains a very strong following worldwide, being regarded as something of a "cult" car, like the Delorean since its 1960s association with the hippie movement. Currently, there is a wide array of clubs that are concerned with the beetle. The fans are quite diverse. Looks include the resto-look, Cal Look, German-look, resto-Cal Look, buggies, Baja bugs, old school, ratlook, etc. Part of their cult status is attributed to being one of a few cars with an air-cooled, horizontally-opposed engine design and the consequent ease of repair and modification as opposed to the more conventional and technically complex watercooled engine design.

By 2002 there had been over 21 million Type 1's had been produced.

On July 21, 2003, the last Type 1 rolled off the production line in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. It was car number 21,529,464, and was immediately shipped off to the company's museum in Wolfsburg, Germany. In true Mexican fashion, a mariachi band serenaded the last car in the 68-year-old history. The last car was nicknamed El Rey, which is Spanish for "The King". The last 3000 type 1's were called the "Ultima Edicion" or the last edition.

In the United States, most notably in California, Volkswagen enthusiasts frequent large Volkswagen-themed car shows, especially in the summer months. Many of these shows feature camping, a car show called a "show 'n' shine", drag racing, parts swap meet, raffles, and other events. Die-hard and loyal "VW-heads" attend these shows regularly, often travelling 500 miles or more to attend their favorite event.

In the winter, a group of drivers of the "split window" bus model (1951-1967 Microbusses, trucks, campers, and panel vans) drive from Guerneville, CA, to Mt. Shasta CA, entirely on unpaved jeep roads. This event is called the "Mt. Shasta Snow Trip Challenge" and is a good example of VW enthusiasts' trust in the durability of their often 40-year-old cars.

Relationship with Porsche

The company has had a close relationship with Porsche, the Stuttgart-based sports car manufacturer founded in 1947 by Ferry Porsche, son of the original Volkswagen designer Ferdinand Porsche. The first Porsche cars, the 1948 Porsche 356, used many Volkswagen components including a tuned engine, gearbox and suspension. Later collaborations include the 1969/1970 VW-Porsche 914, the 1976 Porsche 924 (which used many Audi components and was built at an Audi factory), and the 2002 Porsche Cayenne (which shares engineering with the VW Touareg).

In September 2005, Porsche announced it was buying a 20% stake in Volkswagen at a cost of €3 billion, with the intention that the combined stakes of Porsche, Volkswagen and the government of Lower Saxony ensure that any hostile takeover by foreign investors would be impossible [1].

Corporate structure

Volkswagen is part of the Volkswagen group, along with:

  • Audi (the former post-WWII Auto Union/DKW)—bought from Daimler-Benz in 1964.
  • NSU—bought in 1969 by Volkswagen's Audi division, a brand not used since 1977
  • SEAT—majority owned since 1987
  • Škoda—bought in 1991
  • Bentley—bought in 1998 from Vickers along with Rolls-Royce -cannot produce cars using the Rolls-Royce marque because the trademarks went to BMW
  • Bugatti—name bought in 1998
  • Lamborghini —bought in 1998

From July 1998 until December 2002, Volkswagen's Bentley division also sold cars under the Rolls-Royce name under an agreement with BMW, which had bought the rights to that name. From 2003, only BMW may make cars called Rolls-Royce.


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From 2003, only BMW may make cars called Rolls-Royce. 「僕達は天使だった」「Boku-tachi ha Tenshi Datta」 「We Were Angels」 (Lyrics: Yukinojō Mori, Music: Takeshi Ike, Arrangement: Osamu Tozuka, Vocals: Hironobu Kageyama). From July 1998 until December 2002, Volkswagen's Bentley division also sold cars under the Rolls-Royce name under an agreement with BMW, which had bought the rights to that name. 「でてこいとびきりZENKAIパワー!」 「Detekoi Tobikiri ZENKAI Power!」 「Come Out, Incredible ZENKAI Power!」 (Lyrics: Toshihisa Arakawa, Music: Takeshi Ike, Arrangement: Kenji Yamamoto, Vocals: MANNA). Volkswagen is part of the Volkswagen group, along with:. Rock the Dragon DBZ Theme DBZ Uncut Theme Eternal Sacrific - Tendril (Broly: The Legendary Super Saiyan theme song). In September 2005, Porsche announced it was buying a 20% stake in Volkswagen at a cost of €3 billion, with the intention that the combined stakes of Porsche, Volkswagen and the government of Lower Saxony ensure that any hostile takeover by foreign investors would be impossible [1]. 「WE GOTTA POWER」 (Lyrics: Yukinojō Mori, Music & Arrangement: Keiju Ishikawa, Vocals: Hironobu Kageyama).

Later collaborations include the 1969/1970 VW-Porsche 914, the 1976 Porsche 924 (which used many Audi components and was built at an Audi factory), and the 2002 Porsche Cayenne (which shares engineering with the VW Touareg). 「CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA」 (Lyrics: Yukinojō Mori, Music: Chiho Kiyooka, Arrangement: Kenji Yamamoto, Vocals: Hironobu Kageyama). The first Porsche cars, the 1948 Porsche 356, used many Volkswagen components including a tuned engine, gearbox and suspension.
. The company has had a close relationship with Porsche, the Stuttgart-based sports car manufacturer founded in 1947 by Ferry Porsche, son of the original Volkswagen designer Ferdinand Porsche. You can see the episode numbering given on the Uncut DVD releases, with the correct episode numbering listed beside it in brackets. Shasta Snow Trip Challenge" and is a good example of VW enthusiasts' trust in the durability of their often 40-year-old cars. Below is a list of every uncut DVD released (and too be released) by FUNimation.

This event is called the "Mt. It is still unknown whether FUNimation will re-release all the DVDs with the correct episode and volume numbering but it is unlikely. Shasta CA, entirely on unpaved jeep roads. Most of the old uncut DVDs by FUNimation (Gi'nyu Saga and up) do not have volume numbers and if they do, the numbers are inaccurate. In the winter, a group of drivers of the "split window" bus model (1951-1967 Microbusses, trucks, campers, and panel vans) drive from Guerneville, CA, to Mt. Because of Saban's cuts, all FUNimation released uncut DVDs have incorrect episode and volume numbering. Die-hard and loyal "VW-heads" attend these shows regularly, often travelling 500 miles or more to attend their favorite event. This episode was released as a "Bonus" episode on the Frieza - Transformation DVD.

Many of these shows feature camping, a car show called a "show 'n' shine", drag racing, parts swap meet, raffles, and other events. FUNimation later cut one in the Freeza saga as well (Episode 80, Piccolo the Super-Namek). In the United States, most notably in California, Volkswagen enthusiasts frequent large Volkswagen-themed car shows, especially in the summer months. 1-67), 14 episodes worth of scenes were cut. The last 3000 type 1's were called the "Ultima Edicion" or the last edition. FUNimation dubbed the first release of DVDs which consisted of episodes 1-53 (jap. The last car was nicknamed El Rey, which is Spanish for "The King". The original Japanese episodes totaled to 291.

In true Mexican fashion, a mariachi band serenaded the last car in the 68-year-old history. The original dubs of the movies have the original music as well as scripts that are closer to the original. It was car number 21,529,464, and was immediately shipped off to the company's museum in Wolfsburg, Germany. FUNimation is also re-releasing the first 3 movies as Ultimate Uncut Editions, but the original dubs were actually more uncut. On July 21, 2003, the last Type 1 rolled off the production line in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. Recently, Funimation has begun to re-release the first 67 episodes in uncut form. By 2002 there had been over 21 million Type 1's had been produced. Movies 4-12 are also uncut and have been released by Funimation.

Part of their cult status is attributed to being one of a few cars with an air-cooled, horizontally-opposed engine design and the consequent ease of repair and modification as opposed to the more conventional and technically complex watercooled engine design. Starting with episode 68 (The Ginyu Saga), FUNimation has released all DVDs uncut. Looks include the resto-look, Cal Look, German-look, resto-Cal Look, buggies, Baja bugs, old school, ratlook, etc. If you want the uncut version which contains extra footage, blood, and some profanity, as well as Japanese audio, you're going to want to purchase the uncut DVDs by FUNimation. The fans are quite diverse. If you wish to own every episode of Dragon Ball Z right now on DVD, this can be done with the edited version. Currently, there is a wide array of clubs that are concerned with the beetle. Originally, the edited versions were aired on TV and were the first DVDs to be produced by Geneon [Pioneer].

More so than those cars, it maintains a very strong following worldwide, being regarded as something of a "cult" car, like the Delorean since its 1960s association with the hippie movement. These releases are the uncut and edited versions. Like its competitors, the Mini and the Citroën 2CV, the original-shape Beetle long outlasted predictions of its lifespan. Dragon Ball Z has seen 2 types of DVD releases. In addition, all VAG TDI diesel engines produced since 1996 can be driven on 100% biodiesel. Recently, the official Dragon Ball Z website and FOX Studios have confirmed that they have no current plans for a Dragon Ball Z live action movie. Products such as the Toyota Prius might have highlighted the economy of non-gasoline engines, but in reality, a Volkswagen TDI engine is often found to be more efficient than the Prius on the highway (although not so when driving in the city). The movie was considered to have been in development, though no director had signed on and no casting had taken place, and there was no scheduled release date for the film.

Sales of light duty diesel engine technology are increasing as gasoline prices rise. In early 2004, production was halted, but in June 2004, screenwriter Ben Ramsey (The Big Hit) signed on to adapt Dragon Ball Z for the big screen. They were a three way tie for 8th (TDI Beetle, TDI Golf, TDI Jetta) and 9th, the TDI Jetta Wagon. Official news about the movie was primarily relayed through the official DBZ website or via the Internet Movie Database. in 2004 were powered by Volkswagen diesel engines. Several fan sites were created for the movie, though few had any verifiable information about the movie. Environmental Protection Agency, 4 of the 10 most fuel efficient vehicles available for sale in the U.S. Magazines like Beckett Dragonball Z Collector as well as the official DBZ website began to write surveys and polls soliciting fan input about casting for the live action movie.

According to the U.S. Online forums were created for the express purpose of relaying rumors and "insider information" about the live action movie. While extremely popular in the European market, light duty diesels do not yet enjoy the same wide acceptance in the American marketplace, despite increased fuel economy and performance comparable to gasoline engines due to turbocharging. This created a furor in the online fan community. Volkswagen currently offers a number of its vehicles with an advanced, light duty diesel engine known as the TDI. In 2002, a rumor surfaced on the internet claiming that 20th Century Fox had acquired the rights to make a live action Dragon Ball Z motion picture. Much of the criticism of the new Jetta was stated before the new GLI model came out. Majin-Boo Saga:.

Much of this criticism is due to the poor quality of the last generation Jetta/Golf and the preceived lack of performance in the new Jetta. Cell Saga:. Also, Volkswagen has faced harsh criticism that the Phaeton had used up money that was better invested in their smaller cars. Freeza Saga:. In 2005 VW announced its discontinuance on the US market for fall 2006, mainly due to the disappointing sales there and the need for major investments in the cars line of engines (W12 and V8) to meet new emission requirements. Saiyan Saga:. The Phaeton was critically acclaimed but not well received in the marketplace. For example, during the Freeza Saga, there is a flashback showing that Vegeta, Raditz and Nappa were already aware that Freeza destroyed their home planet long before the events in DBZ took place even though the series showed that Vegeta was not aware until Dodoria told him on Planet Namek.

In 2002, Volkswagen announced two models taking it into market segments new to the company: the Phaeton luxury car, and the Touareg ("tour regg") SUV. They have also been known to contradict the manga and often create new plot holes. It has been popular in the USA, less so in Europe. Garlic Junior's return from the Return my Gohan!! (Dead Zone) movie between the Freeza Saga and Trunks arc (pre-Cell Saga) are both good examples of this). Its genesis was secret and in opposition to VW management, who felt it was too backward-looking. As the anime series was forced to expand 12 pages of manga text into 20 minutes of animation footage, these changes were introduced to kill time or to allow the (anime) writers to explore some other aspect of the series' universe (the Anoyo-ichi Budōkai (Afterlife tournament) between the Cell Saga and Majin Buu Saga and the Garlic Junior arc, a.k.a. In 1998, Volkswagen launched the J Mays-designed New Beetle, a "retro"-themed car with a resemblance to the original Beetle but based on the Golf. Filler doesn't come only in the form of side stories, though; sometimes it's as simple as adding some extra attacks into a fight.

The Scirocco and Corrado were both Golf-based coupés. The company behind the anime, Toei Animation, would occasionally make up their own little side stories to either further explain things, or simply to waste time. As of 2005, there have been four incarnations of the Polo: Mk 1 (1976), Mk 2 (1981, facelifted 1990), Mk 3 (1994, facelifted 1999) and the current Mk 4 (2002). Filler is used to pad out the series for many reasons; in the case of Dragon Ball Z, more often than not, it was because the anime was running alongside the manga, and there was no way for the anime to run ahead of the manga (since Toriyama was still writing it, at the same time). The other main models have been the Polo, a smaller car than the Golf, and the larger Passat for the segment above the Golf. Strangely, these episodes have aired at a TV-PG rating, though this is probably just a mistake due to the sudden schedule change. The fifth generation Jetta, and the performance version, the GLI, are currently available in the United States and Canada. In response to this controversy, Cartoon Network officially removed the uncut version from their schedule on January 21, 2006 and replaced it with the original Saban-edited version from 1996, which heavily altered the show's content for young children.

The fifth-generation Golf is now available in Europe, and the GTI boasts a 2.0 L Turbocharged direct injection engine. Airing these episodes in the 7:30PM timeslot on Saturday nights makes this easier for young kids to watch them, as opposed to airing them at 10:30PM during the week, when most children are asleep. The current Volkswagen Golf was launched in late 2003, came runner-up to the Fiat Panda in the 2004 European Car of the Year, and has so far spawned the new generation Seat Toledo, Skoda Octavia and Audi A3 hatchback ranges as well as a new mini-MPV, the Seat Altea. It also has a scene which shows one of Princess Snake's servents shooting herself in the head, but she doesn't die). However, it was beaten into third place for the 1998 European Car of the Year award by the winning Alfa Romeo 156 and runner-up Audi A6. While there weren't many complaints about earlier episodes, there was controversy from parents over episodes such as Gohan Goes Bananas (which shows Gohan transforming into an Oozaru and then back into a boy, during which his penis and testicles are shown) and Princess Snake (which shows Goku's bare buttocks while excercising in the spa and after he comes out. The fourth incarnation of the Golf arrived in late 1997, its chassis spawned a host of other cars within the Volkswagen group—the Volkswagen Bora (the sedan, still called Jetta in the USA), Volkswagen New Beetle, Seat Toledo, Seat Leon, Audi A3, Audi TT and Skoda Octavia. After Cartoon Network completed its airing of the uncut version on weeknights at 10:30PM EST, it was put on Toonami on Saturdays at 7:30PM EST.

This time the sedan version of the Golf was badged Vento in Europe (but Jetta in the USA). Even missing episodes that were totally left out by FUNimation are now shown, such as young Gohan helping out a robot that refused to help him as an act of teaching him to take care of himself, and eventually saved his life before he shut down and "died". The previous two versions had lost out to the Citroën CX in 1975 and the Fiat Uno in 1984. A comedic scene that is reintroduced is when Gokū accidentally pulls out a beer from the fridge and asking "Hey what’s this doing in here?" puts the beer back and pulls out a healthy sports drink. In 1991, Volkswagen launched the third-generation Golf and it was third time lucky when the Volkswagen Golf was voted European Car of the Year for 1992. The Saibaimen are also more sadistic. The second generation Golf hatchback/Jetta sedan ran from late 1983 to late 1991. Other new scenes include the showing of Gohan's lower central area (albeit not detailed) and Gokū's bare butt while bathing at Princess Snake's palace.

Its chassis also spawned the Scirocco coupe and Jetta sedan. In the new release though, she is constantly following Tien, because she is in love with him. There have been five generations of the Volkswagen Golf, the first of which was produced from the summer of 1974 until the end of 1983, sold as the Rabbit in the United States. Since Launch was not tough and her scenes included bank robbing, guns and alcohol, they decided to remove her. While Volkswagen's range of cars soon became similar to that of other large European car-makers, the Golf has been the mainstay of the Volkswagen lineup since its introduction, and the mechanical basis for several other cars of the company. Other characters such as Korin, Piccolo, Tien, Chiaotzu, and Yajirobe had also not been seen in those 13 episodes, but since they were important to the plot, they were not cut. Beetle production continued in smaller numbers at other German factories until 1978, but mainstream production shifted to Brazil and Mexico. Scenes featuring Lunch also are restored; she was edited out of 4 episodes of the older version, because at the time they only dubbed the first 13 episodes of Dragon Ball, in which she did not appear.

Its design followed trends for small family cars set by the 1959 Mini and 1972 Renault 5—the Golf had a transversely mounted, water-cooled engine in the front, driving the front wheels, and had a hatchback, a format that has dominated the market segment ever since. Scenes containing graphic violence, like Vegeta blowing up a Saibaiman, Gokū shredding his hand on his training rope while on his way to Planet Namek, Vegeta slamming his arm clean through Zarbon's stomach, Vegeta decapitating Guldo and destroying his still-speaking disembodied head or Gohan getting severly beaten by Recoome are restored. This was a car unlike its predecessor in most significant ways, both mechanically as well as visually (its angular styling was designed by the Italian Giorgetto Giugiaro). Mild use of profanity is also heard, like Jeice saying "The crazy bastard killed Guldo!" and Vegeta shouting "Damn you, Kakarrot!" and numerous utterances of the words dammit, bastard and hell. Production of the Beetle at the Wolfsburg factory switched to the VW Golf in 1974, marketed in the United States as the Volkswagen Rabbit in the 1970s and as the Golf in the 1980s. References to death and killing can be heard and Muten Rōshi's lecherous attempts on Bulma are shown at their fullest, too. Audi influences paved the way for this new generation of Volkswagens, known as the Polo, Golf and Passat. Most importantly, all fighting scenes are totally uncut, but several other differences can be seen, like foamy water now actually being beer, blood being red again (whereas the edited version showed purple) and shots of characters sticking up their middle fingers being left in.

The Ingolstadt-based firm had the necessary expertise in front wheel drive and water-cooled engines that Volkswagen so desperately needed to produce a credible Beetle successor. In 2005, Cartoon Network started showing the uncut and unedited version of the first two seasons of Dragon Ball Z, similar to the Japanese original, although the English version features a darker opening theme, whereas the original OP themes were cheerful in tone and had bright, colorful animations. The key to the problem was the 1964 acquisition of Audi/Auto-Union. Since the series is a continuing story, Cartoon Network held off the rest of the 5th season until a few months later. The company knew that Beetle production had to end one day, but the conundrum of replacing it had been a never ending nightmare. Shortly after the September 11 attacks, CN cut an episode of Dragon Ball Z where Gohan saves a plane from crashing, then later has to deal with a burning skyscraper office building, due to the obvious parallel imagery. The Type 3 and Type 4 models had been comparative flops, and the NSU-based K70 also failed to woo buyers. Combined with a widely criticized quality of voice acting, many feel that the English version of Dragon Ball Z almost seems like an entirely different show than the original, and this has led many familiar with the Japanese series to dislike FUNimation's version.

Volkswagen was in serious trouble by the end of the 1960s. To an equal extent, many fans who object to censoring have taken issue with changes that are not seen as necessary, such as extraneous dialogue not found in the original, dubbing that sways the English version in its own creative direction (example: the TV audience booing Gokū's appearance during the dubbed Cell Saga while cheering him in the Japanese series), and the replacement of the original musical score. The US Thing version only lasted two years, 1973 and 1974, due at least in part to Ralph Nader's automobile safety campaigns. The full scene is viewable by purchase of the Frieza-Transformation (Uncut version) VHS or DVD. The military version was produced for the NATO-era German army (Bundeswehr) during the cold war years of 1970 to 1979. All blood was removed from the already edited version. In 1973, Volkswagen introduced the military-themed Thing (Type 181) in America, recalling the wartime Type 81. Non-graphic scenes such as the beginning (Krillin getting stabbed) and the end (Krillin getting thrown into the water) were kept in.

VW expanded their product line in 1967 with the introduction of several Type 3 models, which were essentially body style variations (Fastback, Notchback, Squareback) based on Type 1 mechanical underpinnings, and again in 1969 with the relatively unpopular Type 4 (also known as the 411 and 412) models, which differed substantially from previous models with the notable introduction of unibody construction, a fully automatic transmission, electronic fuel injection, and a sturdier powerplant. A very violent scene with the extended version of Freeza's impalement of Krillin during the Freeza saga was edited out on CN and merged with the other two episodes. By 1973 total production was over 16 million. Satan" was changed to "Hercule" in the edited dub. During the 1960s and early 1970s, although the car was becoming outdated, American exports, innovative advertising and a growing reputation for reliability helped production figures to surpass the levels of the previous record holder, the Ford Model T. The character "Mr. Not until 1998 and the Golf-based New Beetle would the name be adopted by Wolfsburg. The distribution of the redubs started in April 2005.

Despite the fact it was almost universally known as the Beetle, it was never officially known as such, instead referred to as the Type 1. They also redubbed the first three movies that were also dubbed by the Ocean Group voice actors but were distributed by Pioneer. Production of the Type 1 Volkswagen Beetle (German: 'Käfer', US: 'Bug', Mexican: 'Vocho', 'Vochito', French: 'Coccinelle', Portuguese: 'Carocha', Brazilian: 'Fusca', Danish: 'Boble, Folkevogn', Polish: 'Garbus') increased dramatically over the years, the total reaching one million in 1954. In 2003, FUNimation decided to redub the first two sagas of Dragon Ball Z, to remove the problems that were caused from their previous partnership with Saban. market, the VW was briefly sold as a "Victory Wagon". Subsequent DVD and VHS releases of those episodes were not censored in any way. On its entry to the U.S. Some censoring, of nudity, however, was still unavoidable.

Apart from the introduction of the Type 2 commercial vehicle (van, pickup and camper) and the Karmann Ghia sports car, Nordhoff pursued the one-model policy until shortly before his death in 1968. FUNimation did the dubbing on their own this time around with their own voice actors, meeting again with mostly critical reactions. In 1949 Hirst left the company, now re-formed as a trust controlled by the West German government. Starting with the Gi'nyu (3rd US season) on Cartoon Network, censorship was reduced due to fewer restrictions on cable programming. Heinrich Nordhoff (1899–1968), a former senior manager at Opel who had overseen civilian and military vehicle production in the 1930s and 1940s, was recruited to run the factory in 1948. One of the biggest points raised by critics of the editing of violence is that the removal of wounds, blood, and death from a show ultimately about fighting will encourage violence without showing any of the consequences. From 1948, Volkswagen became a very important element, symbolically and economically, of West German regeneration. These changes left many fans irate, and some Dragon Ball purists refuse to watch the American version of the show.

In Italy it was the Fiat 500. This amount of editing led to characters' speech not matching what occurred on screen, unrealistic and twisted plots with major holes, and obviously altered images. In France Citroën started the 2CV on a similar marketing concept. The most infamous dialogue edits would be the characters saying "I will send you to another dimension," rather than "I will kill you", and another where after a villian destroys a helicopter, one of the characters exclaims "It's okay, I can see their parachutes!" when in the original version the crew died with the vehicle. Ford representatives were equally critical: the car was "not worth a damn". The dialogue was changed, removing references to Heaven, Hell, God, and death. If you think you're going to build cars in this place, you're a bloody fool, young man." (In a bizarre twist of fate, Volkswagen would manufacture a locally built version of Rootes' Hillman Avenger in Argentina in the 1980s, long after Rootes went bust at the hands of Chrysler in 1978—the Beetle outliving the Avenger by over 30 years). Dead bodies lingering on the battlefield during ongoing fights were not shown, implying they were taken away or vaporized altogether.

After an inspection of the plant, Sir William Rootes, head of the British Rootes Group, told Hirst the project would fail within two years, and that the car "is quite unattractive to the average motorcar buyer, is too ugly and too noisy .. Many violent scenes were left on the cutting room floor and others had wounds digitally removed or blood re-colored as spit. Famously, all rejected it. For example, FUNimation digitally removed the cigarette from one character's mouth, and digitally pasted the word ROOT above a sign that said BEER to make it say "ROOT BEER." Clear glasses with beer were recolored blue to create frothy mugs of water. It was offered to representatives from the British, American and French motor industries. The series underwent many changes, with the removal of nudity and partial nudity, references to sex, alcohol, and smoking. It was still unclear what was to become of the factory. When it was marketed in the US, the distribution company FUNimation alongside with Saban decided to initially focus exclusively on the young children's market, because the anime market was still small compared to the much larger children's cartoon market.

The car and its town changed their Second World War-era names to Volkswagen and Wolfsburg respectively, and production was increasing. Dragon Ball Z was marketed to appeal to a wide range of viewers from all ages, and contains crude humor and occasional excesses of violence which are commonly seen as inappropriate for younger audiences by American standards. By 1946 the factory was producing 1,000 cars a month, a remarkable feat considering the factory was still in disrepair: the damaged roof and windows meant rain stopped production; the steel to make the cars had to be bartered for new vehicles. One of the biggest criticisms of the series in North America from fans is the extensive amount of editing and other changes it faced, in order to be broadcast. The first few hundred cars went to personnel from the occupying forces, and to the German Post Office. Because of inconsistencies both in the original manga and the anime series, and the common acceptance of the anime as canon, much debate is had by the younger fanbase as to the relative strength (or power levels, speaking in series terms) of the various characters. Short of light transport, in September 1945 the British Army was persuaded to place a vital order for 20,000. Many of these connections are a deliberate attempt by Akira Toriyama to pay homage to the Western superhero archetype, just as the earlier Dragon Ball series paid homage to Chinese folk archetypes.

Hirst painted one of the factory's cars green and demonstrated it to British Army headquarters. The main character of Dragon Ball Z, Son Gokū, is often compared to the DC Comics hero Superman, due to their outward similarities in origins (as redefined in DBZ) and abilities. Since it had been used for military production, and had been a "political animal" (Hirst's words) rather than a commercial enterprise, the equipment was in time intended to be salvaged as war reparations. While contributing much to the shōnen genre in Japan, some feel Dragon Ball Z has created a stereotype associated with anime at large in the West amongst those outside the anime community. At first, the plan was to use it for military vehicle maintenance. In response, fans of Dragon Ball Z have countered that many who criticize the series sound as though they don't know it as well as they'd like to think. The factory was placed under the control of Oldham-born Hirst. These range from simple lack of interest to downright vocal hatred of the series as overrated and superficial.

In April 1945, KdF-Stadt and its heavily bombed factory were captured by the Americans, and handed to the British to administer. Due to its length, associated varying production quality, creative devices, and sometimes overenthusiastic young fanbase, anime fandom at large has mixed reactions to the series. The company owes its postwar existence largely to one man, British Army officer Major Ivan Hirst (1916–2000). Dragon Ball Z was (and largely still is) the most popular shōnen anime series in the worldwide. War meant production turned to military vehicles, the Type 81 Kübelwagen utility vehicle (VW's most common wartime model) and the amphibious Schwimmwagen . There also is a change from the rather myth-oriented theme to a more science fiction oriented one, interpreting several facts from a very different point of view. None were actually delivered to holders of the completed saving stamp books, though one Type 3 Cabriolet was presented to Hitler on his fiftieth birthday, in 1938. The overall mood changes significantly from the one of Dragon Ball, as tournaments and personal vendettas are replaced by wars against alien villains threatening earth in its whole, changing the focus to violent battles and the feeling of a power struggle.

The new factory in the new town of KdF-Stadt, now called Wolfsburg, purpose-built for the factory workers, only produced a handful of cars by the time war started in 1939. The series progresses dramatically throughout its entire run. It was one of the first to be designed with the aid of a wind tunnel; unlike the Chrysler Airflow, it would be a success. Many of the main characters die, are resurrected, get married and/or have children. Erwin Komenda, the longstanding Porsche chief designer, developed the car body of the prototype, which was recognizably the Beetle we know today. As the series progresses, Son Gokū, his son, Son Gohan, and their companions age, get immensely stronger and fight increasingly more powerful and sinister villains. The VW car was just one of many KdF programs which included things such as tours and outings. After many years, Gokū comes face to face with Freeza and his wrath, in a decisive fight of good against evil.

The car already had its distinctive round shape and air-cooled, flat-four, rear-mounted engine, features similar to the Tatra. (See Frieza Family Tree) Freeza killed Gokū's father Bardock ( or in the manga Burdock) as well as King Vegeta when he attacked and obliterated the entire Saiyan planet from existence. Prototypes of the car called the KdF-Wagen (German: Kraft durch Freude = "strength through joy"), appeared from 1936 onwards (the first cars had been produced in Stuttgart). Zarbon, Freeza's top henchman, had requested that the best solution would have been the complete annihilation and extinction of the Saiyan race, thus triggering Freeza's wrath. Volkswagen honored its savings agreements after World War II; Ford, which had a similar "coupon" savings system, reportedly did not. Gokū later learns that his race was destroyed by the one and only Master Freeza, the planet-conquering maniacal onslaught of an alien. The intention was that ordinary Germans would buy the car by means of a savings scheme ("Fünf Mark die Woche mußt Du sparen, willst Du im eigenen Wagen fahren" - "Save five Marks a week to drive in your own car"), which around 336,000 people eventually paid into. This, however, is the trigger for events of even greater magnitude to happen, making Gokū and his friends the foremost defenders of Earth, mankind and ultimately the whole universe.

Hitler's changes to the original design included better fuel efficiency (to make it more economical for the working man), reliability, ease of use, and economically efficient repairs and parts. When he refuses to reassume this task, Raditz challenges him to a lethal battle in which Gokū sacrifices himself to beat his brother (with the prospect of resurrection by the Dragon Balls). Adolf Hitler's desire that almost anybody should be able to afford a car coincided with this design—although much of this design was inspired by the advanced Tatra cars of Hans Ledwinka. After a visit from his previously unknown brother Raditz, he discovers that he belongs to an alien race called Saiya-jin or Saiyan and that his kind once sent him to Earth to destroy it. Though the origins of the company date back to the 1930s, the design for the car that would become known as the Beetle / "Käfer" date back even further, as a pet project by car designer Ferdinand Porsche (1875–1951). Son Gokū, the protagonist, is an extremely powerful but somewhat naïve martial artist. . .

It forms the core of Volkswagen AG (VWAG), one of the world's four largest car producers. Toriyama's humor/parody manga Neko Majin Z features several concepts introduced in Dragon Ball Z (several Dragon Ball Z characters even make various appearances), but that manga is designed as a parody and not a true continuation of the series. Volkswagen, [literally: "people's car"] (also known as VW) is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany. This series is not based on a manga by Akira Toriyama. Lamborghini —bought in 1998. After Dragon Ball Z, the story of Son Gokū and friends continues in the anime-only series Dragon Ball GT. Bugatti—name bought in 1998. It aired in the UK, albeit with the same dubbing problem, on Cartoon Network, premiering on March 6, 2000 and running until 2002, with the final few episodes being shown on CNX starting from October 14, 2002, before that channel relaunched as Toonami, on which it was repeated daily.

Bentley—bought in 1998 from Vickers along with Rolls-Royce -cannot produce cars using the Rolls-Royce marque because the trademarks went to BMW. In the U.S., the series ran between 1996 and 2003, though not always on the same networks or with continuity of dubbing. Škoda—bought in 1991. The anime first premiered in Japan on April 18, 1989 (on Fuji TV) at 7:00 PM and ended on January 31, 1996. SEAT—majority owned since 1987. Originally, creator Akira Toriyama had planned to end the series after the Freeza Saga, but was made a significant offer to keep it going due to the story's continued value. NSU—bought in 1969 by Volkswagen's Audi division, a brand not used since 1977. The separation between the series is also significant as the latter series takes on a more dramatic and serious tone.

Audi (the former post-WWII Auto Union/DKW)—bought from Daimler-Benz in 1964. While the original Dragon Ball anime followed Gokū through childhood into adulthood, Dragon Ball Z is a continuation of his adulthood life. The series follows the adventures of the adult Son Gokū who, along with his companions, defends the earth against assorted villains. The series is a close adaptation of the second half of the Dragon Ball manga (in the United States, the manga's second half is also titled Dragon Ball Z to prevent confusion), but also features characters, situations and backstories not present in the original.
Dragon Ball Z is a very long-running sequel to the popular anime Dragon Ball.

Dragon Ball Z: Sagas for the PS2, GC, and Xbox. Dragon Ball Z: Collectible Card Game for the GBA. Dragon Ball Z: Shin Butoden. Dragon Ball Z Legends.

Dragon Ball Z Legends. The Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans - Part 2. The Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans - Part 1. Dragon Ball Z: Gokū Gekitō Den (1995).

Dragon Ball Z: Gokū Hishō Den (1994). Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Son Gokū Densetsu (Three out of the seven levels) (1994). Dragon Ball Z: Buyū Retsuden (1994). Dragon Ball Z: Hyper Dimension (1996).

Dragon Ball Z: Super Gokū Den 2 (The last two thirds of the game) (1995). Dragon Ball Z: Super Gokū Den (1995). Dragon Ball Z: Super Butoden 3 (1994). Dragon Ball Z: Super Butoden 2 (1993).

Dragon Ball Z: Super Butoden (1993). Dragon Ball Z: Super Saiyan Legend (1992). Dragon Ball Z Supplement: The Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans (1993). Dragon Ball Z: Barcode Battler (1992).

Dragon Ball Z 3: Resen Jinzōningen (1992). Dragon Ball Z 2: Gekishin Freeza!! 1991). Dragon Ball Z: Kyosho! Saiyan (1990). Dragon Ball Z: Super Sonic Warriors 2 (Dragon Ball Z: Bukū Ressen).

Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2 (Dragon Ball Z 2). Dragon Ball Z: Budōkai (Dragon Ball Z). Dragon Ball Z: Buu's Fury. Dragon Ball Z: Bukū Tōgeki (Dragon Ball Z: Super Sonic Warriors).

Dragon Ball Z: Taiketsu. Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku I & II. Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku II (Dragon Ball Z: Legacy of Gokū 2: International). Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku.

Dragon Ball Z: Sagas. Dragon Ball Z: Sparking! (Dragon Ball Z: Budōkai Tenka-ichi). Dragon Ball Z: Budōkai 3 (Dragon Ball Z 3). Dragon Ball Z: Budōkai 2 (Dragon Ball Z 2).

Dragon Ball Z: Budōkai (Dragon Ball Z). Dragon Ball Z: Legendary Super Warriors (Dragon Ball Z: Densetsu no Chou Senshi-tachi). Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout. Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22.

Dragon Ball Z: Legends. Episodes 200~291. Episodes 1~199. Episodes 200~291.

Version 3: episodes 118~199. Version 2: episodes 22~117. Version 1: episodes 1~21. TV Special #2: The History of Trunks.

TV Special #1: Bardock: The Father of Goku. Movie #13: Dragonfist Explosion (FUNimation title unknown). Movie #12: Fusion Reborn (Not yet released, coming 3/28/2006). Movie #11: Bio-Broly.

Movie #10: Broly: Second Coming. Movie #9: Bojack Unbound. Movie #8: Broly: The Legendary Super Saiyan. Movie #7: Super Android 13.

Movie #6: The Return of Cooler. Movie #5: Cooler's Revenge. Movie #4: Lord Slug. Movie #3: The Tree of Might (uncut version released on VHS, LaserDisc, and DVD in November 1997).

Movie #2: World's Strongest (uncut version not yet released, coming ?????). Movie #1: Dead Zone. 91 Kid Buu - A New Beginning Eps #273-276 (Eps #288-291). Vol.

90 Kid Buu - The Price of Victory Eps #270-272 (Eps #285-287). Vol. 89 Kid Buu - Vegeta's Plea Eps #267-269 (Eps #282-284). Vol.

88 Kid Buu - Saiyan Pride Eps #264-266 (Eps #279-281). Vol. 87 Kid Buu - Regression Eps #261-263 (Eps #276-278). Vol.

86 Fusion - Internal Struggle Eps #257-260 (Eps #272-275). Vol. 85 Fusion - The Last Saiyaman Eps #254-256 (Eps #269-271). Vol.

84 Fusion - Hope Returns Eps #251-253 (Eps #266-268). Vol. 83 Fusion - Ambush Eps #248-250 (Eps #263-265). Vol.

82 Fusion - Losing Battle Eps #245-247 (Eps #260-262). Vol. 81 Fusion - Play for Time Eps #242-244 (Eps #257-259). Vol.

80 Fusion - Evil Buu Eps #239-241 (Eps #254-256). Vol. 79 Majin Buu - Emergence Eps #235-238 (Eps #250-253). Vol.

78 Majin Buu - A Hero's Farewell Eps #232-234 (Eps #247-249). Vol. 77 Majin Buu - Defiance Eps #229-231 (Eps #244-246). Vol.

76 Majin Buu - Tacticts Eps #226-228 (Eps #241-243). Vol. 75 Majin Buu - Revival Eps #223-225 (Eps #238-240). Vol.

74 Majin Buu - Attonment Eps #220-222 (Eps #235-237). Vol. 73 Majin Buu - The Hatching Eps #217-219 (Eps #232-234). Vol.

72 Babidi - Rivals Eps #214-216 (Eps #229-231). Vol. 71 Babidi - Dark Prince Returns Eps #211-213 (Eps #226-228). Vol.

70 Babidi - Battle Royale Eps #208-210 (Eps #223-225). Vol. 68 Babidi - Decent Eps #205-207 (Eps #220-222). Vol.

68 World Tournament - Blackout Eps #201-204 (Eps #216-219). Vol. 67 World Tournament - The Draw Eps #198-200 (Eps #213-215). Vol.

66 World Tournament - Junior Division Eps #195-197 (Eps #210-212). Vol. 65 Great Saiyaman - Crash Course Eps #192-194 (Eps #207-209). Vol.

64 Great Saiyaman - Declaration Eps #189-191 (Eps #204-206). Vol. 63 Great Saiyaman - Gohan's Secret Eps #186-188 (Eps #201-203). Vol.

62 Great Saiyaman - Final Round Eps #183-185 (Eps #198-200). Vol. 61 Great Saiyaman - Opening Ceremony Eps #180-182 (Eps #195-197). Vol.

60 Cell Games - Nightmares End Eps #176-179 (Eps #191-194). Vol. 59 Cell Games - Sacrifice Eps #172-175 (Eps #187-190). Vol.

58 Cell Games - Awakening Eps #169-171 (Eps #184-186). Vol. 57 Cell Games - Earth's Last Hope Eps #166-168 (Eps #181-183). Vol.

56 Cell Games - Surrender Eps #163-165 (Eps #178-280). Vol. 55 Cell Games - The Games Begin Eps #160-162 (Eps #175-177). Vol.

54 Cell Games - A Guardians Return Eps #157-159 (Eps #172-174). Vol. 53 Cell Games - A Moments Peace Eps #154-156 (Eps #169-171). Vol.

52 Cell Games - Ultimatum Eps #151-153 (Eps #166-168). Vol. 51 Perfect Cell - Unstoppable Eps #147-150 (Eps #162-165). Vol.

50 Perfect Cell - Perfection Eps #144-146 (Eps #159-161). Vol. 49 Perfect Cell - Temptation Eps #141-143 (Eps #156-158). Vol.

48 Perfect Cell - Hunt for 18 Eps #138-140 (Eps #153-155). Vol. 47 Imperfect Cell - 17's End Eps #134-137 (Eps #149-152). Vol.

46 Imperfect Cell - Race Against Time Eps #131-133 (Eps #146-148). Vol. 45 Imperfect Cell - Discovery Eps #128-130 (Eps #143-145). Vol.

44 Imperfect Cell - Encounter Eps #125-127 (Eps #140-142). Vol. 43 Androids - Invincible Eps #121-124 (Eps #137-139). Vol.

42 Androids - Assassins Eps #118-120 (Eps #133-136). Vol. Gero Eps #115-117 (Eps #130-134). 41 Androids - Dr.

Vol. 40 Androids - Invasion Eps #111-114 (Eps #126-129). Vol. 39 Trunks - Prelude to Terror Eps # 106-110) (Eps #121-125).

Vol. 38 Trunks - Mysterious Youth Eps # 103-105) (Eps #118-120). Vol. - Vanquished Eps #99-102 (Eps #114-117).

37 Garlic Jr. Vol. - Sacred Water Eps #96-98 (Eps #111-113). 36 Garlic Jr.

Vol. - Black Water Mist Eps #93-95 (Eps #108-110). 35 Garlic Jr. Vol.

34 Frieza - Namek's End Eps #90-92 (Eps #105-107). Vol. 33 Frieza - Fall of a Tyrant Eps #86-89 (Eps #101-104). Vol.

32 Frieza - Eleventh Hour Eps #82-85 (Eps #97-100). Vol. 31 Frieza - Super Saiyan Goku Eps #79-81 (Eps #94-96). Vol.

30 Frieza - Desperation Eps #76-78 (Eps #91-93). Vol. 29 Frieza - Clash Eps #73-75 (Eps #88-90). Vol.

28 Frieza - Death of a Prince Eps #70-72 (Eps #85-87). Vol. 27 Frieza - Revealed Eps #67-69) (Eps #82-84). Vol.

26 Frieza - Transformation Eps #64-66 + Bonus Episode (Eps #78-81). Vol. 25 Frieza - The Summoning Eps #61-63 (Eps #75-77). Vol.

24 Captain Ginyu - Double Cross Eps #57-60) (Eps #71-74). Vol. 23 Captain Ginyu - Assault Eps #54-56 (Eps #68-70). Vol.

22 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #64-67. Vol. 21 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #61-63. Vol.

20 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #58-60. Vol. 19 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #54-57. Vol.

18 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #51-53. Vol. 16 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #48-50. Vol.

15 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #45-47. Vol. 14 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #42-44. Vol.

13 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #39-41. Vol. 12 Namek - (Not yet released, coming ?????) Eps #36-38. Vol.

11 Vegeta Saga 2: ????? (Not yet released, coming ????? Eps #32-35. Vol. 10 Vegeta Saga 2: ????? (Not yet released, coming ????? Eps #28-31. Vol.

9 Vegeta Saga 2: Ultimate Sacrifice (Not yet released, coming 5/16/2006) Eps #25-27. Vol. 8 Vegeta Saga 2: Saiyan Invasion (Not yet released, coming 3/21/2006) Eps #22-24. Vol.

7 Vegeta Saga 1: Back From the Dead Eps #19-21. Vol. 6 Vegeta Saga 1: Doomed Heroes Eps #16-18. Vol.

5 Vegeta Saga 1: Goku Held Hostage Eps #13-15. Vol. 4 Vegeta Saga 1: Gohan's Trials Eps #10-12. Vol.

3 Vegeta Saga 1: Into the Wild Eps #7-9. Vol. 2 Vegeta Saga 1: Piccolo's Plan Eps #4-6. Vol.

1 Vegeta Saga 1: Saiyan Showdown Eps #1-3. Vol. The Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans (Video game footage). The History of Trunks.

Bardock - The Father of Goku. Resistance to Despair!! The Remaining Super-Warriors, Gohan and Trunks. A Lonesome, Final Battle: The Father of Z-Warrior Kakarrot, who Challenged Freeza. Dragonfist Explosion (FUNimation Title Unknown).

Fusion Rebirth. Bio-Broly. Broly: The Second Coming. Bojack Unbound.

Broly: The Legendary Super Saiyan. Super Android 13!. Return of Cooler. Cooler's Revenge.

Lord Slug. The Tree of Might. The World's Strongest. Dead Zone.

Dragon Fist Explosion!! If Gokū Won't Do It, Who Will?. Fusion Reborn!! Gokū and Vegeta. Super-Warrior Defeat!! I'm the One who'll Win. The Dangerous Duo! Super-Warriors Can't Rest.

The Galaxy at the Brink!! The Super Incredible Guy. Burn Up!! A Close, Intense, Super-Fierce Battle. Extreme Battle!! The Three Great Super Saiyans. Clash!! 10,000,000,000 Powerful Warriors.

Mightiest. The Incredible Mightiest vs. Super Saiyan Son Gokū. Super Deciding Battle for the Entire Planet Earth.

The World's Strongest Guy. Return my Gohan!!. The Kid Buu Saga (Episodes 275~290). The Fusion Saga (Episodes 253~274).

The Majin Buu Saga (Episodes 231~252). The Babidi Saga (Episodes 219~230). The World Tournament Saga (Episodes 209~218). The Great Saiyaman Saga (Episodes 194~208).

The Cell Games Saga (Episodes 165~193). The Perfect Cell Saga (Episodes 152~164). The Imperfect Cell Saga (Episodes 139~151). The Androids Saga (Episodes 125~138).

The Trunks Saga (Episodes 117~124). The Garlic Junior Saga (Episodes 107~116). The Frieza Saga (Episodes 75~106). The Captain Ginyu Saga (Episodes 68~74).

The Namek Saga. The Vegeta Saga (Formerly known as the Saiyan Saga). Majin-Buu Saga (Episodes 200~291); 30 June 1993 - 31 January 1996. Cell Saga (Episodes 126~199); 5 February 1992 - 23 June 1993.

Freeza Saga (Episodes 36~125); 14 February 1990 - 29 January 1992. Saiyan Saga (Episodes 1~35); 26 April 1989 - 7 February 1990.

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