Valencia

The Hemispheric at the Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències by Santiago Calatrava, Valencia, Spain.

Valencia (Castilian Spanish: Valencia /va'lenθia/; Valencian Catalan: València /va'łεnsia/) is a medium-sized port city (the third largest city in Spain) and industrial area on the Costa del Azahar in Spain. It is the capital of the Land of Valencia and of province of Valencia. Population of the city of Valencia proper was 796,549 as of 2005 estimates. Population of the urban area was 1,012,000 as of 2000 estimates. Population of the metropolitan area (urban area plus satellite towns) was 1,623,724 as of 2005 estimates. As of 2005, the mayor of Valencia is Rita Barberá Nolla.

Valencia has a Mediterranean climate, with warm dry summers and mild winters.

Architecture

The ancient winding streets of the Barrio del Carmen contain buildings dating to Roman and Arabic times. The Cathedral, built between the 13th and 15th century, is primarily of gothic style but contains elements of baroque and Romanesque architecture. Beside the Cathedral is the gothic Basilica of the Virgin (Basílica De La Virgen De Los Desamparados). The 15th century Serrano and Quart towers are part of what was once the wall surrounding the city.

UNESCO has declared the gothic silk exchange (La Lonja de la Seda) as a world heritage sight. The modernist Central Market (Mercado Central) is one of the largest in Europe. The main railway station (Estación Del Norte) is built in art deco style.

World-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava produced the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències), which contains a science museum, IMAX cinema, and oceanographic park. Calatrava is also responsible for the bridge named after him in the center of the city. The Music Palace (Palau De La Música) is another good example of modern architecture in Valencia.

Museums

Museums in Valencia include:

  • Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias (arts and science)
  • Instituto Valenciano De Arte Moderno (IVAM, modern art)
  • Museo De Bellas Artes (fine art)
  • Museo Fallero & Museo Del Artista Fallero (Les Falles)
  • Museo Taurino (bullfighting)
  • Museo Del Arroz (rice)
  • Museo Valenciano de la ilustración y la Modernidad (MUVIM, various exhibits)
  • Almudín (various exhibits, mainly art and archaeology)

Squares and gardens

The largest square is the Plaza del Ayuntamiento, which contains the town hall (ayuntamiento), a cinema which shows classic movies (Filmoteca), and many restaurants and bars. This is where the noisy fireworks of the mascleta can be heard every afternoon during the Fallas.

The Plaza de la Virgen contains the Basilica of the Virgin and the Turia fountain, and is a popular spot for locals and tourists. Around the corner is the Plaza de la Reina, with the Cathedral, orange trees, and many bars and restaurants.

The Turia river was diverted in the 1950s, and the old river bed is now the Turia gardens, which contain a children’s playground, a fountain, and sports fields. The Palau De La Música is adjacent to the Turia gardens and the City of Arts and Sciences lies at one end.

Other gardens in Valencia include the Real, Monforte, and Botanic gardens.

Education

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Economy

Valencia has enjoyed strong economic growth over the last decade, much of it spurred by tourism and construction.

Valencia’s port is one of the busiest on the Mediterranean coast and handles 20% of Spain’s exports. The main exports are food and drink (the Valencian region is famous for its oranges), furniture, ceramic tiles, fans, textiles and iron products. Valencia’s manufacturing sector focuses on metallurgy, chemicals, textiles, shipbuilding and brewing. Unemployment is lower than the Spanish average. Small and medium sized industries are an important part of the local economy. (See Travel and Tourism in Valencia.)

The city of Valencia and the surrounding area are expected to attract millions of visitors from around the world given that the city of Valencia has been chosen to host the 32nd America's Cup. The first America's Cup competitions took place in June and July 2005 and were key attractions during the summer of 2005. According to official data from the organizing committee, as many as 150,000 visitors flocked to Valencia's port each day during the two-week events.

Criticisms of the Valencian model of economic growth:

  • Focusing on tourism and construction has led to a great deal of building on rural land. The Valencia government's implementation of the LRAU [law regulating urban activity] has been controversial since it involves the expropriation of the homes of both Spanish nationals and foreign residents without compensation. Critics argue that this legislation (which was theoretically designed to protect rural land) is being misused for large urban and industrial developments. The European Union's Committee of Petitions reported on the issue in 2004, finding that the Valencian government was breaching basic European rights.
  • Valencian citizens in the Cabanyal, Malvarosa, and Canyamelar districts claim that the America's Cup is being used as a pretext to fuel property speculation and to demolish historical buildings saved in the past by demonstrations and court rulings. However, the Supreme Court has deemed the action of the local government as legal.

Demography

Culture

It is famous for the Las Fallas festival in March, for paella valenciana and the new City of Arts and Sciences. La Tomatina, an annual tomato fight, draws crowds to the nearby town of Buñol in August. Valencia has a metro system [1], run by FGV. Valencia has a successful football club, Valencia C.F., who won the Spanish league in 2004.

The two official languages spoken in the city are Spanish and Valencian. Due to political and demographic pressure in the past, the predominant language is Spanish, as opposed to areas surrounding the metropolitan area in the province of Valencia. The local government makes sure it emphasizes the use of the local language. For instance, all signs and announcements in the Metro are in Valencian, with Spanish translations underneath in smaller type. In relation to street naming policy, new street signs when erected are always given the Valencian name for street (Carrer) however the older street names bearing the Spanish names are only replaced when necessary. This results in a situation where in longer streets both languages can often be seen on street signs.

Valencia is famous for its vibrant nightlife. In the 1980s and 1990s clubbers would follow the “ruta de bacalao” from Madrid to Valencia. Today, bars and nightclubs are concentrated in the Carmen and university areas. As is normal for Spain, nightlife does not take off until after midnight.


History

Pavement of a Valencia street, with arbour. Many ordinary places in the city are designed with attention to detail, and a sense of aesthetics.

The city was founded by the Romans in 137 BC on the site of a former Iberian town, by the river Turia. It was originally named Valentia, but centuries of changing pronunciations have since altered the name to its modern form.

The city has been occupied by the Visigoths, Moors and the Aragonese. In 1094, Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (El Cid) conquered Valencia (this victory was immortalised in the Lay of the Cid), but the city returned to the Almoravids in 1102. The king James I of Aragon reconquered the city in 1238 and incorporated it to the new formed Kingdom of Valencia, one of the kingdoms forming the Crown of Aragon.

In the 15th and 16th centuries, Valencia was one of the major cities in the Mediterranean. The writer Joanot Martorell, author of Tirant lo Blanch, and the poet Ausias March are famous Valencians of that era.

The first printing press in the Iberian Peninsula was located in Valencia. The first printed Bible in a Romance language, Valencian, was printed in Valencia circa 1478, attributed to Bonifaci Ferrer.

Valencian bankers loaned funds to Queen Isabella for Columbus' trip in 1492.

A narrow street of the Old Medieval City.

War of the Germanies 1519–1522.

Expulsion of Moriscos in 1609.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, Valencia sided with Charles of Austria. After the victory of the Bourbons at the Battle of Almansa (April 25, 1707), the city lost its privileges or furs.

After the fall of Madrid in the Spanish Civil War, the capital of the Republic was moved to Valencia. The city suffered from the blockade and siege by Franco's forces. The postwar period was hard for Valencians. During the Franco years, speaking or teaching Valencian was discouraged (nowadays it is compulsory for every child studying in Valencia, even if their parents don't want it). In 1957 the city suffered a several flood by the Turia River, with 2 meters in some steets. One consequence of this was that a decision was made to drain and reroute the river and it now passes around the Western and southern suburbs of the city. A plan to turn the drained area into a motorway was dropped in favour of a picturesque 7 km park which bisects the city.

Valencia was granted Autonomous Statutes in 1982.

Valencia was selected in 2003 to be the first city in continental Europe ever to host the historic America's Cup regatta, to take place in 2007.

The name

The original Latin name of the city was Valentia /wa'lentia/, meaning "Strength", "Vigour". (And during the Moorish occupation it was known as Balansiya.) By regular sound changes this has become Valencia /ba'lenθja/ in Spanish and València in Valencian. The latter name is pronounced /bə'łεnsjə/ in Central Catalan. One possible pronunciation in Valencian (South-west Catalan) is /va'lensja/. (See International Phonetic Alphabet for the symbols used to represent pronunciation.)

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(See International Phonetic Alphabet for the symbols used to represent pronunciation.). They also sponsor the following teams:. One possible pronunciation in Valencian (South-west Catalan) is /va'lensja/. In addition to the venues in Philadelphia and Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Wachovia also sponsors an annual PGA tournament in Charlotte, called the Wachovia Championship. The latter name is pronounced /bə'łεnsjə/ in Central Catalan. Interestingly, Capital One was originally established as the credit card division of Signet Bank, which was later purchased by First Union prior to the Wachovia merger. (And during the Moorish occupation it was known as Balansiya.) By regular sound changes this has become Valencia /ba'lenθja/ in Spanish and València in Valencian. This purchase would give Wachovia an established credit card division, plus allow it to establish (via Capital One's purchase of Hibernia National Bank) a banking presence in Louisiana and strengthen its presence in Texas.

The original Latin name of the city was Valentia /wa'lentia/, meaning "Strength", "Vigour". Nevertheless, speculation remains that Wachovia may buy Capital One. Valencia was selected in 2003 to be the first city in continental Europe ever to host the historic America's Cup regatta, to take place in 2007. As of 2006, new credit card accounts opened through Wachovia will remain with this new division. Valencia was granted Autonomous Statutes in 1982. On November 2, 2005 Wachovia announced that it would end its credit card relationship with MBNA and start up its own credit card division. A plan to turn the drained area into a motorway was dropped in favour of a picturesque 7 km park which bisects the city. The payment is part of the agreement Wachovia predecessor First Union made in 2000 when it sold its credit card portfolio to MBNA.

One consequence of this was that a decision was made to drain and reroute the river and it now passes around the Western and southern suburbs of the city. Multiple sources have reported that as part of its agreement with Wachovia, MBNA is required to pay the nine-figure sum if it ever sells to Wachovia's cross-town rival Bank of America. In 1957 the city suffered a several flood by the Turia River, with 2 meters in some steets. Wachovia is set to get $100 million out of this deal. During the Franco years, speaking or teaching Valencian was discouraged (nowadays it is compulsory for every child studying in Valencia, even if their parents don't want it). Within a week of the deal's collapse, MBNA entered into an agreement to be purchased by Wachovia's chief rival, Bank of America. The postwar period was hard for Valencians. However, the deal fell through when Wachovia balked at MBNA's purchase price.

The city suffered from the blockade and siege by Franco's forces. In June of 2005, Wachovia negotiated to purchase monoline credit card company MBNA. After the fall of Madrid in the Spanish Civil War, the capital of the Republic was moved to Valencia. This purchase will give Wachovia 19 branches in Southern California, but more importantly, will more than double the size of Wachovia's dealer financial services business, making it the nation's ninth largest auto loan originator. After the victory of the Bourbons at the Battle of Almansa (April 25, 1707), the city lost its privileges or furs. Wachovia will enter the California market with its purchase of Western Financial Bank. During the War of the Spanish Succession, Valencia sided with Charles of Austria. The merger created the largest bank in the southeast, the fourth largest bank in the United States in terms of holdings, and the second largest in terms of number of branches.

Expulsion of Moriscos in 1609. On November 1, 2004, Wachovia completed the acquisition of banking competitor SouthTrust Corporation, a transaction valued at $14.3 billion. War of the Germanies 1519–1522. It also operates Wachovia Securities, its brokerage services subsidiary. Valencian bankers loaned funds to Queen Isabella for Columbus' trip in 1492. It has banking centers in 15 East coast states and Washington, D.C. The first printed Bible in a Romance language, Valencian, was printed in Valencia circa 1478, attributed to Bonifaci Ferrer. Wachovia is currently ranked number 23 on the Forbes 500 list for 2003, and is the fourth largest bank holding company in the US.

The first printing press in the Iberian Peninsula was located in Valencia. Formerly known as the First Union Center and the First Union Spectrum (both Philadelphia) and First Union Arena (Wilkes-Barre), they are now known as the Wachovia Center, Wachovia Spectrum, and Wachovia Arena. The writer Joanot Martorell, author of Tirant lo Blanch, and the poet Ausias March are famous Valencians of that era. The merger also affected the names of the indoor professional sports arenas in Philadelphia and Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. In the 15th and 16th centuries, Valencia was one of the major cities in the Mediterranean. Charlotte, North Carolina's One, Two, Three, and Four First Union buildings became One, Two, Three, and Four, Wachovia Center (respectively), and the 55-story First Union Tower in downtown Miami became the Wachovia Tower. The king James I of Aragon reconquered the city in 1238 and incorporated it to the new formed Kingdom of Valencia, one of the kingdoms forming the Crown of Aragon. When Wachovia and First Union merged, the multiple skyscrapers with First Union's name came under Wachovia's name.

In 1094, Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (El Cid) conquered Valencia (this victory was immortalised in the Lay of the Cid), but the city returned to the Almoravids in 1102. The company has also been reporting record revenues since the merger. The city has been occupied by the Visigoths, Moors and the Aragonese. In addition, the company's stock price has remained strong, and provided a good return to legacy Wachovia shareholders, in contrast to SunTrust's claims during the takeover attempt. It was originally named Valentia, but centuries of changing pronunciations have since altered the name to its modern form. In fact, Wachovia has been ranked number one in customer satisfaction every year since the merger. The city was founded by the Romans in 137 BC on the site of a former Iberian town, by the river Turia. The company's slow strategy to combine seems to have prevented large customer attrition rates.


. In comparison the CoreStates purchase, the merger of First Union and Wachovia has been a huge success. As is normal for Spain, nightlife does not take off until after midnight. This process officially ended on August 18, 2003, almost 2 years after the merger took place. Today, bars and nightclubs are concentrated in the Carmen and university areas. The company first began converting systems in the Southeast United States (where both banks had branches) before moving to the Northeast, where First Union branches only had to change their signs to reflect the new company name and logo. In the 1980s and 1990s clubbers would follow the “ruta de bacalao” from Madrid to Valencia. Over a period of several years, legacy Wachovia computer systems were converted to First Union systems.

Valencia is famous for its vibrant nightlife. In order to prevent a repeat of the CoreStates fiasco, the new Wachovia took a deliberately long period of time to combine the banking operations of the new company. This results in a situation where in longer streets both languages can often be seen on street signs. On September 4, 2001, First Union and Wachovia officially merged to form the new Wachovia Corporation. In relation to street naming policy, new street signs when erected are always given the Valencian name for street (Carrer) however the older street names bearing the Spanish names are only replaced when necessary. Wachovia paid Bank One a $350 million termination fee. For instance, all signs and announcements in the Metro are in Valencian, with Spanish translations underneath in smaller type. After entering into negotiations, the new Wachovia agreed to buy back its portfolio from Bank One in September of 2001 and resell it to MBNA.

The local government makes sure it emphasizes the use of the local language. First Union sold their credit card portfolio to MBNA in August of 2000. Due to political and demographic pressure in the past, the predominant language is Spanish, as opposed to areas surrounding the metropolitan area in the province of Valencia. The cards, which would have still been branded as Wachovia, would have been issued through Bank One's First USA division. The two official languages spoken in the city are Spanish and Valencian. In April of 2001, Wachovia agreed to sell its $8 billon credit card portfolio to Bank One. Valencia has a successful football club, Valencia C.F., who won the Spanish league in 2004. Another problem concerned each banks' credit card divisions.

Valencia has a metro system [1], run by FGV. They rejected SunTrust's attempts to elect a new Board of Directors for Wachovia, and thus, ended SunTrust's hostile takeover. La Tomatina, an annual tomato fight, draws crowds to the nearby town of Buñol in August. On August 3, 2001, Wachovia shareholders approved the First Union deal. It is famous for the Las Fallas festival in March, for paella valenciana and the new City of Arts and Sciences. Long a rumored suitor for Wachovia, SunTrust had been in on-again off-again merger talks with it over the course of many years, with both Wachovia and SunTrust eventually confirming the most recent effort took place during the winter of 2000 before Wachovia terminated the discussions. Criticisms of the Valencian model of economic growth:. In its effort to make the "Smoke-and-Coke" deal appeal to investors, SunTrust argued that it would provide a smoother transition than First Union and offered a higher cash price for Wachovia stock than First Union.

According to official data from the organizing committee, as many as 150,000 visitors flocked to Valencia's port each day during the two-week events. On May 14, 2001, Atlanta-based SunTrust announced a rival takeover bid for Wachovia, the first hostile takeover attempt in the banking sector in many years. The first America's Cup competitions took place in June and July 2005 and were key attractions during the summer of 2005. First Union responded to these concerns by placing the wealth management and Carolinas-region headquarters in Winston-Salem. The city of Valencia and the surrounding area are expected to attract millions of visitors from around the world given that the city of Valencia has been chosen to host the 32nd America's Cup. The city of Winston-Salem was concerned both by job losses by the move and the loss of stature from losing a corporation. (See Travel and Tourism in Valencia.). Citizens and politicians of Winston-Salem suffered from a hurt of their civic pride because the city would lose Wachovia's corporate headquarters to Charlotte, partly because Winston-Salem is a much smaller city than Charlotte.

Small and medium sized industries are an important part of the local economy. Analysts were concerned of First Union's ability to merge with another large company because of the CoreStates deal. Unemployment is lower than the Spanish average. The deal was met with criticism and doubt by several groups. Valencia’s manufacturing sector focuses on metallurgy, chemicals, textiles, shipbuilding and brewing. At the same time, Wachovia's name and corporate identity would survive, an important source of pride to Wachovia's board. The main exports are food and drink (the Valencian region is famous for its oranges), furniture, ceramic tiles, fans, textiles and iron products. Analysts said this move was most likely to help First Union acquire a new identity, as Wachovia's reputation was far better with consumers than First Union.

Valencia’s port is one of the busiest on the Mediterranean coast and handles 20% of Spain’s exports. As an important part of the deal, First Union would shed its name and assumed the Wachovia identity and stock ticker. Valencia has enjoyed strong economic growth over the last decade, much of it spurred by tourism and construction. The former CEO of Wachovia, Bud Baker, later said that he and First Union's CEO, Ken Thompson, met at interstate motels to keep their talks of merger as secret as possible. Other gardens in Valencia include the Real, Monforte, and Botanic gardens. While Wachovia had been viewed as an acquisition candidate after running into problems with earnings and credit quality in 2000, the suitor shocked analysts as most assumed that should Wachovia be sold it would be to SunTrust in the long-assumed "Smoke-and-Coke" merger (the nickname coming from Wachovia's long relationship with tobacco companies and SunTrust's holdings of Coke stock dating from Coke's initial public offering). The Palau De La Música is adjacent to the Turia gardens and the City of Arts and Sciences lies at one end. This was viewed with great surprise by the financial press and security analysts.

The Turia river was diverted in the 1950s, and the old river bed is now the Turia gardens, which contain a children’s playground, a fountain, and sports fields. Although the merger was billed in the proxy as a merger of equals by pooling, the deal was actually a purchase of Wachovia by First Union. Around the corner is the Plaza de la Reina, with the Cathedral, orange trees, and many bars and restaurants. On April 16, 2001, Charlotte-based First Union Corporation announced it would merge with Winston-Salem-based Wachovia Corporation. The Plaza de la Virgen contains the Basilica of the Virgin and the Turia fountain, and is a popular spot for locals and tourists. This is very ironic since the company weasled the judge into believing that the legitimate owner had no interest in the domain name, but Wachovia did. This is where the noisy fireworks of the mascleta can be heard every afternoon during the Fallas. As of this writing, the domain name is owned by Wachovia, but is not being used.

The largest square is the Plaza del Ayuntamiento, which contains the town hall (ayuntamiento), a cinema which shows classic movies (Filmoteca), and many restaurants and bars. Recently, Wachovia has sued for and obtained several domain names of sites warning people about Wachovia, including wachovia-sucks.com. Museums in Valencia include:. However, the company has taken steps to silence anyone who gives an honest opinion of the bank. The Music Palace (Palau De La Música) is another good example of modern architecture in Valencia. First Union, now Wachovia, has proceeded to trash the Wachovia named. Calatrava is also responsible for the bridge named after him in the center of the city. This tactic is similiar to ValueJet renaming itself after it killed a plane full of passengers to make an extra buck by carying volatile materials.

World-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava produced the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències), which contains a science museum, IMAX cinema, and oceanographic park. Unfortunately for First Union's customers, the bank itself had not change. The main railway station (Estación Del Norte) is built in art deco style. First Union found a far small bank that had a good reputation, and proceeded to purchase it in order to cover up its past. The modernist Central Market (Mercado Central) is one of the largest in Europe. The reputation was so bad that the company felt that it had to abandon its brand name and acquire a new one. UNESCO has declared the gothic silk exchange (La Lonja de la Seda) as a world heritage sight. First Union had a terrible reputation for incompetence and fraud.

The 15th century Serrano and Quart towers are part of what was once the wall surrounding the city. In 2000, legacy Wachovia made its final purchase, which was Republic Security Bank, giving its first entry into Florida. Beside the Cathedral is the gothic Basilica of the Virgin (Basílica De La Virgen De Los Desamparados). In 1998, legacy Wachovia acquired two Virginia-based banks, Jefferson National Bank and Central Fidelity Bank. The Cathedral, built between the 13th and 15th century, is primarily of gothic style but contains elements of baroque and Romanesque architecture. This purchase made legacy Wachovia one of the few companies with dual headquarters: one in Winston-Salem and one in Atlanta. The ancient winding streets of the Barrio del Carmen contain buildings dating to Roman and Arabic times. Founded as Atlanta National Bank on September 14, 1865, and later renamed to First National Bank of Atlanta, this institution was the oldest national bank in Atlanta.

. On December 12, 1986 Wachovia took over First Atlanta. Valencia has a Mediterranean climate, with warm dry summers and mild winters. Wachovia Bank and Trust was formed in 1911 by the merger of Wachovia National Bank (founded 1879) and Wachovia Loan and Trust (founded 1893), and was located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. As of 2005, the mayor of Valencia is Rita Barberá Nolla. First Union had to restructure and lay off thousands of employees in 1999, partly as a result of the purchase of CoreStates. Population of the metropolitan area (urban area plus satellite towns) was 1,623,724 as of 2005 estimates. Partly due to the CoreStates purchase and partially due to 80 other bank purchases over the last few years, First Union experienced several years of lower earnings and no dividend growth.

Population of the urban area was 1,012,000 as of 2000 estimates. Furthermore, First Union substanially overpaid for CoreStates at over 4 times book value. Population of the city of Valencia proper was 796,549 as of 2005 estimates. As a result, customers left the bank in droves - First Union experienced a 19 percent attrition rate - because of poor customer service and the account issues. It is the capital of the Land of Valencia and of province of Valencia. This attempt led to multiple problems: poorly trained employees (as CoreStates tellers were not familiar with the new systems) and First Union and CoreStates' systems unable to communicate with each other, which led to such problems as account access issues and payments not being correctly applied to loans. Valencia (Castilian Spanish: Valencia /va'lenθia/; Valencian Catalan: València /va'łεnsia/) is a medium-sized port city (the third largest city in Spain) and industrial area on the Costa del Azahar in Spain. To start with, First Union attempted to rapidly integrate CoreStates' systems into First Union.

However, the Supreme Court has deemed the action of the local government as legal. The purchase proved to be a fiasco for a number of reasons. Valencian citizens in the Cabanyal, Malvarosa, and Canyamelar districts claim that the America's Cup is being used as a pretext to fuel property speculation and to demolish historical buildings saved in the past by demonstrations and court rulings. CoreStates Financial Corporation, headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was acquired by First Union in April 1998. The European Union's Committee of Petitions reported on the issue in 2004, finding that the Valencian government was breaching basic European rights. Over the decades, First Union purchased over 80 other banks before purchasing Wachovia, the majority of them in the 1990s. Critics argue that this legislation (which was theoretically designed to protect rural land) is being misused for large urban and industrial developments. First Union National Bank of North Carolina was originally formed in 1958 with the merger of Union National Bank and First National Bank and Trust Company of Asheville.

The Valencia government's implementation of the LRAU [law regulating urban activity] has been controversial since it involves the expropriation of the homes of both Spanish nationals and foreign residents without compensation. It merged with Wachovia Corporation in 2001, and the combined company kept Wachovia's name. Focusing on tourism and construction has led to a great deal of building on rural land. First Union Corporation was a large banking chain based in Charlotte, North Carolina. Almudín (various exhibits, mainly art and archaeology). First Union then took the Wachovia name. Museo Valenciano de la ilustración y la Modernidad (MUVIM, various exhibits). While the transaction was billed as a merger of equals, the transaction was actually a purchase of the legacy Wachovia by Charlotte-based First Union Corporation.

Museo Del Arroz (rice). Today's Wachovia Corporation was created by the merger of the legacy Wachovia Corporation and First Union Corporation. Museo Taurino (bullfighting). (See Old Salem.). Museo Fallero & Museo Del Artista Fallero (Les Falles). The area formerly known as Bethabara is now inside the city limits of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Museo De Bellas Artes (fine art). When Moravian settlers arrived in Bethabara, North Carolina in 1753, they gave this name to the land they acquired, because it resembled a valley along the Danube River called Die Wachau.

Instituto Valenciano De Arte Moderno (IVAM, modern art). The origin of the name is the Latin form of the German name Wachau. Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias (arts and science). Wachovia, pronounced wah-KO-vee-yah, has one of the most unusual corporate names in the United States. . Wachovia Corporation NYSE: WB, based in Charlotte, North Carolina is one of the largest banking chains in the United States.


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Wachovia named fourth WORST bank in the world. 700,000 Bank Customers' Account Information Allegedly Stolen. Scope of bank data theft grows to 676,000 customers. The theft affected nearly 50,000 Wachovia customers, and the bank knew it ...

More than 100,000 customers of Wachovia and Bank of America have been notified that their financial records may have been stolen. Wachovia knew or should have known that customers' private information was being stolen or misappropriated. Wachovia lets hackers get access to bank accounts. Bank security breach may be biggest yet.

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