Valencia

The Hemispheric at the Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències by Santiago Calatrava, Valencia, Spain.

Valencia (Castilian Spanish: Valencia /va'lenθia/; Valencian Catalan: València /va'łεnsia/) is a medium-sized port city (the third largest city in Spain) and industrial area on the Costa del Azahar in Spain. It is the capital of the Land of Valencia and of province of Valencia. Population of the city of Valencia proper was 796,549 as of 2005 estimates. Population of the urban area was 1,012,000 as of 2000 estimates. Population of the metropolitan area (urban area plus satellite towns) was 1,623,724 as of 2005 estimates. As of 2005, the mayor of Valencia is Rita Barberá Nolla.

Valencia has a Mediterranean climate, with warm dry summers and mild winters.

Architecture

The ancient winding streets of the Barrio del Carmen contain buildings dating to Roman and Arabic times. The Cathedral, built between the 13th and 15th century, is primarily of gothic style but contains elements of baroque and Romanesque architecture. Beside the Cathedral is the gothic Basilica of the Virgin (Basílica De La Virgen De Los Desamparados). The 15th century Serrano and Quart towers are part of what was once the wall surrounding the city.

UNESCO has declared the gothic silk exchange (La Lonja de la Seda) as a world heritage sight. The modernist Central Market (Mercado Central) is one of the largest in Europe. The main railway station (Estación Del Norte) is built in art deco style.

World-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava produced the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències), which contains a science museum, IMAX cinema, and oceanographic park. Calatrava is also responsible for the bridge named after him in the center of the city. The Music Palace (Palau De La Música) is another good example of modern architecture in Valencia.

Museums

Museums in Valencia include:

  • Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias (arts and science)
  • Instituto Valenciano De Arte Moderno (IVAM, modern art)
  • Museo De Bellas Artes (fine art)
  • Museo Fallero & Museo Del Artista Fallero (Les Falles)
  • Museo Taurino (bullfighting)
  • Museo Del Arroz (rice)
  • Museo Valenciano de la ilustración y la Modernidad (MUVIM, various exhibits)
  • Almudín (various exhibits, mainly art and archaeology)

Squares and gardens

The largest square is the Plaza del Ayuntamiento, which contains the town hall (ayuntamiento), a cinema which shows classic movies (Filmoteca), and many restaurants and bars. This is where the noisy fireworks of the mascleta can be heard every afternoon during the Fallas.

The Plaza de la Virgen contains the Basilica of the Virgin and the Turia fountain, and is a popular spot for locals and tourists. Around the corner is the Plaza de la Reina, with the Cathedral, orange trees, and many bars and restaurants.

The Turia river was diverted in the 1950s, and the old river bed is now the Turia gardens, which contain a children’s playground, a fountain, and sports fields. The Palau De La Música is adjacent to the Turia gardens and the City of Arts and Sciences lies at one end.

Other gardens in Valencia include the Real, Monforte, and Botanic gardens.

Education

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Economy

Valencia has enjoyed strong economic growth over the last decade, much of it spurred by tourism and construction.

Valencia’s port is one of the busiest on the Mediterranean coast and handles 20% of Spain’s exports. The main exports are food and drink (the Valencian region is famous for its oranges), furniture, ceramic tiles, fans, textiles and iron products. Valencia’s manufacturing sector focuses on metallurgy, chemicals, textiles, shipbuilding and brewing. Unemployment is lower than the Spanish average. Small and medium sized industries are an important part of the local economy. (See Travel and Tourism in Valencia.)

The city of Valencia and the surrounding area are expected to attract millions of visitors from around the world given that the city of Valencia has been chosen to host the 32nd America's Cup. The first America's Cup competitions took place in June and July 2005 and were key attractions during the summer of 2005. According to official data from the organizing committee, as many as 150,000 visitors flocked to Valencia's port each day during the two-week events.

Criticisms of the Valencian model of economic growth:

  • Focusing on tourism and construction has led to a great deal of building on rural land. The Valencia government's implementation of the LRAU [law regulating urban activity] has been controversial since it involves the expropriation of the homes of both Spanish nationals and foreign residents without compensation. Critics argue that this legislation (which was theoretically designed to protect rural land) is being misused for large urban and industrial developments. The European Union's Committee of Petitions reported on the issue in 2004, finding that the Valencian government was breaching basic European rights.
  • Valencian citizens in the Cabanyal, Malvarosa, and Canyamelar districts claim that the America's Cup is being used as a pretext to fuel property speculation and to demolish historical buildings saved in the past by demonstrations and court rulings. However, the Supreme Court has deemed the action of the local government as legal.

Demography

Culture

It is famous for the Las Fallas festival in March, for paella valenciana and the new City of Arts and Sciences. La Tomatina, an annual tomato fight, draws crowds to the nearby town of Buñol in August. Valencia has a metro system [1], run by FGV. Valencia has a successful football club, Valencia C.F., who won the Spanish league in 2004.

The two official languages spoken in the city are Spanish and Valencian. Due to political and demographic pressure in the past, the predominant language is Spanish, as opposed to areas surrounding the metropolitan area in the province of Valencia. The local government makes sure it emphasizes the use of the local language. For instance, all signs and announcements in the Metro are in Valencian, with Spanish translations underneath in smaller type. In relation to street naming policy, new street signs when erected are always given the Valencian name for street (Carrer) however the older street names bearing the Spanish names are only replaced when necessary. This results in a situation where in longer streets both languages can often be seen on street signs.

Valencia is famous for its vibrant nightlife. In the 1980s and 1990s clubbers would follow the “ruta de bacalao” from Madrid to Valencia. Today, bars and nightclubs are concentrated in the Carmen and university areas. As is normal for Spain, nightlife does not take off until after midnight.


History

Pavement of a Valencia street, with arbour. Many ordinary places in the city are designed with attention to detail, and a sense of aesthetics.

The city was founded by the Romans in 137 BC on the site of a former Iberian town, by the river Turia. It was originally named Valentia, but centuries of changing pronunciations have since altered the name to its modern form.

The city has been occupied by the Visigoths, Moors and the Aragonese. In 1094, Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (El Cid) conquered Valencia (this victory was immortalised in the Lay of the Cid), but the city returned to the Almoravids in 1102. The king James I of Aragon reconquered the city in 1238 and incorporated it to the new formed Kingdom of Valencia, one of the kingdoms forming the Crown of Aragon.

In the 15th and 16th centuries, Valencia was one of the major cities in the Mediterranean. The writer Joanot Martorell, author of Tirant lo Blanch, and the poet Ausias March are famous Valencians of that era.

The first printing press in the Iberian Peninsula was located in Valencia. The first printed Bible in a Romance language, Valencian, was printed in Valencia circa 1478, attributed to Bonifaci Ferrer.

Valencian bankers loaned funds to Queen Isabella for Columbus' trip in 1492.

A narrow street of the Old Medieval City.

War of the Germanies 1519–1522.

Expulsion of Moriscos in 1609.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, Valencia sided with Charles of Austria. After the victory of the Bourbons at the Battle of Almansa (April 25, 1707), the city lost its privileges or furs.

After the fall of Madrid in the Spanish Civil War, the capital of the Republic was moved to Valencia. The city suffered from the blockade and siege by Franco's forces. The postwar period was hard for Valencians. During the Franco years, speaking or teaching Valencian was discouraged (nowadays it is compulsory for every child studying in Valencia, even if their parents don't want it). In 1957 the city suffered a several flood by the Turia River, with 2 meters in some steets. One consequence of this was that a decision was made to drain and reroute the river and it now passes around the Western and southern suburbs of the city. A plan to turn the drained area into a motorway was dropped in favour of a picturesque 7 km park which bisects the city.

Valencia was granted Autonomous Statutes in 1982.

Valencia was selected in 2003 to be the first city in continental Europe ever to host the historic America's Cup regatta, to take place in 2007.

The name

The original Latin name of the city was Valentia /wa'lentia/, meaning "Strength", "Vigour". (And during the Moorish occupation it was known as Balansiya.) By regular sound changes this has become Valencia /ba'lenθja/ in Spanish and València in Valencian. The latter name is pronounced /bə'łεnsjə/ in Central Catalan. One possible pronunciation in Valencian (South-west Catalan) is /va'lensja/. (See International Phonetic Alphabet for the symbols used to represent pronunciation.)

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(See International Phonetic Alphabet for the symbols used to represent pronunciation.). Milan has 14 sister cities:. One possible pronunciation in Valencian (South-west Catalan) is /va'lensja/.
There are other stadiums and multiuse palaces located in the metropolitan area, the biggest being Monza Brianteo Stadium (18,000 seats), the PalaDesio (10,000) and Geas Stadium (8,500). The latter name is pronounced /bə'łεnsjə/ in Central Catalan. Milan and Lombardy are candidates for the Summer Olympic Games of 2016 (Milan-Lombardy 2016). (And during the Moorish occupation it was known as Balansiya.) By regular sound changes this has become Valencia /ba'lenθja/ in Spanish and València in Valencian. Many of the strongest Italian football players were born in Milan, in the surrounding metropolitan area, or in Lombardy: Valentino Mazzola, Renzo De Vecchi, Paolo Maldini, Giuseppe Meazza, Giacinto Facchetti, Gianni Rivera, Paolo Rossi, Luigi Riva, Gaetano Scirea, Giuseppe Bergomi, Walter Zenga, Antonio Cabrini, Roberto Donadoni, Gianluca Vialli, Silvio Piola, Virginio Rosetta, Giampiero Boniperti, Giuseppe Dossena, Gabriele Oriali, Giuseppe Signori, Ugo Locatelli, Giampiero Marini, Aristide Guarneri, Paolino Pulici, Marcello Lippi, Giovanni Trapattoni, Franco e Giuseppe Baresi, Luigi Cevenini, Virgilio e Giuseppe Fossati, Giovanni Ferrari...

The original Latin name of the city was Valentia /wa'lentia/, meaning "Strength", "Vigour". Both teams play at Giuseppe Meazza - San Siro Stadium (85,700). Valencia was selected in 2003 to be the first city in continental Europe ever to host the historic America's Cup regatta, to take place in 2007. Milan is the only city in Europe whose teams have won both the European Cup and the Intercontinental Cup. Valencia was granted Autonomous Statutes in 1982. Milan and Internazionale. A plan to turn the drained area into a motorway was dropped in favour of a picturesque 7 km park which bisects the city. Football is the most important sport in Italy, and Milan is home to 2 world-famous football teams: A.C.

One consequence of this was that a decision was made to drain and reroute the river and it now passes around the Western and southern suburbs of the city. Prices are based on time elapsed and distance traveled. In 1957 the city suffered a several flood by the Turia River, with 2 meters in some steets. All taxis are the same color: white. During the Franco years, speaking or teaching Valencian was discouraged (nowadays it is compulsory for every child studying in Valencia, even if their parents don't want it). Milan has an efficient Taxi service, operated by private companies and licensed by the City of Milan (Comune di Milano). The postwar period was hard for Valencians. The "Passante ferroviario" is an underground railway serving a couple of "S" lines and is very much like another subway line (and is even marked as such on subway maps), except that it is connected to the FNME and Trenitalia suburban networks.

The city suffered from the blockade and siege by Franco's forces. The Regional Railway Service ( "R"), instead, links Milan with the rest of Lombardy and the national railway system. After the fall of Madrid in the Spanish Civil War, the capital of the Republic was moved to Valencia. The Suburban Railway Service ( "S" Lines, a service similar to the French RER and German S-Bahn), composed of 8 suburban lines and 10 more scheduled for 2008, connects the "Greater Milan" to cities such as Como and Varese. After the victory of the Bourbons at the Battle of Almansa (April 25, 1707), the city lost its privileges or furs. At the end of the work, the TAV station for Milan to the east will be:. During the War of the Spanish Succession, Valencia sided with Charles of Austria. A line from Milan to Venice and then to Trieste is under construction.

Expulsion of Moriscos in 1609. The stations for the TAV (Treni ad Alta Velocità - High Speed Trains) will be:. War of the Germanies 1519–1522. High speed train lines are under contruction all across Italy, and new lines will open from Milan to Rome and Naples, and from Milan to Torino. Valencian bankers loaned funds to Queen Isabella for Columbus' trip in 1492. Three new stations for passenger service are under construction:. The first printed Bible in a Romance language, Valencian, was printed in Valencia circa 1478, attributed to Bonifaci Ferrer. Milan is one of the most important railway hubs of Italy, and the 5 major stations of Milan are among Italy's busiest:.

The first printing press in the Iberian Peninsula was located in Valencia. The local transportation authority (ATM) transported more than 600 million passengers in 2003 . The writer Joanot Martorell, author of Tirant lo Blanch, and the poet Ausias March are famous Valencians of that era. 93 bus lines cover over 1,070 km between them. In the 15th and 16th centuries, Valencia was one of the major cities in the Mediterranean. Greater Milan also has one of the most extensive tramway systems in the world, with more than 286 km of track, and 20 lines. The king James I of Aragon reconquered the city in 1238 and incorporated it to the new formed Kingdom of Valencia, one of the kingdoms forming the Crown of Aragon. Lines 4 (linking downtown with Linate Airport) and 6 are in planning stages.

In 1094, Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (El Cid) conquered Valencia (this victory was immortalised in the Lay of the Cid), but the city returned to the Almoravids in 1102. Line 5 is also under construction, to be finished in the first half of 2008. The city has been occupied by the Visigoths, Moors and the Aragonese. Extensions of lines 1, 2 and 3 are under construction, to create more than 15 km of track with 10 new stations. It was originally named Valentia, but centuries of changing pronunciations have since altered the name to its modern form. Raffaele Hospital with the Cascina Gobba station (M2). The city was founded by the Romans in 137 BC on the site of a former Iberian town, by the river Turia. Raffaele", connecting the S.


. There is also a light metro-service, "Metrò S. As is normal for Spain, nightlife does not take off until after midnight. Milan has 3 subway lines (M1 - red, M2 - green, M3 - yellow) and the system, called Milan Metro - "M", running for more than 80 km. Today, bars and nightclubs are concentrated in the Carmen and university areas. The main 3 airports of Milano (Malpensa, Linate and Orio) comprise the largest and most important hub in Italy, both for passengers and cargo. In the 1980s and 1990s clubbers would follow the “ruta de bacalao” from Madrid to Valencia. Vergiate, Bresso, and Parma are further airports in the region.

Valencia is famous for its vibrant nightlife. A third airport is Orio al Serio (BGY), close to the city of Bergamo. This results in a situation where in longer streets both languages can often be seen on street signs. Babila). In relation to street naming policy, new street signs when erected are always given the Valencian name for street (Carrer) however the older street names bearing the Spanish names are only replaced when necessary. Milan also has the Linate Airport (LIN) within the city limits (for European and domestic traffic), connected with bus line 73 (from S. For instance, all signs and announcements in the Metro are in Valencian, with Spanish translations underneath in smaller type. Malpensa was designed by the famous Ettore Sottsass.

The local government makes sure it emphasizes the use of the local language. The city has a large international airport known as Malpensa International Airport (MXP), located in the northern suburb of Busto Ariszio and connected to the downtown with the "Malpensa Express" railway service (from Cadorna Station). Due to political and demographic pressure in the past, the predominant language is Spanish, as opposed to areas surrounding the metropolitan area in the province of Valencia. In the church Santa Maria delle Grazie can be found one of the most famous paintings of Leonardo da Vinci: The Last Supper (it: "Cenacolo"). The two official languages spoken in the city are Spanish and Valencian. The city is also the home of the Brera Academy of Fine Arts. Valencia has a successful football club, Valencia C.F., who won the Spanish league in 2004. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana contains drawings and notebooks by Leonardo da Vinci among its vast holdings of books, manuscripts, and drawings, and is one of the main repositories of European culture.

Valencia has a metro system [1], run by FGV. Milan is one of the most important centres in the world for Opera lirica, with its famous Teatro alla Scala (La Scala, theatre). La Tomatina, an annual tomato fight, draws crowds to the nearby town of Buñol in August. Cities in the 'World City Network'" (Key Findings, Full Report). It is famous for the Las Fallas festival in March, for paella valenciana and the new City of Arts and Sciences. Lang of the Brookings Institution in the economic report "U.S. Criticisms of the Valencian model of economic growth:. Taylor and Robert E.

According to official data from the organizing committee, as many as 150,000 visitors flocked to Valencia's port each day during the two-week events. Milan was included in a list of ten "Alpha world cities" by Peter J. The first America's Cup competitions took place in June and July 2005 and were key attractions during the summer of 2005. This new fairground, in the north-western suburb of Pero and Rho (opened in April 2005), is Europe's largest open construction project, making Fiera Milano the largest trade fair complex in the world. The city of Valencia and the surrounding area are expected to attract millions of visitors from around the world given that the city of Valencia has been chosen to host the 32nd America's Cup. Fiera Milano, the city's Exhibition Center and Trade Fair complex, is one of the most important in the world. (See Travel and Tourism in Valencia.). Milan is the centre of much finance, the seat of the Italian Stock Exchange (la Borsa Valori) and its hinterland is an avant-garde industrial area.

Small and medium sized industries are an important part of the local economy. The city is 85% Italian, 4% from other EU countries, and the remainder include Romanian, Egyptian, Filipino, Sri Lankan, Chinese, and Albanian. Unemployment is lower than the Spanish average. A small percentage comes from Latin America. Valencia’s manufacturing sector focuses on metallurgy, chemicals, textiles, shipbuilding and brewing. Many immigrants come from Asian and North African nations. The main exports are food and drink (the Valencian region is famous for its oranges), furniture, ceramic tiles, fans, textiles and iron products. Milan is a very diverse city, being the second largest city in Italy, but it is the most industrial and main financial centre of the country.

Valencia’s port is one of the busiest on the Mediterranean coast and handles 20% of Spain’s exports. See also: Rulers of Milan. Valencia has enjoyed strong economic growth over the last decade, much of it spurred by tourism and construction. After the war, the city was reconstructed and has again become an important financial and industrial centre of Italy. Other gardens in Valencia include the Real, Monforte, and Botanic gardens. When war in Italy was finally over, April 25, 1945, Milan was heavily damaged and entire neighborhoods such as Precotto and Turro were destroyed. The Palau De La Música is adjacent to the Turia gardens and the City of Arts and Sciences lies at one end. In fact, Milan was part of Mussolini's Italian Social Republic puppet state, and an important command centre of the German Army stationed in Italy.

The Turia river was diverted in the 1950s, and the old river bed is now the Turia gardens, which contain a children’s playground, a fountain, and sports fields. The city was bombed even after Pietro Badoglio surrendered to the allied forces in 1943. Around the corner is the Plaza de la Reina, with the Cathedral, orange trees, and many bars and restaurants. As a critical industrial center of Italy, Milan was target of continuous carpet bombing during World War II. The Plaza de la Virgen contains the Basilica of the Virgin and the Turia fountain, and is a popular spot for locals and tourists. In 1859 (after the second of the Wars of Italian Independence) Austrian rule was ended by the Kingdom of Sardinia (which transformed into the kingdom of Italy in 1861). This is where the noisy fireworks of the mascleta can be heard every afternoon during the Fallas. Milan eventually became one of the main centers of Italian nationalism, claiming independence and the unification of Italy.

The largest square is the Plaza del Ayuntamiento, which contains the town hall (ayuntamiento), a cinema which shows classic movies (Filmoteca), and many restaurants and bars. After this period, Milan was part of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia under Austrian rule. Museums in Valencia include:. But the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars saw the city annexed into the French satellite states of the Cisalpine Republic, which later became the Kingdom of Italy. The Music Palace (Palau De La Música) is another good example of modern architecture in Valencia. In the 18th century Austria replaced Spain as Milan's overlord, because the Spanish line of Habsburgs died out. Calatrava is also responsible for the bridge named after him in the center of the city. After trying to conquer the rest of northern Italy in the 15th century, Milan was conquered by France, and then later on by Austria (Habsburg), then given in the early 16th century to the Spanish Habsburg line to rule.

World-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava produced the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències), which contains a science museum, IMAX cinema, and oceanographic park. During the Renaissance Milan was ruled by dukes of the Visconti and Sforza families, who had artists like Leonardo da Vinci and Bramante at their service. The main railway station (Estación Del Norte) is built in art deco style. During the Plague of 1349 Milan was one of the few places in Europe that was untouched by the epidemic, but it was deeply affected by the plagues of 1402 (50,000 deaths), 1542 (80,000), 1576 (17,000) and 1629 (also known as Great Plague of Milan, 70,000 deaths). The modernist Central Market (Mercado Central) is one of the largest in Europe. In the 11th century, after the Ostrogothic and Lombard periods, the city regained its importance and led other Italian cities in gaining semi-independence from the Holy Roman Empire. UNESCO has declared the gothic silk exchange (La Lonja de la Seda) as a world heritage sight. His feast day is the 7th of Decmeber.

The 15th century Serrano and Quart towers are part of what was once the wall surrounding the city. St Ambrose is now the Patron Saint of the city. Beside the Cathedral is the gothic Basilica of the Virgin (Basílica De La Virgen De Los Desamparados). At that time Milan was the second largest city in Europe, with more than 300,000 inhabitants. The Cathedral, built between the 13th and 15th century, is primarily of gothic style but contains elements of baroque and Romanesque architecture. In the 4th century CE, at the time of the bishop Saint Ambrose and emperor Theodosius I, the city was briefly the capital of the Western Roman Empire. The ancient winding streets of the Barrio del Carmen contain buildings dating to Roman and Arabic times. It is presumed Milan was originally founded by the Celts of Northern Italy around 600 BCE and was conquered around 222 BCE by the Romans, who gave it the name of Mediolanum.

. . Valencia has a Mediterranean climate, with warm dry summers and mild winters. Inhabitants of Milan are referred to as "Milanesi" and nicknamed "Meneghini". As of 2005, the mayor of Valencia is Rita Barberá Nolla. Milan is also famous for the Alfa Romeo motorcar and for its silk production. Population of the metropolitan area (urban area plus satellite towns) was 1,623,724 as of 2005 estimates. Another famed product of the city is the traditional Christmas sweet cake called Panettone.

Population of the urban area was 1,012,000 as of 2000 estimates. Indeed the English word milliner is derived from the name of the city. Population of the city of Valencia proper was 796,549 as of 2005 estimates. Milan is one of the world capitals of fashion, like New York City, Paris, London and Rome, and design. It is the capital of the Land of Valencia and of province of Valencia. The town is famous for fashion firms and shops (via Montenapoleone) and the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele on the Piazza Duomo, reputed to be the world's oldest shopping mall. Valencia (Castilian Spanish: Valencia /va'lenθia/; Valencian Catalan: València /va'łεnsia/) is a medium-sized port city (the third largest city in Spain) and industrial area on the Costa del Azahar in Spain. The province comprises 188 communes, ranging in population (2001) from Milan Municipality (1,308,311) to Nosate (638); the city of Milan has lost 113,084 inhabitants (8.3 percent), from 1991 to 2001.

However, the Supreme Court has deemed the action of the local government as legal. Its province lies in the western part of Lombardy; it covers an area of 1,982 km2 and has a population of 3,839,818 (2004); in 1991, the population was 3,738,685. Valencian citizens in the Cabanyal, Malvarosa, and Canyamelar districts claim that the America's Cup is being used as a pretext to fuel property speculation and to demolish historical buildings saved in the past by demonstrations and court rulings. It comes from the Celtic Mid-lan (meaning "in the middle of the plain") and was known as Mediolanum by the Romans. The European Union's Committee of Petitions reported on the issue in 2004, finding that the Valencian government was breaching basic European rights. Milan's name has for many centuries been recorded as Mailand, which is still the German name of the city today. Critics argue that this legislation (which was theoretically designed to protect rural land) is being misused for large urban and industrial developments. The metropolitan area, called the Città Regione (The City Region) claims more than 9.4 million inhabitants (this is an ambitious definition of Milan's metropolitan area, perhaps not very comparable with figures claimed for metros outside Italy).

The Valencia government's implementation of the LRAU [law regulating urban activity] has been controversial since it involves the expropriation of the homes of both Spanish nationals and foreign residents without compensation. The city proper has about 1,308,311 inhabitants (2004), but the population of the urban area including the hinterland is about 4 million and is called La Grande Milano (Greater Milan, 1,981 square kilometres). Focusing on tourism and construction has led to a great deal of building on rural land. Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed region in Italy. Almudín (various exhibits, mainly art and archaeology).
. Museo Valenciano de la ilustración y la Modernidad (MUVIM, various exhibits). Toronto, Canada.

Museo Del Arroz (rice). Thessaloniki, Greece. Museo Taurino (bullfighting). Tel Aviv, Israel. Museo Fallero & Museo Del Artista Fallero (Les Falles). Tianjin, China. Museo De Bellas Artes (fine art). Shanghai, China.

Instituto Valenciano De Arte Moderno (IVAM, modern art). São Paulo, Brazil. Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias (arts and science). Saint Petersburg, Russia. Osaka, Japan. Melbourne, Australia.

Lyon, France. Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Dakar, Senegal. Krakow, Poland.

Chicago, Illinois, United States. Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Birmingham, Great Britain, Birmingham's Partner City page. Bethlehem, Palestine.

Radio 24. Radio 105. R101. Radio Deejay (National Hdq).

Sky Italia (National Hdq). MTV (South-Europe Hdq). RAI (Milan Regional Hdq). Mediaset (National Hdq).

Focus (monthly). Explora (monthly). AnnaBella (weekly). Marie Claire (weekly).

Oggi (weekly). TV Sorrisi & Canzoni (weekly). La Settimana Enigmistica (weekly). Panorama (weekly).

Metro (daily). La Gazzetta dello Sport (daily, sports only). La Padania (daily). Milano Finanza (daily).

Il Sole 24 Ore (daily). Libero (daily). Il Giornale (daily). Il Giorno (daily).

Corriere della Sera (daily). Nuovo Giuriati - Rugby - 4,000. Agorà - Ice Hockey - 4,000. PalaLido - Basket - 5,000.

Velodromo Vigorelli - Cycling, American Football - 12,000. MazdaPalace - Basket, Volley - 13,500. Forum di Assago - Basket, Ice Hockey, Volley, Music - 13,000 to 16,000. Ippodromo del Galoppo - Horse Racing - 15,000.

Ippodromo del Trotter - Horse Racing - 16,000. Brianteo - Athletic, Football - 18,568. Arena Civica - Athletic, Rugby, Football, 30,000. San Siro - only football - 85,700.

Autodromo Nazionale Monza - car and motorcycle racing - 137,000. Past winners include Tacchini, Kodes, Panatta, Barazzutti, Moreno, Borg, Smid, Lendl, Forget, Curier, Ivanisevic, Kafelnikov, and Coira. The central court has a capacity of 8000. It is the most important youth tournament in the world, and is played at the Milan Tennis Club.

Every year, Milan hosts the Bonfiglio Trophy Under 18 Tennis Tournament. They play at the Agora Stadium (capacity 4,500) during the regular season, and at the Forum during playoffs . The Vipers Milano have won the last 4 national championships, the Alpenliga and several Coppa Italia, and are the leaders of that sport in Italy. Different ice hockey teams from Milan have won 30 National Championships between them.

The Amatory Rugby Club Milano have won 18 National Championships and are the most famous and important Rugby team in Italy. Olimpia play at the Forum (capacity 14,000). It is the most important Italian team and one of the top 5 in Europe. Olimpia Milano is a successful European basketball team that have won 3 European Cups, a World Cup, 3 Winners' Cups, 2 Korac Cups and 25 National Championships.

The capacity for the F1 races is around 137,000 spectators. It one of the world's oldest car racing circuits, and one of the most famous. The famous Monza Formula One circuit is located in the suburbs. Milano Pioltello.

Milano Certosa and Milano/Rho Fiera (for the west). Milano Rogoredo (for the south). Milano/Rho Fiera. Milano Tibaldi.

Milano Romolo. Milano Smistamento/Scalo Farini (cargo-trains). Milano Certosa (passenger station). Milano Porta Romana (passenger and cargo station).

Milano San Cristoforo (passenger and cargo station). Milano Greco (passenger station). Milano Rogoredo (passenger station and cargo station). Milano Lambrate (passenger station).

Milano P.ta Garibaldi (passenger station). Milano Centrale (passenger station - the second busiest Italian station). I.S.E.F. Istituto Europeo di Design.

Verdi" di Milano. Conservatorio Superiore "G. Accademia delle Belle Arti di Brera. Beato Angelico.

L.U.C. Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele. Università C.Cattaneo L.I.U.C. Università I.U.L.M.

Scuola Superiore di Direzione Aziendale - Bocconi. Università Bocconi. Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. Università Statale Milano-Bicocca.

Università Statale. Politecnico di Milano. Verdi. Teatro Studio.

Franco Parenti. Porta Romana. L'Elfo. Out Off.

Olmetto. Litta. Filodrammatici. Della 14a.

Ciak. Smeraldo. San Babila. Piccolo Teatro di Milano.

Nuovo Piccolo Teatro. Nuovo. Ventaglio Nazionale. Manzoni.

CRT - Teatro dell'Arte. Teatro Carcano. Teatro Lirico. Piccolo teatro.

Arcimboldi. Teatro alla Scala. Museo del Risorgimento. Museo di Storia Contemporanea.

Museo di Milano. Museo Archeologico. Museo delle Arti Decorative. Museo degli Strumenti Musicali.

Museo Bagatti Valsecchi. Galleria Vinciana. Museo della Scienza e della Tecnica "Leonardo da Vinci". Museo di Storia Naturale.

Padiglione di Arte Contemporanea. Museo Teatro alla Scala. Palazzo Reale. Museo d’Arte Antica.

Museo della Preistoria e Protostoria. Museo Poldi Pezzoli. Museo Egizio. Castello Sforzesco.

Triennale di Milano. Galleria d'Arte Moderna. Pinacoteca Ambrosiana. Pinacoteca di Brera.

Fuksas (in Rho-Pero). New Milan Fair Complex of M. Pirelli Tower (seat of Lombardy Region and the highest italian skyscraper). Velasca Tower.

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. Palazzo Serbelloni. Central Station (the biggest Italian station). Teatro alla Scala.

Palazzo Reale. Palazzo della Ragione. Ca' Granda (University of Milan). Castello Sforzesco (Sforza Castle).

Duomo. "The Needle and the Yarn" in Piazza Cadorna. Leonardo da Vinci's Horse Statue at Hippodrome. Archi di Porta Nuova.

Roman amphitheatre (scant remains). Leonardo's monument in Piazza della Scala. San Carlo Borromeo in Piazza Borromeo. Oldrado da Trasseno del Palazzo della Ragione.

Napoleone of Canova in Brera. Monumento Cinque Giornate. Mazzini's monument in Piazza della Repubblica. Fontana del Piermarini in Piazza Fontana.

Disc of Pomodoro. Colonne di San Lorenzo. Alessandro Manzoni in Piazza San Fedele. Santo Stefano Maggiore.

San Simpliciano. San Sebastiano. Santa Maria presso San Satiro. Basilica di San Nazaro Maggiore.

Santa Maria del Carmine. Santuario di Santa Maria dei Miracoli. San Marco. Basilica di San Lorenzo Pirelli Tower, Milan .

Basilica di Sant'Eustorgio. San Bernardino alle Ossa. San Babila. Santa Maria delle Grazie (with Leonardo's "Last Supper").

Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio. Sant'Alessandro. Duomo (Milan cathedral). Aermacchi.

Mediobanca. Banca Intesa. Ferrovie Nord Milano. Eni.

Arnoldo Mondadori Editore. Giangiacomo Feltrinelli Editore. Corriere della Sera/RCS. Bugatti.

Mediaset. Motta. Alfa Romeo. Alemagna.

Fiera Milano. Telecom Italia. Pirelli. Gianni Versace.

Prada. Dolce & Gabbana. Giorgio Armani.

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