Tile

Mission, or barrel, roof tiles

A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, clay, stone, porcelain or even glass. Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, and walls, or other objects such as tabletops. The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of baked clay. Less precisely, the modern term can refer to any sort of construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game).

Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made from ceramic, with a hard glaze finish, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, slate, and reformed ceramic slurry, which is cast in a mould and fired.


Roof tiles

Fancy Japanese roof tiles The largest (6000 m²)
wooden shingle roof
in Europe: Zakopane, Poland

Roof tiles are designed mainly to keep out rain, and are traditionally made from locally available materials such as clay, slate, or wood (wooden tiles are called shingles). Modern materials such as concrete and plastic are also used. Some clay tiles have a waterproof glaze.

Because of their long history, a large number of shapes (or "profiles") of roof tiles have evolved. These include:

  • Flat tiles - the simplest type, which are laid in regular overlapping rows. This profile is suitable for stone and wooden tiles, and most recently, solar cells.
  • Roman tiles - flat in the middle, with a concave curve at one end at a convex curve at the other, to allow interlocking.
  • Pantiles - with an S-shaped profile, allowing adjacent tiles to interlock. These result in a ridged pattern resembling a ploughed field.
  • Mission or barrel tiles are semi-cylindrical tiles made by forming clay around a log and laid in alternating columns of convex and concave tiles.

Roof tiles are 'hung' from the framework of a roof by fixing them with nails. The tiles are usually hung in parallel rows, with each row overlapping the row below it to exclude rainwater and to cover the nails that hold the row below.

There are also roof tiles for special positions, particularly where the planes of the several pitches meet. They include ridge, hip and valley tiles.

Floor tiles

6"x6" porcelain floor tiles

These are commonly made of ceramic, clay, porcelain or stone. Clay tiles may be painted and glazed. Small mosaic tiles may be laid in various patterns. Floor tiles are typically set into mortar consisting of sand, cement and oftentimes a latex additive for extra strength. The spaces between the tiles are nowadays filled with sanded or unsanded floor grout, but traditionally mortar was used.

See Laying tile

Wall tiles

Tilework on the wall of the Bond Street tube station

While ancient Roman building bricks were broader and thinner than modern ones and are therefore usually called tiles, the term wall tile is normally applied to finishing tiles. These are usually ceramic, but other materials such as mirrored glass or polished metal can be used. Wall tiles are usually glazed, and are often patterned by painting or embossing. Pictorial tiles, consisting of many tiles that the installer assembles like a jigsaw puzzle to form a single large picture, are available.

Modern wall tiles are fixed to a wall using a synthetic bonding agent tile adhesive for dry areas, or a cement-based mortar for areas prone to moisture, such as bath or shower walls. The spaces between the tiles are filled with a fine cement called unsanded grout. The excess grout is scraped off with a hard rubber block called a float immediately after applying; further, the grout is wiped again with a moist sponge before it completely hardens. The sponging provides added moisture to strengthen the grout as it cures. Finally, a cloth is rubbed over the wall tile to remove any haze which may remain from residual grout.

Decorative tilework

Ancient mosaic in the British Museum. Typical tilework on buildings in Santarém, Portugal.

Decorative tilework typically takes the form of mosaic upon the walls, floor, or ceiling of a building. Although decorative tilework was known and extensively practiced in the ancient world (as evidenced in the magnificent mosaics of Pompeii and Herculaneum), it perhaps reached its greatest expression during the Islamic period.

Some places, notably Portugal, have a tradition of tilework on buildings that continues today.

In the United States, decorative tiles were in vogue, especially in southern California, in the 1920s and 1930s. Prominent among art tile makers during this period was Ernest A. Batchelder.

Islamic tilework

Tilework of Hazrat Masoumeh shrine, Qom. First constructed in the late 8th century.

Perhaps because of the tenets of Moslem law (sharia) which disavow religious icons and images in favor of more abstract and universal representations of the divine, many consider decorative tilework to have reached a pinnacle of expression and detail during the Islamic period. Palaces, public buildings, and mosques were heavily decorated with dense, often massive mosaics and friezes of astonishing complexity. As both the influence and the extent of Islam spread during the Middle Ages this artistic tradition was carried along, finding expression from the gardens and courtyards of Málaga in Moorish Spain to the mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.

The mathematics of tiling

Certain shapes of tiles, most obviously rectangles, can be replicated to cover a surface with no gaps. These shapes are said to tessellate (from the Latin tessera, 'tile'). For detailed information on tilings see the tessellation page.

History of tiles

Tiles were developed as a product of earthenware pottery, either as an alternative use for fragments of broken pottery (called potsherds) or as an independent invention. Tiles have been used in construction for at least 4000 years, by the Romans, Greeks, Babylonians, Phoenicians and many other cultures.


This page about tiles includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about tiles
News stories about tiles
External links for tiles
Videos for tiles
Wikis about tiles
Discussion Groups about tiles
Blogs about tiles
Images of tiles

Tiles have been used in construction for at least 4000 years, by the Romans, Greeks, Babylonians, Phoenicians and many other cultures. Recently, he was reintroduced in commercials not as a cartoon character, but as a real-life giraffe who talks. Tiles were developed as a product of earthenware pottery, either as an alternative use for fragments of broken pottery (called potsherds) or as an independent invention. His name followed in the 1970s. For detailed information on tilings see the tessellation page. In the 1960s, Geoffrey the Giraffe, an anthropomorphic cartoon giraffe, was introduced as its mascot. These shapes are said to tessellate (from the Latin tessera, 'tile'). The "R Us" name has been imitated by many other businesses, such as Tiles R Us and Tuxedos R Us.

Certain shapes of tiles, most obviously rectangles, can be replicated to cover a surface with no gaps. A blue star was added to the logo in 1999. As both the influence and the extent of Islam spread during the Middle Ages this artistic tradition was carried along, finding expression from the gardens and courtyards of Málaga in Moorish Spain to the mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. The "R" is the most distinctive part of the retailer's colorful kid-friendly logo. Palaces, public buildings, and mosques were heavily decorated with dense, often massive mosaics and friezes of astonishing complexity. The yellow reverse "R" in quotation marks, similar to the Cyrillic "yah" (Я), imitates a small child's backward writing of "R", which is short for "are". Perhaps because of the tenets of Moslem law (sharia) which disavow religious icons and images in favor of more abstract and universal representations of the divine, many consider decorative tilework to have reached a pinnacle of expression and detail during the Islamic period. also owns other chains:.

Batchelder. Toys "R" Us, Inc. Prominent among art tile makers during this period was Ernest A. [1]. In the United States, decorative tiles were in vogue, especially in southern California, in the 1920s and 1930s. Approximately 3000 jobs will be eliminated as a result of the closures. Some places, notably Portugal, have a tradition of tilework on buildings that continues today. 12 more stores are to be converted to the "Babies 'R' Us" format.

Although decorative tilework was known and extensively practiced in the ancient world (as evidenced in the magnificent mosaics of Pompeii and Herculaneum), it perhaps reached its greatest expression during the Islamic period. On January 9, 2006, Toys "R" Us announced that 75 stores in the United States would close that year, most closing within the spring. Decorative tilework typically takes the form of mosaic upon the walls, floor, or ceiling of a building. Toys "R" Us is now a privately owned entity. Finally, a cloth is rubbed over the wall tile to remove any haze which may remain from residual grout. Public stock closed for the last time at $26.74, just pennies from the 52-week high, but far short of its all time high of almost $45 in fourth-quarter 1993, and its five-year high of $31 in 2Q 2001. The sponging provides added moisture to strengthen the grout as it cures. (KKR), and Vornado Realty Trust completed the $6.6 billion acquisition of the toy giant.

The excess grout is scraped off with a hard rubber block called a float immediately after applying; further, the grout is wiped again with a moist sponge before it completely hardens. On July 21, 2005, a consortium of Bain Capital Partners LLC, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. The spaces between the tiles are filled with a fine cement called unsanded grout. Blaming market pressures (primarily competition from Wal-Mart and Target Stores), Toys "R" Us considered splitting its toys and babies businesses. Modern wall tiles are fixed to a wall using a synthetic bonding agent tile adhesive for dry areas, or a cement-based mortar for areas prone to moisture, such as bath or shower walls. Eyler launched an unsuccessful (and very expensive) plan to remodel and re-launch the chain. Pictorial tiles, consisting of many tiles that the installer assembles like a jigsaw puzzle to form a single large picture, are available. In an effort to shore up their failing enterprise, the Board of Directors installed John Eyler, formally of FAO Schwarz.

Wall tiles are usually glazed, and are often patterned by painting or embossing. Nokosone’s replacement did little to help as he showed as little understanding of the Internet as the Board did. These are usually ceramic, but other materials such as mirrored glass or polished metal can be used. After several major missteps in the marketplace, mainly precipitated by the removal of Robert Nokasone by the Board of Directors, Toys ‘R’ Us had been limping into what appeared to be oblivion. While ancient Roman building bricks were broader and thinner than modern ones and are therefore usually called tiles, the term wall tile is normally applied to finishing tiles. Eleven of the company's stores are in Sweden. See Laying tile
. When the banks refused to process financial transactions, Toys "R" Us finally signed the labor agreement.

The spaces between the tiles are nowadays filled with sanded or unsanded floor grout, but traditionally mortar was used. Later, a "worker's blockade" was established against the stores, the electric utility company of Sweden would not show up to fix electrical problems, and even the garbage trucks failed to remove the trash. Floor tiles are typically set into mortar consisting of sand, cement and oftentimes a latex additive for extra strength. The stores were empty, even with price reductions, thanks to strong public support. Small mosaic tiles may be laid in various patterns. During the 1990's, when Toys "R" Us was establishing itself in Sweden, the firm did not want to enter into the standard worker's union agreement, so in 1995 the workers of Toys "R" Us went on strike. Clay tiles may be painted and glazed. The company has since relocated to Wayne, New Jersey.

These are commonly made of ceramic, clay, porcelain or stone. Eventually the focus of the store changed and Toys "R" Us as we know it was born. They include ridge, hip and valley tiles. After adding baby toys, he got requests for more grown up toys. There are also roof tiles for special positions, particularly where the planes of the several pitches meet. Initially founded in Washington, DC during the post-war baby boom era in 1948 as a baby furniture retailer, Charles Lazarus began receiving requests from customers for baby toys. The tiles are usually hung in parallel rows, with each row overlapping the row below it to exclude rainwater and to cover the nails that hold the row below. .

Roof tiles are 'hung' from the framework of a roof by fixing them with nails. The flagship store in New York City's Times Square is the largest toy store in the world, featuring a colorful ferris wheel. These include:. The company operates nearly 700 stores in the United States and nearly 600 stores are operating in 29 other countries, some of them under franchises or licenses. Because of their long history, a large number of shapes (or "profiles") of roof tiles have evolved. Toys "R" Us is a toy store chain based in the United States. Some clay tiles have a waterproof glaze. Kois "R" Us — Fairly Odd Parents.

Modern materials such as concrete and plastic are also used. TVs Are Us — The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour 2: When Nerds Collide. Roof tiles are designed mainly to keep out rain, and are traditionally made from locally available materials such as clay, slate, or wood (wooden tiles are called shingles). Ladders "R" Us — The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour 2: When Nerds Collide. . Toys Czar Us — Darkwing Duck.
. Toy Saurus — The Flintstones.

Tiles are most often made from ceramic, with a hard glaze finish, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, slate, and reformed ceramic slurry, which is cast in a mould and fired. Boys "R" Us — The Simpsons. Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Toykins — The Simpsons. Less precisely, the modern term can refer to any sort of construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). J.R.R. The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of baked clay. Toys "L" Us — The Simpsons.

Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, and walls, or other objects such as tabletops. Toys "R" We — The Powerpuff Girls. A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, clay, stone, porcelain or even glass. Toys "R" Mine — Tiny Toon Adventures. Mission or barrel tiles are semi-cylindrical tiles made by forming clay around a log and laid in alternating columns of convex and concave tiles. The car chase scene in the movie Blues Brothers included a shopping mall chase scene which featured a Toys "R" Us at Dixie Square Mall where Jake and Elwood are being chased by the police into the main concourse of the mall. These result in a ridged pattern resembling a ploughed field. In addition to that, Geoffrey comes out to host the bithday parties.

Pantiles - with an S-shaped profile, allowing adjacent tiles to interlock. The stores are basically a regular Toys "R" Us store given a complete overhaul to feature a more colorful motif, "Studio G" activity center, "Candy Spot", "Imaginarium", "Gee Baby", "The "R" ZONE", a party room to host birthday parties and an adjacent playground with the existing collection of toys and clothes. Roman tiles - flat in the middle, with a concave curve at one end at a convex curve at the other, to allow interlocking. Most "Geoffrey" and "Geoffrey's Toys "R" Us" stores are located in the midwest. This profile is suitable for stone and wooden tiles, and most recently, solar cells. Nintendo games accounted for most of Toys "R" Us' sales in the mid '80s. Flat tiles - the simplest type, which are laid in regular overlapping rows. "I don't want to grow up, I'm a Toys 'R' Us kid!".

"There's millions says Geoffery all under one roof, it's called Toys 'R' Us, Toys 'R' Us, Toys 'R' Us!". "Play More, Spend Less.". "The World's Greatest Toy Store.". "The World's Biggest Toy Store.".

Guaranteed.". Bigger Selection. "Lower Prices. "Big Fun! Low Prices!".

"The World's JOY Store!". Toys "R" Us/Kids "R" Us cobranded stores. Toys "R" Us KidsWorld - A toy superstore format introduced in 1996. Toys "R" Us Toy Box - Introduced in 2003, this version of Toys "R" Us is found in Albertson's, Osco Drug, Jewel-Osco, and Sav-On supermarkets and drug stores.

Mostly found in the midwest. Other features include a "Studio G" activity center. Geoffrey's Toys "R" Us - Stores for Toys "R" Us mascot Geoffrey the Giraffe, offering toys, juvenile merchandise, and children's apparel all in one location. Babies "R" Us - Baby superstores.

Kids "R" Us is also the brand name label of kids' clothing found at the Geoffrey Stores. Most Kids "R" Us stores were cobranded with Toys "R" Us. Kids "R" Us - A store that is out of business, dealt with children's clothing.

04-18-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory