De Telegraaf

De Telegraaf is the largest Dutch daily morning newspaper, with a daily circulation of approximately 800,000. De Telegraaf ("The Telegraph") is based in Amsterdam.

A subsidiary, Basismedia BV, publishes a daily free newspaper, Sp!ts (which in Dutch means both "rush hour" and "sharp point").

Editorial Content

This national newspaper contains many "sensational" and sports-related articles, and one or more pages whose content is supplied by the gossip-magazine Privé ("Private"). The financial news coverage, however, is more serious in tone. Politically, the paper leans towards the populist right. In the recent past, editorial commentary often supported the views of the late Pim Fortuyn.

History

De Telegraaf was founded by Henry Tindal, who simultaneously started another paper De Courant ("The Gazette"). The first issue appeared on 1 January 1893. Following Tindal's death on 31 January 1902 the printer Hak Holdert, with backing from financiers, took over De Telegraaf and De Courant on 12 September 1902. This proved to be a good investment, particularly with regard to De Courant, enabling Holdert between 1903 and 1923 to take over one newspaper after another, suspending publication as he went. He added the name Amsterdamsche Courant ("Amsterdam Gazette") as a subtitle to De Telegraaf, and Het Nieuws van den Dag ("The News of the Day") to De Courant. In 1926, he began construction of a new printing facility at the Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal in Amsterdam, designed by J.F. Staal and G.J. Langhout. Construction was completed and the building occupied in 1930. At one point, in June 1966, the building was besieged by angry construction workers and Provo followers, after falsely reporting that a victim of labour dispute had not been killed by the police, but by a co-worker. In 1974, De Telegraaf moved to its current location in the Basisweg.

During World War I, when the Netherlands was officially neutral, Holdert's French sympathies and his pro-English standpoint caused De Telegraaf to be the focus of some controversy. During World War II, the Telegraaf companies published pro-German papers, which led to a twenty year ban on publication after the war. The prohibition was, however, lifted in 1949 and De Telegraaf flourished anew to become the biggest newspaper in the Netherlands.

De Courant/Nieuws van de Dag ceased publication in 1998.

Since 21 March 2004, De Telegraaf has also appeared on Sundays.

Finances

De Telegraaf's holding company, N.V. Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf, is minority-owned (about 30%) by the Van Puijenbroek family from Goirle. It not only controls the newspapers De Telegraaf and Sp!ts, but is also a stakeholder in Channel SBS6, the regional newspaper publisher Wegener, and the Dutch press agency ANP (28.4% since 2001).

Hollandse Dagbladcombinatie, or HDC-Media, which publishes the Noordhollands Dagblad, Haarlems Dagblad, Leidsch Dagblad, IJmuider Courant, and De Gooi- en Eemlander is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf.

Mediagroep Limburg, publisher of the Limburgs Dagblad and Dagblad De Limburger, also belongs to De Telegraaf.


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Mediagroep Limburg, publisher of the Limburgs Dagblad and Dagblad De Limburger, also belongs to De Telegraaf.
The Rabobank Group currently consists of the following divisions:. Hollandse Dagbladcombinatie, or HDC-Media, which publishes the Noordhollands Dagblad, Haarlems Dagblad, Leidsch Dagblad, IJmuider Courant, and De Gooi- en Eemlander is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf. Rabobank also holds some 40% of the total outstanding sums on Dutch savings accounts and they account for approximately 20% of all private consumer mortgages in The Netherlands. It not only controls the newspapers De Telegraaf and Sp!ts, but is also a stakeholder in Channel SBS6, the regional newspaper publisher Wegener, and the Dutch press agency ANP (28.4% since 2001). By 2005 the agricultural credits amounted to some 8% of total outstanding credit. Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf, is minority-owned (about 30%) by the Van Puijenbroek family from Goirle. In 1987 an important milestone was reached; the total outstanding loans in sectors other than agriculture exceeded those in the agricultural sector for the first time.

De Telegraaf's holding company, N.V. By mid 1970s the marketshare in this sector reached some 30% and currently amounts to approximately 40%. Since 21 March 2004, De Telegraaf has also appeared on Sundays. Throughout the years the company also started targeting other sectors of Small and Medium Sized companies. De Courant/Nieuws van de Dag ceased publication in 1998. It is not surprising to learn that they still hold an 85%-90% marketshare in the agrarian sector in The Netherlands. The prohibition was, however, lifted in 1949 and De Telegraaf flourished anew to become the biggest newspaper in the Netherlands. The Rabobank is traditionally a farmers' bank.

During World War II, the Telegraaf companies published pro-German papers, which led to a twenty year ban on publication after the war. The latter is the most distinguishing organ as compared to other financial institutions in Holland and abroad. During World War I, when the Netherlands was officially neutral, Holdert's French sympathies and his pro-English standpoint caused De Telegraaf to be the focus of some controversy. The chairman of this board also presides over the Centrale Kringvergadering. In 1974, De Telegraaf moved to its current location in the Basisweg. The supervisory board was renamed to Board of Commissioners and now held an independent supervisory role. At one point, in June 1966, the building was besieged by angry construction workers and Provo followers, after falsely reporting that a victim of labour dispute had not been killed by the police, but by a co-worker. they are expected to look out for the specific interests of the members (local banks and their certificate holders).

Construction was completed and the building occupied in 1930. They have an added task compared to a traditional board i.e. Langhout. It was also renamed to Raad van Bestuur or Board of Directors. Staal and G.J. De Hoofddirectie received an integral authority over the banking business. In 1926, he began construction of a new printing facility at the Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal in Amsterdam, designed by J.F. The Raad van Beheer was disbanded.

He added the name Amsterdamsche Courant ("Amsterdam Gazette") as a subtitle to De Telegraaf, and Het Nieuws van den Dag ("The News of the Day") to De Courant. In 2002 this rather cumbersome structure was simplified. This proved to be a good investment, particularly with regard to De Courant, enabling Holdert between 1903 and 1923 to take over one newspaper after another, suspending publication as he went. At the time of the merger there were five management instruments within Rabobank Nederland:. Following Tindal's death on 31 January 1902 the printer Hak Holdert, with backing from financiers, took over De Telegraaf and De Courant on 12 September 1902. This has led to a very ambivalent relationship between the two over the years. The first issue appeared on 1 January 1893. This leads to an interesting and rather unusual phenomenon within international business: the mother companies and the much larger daughter are essentially forced to coexist together in order to function properly.

De Telegraaf was founded by Henry Tindal, who simultaneously started another paper De Courant ("The Gazette"). This has grown to be especially important in view of recent developments and international standards such as Sarbanes-Oxley Act, Basel II and IFRS. In the recent past, editorial commentary often supported the views of the late Pim Fortuyn. In accordance with Dutch regulations in the field of credit and financial services Rabobank Nederland oversees that the local banks maintain a required level of prudency and professionalism while selling financial products. Politically, the paper leans towards the populist right. The central organisation does occasionally overrule the autonomy of the local bank organisations. The financial news coverage, however, is more serious in tone. Employees of the group do not routinely speak of a headquarters but prefer to speak of Rabobank Nederland, which is their daughter organisation.

This national newspaper contains many "sensational" and sports-related articles, and one or more pages whose content is supplied by the gossip-magazine Privé ("Private"). The local banks are facilitated by Rabobank Nederland to serve their customers and not the other way around as is often the case with traditional banking organisations. . Formally the local Rabobanks are the mother organisation of Rabobank Nederland, their central organisation. A subsidiary, Basismedia BV, publishes a daily free newspaper, Sp!ts (which in Dutch means both "rush hour" and "sharp point"). The Rabobank Group consists of a network of local banks, Rabobank Nederland and several daughter organisations. De Telegraaf ("The Telegraph") is based in Amsterdam. Rabobank is one of the most well-organised banks in the world and has been awarded the Triple A (AAA+) status, making it the only non-publicly traded bank in the world with such a status [1].

De Telegraaf is the largest Dutch daily morning newspaper, with a daily circulation of approximately 800,000. This has led to Rabobank being a prominent player in the field of savings accounts, checking accounts and mortgages in The Netherlands. Since the introduction of consumer salary accounts in the 1960s the number of retail clients grew exponentially. Traditionally the bank served mostly farmers and small businesses. this of course applies to the size of the local bank offices.

As large as is necessary, as small as possible. Currently the motto is:. Increasing customer demand for standardized and widely available products also played a significant part in this development. The major rationale behind this was the need to attain economies of scale in the fields of payments, transaction, processing, staff and of course capital.

Local presence and local autonomy were always important but this hasn't stopped a wave of concentration of the local banks. Since 1998 the local bank director is an appointed professional banker and he presides over a board of directors which is chosen from among the members. The position cashier was replaced by a local bank director. Much later, in the 60's the most local banks moved into new and modern offices that reflected their new-found professionalism.

This has of course changed by now, but even as recently as in late 1950's the local bank office was nothing more than the cashier's living room, he generally performed his administrative duties besides another regular job. Only the cashier received a small salary. They adhered to the principle of non-remunerated management and elected the board and the commissioners from among themselves. The local banks were self-governed by members of the cooperation.

This allowed the banks to offer lower interest rates. These moneylenders stood close to the farmers and were better in judging the creditworthiness of individual farmers than the city banks. bringing excess capital and capital shortages together. They managed to perform the key tasks of a banking organisation i.e.

Right from the start the cooperative banks prosperred well. As of 1980 the central organisation is referred to as Rabobank Nederland. The organisation chose Amsterdam to be its statutory headquarter due to the historical neutrality in relation to the founding organisations. The name Rabobank is a portmanteau of Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank.

In 1972 the two organisation merged. Three major developments caused a further tightening of the bonds between the two:. By 1940 the two organisations cooperated with each other, be it on a limited scale. The religious backgrounds found their way to the organisational structure as well; the Eindhoven organisation stressed a highly centralised structure while the Utrecht organisation promoted local autonomy.

In the past The Netherlands underwent a process of pillarization or verzuiling, which in practice meant that members of different religious congregations and political movements essentially lived side by side each other without contact between the two. The Eindhoven based Boerenleenbank had a decidedly catholic signature while the Raiffeisen-Bank had a protestant background. The most important difference, however, was cultural. The reasons for this owed in part to legal disagreements.

These two existed side by side for three quarters of a century despite their obvious similarities. The first was formed as a cooperation of 6 local banks and the latter as a cooperation of 22 local banks. In 1898 two cooperative bank conglomerates were formed:. The bank's traditional headquarters are Utrecht and Eindhoven.

The cooperative bank model assured a tight bond between invested capital and the community. The mission of the farmers' lending banks was an idealistic one but they always operated using strict business principles. The model caught on being championed by the clergy and the countryside elites. One of the first of Raiffeisen's followers was father Gerlacus van den Elsen who stood at the basis of a number of local farmers'banks in the south of The Netherlands.

This model found a lot of interest in The Netherlands at the end of the 19th century. In doing so he created the Darlehnskassen-Verein, it collected the savings of the countryside dwellers and provided the enterprising but needy farmers with loans. He therefore converted his charitable foundations into a farmers' bank in 1864. He soon realised, however, that self-reliance had more potential in the long run than charitable aid.

He tried to alleviate this need through a variety of charitable activities. Being a countryside mayor he was confronted with the abject poverty of the farmers and their families. The bank is rooted in the ideas of Friedrich Wilhelm Raiffeisen, the founder of the co-operative movement of credit unions who in 1864 created the first farmers' bank in Germany. The central organisation is the daughter organisation of the local branches, rather than the parent organisation, as is the case with most banks.

Rooted in agriculture, Rabobank is set up as a federation of local credit unions, which offer services to the local markets. . Rabobank is a Dutch cooperative banking institution with offices all over the world, although primarily in the Netherlands. For the cycling team sponsored by the Rabobank, go to Rabobank (cycling).

VIB Corp - California based financial services corporation. ACCBank - Agricultural Credit Corporation, Ireland. FGH Bank - Real estate bank. Alex - online stocktrading.

Obvion - Mortgage intermediary. Schretlen & Co - Asset management, private banking sector. De Lage Landen - Vendor finance, leasing and trade finance. Interpolis - Insurance and pensions (401k).

Robeco - Asset management. Rabo Vastgoed - Project developer, real estate. 260 independent and cooperative local banks in The Netherlands. Local Banks - Approx.

Wholesalebanking and international retail banking. ICT, Legal and other facilitary departments. Groupfunctions i.e. Market (staff)support for the domestic retail banking business.

It currently performs the following core activities:

    . Rabobank Nederland - the facilitary and staff organisation that serves the local banks. Raad van Toezicht - supervisory board. An independent advisory council whose chairman also attended the meetings of De Hoofddirectie.

    Raad van Beheer - management council. Theoretically they were an autonomous management organ, but in practice, they had to pay 'serious consideration' to what the 4th organ; Raad van Beheer; thought about the course of action for the organisation. De Hoofddirectie - general management. De Centrale Kringvergadering - advisoryboard manned by representatives of clusters of local banks.

    The boards of all local banks within the cooperation were represented here. Algemene Vergadering - general assembly. An increasing demand for capital in the Dutch industry, which in turn led to higher concentration in the banking business. A gradual fading of the confessional differences between the two.

    Increasing number of offices - leading to increased local competition. Coöperatieve Centrale Boerenleenbank in Eindhoven. Coöperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Bank in Utrecht.

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