De Telegraaf

De Telegraaf is the largest Dutch daily morning newspaper, with a daily circulation of approximately 800,000. De Telegraaf ("The Telegraph") is based in Amsterdam.

A subsidiary, Basismedia BV, publishes a daily free newspaper, Sp!ts (which in Dutch means both "rush hour" and "sharp point").

Editorial Content

This national newspaper contains many "sensational" and sports-related articles, and one or more pages whose content is supplied by the gossip-magazine Privé ("Private"). The financial news coverage, however, is more serious in tone. Politically, the paper leans towards the populist right. In the recent past, editorial commentary often supported the views of the late Pim Fortuyn.

History

De Telegraaf was founded by Henry Tindal, who simultaneously started another paper De Courant ("The Gazette"). The first issue appeared on 1 January 1893. Following Tindal's death on 31 January 1902 the printer Hak Holdert, with backing from financiers, took over De Telegraaf and De Courant on 12 September 1902. This proved to be a good investment, particularly with regard to De Courant, enabling Holdert between 1903 and 1923 to take over one newspaper after another, suspending publication as he went. He added the name Amsterdamsche Courant ("Amsterdam Gazette") as a subtitle to De Telegraaf, and Het Nieuws van den Dag ("The News of the Day") to De Courant. In 1926, he began construction of a new printing facility at the Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal in Amsterdam, designed by J.F. Staal and G.J. Langhout. Construction was completed and the building occupied in 1930. At one point, in June 1966, the building was besieged by angry construction workers and Provo followers, after falsely reporting that a victim of labour dispute had not been killed by the police, but by a co-worker. In 1974, De Telegraaf moved to its current location in the Basisweg.

During World War I, when the Netherlands was officially neutral, Holdert's French sympathies and his pro-English standpoint caused De Telegraaf to be the focus of some controversy. During World War II, the Telegraaf companies published pro-German papers, which led to a twenty year ban on publication after the war. The prohibition was, however, lifted in 1949 and De Telegraaf flourished anew to become the biggest newspaper in the Netherlands.

De Courant/Nieuws van de Dag ceased publication in 1998.

Since 21 March 2004, De Telegraaf has also appeared on Sundays.

Finances

De Telegraaf's holding company, N.V. Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf, is minority-owned (about 30%) by the Van Puijenbroek family from Goirle. It not only controls the newspapers De Telegraaf and Sp!ts, but is also a stakeholder in Channel SBS6, the regional newspaper publisher Wegener, and the Dutch press agency ANP (28.4% since 2001).

Hollandse Dagbladcombinatie, or HDC-Media, which publishes the Noordhollands Dagblad, Haarlems Dagblad, Leidsch Dagblad, IJmuider Courant, and De Gooi- en Eemlander is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf.

Mediagroep Limburg, publisher of the Limburgs Dagblad and Dagblad De Limburger, also belongs to De Telegraaf.


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Mediagroep Limburg, publisher of the Limburgs Dagblad and Dagblad De Limburger, also belongs to De Telegraaf. The expatriate English musical group the Legendary Pink Dots has a song on their 1983 album "Curse" titled "Wall Purges Night," an obvious pun on Walpurgisnacht, with lyrical references to Nazism and rioting. Hollandse Dagbladcombinatie, or HDC-Media, which publishes the Noordhollands Dagblad, Haarlems Dagblad, Leidsch Dagblad, IJmuider Courant, and De Gooi- en Eemlander is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf. Adolf Hitler, with several members of his staff (including Joseph Goebbels), committed suicide on Walpurgisnacht, April 30/May 1, 1945. It not only controls the newspapers De Telegraaf and Sp!ts, but is also a stakeholder in Channel SBS6, the regional newspaper publisher Wegener, and the Dutch press agency ANP (28.4% since 2001). Anton Szandor LaVey chose Walpurgis Night in 1966 to found the Church of Satan. Holdingmaatschappij De Telegraaf, is minority-owned (about 30%) by the Van Puijenbroek family from Goirle. The second act of Edward Albee's play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is entitled "Walpurgisnacht.".

De Telegraaf's holding company, N.V. In Sweden it is only the labour and socialist parties which use May 1 for political activities, while others observe the traditional festivities. Since 21 March 2004, De Telegraaf has also appeared on Sundays. This does not only include right-wing parties, but also others like the church have followed suit, marching and making speeches. De Courant/Nieuws van de Dag ceased publication in 1998. Starting with the parties of the left, the whole of the Finnish political scene has nominated Vappu as the day to go out on stumps and agitate. The prohibition was, however, lifted in 1949 and De Telegraaf flourished anew to become the biggest newspaper in the Netherlands. The Finnish tradition is also a shadowing of the Soviet Era May Day parade.

During World War II, the Telegraaf companies published pro-German papers, which led to a twenty year ban on publication after the war. The festivities also include a picnic on May 1st, which is sometimes prepared in a lavish manner. During World War I, when the Netherlands was officially neutral, Holdert's French sympathies and his pro-English standpoint caused De Telegraaf to be the focus of some controversy. Often the magazine has been stuffed inside standard industrial packages such as sardine-cans and milk cartons. In 1974, De Telegraaf moved to its current location in the Basisweg. Classic forms have included an Äpy printed on a toilet-roll and a bedsheet. At one point, in June 1966, the building was besieged by angry construction workers and Provo followers, after falsely reporting that a victim of labour dispute had not been killed by the police, but by a co-worker. Both are sophomoric; but while Julkku is a standard magazine, Äpy is always a gimmick.

Construction was completed and the building occupied in 1930. Fixtures include the capping of the Havis Amanda, a nude female statue in Helsinki, and the biannually alternating publications of ribald matter called Äpy and Julkku. Langhout. One tradition is drinking mead, whose alcohol content varies. Staal and G.J. Many people who have graduated from lukio wears the cap. In 1926, he began construction of a new printing facility at the Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal in Amsterdam, designed by J.F. From the end of the 19th century, "Fin de Siècle", and onwards, this traditional upper class feast has been co-opted by students attending university, already having received their student cap.

He added the name Amsterdamsche Courant ("Amsterdam Gazette") as a subtitle to De Telegraaf, and Het Nieuws van den Dag ("The News of the Day") to De Courant. The student traditions are also one of the main characteristics of "Vappu". This proved to be a good investment, particularly with regard to De Courant, enabling Holdert between 1903 and 1923 to take over one newspaper after another, suspending publication as he went. The celebration is typically centered on plentiful use of sparkling wine and other alcoholic beverages. Following Tindal's death on 31 January 1902 the printer Hak Holdert, with backing from financiers, took over De Telegraaf and De Courant on 12 September 1902. Today in Finland, Walpurgis Night (Vapunaatto) is, along with New Year's Eve, the biggest carnival-style festivity taking place in the streets of Finland's towns and cities. The first issue appeared on 1 January 1893. In Sweden, Valborg is especially notorious because of the excessive amounts of alcohol people consume on that very day.

De Telegraaf was founded by Henry Tindal, who simultaneously started another paper De Courant ("The Gazette"). There are also newer student traditions like the carnival parade, the "Cortège", which has been held since 1910 by the students at Chalmers in Gothenburg. In the recent past, editorial commentary often supported the views of the late Pim Fortuyn. The strongest and most traditional spring festivities are also found in the old university cities, like Uppsala and Lund where both current and graduated students gather at events that take up most of the day from early morning to late night on April 30, or "sista april" ("The last day of april") as most students of Lund call it. Politically, the paper leans towards the populist right. Most of the songs are from the 19th century and were spread by the students' spring festivities. The financial news coverage, however, is more serious in tone. The tradition which is most spread throughout the country is probably singing songs of spring.

This national newspaper contains many "sensational" and sports-related articles, and one or more pages whose content is supplied by the gossip-magazine Privé ("Private"). The expected reward for this task to be paid in eggs. . An older tradition from Southern Sweden was for the younger people to collect greens and branches from the woods at twilight, which were used to adorn the houses of the village. A subsidiary, Basismedia BV, publishes a daily free newspaper, Sp!ts (which in Dutch means both "rush hour" and "sharp point"). One of the main traditions in Sweden is to light large bonfires, a custom which is most firmly established in Svealand, and which began in Uppland during the 18th century. De Telegraaf ("The Telegraph") is based in Amsterdam. The forms of celebration in Sweden vary in different parts of the country and between different cities.

De Telegraaf is the largest Dutch daily morning newspaper, with a daily circulation of approximately 800,000. Walpurgis is one of the main holidays during the year in both Sweden and Finland, alongside of Christmas and Midsummer. The phenomenon was first reported on the Brocken."
—Taken from Oxford Phrase & Fable. It is noted for the phenomenon of the Brocken spectre and for witches' revels which reputably took place there on Walpurgis night.
The Brocken Spectre is a magnified shadow of an observer, typically surrounded by rainbow-like bands, thrown onto a bank of cloud in high mountain areas when the sun is low. "Walpurgis Night (in German folklore) the night of April 30 (May Day's eve), when witches meet on the Brocken mountain and hold revels with their Gods..."
"Brocken the highest of the Harz Mountains of north central Germany.

In Germany, Walpurgisnacht, the night from April 30 to May 1, is the night when allegedly the witches hold a large celebration on the Blocksberg and await the arrival of Spring. Walburga was worshipped in the same way that Vikings had celebrated spring and as they spread throughout Europe, the two dates became mixed together and created the Walpurgis Night celebration. Viking fertility celebrations took place around April 30 and due to Walburga being declared a saint at that time of year, her name became associated with the celebrations. Historically the Walpurgisnacht is derived from Pagan spring customs, where the arrival of spring was celebrated with bonfires at night.

However she was not made a saint until 1 May in the same year, and that day carries her name in the Swedish calendar. Walburga died on 25 February 779 and that day still carries her name in the Catholic calendar. Together with her brothers she travelled to Württemberg, Germany where she became a nun and lived in the convent of Heidenheim, which was founded by her brother Wunibald. Richard.

The festival is named after Saint Walburga (known in Scandinavia as "Valborg"; alternative forms are "Walpurgis", "Wealdburg", or "Valderburger"), born in Wessex in 710 a niece of Saint Boniface and, according to legend, she was a daughter to the Saxon prince St. . Walpurgis Night (Valborgsmässoafton in Swedish, Vappu in Finnish, Volbriöö in Estonian, Valpurģu nakts or Valpurģi in Latvian, Walpurgisnacht in German) is a holiday celebrated on April 30 or May 1, in Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Germany.

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