Six Feet Under

Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005.

Overview

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Hall. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Patrick).

The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005).

On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment.

The Fisher family in an earlier season.

In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005.

Setting

The Fisher & Sons Funeral Home in 2001.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself.

The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode.

Cast & Characters

List of episodes

  • List of Six Feet Under episodes

Guest Starring roles

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series.

Celebrity cameos

  • Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes)
  • Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play)
  • Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled)
  • Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer)
  • Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons)

Recurring cast

  • Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes)
  • Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes)
  • Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes)
  • Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes)
  • Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes)
  • Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes)
  • Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes)
  • Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes)
  • Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes)
  • Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes)
  • Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes)
  • Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes)
  • Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes)
  • Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes)
  • Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes)
  • Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes)
  • Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes)
  • Ed Begley, Jr. - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes)
  • Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes)
  • Robert Foxworth - Dr. Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes)
  • Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes)
  • Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes)
  • Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes)
  • Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes)
  • Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes)
  • Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes)
  • Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes)
  • Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes)
  • Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes)
  • Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes)
  • Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Loretta Sibley (3 episodes)
  • Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes)
  • Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes)
  • Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes)
  • Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes)
  • Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes)
  • Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes)

Promotionals

Promotional for the 2005 season, which features Claire driving her trademark lime green hearse into the sunset.

As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:

  • Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]
  • Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]
  • Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]
  • Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]

Episode Recaps

  • Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix.
  • The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

Soundtracks

Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:

  • Six Feet Under, 2002
  • Six Feet Under, Vol. 2: Everything Ends, 2005

Scheduling Changes

In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes.

Timeframe

The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired.

  • Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes)
  • Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes)
  • Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes)
  • Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes)
  • Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes)

Trivia

  • Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball.
  • The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America.
  • Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death.
  • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life.
  • The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode.
  • Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.
    • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy.
    • Mathew St. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc.
    • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline.
  • Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot.
  • HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired.
  • Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. The show was cancelled after 11 episodes.
  • Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show.
  • Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles.
  • Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. David in the first two seasons. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons.
  • Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother.
  • Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams.
  • The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003).
  • Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series.
  • Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie.
  • Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. The Foot, The Dare.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait.
  • Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Hall (David Fisher) in real life.
  • The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes.

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Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired. Whether Legolas of Gondolin was of Noldorin or Sindarin descent is debatable. The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. The Silmarillion, in describing Turgon's founding of Gondolin, states that Turgon took with him up to a third of the people under Fingolfin, but an even larger number of the Sindar. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes. But the others, led by one Legolas Greenleaf of the house of the Tree, who knew all that plain by day or by dark, and was night-sighted, made much speed over the vale for all their weariness, and halted only after a great march.
—"The Fall of Gondolin", The Book of Lost Tales, Volume 2. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. The names are very similar, but the characters were different: Legolas of Gondolin was a Ñoldorin Exile, of the House (kindred) of the Tree.

Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. His name (Laiqalassë in its pure form) comes from the primitive Quenya (Qenya) words laica, green, and lassë, leaf. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. The Legolas of Gondolin, who Tolkien would have likely renamed, has a different etymology. In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. Because Tolkien had reused the name in The Lord of the Rings, this Legolas was not included in the published Silmarillion. Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:. The character is mentioned only once and is unrelated to the character discussed above.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:. The name Legolas Greenleaf first appeared in The Fall of Gondolin, one of the "Lost Tales". Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers. No definitive evidence is given, either way. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. Thranduil did let him leave Mirkwood to found a new elf-community in Ithilien, suggesting to some that he was not his heir; but then others opine that given the longevity of Elves and the relative safety of Middle-earth after Sauron's downfall, Thranduil could go on ruling the Woodland Realm as long as he liked or until he felt the sea-longing. As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. Some assume that he is an only child; however, he could be only one of Thranduil's children.

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series. (Blond hair was mostly exclusive to the Vanyar.) However, the "blond" camp points out that the above quote takes place at night, and opines that his head may have appeared "dark" due to shadows, rather than his actual hair color. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode. According to this camp, his hair must be either dark brown or black, as was the norm for the Sindar. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. However, Tolkien describes his head as "dark" when he shoots down a Ringwraith's fell beast in The Fellowship of the Ring in the following quote, suggesting the contrary to some:. The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. His father Thranduil was blond, so many assume that Legolas must have been blond also (Indeed, both Ralph Bakshi and Peter Jackson make him blond).

Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself. For them, this might be a sign that he was born in the First Age, since the Appendices only record dates from the Second Age onwards. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Also, some readers point out that his birthdate is not recorded in the Appendices. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. However, even the minimum figure of 500 can still apply here, since Tolkien could have had the English oak in mind, and it can live up to about 500 years. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. Also, he speaks of watching oaks grow from acorns to "ruinous age", suggesting that he is in fact old, though possibly young for Elves (some kinds of oak can live for a very long time):.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. He does call Aragorn (87) and Gimli (139) "children" while in Fangorn Forest, and says that he does not feel young:. The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005. It is certainly possible that he was older than what many fans imagine him to be, at least (probably due to the influence of Bloom and his portrayal). The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". At face value, his statement says nothing about his age - to go further would only be speculation. In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. However, he could be merely commenting on the contrasting viewpoints of Men and Elves on time ("and but a little while does that seem to us"); also, 500 years is here clearly the time elapsed since Meduseld was built.

The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment. If we are to infer that Elves can have concrete memories at a younger age than humans do, Legolas could conceivably have remembered the last 500 autumns that have passed, starting when he was very young. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. By their first year, elf-children can already walk, speak, and even sing. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. In his essay Laws and Customs among the Eldar, found in Morgoth’s Ring, one of the volumes of The History of Middle-earth, Tolkien states that the mental development of elf-children is much quicker than those of human children. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. To see their reasoning for an age of 800-900 years, see the articles referred to below.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. The figure of 500 years minimum was derived from the following — at one point he says that the leaves have fallen in Mirkwood 500 times since Meduseld was built, and he appears to be describing it as if he actually experienced this:. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters. While Legolas' age is never given in Tolkien's writings, some Tolkien scholars have estimated he is at the most 800–900 years old by the time of the War of the Ring, and at least 500, though probably more; however, many others disagree on the maximum figure. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. He is absent from the 1980 animated version of The Return of the King. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. Legolas was voiced by David Collings in the BBC Radio 4 adaptation.

At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. However, many viewers have criticized his performance as wooden; ironically (and humorously, one might add), his character is fittingly a Wood-elf. On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. Although the disproportionate popular reaction to Legolas met with mixed reactions from fans, many debaters on the Internet during earlier stages of production were worried, like Tolkien's complaint above, that a film portrayal of Legolas might render him as far too effeminate for popular consumption, and many were simply happy that Orlando Bloom was able to avoid this entirely. The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005). His good looks and Legolas' "coolness", so to speak, as depicted in the film, have led to the character becoming a unprecedented fan favorite with both fangirls and fanboys, not to mention other Tolkien fans. Patrick). Playing Legolas in the trilogy was Orlando Bloom's breakout route to superstardom.

Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. This idea subsequently spread to fanfiction; however, it is pure fanon, and is nowhere to be found in Tolkien's writings, and is often simply meant as a joke; in any case, Elven eye color was most likely restricted to grey, as no other color is explicitly stated in Tolkien's writings. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). This was justified by the notion that Elves' eyes change colour with their mood. Hall. Due to technical mishaps involving Orlando Bloom's contact lenses, in the films Legolas' eye colour sometimes changes between brown, purple, and blue. The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Curiously, this directly contradicts The Hobbit, where his father's own servants are shown to pass out after drinking powerfully heady Dorwinion wine (a brief line in the same passage mentions that drinks must be "powerful indeed" to affect Elves, like the Dorwinion wine, but still this does nothing to validate the implication that it is impossible for Elves to become intoxicated).

. He wins, because Elves are not affected by alcohol. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005. In the Extended Edition of The Return of the King, Legolas and Gimli have a drinking contest at Meduseld after the events at Helm's Deep. Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. He bears two long knives, while in the book he bears only one. The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes. He wears green and grey clothes and uses boots, in contrast to Tolkien's "light shoes".

Hall (David Fisher) in real life. The film-makers later stated that the entire scene of Legolas killing the Oliphaunt and its entire crew was filmed during pick-ups (months after original filming) to insert a major action scene showcasing him, because at that point they realized that he simply doesn't get to do much in the third part of the trilogy. Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Aside from shooting the fell beast, he undertakes no major actions other than to make peace with Gimli, overcoming their longstanding mutual racial animosity — he and Gimli are followers, rather than leaders. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait. However, in the books Legolas's exploits in battle are not presented in great detail. The Foot, The Dare. For example, in the Battle of the Hornburg, he slides down a staircase using a shield, shooting arrows all the while, and in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, he takes down an Oliphaunt all by himself.

Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. He is presented as an unstoppable fighter, arguably to the point of stealing the show; he performs show-stopping yet implausible stunts in battle scenes. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie. Curiously, the year 2931 of the Third Age is the year Aragorn was born; the writers may have picked the number at random from the Tale of Years (the timeline) in the Appendices. Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. 3018. Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series. This date for Legolas' birth was made up by the movie writers, as in the books there are no known dates concerning Legolas before T.A.

The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003). This would make him 2931 years old at the time of the War of the Ring. Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams. In the "official movie guide" for The Lord of the Rings, a birthdate for Legolas is set to 87 of the Third Age. Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother. In Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movie trilogy (2001–2003), Legolas was portrayed by Orlando Bloom. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons. Here, he is apparently from Rivendell, because he answers to Elrond; he is not identified as a Wood-elf.

David in the first two seasons. In the film, he takes Glorfindel's place in the Flight to the Ford sequence; he meets Strider and the hobbits on their way to Rivendell, and sets Frodo on his horse before he is chased by the Nazgûl to the ford of Bruinen (In Peter Jackson's version, Arwen takes Glorfindel's place and rides to the Ford herself with Frodo). Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. Legolas was voiced by Anthony Daniels (who had voiced the droid C-3PO of Star Wars fame) in Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated version of The Lord of the Rings. Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles. In Sindarin, that would be Legolas Thranduilion, -ion meaning "son of". Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show. In English, therefore, a fuller name would be "Legolas son of Thranduil" or "Legolas Thranduil's son".

The show was cancelled after 11 episodes. Men and Elves alike used the patronymic (son of) formula. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. Apparently, only Hobbits (and the Men of Bree) used surnames (like Baggins or Gamgee), as recorded in the Red Book. Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina. It may be that Thranduil named his son Legolas to at least in part refer to this people, who were remote kin and ancestors of the later Silvan Elves, the people Thranduil ruled and to whom - very likely - Thranduil's wife belonged. HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired. Calenhad, mutated Parth Galen and plural Pinnath Gelin) and is otherwise almost only preserved in Laegrim, Laegel(d)rim (Sindarin form of Quenya Laiquendi), the Green Elves of the First Age.

Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot. There might, however, be a certain meaning to his name: laeg is a very rare, archaic word for green, which is normally replaced by calen (cf. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline. The Quenya form (mentioned in the Book of Lost Tales in the context of another character of that name) is Laiqualassë. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc. It consists of the Sindarin words laeg, green; and golas, a collection of leaves, foliage (being a prefixed collective form of las(s), leaf). Mathew St. The name Legolas is a Silvan dialect form of pure Sindarin Laegolas, which means Greenleaf (thus, Greenleaf is not his surname, as is sometimes erroneously believed; nor is it an epithet (like Oakenshield), but a translation of his name).

Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy. Logically, as a retcon he could quite conceivably have been present in his father's halls at the time, and may have even fought at Erebor. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.

    . The events in The Hobbit take place less than one hundred years before the Quest of Mount Doom, and at that point Legolas was at least 500 years old, and possibly older. Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. However, some have theorized that he may well have fought in the Battle of the Five Armies. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode. Of course, his character had not been created yet (though his name had; see below).

    The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. Though his father and his kingdom appear in The Hobbit, he does not appear himself. Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life. However, as given in Unfinished Tales, the author himself states that Legolas "probably accomplished the least of the Fellowship", compared to the rest (Frodo endured the Ring's temptations and took it to the Crack of Doom, Gandalf was an angelic agent from Valinor who worked against Sauron for centuries, Aragorn restored his ancestors' old kingdom, and even Merry helped kill the Witch-king, et cetera). Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death. 2), his father wrote the following comment protesting a "pretty" or "ladylike" illustration of Legolas:. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America. As Christopher Tolkien recounts in The Book of Lost Tales (Vol.

    The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. In Lothlórien, he receives a new longbow from the Galadhrim, along with the other gifts that Galadriel and Celeborn give him and the rest of the Fellowship, such as special cloaks and lembas. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball. As the Fellowship sets out, he is armed with a short bow, and a long knife. Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. Tolkien first describes him as "a strange Elf, clad in green and brown". Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes). The Sindarin minority in that realm, who should have been more noble and wise than the Silvan Elves, can be seen as having "gone native" at the end of the First Age: after Morgoth was defeated and all of the grand Elf-kingdoms of Beleriand were destroyed, they can be seen as going back to "a simpler time" in their culture.

    Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes). A small minority of Sindarin Elves ruled the predominantly Silvan Woodland Realm of Northern Mirkwood, a minority which Thranduil headed. Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes). His father Thranduil had originally come from Doriath; he and his son were actually Sindarin Elves. Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes). Although he lived among them and was exposed to their culture, Legolas was not one of the Silvan Elves (Wood-elves). Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes). It is told in the Red Book (first written by Bilbo Baggins, continued by Frodo Baggins and supposedly finished by Samwise Gamgee) that after the death of King Elessar, Legolas builds a grey ship in Ithilien, and leaves Middle-earth to go over the Sea to Valinor, the Blessed Realm, and Gimli the Dwarf goes with him.

    2: Everything Ends, 2005. Eventually, Legolas comes to Ithilien with some of his people, with his father's leave, to live out his remaining time in Middle-earth helping to restore the devastated forests of that war-ravaged land. Six Feet Under, Vol. Later, Legolas and Gimli go off travelling together through Fangorn Forest. Six Feet Under, 2002. After the destruction of the One Ring, he stays in Minas Tirith for some time, as Aragorn is crowned King of the Reunited Kingdom as King Elessar and marries his love Arwen. The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell. He fights in the Battles of the Pelennor Fields and the Morannon, and watches as Sauron is defeated and Barad-dûr collapses.

    Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix. After Aragorn summons the Dead Men of Dunharrow to fight for him, he watches them scare away the Corsairs of Umbar from their ships at Pelargir. Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. In The Return of the King, he and Gimli accompany Aragorn on the Paths of the Dead, along with the Grey Company. Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]. In the Battle of the Hornburg, he and Gimli engage in an Orc-slaying contest (Gimli wins by one with 42, but the real result is stronger mutual respect). Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]. They meet the revived Gandalf and the Rohirrim, fight in the Battle of the Hornburg, and witness Saruman's (partial) downfall at Isengard, where they are reunited with the two.

    Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]. After Boromir is killed and Merry and Pippin are captured by Orcs in The Two Towers, he, Aragorn and Gimli set forth in pursuit of the two (Frodo the Ring-bearer and Sam had gone ahead on the road to Mordor). Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]. While the Fellowship is travelling over the River Anduin, he shoots down a nearby fell beast with one shot. Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes). They take leave of Lothlórien, but not before recieving several gifts. Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes). Legolas and Gimli become friends, however, when Gimli greets the Lady of the Golden Wood with gentle words.

    Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes). Within the Fellowship, there is friction between Legolas and the dwarf Gimli, because of the ancient quarrel between Elves and Dwarves after the destruction of Doriath in the First Age, and also because his father, Thranduil, once threw Gimli's father, Glóin, in prison (as described in The Hobbit). Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes). Legolas serves as the initial spokesperson for the company, speaking with the inhabitants, the Galadhrim. Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes). After Gandalf is lost while facing the Balrog, Aragorn takes charge of the Fellowship and leads them to the Elven realm of Lothlórien, the Golden Wood. Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes). Once in Moria, he helps fight off the Orcs whom they encounter there, and recognizes Durin's Bane as a Balrog of Morgoth.

    Loretta Sibley (3 episodes). Before they reach Moria, however, Legolas helps fend off an attack of Sauron's wolves. Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. After their attempt to cross Caradhras is foiled, their leader Gandalf takes them on an underground journey through Moria, an ancient Dwarf-kingdom, though some (including Legolas) do not wish to go there. Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes). Unlike them, he is little affected by the blowing winds and snow; he does not even wear boots, only light shoes, and his feet scarcely make imprints on the snow. Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes). When the Fellowship is snowed down while crossing Caradhras, he scouts ahead to find the Sun, while Aragorn and Boromir drive a path through the snow.

    Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes). He accompanies the others in their travels from Rivendell to Amon Hen. Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes). Legolas volunteers or is chosen to become one of the members of the Fellowship that sets out to destroy the One Ring. Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes). He is introduced in the first part of The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, at the council of Elrond of Rivendell, where he comes as a messenger from his father to discuss the escape of Gollum from their guard. Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes). Legolas is the son of King Thranduil of the Woodland Realm of Northern Mirkwood, who appears as "the Elvenking" in The Hobbit; his father rules over the Silvan Elves who dwell there.

    Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes). . Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes). Legolas serves as a link to the earlier story, The Hobbit, because he (like Gimli the Dwarf) is the son of a character from the previous tale. Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes). Tolkien himself states, however, that Legolas accomplishes the least of the nine members of the Fellowship. Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes). With his keen telescopic eyesight, sensitive hearing, and great skill at arms, particularly bowmanship, Legolas is a valuable resource to the other eight members of the Fellowship.

    Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes). Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Legolas Greenleaf is a Sindarin Elven prince who becomes a member of the Fellowship of the Ring. Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes). R. Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes). R. Robert Foxworth - Dr. In J.

    Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes). - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes). Ed Begley, Jr. Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes).

    Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes). Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes). Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes). Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes).

    Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes). Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes). Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes). Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes).

    Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes). Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes). Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes). Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes).

    Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes). Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes). Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes). Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes).

    Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons). Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer). Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled). Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play).

    Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes). List of Six Feet Under episodes.

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