Six Feet Under

Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005.

Overview

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Hall. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Patrick).

The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005).

On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment.

The Fisher family in an earlier season.

In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005.

Setting

The Fisher & Sons Funeral Home in 2001.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself.

The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode.

Cast & Characters

List of episodes

  • List of Six Feet Under episodes

Guest Starring roles

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series.

Celebrity cameos

  • Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes)
  • Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play)
  • Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled)
  • Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer)
  • Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons)

Recurring cast

  • Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes)
  • Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes)
  • Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes)
  • Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes)
  • Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes)
  • Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes)
  • Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes)
  • Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes)
  • Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes)
  • Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes)
  • Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes)
  • Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes)
  • Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes)
  • Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes)
  • Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes)
  • Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes)
  • Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes)
  • Ed Begley, Jr. - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes)
  • Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes)
  • Robert Foxworth - Dr. Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes)
  • Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes)
  • Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes)
  • Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes)
  • Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes)
  • Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes)
  • Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes)
  • Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes)
  • Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes)
  • Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes)
  • Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes)
  • Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Loretta Sibley (3 episodes)
  • Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes)
  • Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes)
  • Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes)
  • Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes)
  • Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes)
  • Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes)

Promotionals

Promotional for the 2005 season, which features Claire driving her trademark lime green hearse into the sunset.

As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:

  • Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]
  • Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]
  • Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]
  • Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]

Episode Recaps

  • Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix.
  • The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

Soundtracks

Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:

  • Six Feet Under, 2002
  • Six Feet Under, Vol. 2: Everything Ends, 2005

Scheduling Changes

In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes.

Timeframe

The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired.

  • Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes)
  • Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes)
  • Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes)
  • Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes)
  • Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes)

Trivia

  • Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball.
  • The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America.
  • Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death.
  • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life.
  • The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode.
  • Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.
    • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy.
    • Mathew St. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc.
    • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline.
  • Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot.
  • HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired.
  • Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. The show was cancelled after 11 episodes.
  • Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show.
  • Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles.
  • Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. David in the first two seasons. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons.
  • Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother.
  • Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams.
  • The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003).
  • Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series.
  • Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie.
  • Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. The Foot, The Dare.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait.
  • Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Hall (David Fisher) in real life.
  • The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes.

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Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired.
. The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Among the imitators on the internet:. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes. The initial success of the show's concept spawned several imitators, mostly on the websites, but also including "The Daily Flash", a news program on Playboy TV. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. Past male anchors are:.

Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The current male anchors are:. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. Past female anchors are:. In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The current female anchors are:. Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:. The female announcers have been featured in almost every media including television (CBS Sunday Morning, The Today Show, The View, Sally Jesse Raphaël, and numerous appearances on Entertainment Tonight and ET Insider) newspapers and magazines, (TV Guide, Playboy) and as guests on multiple radio shows including Howard Stern.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:. Since the show's inception in 1999, there has been much turnover among the newscasters, and many guest anchors. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers. The show features occasional on-the-street interviews by topless newscasters, which are made possible by Ontario's Topfree equality laws. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. As such, most of the show's crew comes from the Toronto area. As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. Most of the show's announcers have been recruited through classified ads in alternative newspapers in Toronto.

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series. It was said that events like the 2005 Indian Ocean Earthquake were reported in the nude, while news of the London bombings as well as all follow-up reports and interviews done in the following days, were done fully clothed both in studio and in London. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode. This too has proven to be controversial as observers have complained that stories that warranted "fully-clothed" coverage were, in fact, Western or "Eurocentric" tragedies, while disasters happening elsewhere in the world were deemed "less important." In actuality, the producers of Naked News have instituted a basic rule in this area: No disrobing during any news coverage of a major tragedy anywhere in the world. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. The anchors have all since continued the tradition of reading tragic events fully clothed. The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. She did not undress when she read the news of the death of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, nor for the September 11, 2001 program (which was not aired).

Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself. Sinclair herself has questioned the appropriateness of disrobing while reading of tragic events. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Critics charge that the nudity is little more than a gimmick that trivializes important news events, while proponents argue that such gimmicks exist on most television news already; nudity is just a particularly successful one. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. Naked News has generated some controversy among the media, and even within its own staff. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. Victoria Sinclair, the first NN announcer and one of only two with journalism experience, has also received some praise for her newsreading ability.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Naked News has earned some praise from established journalists for its coverage of international news items not often covered in mainstream news media. The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005. The show is or has been available on pay-per-view or by subscription in various markets in the U.S., Australia, Canada, the UK, Ireland, and even France (dubbed into French). The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". Its offshoot Naked News TV aired as a late-night television series on the Toronto television station Citytv, and (until February 2005) on British satellite channel Get Lucky TV. In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. Although it was originally targeted towards female viewers (at one point said to be 30% of the website's audience), the male show now openly promotes itself as news from a gay perspective.

The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment. It does not however enjoy the same popularity and fame, and there are currently more female than male anchors. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. A male version of the show was created in 2001 to parallel the female version. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. By 2002, only one news segment could be viewed freely, and by 2004, no free content remained on the website. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. Part of the large amounts of web traffic in the site's early days was because the entire newscast could be viewed for free, though subscribers got access to a higher bandwidth feed and other extras.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. This number did not refer to the number of actual subscribers of the site, which was believed to be vastly lower. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters. During the height of its popularity, the website was promoted as receiving over 6 million hits per month. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The website was popularized entirely by word of mouth, and quickly became an internet meme. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. Naked News was conceived in 1998 and debuted in 1999 as a web-based news service and featuring an all-female cast.

At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. . On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. Regardless of the gender of the anchor, the male demographic is particularly high for the show. The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005). Naked News TV is its offshoot pay-per-view or subscription service. Patrick). The male and female anchors read the news fully nude or strip as they present their news segments.

Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Naked News, billing itself as "the program with nothing to hide", is a subscription website featuring a real television newscast prepared in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Radio Tango - Oslo, Norway radio station once featured stripping female weather readers on their website. Hall. Comedie - This program on a French cable TV network ran a series promos featuring males and females casually undressing as they read jokes. The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. www.strip-news.de, a now-defunct German language webcast with both male and female announcers.

. Robert Milan. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005. Warren Michaels. Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. Brock Stern. The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes. Brendan Tanner.

Hall (David Fisher) in real life. Joshua Holt - Recently announced he was gay in the pages of The Advocate magazine. Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Cole McQuade. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait. Derek Shaw. The Foot, The Dare. Malcolm Matisse.

Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. Jack Lange. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie. Jeremy Chase. Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Raoul Santos. Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series. Lucas Tyler - The first male anchor of the show, now also producer and director, said to bear a strong resemblance to NBC newsman Matt Lauer.

The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003). Sarah Winters. Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams. Kelli Graham. Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother. Kaye Grant. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons. Gretchen Frazier.

David in the first two seasons. Allyson Jones. Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. Erin Sherwood. Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles. Devon Calwell - At age 19, she is the youngest cast member. Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show. She is unrelated to the Italian model of the same name.

The show was cancelled after 11 episodes. Carmen Russo - At age 42, she is the oldest cast member. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. Holly Weston - She continued on the show throughout her pregnancy. Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina. Brooke Roberts. HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired. Diane Foster.

Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot. Erica Stevens. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline. Samantha Page. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc. Ashley Jenning. Mathew St. Yukiko Kimura.

Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy. Cameron Shore. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.

    . Gia Gomez. Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Christine Kerr. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode. Michelle Pantoliano - Former radio & TV broadcaster from New York City.

    The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. Lily Kwan. Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life. Sandrine Renard. Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death. Roxanne West. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America. "Athena the Greek".

    The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. Athena King - a.k.a. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball. April Torres. Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. 2002. Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes). 2001, and returned in Nov.

    Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes). Sinclair left the show in Sept. Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes). Victoria Sinclair - The first NN reporter, she originally performed solo before additional news anchors were added. Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes). Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes).

    2: Everything Ends, 2005. Six Feet Under, Vol. Six Feet Under, 2002. The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

    Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix. Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]. Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4].

    Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]. Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]. Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes). Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes).

    Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes). Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes). Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes). Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes).

    Loretta Sibley (3 episodes). Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes). Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes).

    Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes). Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes). Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes). Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes).

    Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes). Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes). Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes). Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes).

    Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes). Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes). Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes). Robert Foxworth - Dr.

    Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes). - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes). Ed Begley, Jr. Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes).

    Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes). Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes). Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes). Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes).

    Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes). Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes). Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes). Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes).

    Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes). Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes). Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes). Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes).

    Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes). Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes). Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes). Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes).

    Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons). Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer). Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled). Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play).

    Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes). List of Six Feet Under episodes.

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