Six Feet Under

Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005.

Overview

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Hall. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Patrick).

The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005).

On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment.

The Fisher family in an earlier season.

In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005.

Setting

The Fisher & Sons Funeral Home in 2001.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself.

The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode.

Cast & Characters

List of episodes

  • List of Six Feet Under episodes

Guest Starring roles

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series.

Celebrity cameos

  • Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes)
  • Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play)
  • Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled)
  • Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer)
  • Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons)

Recurring cast

  • Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes)
  • Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes)
  • Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes)
  • Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes)
  • Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes)
  • Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes)
  • Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes)
  • Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes)
  • Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes)
  • Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes)
  • Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes)
  • Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes)
  • Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes)
  • Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes)
  • Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes)
  • Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes)
  • Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes)
  • Ed Begley, Jr. - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes)
  • Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes)
  • Robert Foxworth - Dr. Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes)
  • Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes)
  • Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes)
  • Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes)
  • Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes)
  • Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes)
  • Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes)
  • Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes)
  • Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes)
  • Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes)
  • Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes)
  • Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Loretta Sibley (3 episodes)
  • Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes)
  • Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes)
  • Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes)
  • Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes)
  • Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes)
  • Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes)

Promotionals

Promotional for the 2005 season, which features Claire driving her trademark lime green hearse into the sunset.

As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:

  • Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]
  • Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]
  • Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]
  • Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]

Episode Recaps

  • Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix.
  • The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

Soundtracks

Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:

  • Six Feet Under, 2002
  • Six Feet Under, Vol. 2: Everything Ends, 2005

Scheduling Changes

In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes.

Timeframe

The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired.

  • Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes)
  • Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes)
  • Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes)
  • Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes)
  • Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes)

Trivia

  • Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball.
  • The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America.
  • Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death.
  • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life.
  • The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode.
  • Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.
    • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy.
    • Mathew St. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc.
    • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline.
  • Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot.
  • HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired.
  • Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. The show was cancelled after 11 episodes.
  • Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show.
  • Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles.
  • Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. David in the first two seasons. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons.
  • Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother.
  • Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams.
  • The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003).
  • Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series.
  • Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie.
  • Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. The Foot, The Dare.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait.
  • Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Hall (David Fisher) in real life.
  • The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes.

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Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired. Almost every year at least one, but often several such films are produced and released, resulting in Cinderella becoming a work of literature with one of the largest numbers of film adaptations ascribed to it, perhaps rivaled only by the sheer number of films that have been adapted from or based on Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Over the decades since the invention of motion pictures, literally hundreds of films have been made that are either direct adaptations or have plots loosely based on the story of Cinderella. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes. Her traditional line "Cinderella, you shall go to the ball!" has passed into common usage from gay culture where the meme of the "glamorous transformation" is a source of fascination and humor. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. The fairy Godmother must magically create a coach (from a pumpkin), footmen (from mice) and a beautiful dress for Cinderella in order for her to go to the ball.

Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. There are also added characters such as Buttons (Baron Hardup's servant, and Cinderella's friend) and Dandini (the Prince's right-hand man, the character and even his name coming from Rossini's opera). The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. The stepmother's own daughters are the Ugly sisters who are jealous of Cinderella and cruel to her. In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. In the pantomime form Cinderella's father (Baron Hardup) is under the thumb of the stepmother. Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:. The subject of Cinderella is very common for British and Australian pantomimes.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:. The story of "Cinderella" has formed the basis of many works:. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers. Detractors of such princess brides argue that the wedding is not solely about the bride; nevertheless, many wedding gown retailers appeal, directly or indirectly, to the Cinderella ideal. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. A bride with the Cinderella mindset believes that the dress and the occasion exist in order that she may be transformed for the day into a beautiful princess. As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. Cinderella, along with the more general "princess," are shorthand for a particular approach to weddings and Western wedding attire, especially the white dress.

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series. For example, a girl from a wealthy household who has been ordered to wash the dishes as a fulfilment of her once a month chores would be deemed a Cinderella; a fallen princess who has finally met with tough reality. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode. Others are called Cinderella if they tend to quietly complain. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. Some girls are described as a Cinderella if they are meek and immediately submissive to stern orders. The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. The term Cinderella has evolved from its storybook beginnings to become the name for a variety of female personalities.

Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself. Earlier, less self-consciously instructive Cinderellas have more revealing mythic content. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. The anachronism of a supposed skin-color sensitivity in Egypt itself is revealing. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. As a document, this reveals some contemporary American approaches to historicism, cultural multiplicity, racism, and educating for a spirit of tolerance. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. Based partly on fact (a slave named Rhodopis did marry Pharaoh Amasis) and partly on folk legends, this story is remarkable for its details of life in ancient Egypt and for the Egyptian-style illustrations".

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. He searches for, and finds, the girl. The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005. Eventually, one of her rosy-gold slippers is carried to the pharaoh's court. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". An example of the "uses of Cinderella" is presented by Shirley Climo, The Egyptian Cinderella (1989), aimed at young children: "Rhodopis, a Greek slave girl living in Egypt, is teased by the servants about her coloring. In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. Refactoring continues.

The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment. Thus serious uses come from what appears on the surface to be a trivial wish-fulfilment narrative. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. Mythographers return to Cinderella for hints of the social ethos embodied in it, and the familiar story proves to be a useful case example for young students beginning to understand how myth works. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. Each social group, in re-telling "Cinderella," has emphasized or suppressed individual elements and has given them interpretations that are especially relevant within each society. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. Instead, cultural elements ("memes" to some writers) may be disentangled from the Cinderella tale.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. In more recent times, as Freud's concepts have found more support as myth and poetry than as neurological science, it has seemed to mythographers less useful to explain one myth in terms of another myth. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters. The idea that "Cinderella" embodies myth elements was explored in The Uses of Enchantment (1989) by Bruno Bettelheim, who made many connections to the principles of Freudian psychology. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. Humorous retellings of the story sometimes use the twist of having the shoes turn out to also fit somebody completely unsuitable, such as an amorous old crone. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. The translation of the story into cultures with different standards of beauty has left the significance of Cinderella's shoe size unclear, and resulted in the implausibility of Cinderella's feet being of a unique size for no particular reason.

At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. Small feet were an important aspect of beauty in Chinese culture, leading to practices such as foot binding. On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. The original Chinese version of the story emphasized that Cinderella (or Yè Xiàn [葉羨] as she was called; known in the West as Yeh-Shen) had the smallest feet in the land. The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005). Interpreters unaware of the value attached to glass in 17th century France and perhaps troubled by sartorial impracticalities, have suggested that Perrault's "glass slipper" (pantoufle de verre) had been a "fur slipper" (pantoufle de vair) in some unidentified earlier version of the tale, and that Perrault or one of his sources confused the words; however, most scholars believe the glass slipper was a deliberate piece of poetic invention on Perrault's part. Patrick). The glass slipper is unique to Perrault's version; in other versions of the tale it may be made of other materials (in the version recorded by the Brothers Grimm, German: Aschenbroedel and Aschenputtel, for instance, it is gold) and in still other tellings, it is not a slipper but a ring or a bracelet that gives the prince the key to Cinderella's identity.

Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. The midnight curfew is also absent in many versions; Cinderella leaves the ball to get home before her stepmother and stepsisters, or she is simply tired. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Thus her mother (sometimes represented as a bird) is the supernatural force who assists the girl to find her prince. Hall. It is also worth noting that in some versions of the story there is no fairy godmother; rather Cinderella's dress and shoes come from a tree that grows over her mother's grave. The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. The evil stepsisters are sometimes punished for their deception by having their eyes pecked out by crows, or in other cases forgiven.

. In all variants, Cinderella arrives and proves her identity by fitting into the slipper (in some cases she has kept the other, as in the Disney retelling). It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005. The second stepsister fits into the slipper by cutting off her heel, but the same eagle gives her away. Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. In the German telling of the story, the first stepsister fits into the slipper by cutting off a toe, but a magical eagle tells the prince to notice the blood dripping from the slipper, and he returns the false bride to her mother. The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes. Cinderella's stepmother and stepsisters (in some versions just the stepsisters) conspire to win the prince's hand for one of them.

Hall (David Fisher) in real life. He declares that he will marry only the girl whose petite foot fits into the slipper. Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. In her haste, she loses a glass slipper which the prince finds. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait. However, on the third (or only) night, she loses track of the time and must flee the castle before her disguise vanishes. The Foot, The Dare. In the three-ball version, Cinderella keeps a close watch on the time the first two nights and is able to leave without difficulty.

Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. Unfortunately, the magic comes to an end at the first stroke of midnight. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie. In some versions of the tale, there are three balls, though most tellings mention only one. Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Forced into a life of domestic servitude, hence the nickname, as she was forced to tend the fireplace, Cinderella accepts the help of her attendant spirit ("fairy godmother") who transforms her to attend a royal ball and attract the attention of the handsome prince. Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series. The familiar plot revolves around a girl deprived of her rightful station in the family and given the cruel nickname "Cinderella" by her horrible stepmother and step-sisters.

The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003). . Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams. The best-known version was written by the French author, Charles Perrault in 1697, based on a common folk tale earlier recorded by Giambattista Basile as La Gatta Cennerentola in 1634, but the animated film from Walt Disney Productions, (see Cinderella (1950 film)) has become the standard contemporary version despite the fact that it somewhat sanitises the original plotline. Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother. It appeared in The Miscellaneous Record of You Yang (酉阳杂俎) by Tuan Ch'eng-Shih, a book which dates from the Tang Dynasty. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons. The earliest version of the story originated in China around AD 860.

David in the first two seasons. Cinderella is a popular fairy tale embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward, which received literally hundreds of tellings before modern times. Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. The Ash Girl by Timberlake Wertenbaker. Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles. I was a Rat! or The Scarlet Slippers by Philip Pullman. Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show. Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by Gregory Maguire.

The show was cancelled after 11 episodes. Phoenix and Ashes by Mercedes Lackey. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. The Glass Slipper by Eleanor Farjeon. Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina. Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix. HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired. Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine.

Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot. Witches Abroad by Terry Pratchett. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline. Ella Enchanted, starring Minnie Driver and Anne Hathaway (2004). Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc. Cinderelmo, a Cinderella story featuring Sesame Street's Elmo and Keri Russell. Mathew St. A Cinderella Story, released July 16, 2004, is a modernization of the classic fairy tale featuring Hilary Duff and Chad Michael Murray.

Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy. Cinderella, a 2000 British production set in mid-20th century and starring Kathleen Turner. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.

    . Ever After, 1998, starring Drew Barrymore. Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Cinderella, 1997 with Brandy and Whitney Houston. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode. Cindy, made for television, 1978.

    The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. The Slipper and the Rose, a 1976 British musical film starring Gemma Craven and Richard Chamberlain. Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life. Tři oříšky pro Popelku (Three Nuts for Cinderella), Czech movie 1973. Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death. Cinderfella, 1960, notorious because the main character is a man, played by Jerry Lewis. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America. Cinderella, 1957 with Julie Andrews.

    The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. The Glass Slipper, 1955, with Leslie Caron and Michael Wilding. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball. A Cinderella III is set to be released in 2006. Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. A direct-to-video sequel, Cinderella II: Dreams Come True, was released in 2002. Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes). Cinderella, an animated feature released on February 14, 1950, now considered one of Disney's "classics".

    Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes). Cinderella (Зо́лушка), Russian musical film of 1947, 84 min, by Lenfilm studios. Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes). This film was about 7 minutes long. Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes). Cinderella, an animated Laugh-O-Gram produced by Walt Disney, first released on December 6, 1922. Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes). Cinderella, 1911 silent film, starring Florence La Badie.

    2: Everything Ends, 2005. Cinderella, the 1899 first ever film version produced in France by Georges Méliès. Six Feet Under, Vol. Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim (Cinderella is only a small part of this plot). Six Feet Under, 2002. Mister Cinders, which was filmed in 1934. The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell. In 2005 the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical was adapted for the stage, also starring Paolo Montalban and with an ethnically diverse cast.

    Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix. Cinderella (1997) featuring Brandy, Paolo Montalban, Whitney Houston, Whoopi Goldberg, Victor Garber, Bernadette Peters, and Jason Alexander, considered by Amazon.com to be weak despite its diverse cast. Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Cinderella (1965) featuring Lesley Ann Warren, Stuart Damon, Ginger Rogers, Walter Pidgeon, and Celeste Holm, considered by Amazon.com to be the best TV version. Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]. Cinderella (1957) featuring Julie Andrews, Jon Cypher, Kaye Ballard, Alice Ghostley and Edith Adams. Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]. Cinderella by Rodgers and Hammerstein, which was produced for television three times:

      .

      Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]. Cinderella by Sergei Prokofiev. Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]. Aschenbroedel by Johann Strauss II. Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes). La Cenicienta by Jorge Peña Hen. Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes). Cendrillon by Jules Massenet.

      Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes). La Cenerentola by Gioacchino Rossini. Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes). Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes). Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes).

      Loretta Sibley (3 episodes). Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes). Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes).

      Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes). Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes). Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes). Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes).

      Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes). Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes). Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes). Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes).

      Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes). Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes). Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes). Robert Foxworth - Dr.

      Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes). - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes). Ed Begley, Jr. Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes).

      Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes). Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes). Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes). Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes).

      Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes). Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes). Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes). Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes).

      Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes). Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes). Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes). Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes).

      Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes). Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes). Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes). Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes).

      Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons). Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer). Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled). Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play).

      Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes). List of Six Feet Under episodes.

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