Six Feet Under

Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005.

Overview

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Hall. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Patrick).

The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005).

On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment.

The Fisher family in an earlier season.

In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005.

Setting

The Fisher & Sons Funeral Home in 2001.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself.

The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode.

Cast & Characters

List of episodes

  • List of Six Feet Under episodes

Guest Starring roles

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series.

Celebrity cameos

  • Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes)
  • Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play)
  • Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled)
  • Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer)
  • Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons)

Recurring cast

  • Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes)
  • Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes)
  • Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes)
  • Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes)
  • Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes)
  • Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes)
  • Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes)
  • Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes)
  • Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes)
  • Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes)
  • Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes)
  • Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes)
  • Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes)
  • Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes)
  • Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes)
  • Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes)
  • Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes)
  • Ed Begley, Jr. - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes)
  • Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes)
  • Robert Foxworth - Dr. Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes)
  • Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes)
  • Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes)
  • Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes)
  • Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes)
  • Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes)
  • Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes)
  • Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes)
  • Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes)
  • Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes)
  • Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes)
  • Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Loretta Sibley (3 episodes)
  • Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes)
  • Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes)
  • Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes)
  • Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes)
  • Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes)
  • Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes)

Promotionals

Promotional for the 2005 season, which features Claire driving her trademark lime green hearse into the sunset.

As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:

  • Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]
  • Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]
  • Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]
  • Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]

Episode Recaps

  • Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix.
  • The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

Soundtracks

Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:

  • Six Feet Under, 2002
  • Six Feet Under, Vol. 2: Everything Ends, 2005

Scheduling Changes

In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes.

Timeframe

The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired.

  • Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes)
  • Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes)
  • Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes)
  • Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes)
  • Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes)

Trivia

  • Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball.
  • The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America.
  • Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death.
  • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life.
  • The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode.
  • Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.
    • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy.
    • Mathew St. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc.
    • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline.
  • Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot.
  • HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired.
  • Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. The show was cancelled after 11 episodes.
  • Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show.
  • Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles.
  • Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. David in the first two seasons. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons.
  • Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother.
  • Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams.
  • The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003).
  • Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series.
  • Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie.
  • Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. The Foot, The Dare.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait.
  • Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Hall (David Fisher) in real life.
  • The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes.

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Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired. MAD Magazine ran a parody of The Onion called "The Bunion" in one issue. The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Another popular send-up of the news that pre-dates The Onion is the Weekend Update segment on Saturday Night Live. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes. Also, the National Lampoon crew has had a lasting influence on most American humorists, so it is not unlikely that The Onion's founders and staff had been influenced by them (considering that National Lampoon grew out of the college humor publication Harvard Lampoon and that The Onion also began as a college humor magazine.). The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. While it is unknown if this book directly inspired/influenced The Onion's founders, it certainly shares similarities.

Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The paper contained all the usual sections found in most major newspapers (classified ads, Sunday magazines, sports, local news, comics) satirized with the anarchistic Lampoon sense of humor. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. The book was an issue of the fictional "Ohio Republican-Democrat," a tabloid style newspaper. In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. O'Rourke and John Hughes. Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:. In 1978 National Lampoon released the book "National Lampoon's Sunday Newspaper Parody" which was edited by P.J.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:. sponsorship or approval' by the president," referring to Title 18, 713, but then went on to ask that the letter be considered a formal application asking for permission to use the seal. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers. Klaskin, the Onion's lawyer, is quoted in the New York Times as saying "It is inconceivable that anyone would think that, by using the seal, The Onion intends to 'convey.. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. The letter written by Rochelle H. As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. The Onion has responded with a letter asking for formal use of the Seal in accordance with the Executive Order, while still declaring that the use is legitimate under Title 18, 713.

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series. 11649), but which allows for exceptions to be granted upon formal request. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode. No. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. Ord. The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. However, by Executive Order President Richard Nixon specifically enumerated the allowed uses of the Presidential Seal which is more restictive than the above title (Ex.

Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself. This section would seem to allow the use of the presidential seal by The Onion. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Whoever knowingly displays any printed or other likeness of the great seal of the United States, or of the seals of the President or the Vice President of the United States, or the seal of the United States Senate, or the seal of the United States House of Representatives, or the seal of the United States Congress, or any facsimile thereof, in, or in connection with, any advertisement, poster, circular, book, pamphlet, or other publication, public meeting, play, motion picture, telecast, or other production, or on any building, monument, or stationery, for the purpose of conveying, or in a manner reasonably calculated to convey, a false impression of sponsorship or approval by the Government of the United States or by any department, agency, or instrumentality thereof, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than six months, or both. (emphasis added). (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. The law governing the Presidential Seal is contained in TITLE 18, 713 and contains the section:. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. Dixton, wrote a cease and desist letter to The Onion, asking the paper to stop using the presidential seal, which is used in an online segment poking fun at the President through parodies of his weekly radio address.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Bush, Grant M. The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005. In September 2005, the assistant counsel to President George W. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". Recently, an article from The Onion appeared on the 2005 Advanced Placement English Language and Composition test, in which students were asked to write an essay analyzing its use of satire.[4]. In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. [2] [3].

The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment. Columnist Ellen Makkai and others who believe the Harry Potter books recruit children to Satanism have also been taken in by The Onion's satire, using quotes from an Onion article as evidence for their claims. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. [1]. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. Exercise Televised. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. In late March 2004, Deborah Norville of MSNBC presented as genuine an article entitled Study: 58 Percent Of U.S.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. The Evening News is Beijing's most popular newspaper, claiming a circulation of 1.25 million. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters. sports franchises' threats to leave their home city unless new stadiums are built for them. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The article is a parody of U.S. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. Congress's threats to leave Washington for Memphis, Tennessee or Charlotte, North Carolina unless Washington, DC built them a new Capitol building with a retractable dome.

At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. The story discusses the U.S. On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. Unless New Capitol Is Built (they were apparently unaware of The Onion's satirical nature). The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005). On June 7, 2002, Reuters reported that the Beijing Evening News republished, in the international news page of its June 3 edition, translated portions of Congress Threatens To Leave D.C. Patrick). to introduce democracy and protect their interests in the region, Bill Clinton declared himself "President for life.", Bob Dole was shot, and Tipper Gore was being held hostage.

Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. As the recount process unfolded, the Onion published a satirical issue reporting chaos in America, in which Serbia sent peacekeepers to the U.S. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Gore. Hall. The noteworthiness of this story was largely a matter of luck: the paper went to press election night, before the contested election results which led to Bush v. The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Presidential election, when the future President remained undetermined, the Onion published a story titled Bush or Gore: "A New Era Dawns" which parodied the similarities between the two politicians.

. Just after the 2000 U.S. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005. In 1998, controversial minister Fred Phelps posted the Onion article '98 Homosexual-recruitment drive nearing goal on his God Hates Fags website as proof that homosexuals were indeed actively trying to get straight people to join their ranks. Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. Upon occasion the straight-faced manner in which the Onion reports non-existent happenings has resulted in outside parties mistakenly citing Onion stories as real news. The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes. The Onion's coverage of the September 11, 2001 attacks less than two weeks following the attacks was one of the earliest satirical reactions to those attacks, and was considered for a Pulitzer Prize.

Hall (David Fisher) in real life. This brings The Onion back to the open state it was in prior to April 2004 when the restrictive move towards a Premium Service was first initiated. Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Simultaneously The Onion discontinued their Premium Service which charged readers a substantial fee for additional content and vintage archives. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait. Club relaunched in a new design which presents the content as almost entirely discrete from The Onion itself. The Foot, The Dare. In late August 2005, The Onion's companion website The Onion A.V.

Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. As of 2004 the paper's founders are publishers of other weeklies: Keck of the Seattle weekly The Stranger and Johnson of Albuquerque's Weekly Alibi. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie. In early 2001, the company relocated its offices to New York City. Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. A possible origin for its name is a mispronunciation of "The Union", which is a fairly common name for a legitimate paper. Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series. The Onion remained a regional success until it began its website in 1996.

The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003). The Onion was founded in 1988 and originally published in Madison, Wisconsin by two juniors at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Tim Keck and Christopher Johnson; they sold it to colleagues the following year. Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams. The regular contributors include:. Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother. Each issue features columns by (fictional) regular and guest writers. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons. Past writers have included Max Cannon, Rich Dahm, Tim Harrod, David Javerbaum, Ben Karlin, Carol Kolb, Robert Siegel, and Jack Szwergold.

David in the first two seasons. Herman Zweibel (Zwiebel is German for onion), who has "held the position since 1901" and is rather insane; the real editor is currently Scott Dikkers, the managing editor is Peter Koechley, and the current writing staff comprises Todd Hanson, Maria Schneider, John Krewson, Joe Garden, and Chris Karwowski, as well as the graphics work of Mike Loew and Chad Nackers. Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. The Onion's fictional editor is T. Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles. . Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show. Both print and online editions of The Onion are published on Wednesdays.

The show was cancelled after 11 episodes. The staff of the Onion have also produced numerous books, including Our Dumb Century, Finest News Reporting, and Dispatches from the Tenth Circle. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. As well:. Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina. The newspaper was revamped on August 31, 2005, which changed the layout of the website homepage. HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired. Regular features of The Onion include:.

Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot. Club blogs and reader forums, and presents itself as an almost-separate entity from The Onion itself. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline. Club has its own domain, includes its own regular features (including weekly sex advice column Savage Love), A.V. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc. The online incarnation of The A.V. Mathew St. The print edition also contains previews of upcoming live entertainment specific to cities where a print edition is published.

Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy. Club that features interviews, reviews of various newly-released media, and other weekly features. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.

    . The second half of the newspaper is a non-satirical — but still often humorous — entertainment section called The A.V. Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Obsession with fame and celebrity are frequently satirized, as well as the general credulousness of the public. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode. The paper often reports on everyday events in a sensationalistic manner ("Area Man Confounded by Buffet Procedure").

    The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. It parodies traditional newspaper features and styles. Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life. The Onion's articles comment on current events, both real and imagined (an example of the latter: "All Americans Issued Life Jackets for Some Reason"). Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death. Paul, Denver/Boulder, and San Francisco. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America. As of May 2005 its print editions are distributed in Madison, Milwaukee, New York City, Chicago, Minneapolis-St.

    The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. It contains satirical articles as well as a general entertainment section. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball. The Onion is a parody newspaper published weekly in print and on the Internet. Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. "Embedded in America": The Onion Ad Nauseam Complete News Archives Volume 16 (2005, ISBN 1400054567). Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes). "Fanfare for the Area Man": The Onion Ad Nauseam Complete News Archives Volume 15 (2004, ISBN 1400054559).

    Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes). and Them": The Onion Ad Nauseam: Complete News Archives Volume 14 (2003, ISBN 140004961X). Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes). "Relations Break Down Between U.S. Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes). The Onion Ad Nauseam: Complete News Archives Volume 13 (2002, ISBN 1400047242). Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes). Dispatches from the Tenth Circle: The Best of The Onion (2001, ISBN 0609808346).

    2: Everything Ends, 2005. The Onion's Finest News Reporting, Volume 1 (2000, ISBN 0609804634). Six Feet Under, Vol. Our Dumb Century: The Onion Presents 100 Years of Headlines from America's Finest News Source (1999, ISBN 0609804618). Six Feet Under, 2002. Gorzo the Mighty, the Emperor of the Universe, villain in the style of 1930s science fiction. The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell. Jackie Harvey, a ridiculously uninformed media critic who writes the column The Outside Scoop.

    Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix. Jean Teasdale, an overweight nerdish woman with kitsch tastes, whose constantly upbeat attitude always finds the bright side of her otherwise depressing white trash life. Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Smoove B, a smooth talking ladies' man who insists on the best of everything for his dates. Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]. Herbert Kornfeld, Accounts Receivable Supervisor, a white man with a boring desk job who speaks in gangsta rap-isms and ebonics. Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]. He is similar to the Comic Book Guy from The Simpsons.

    Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]. Larry Groznic, an overweight geek with an obsession for subcultural fandoms. Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]. Jim Anchower, a slacker and stoner with a different job every few weeks, whose musical tastes are stuck in 1970s rock and roll. Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes). Jackie Harvey was given his own blog. Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes). A daily fictional stock market analysis titled "Stock Watch", a web opinion poll titled "QuickPoll", and "National News Highlights" of three regional stories, were added.

    Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes). "In the News" was retitled "From the Print Edition". Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes). "What Do You Think?" became "American Voices," with the question updated daily, and only three responders each day. Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes). Up until August 31, 2005, one of them was almost always a "systems analyst.". Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes). "What Do You Think?", a survey showing photos of the same six people, although their names and professions change every week.

    Loretta Sibley (3 episodes). "In the News" photograph and caption with no accompanying story (such as "Frederick's of Anchorage Debuts Crotchless Long Underwear", "National Association Advances Colored Person"). Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. "The ONION in History": a front page produced in the look of newspapers of an earlier era, satirizing that earlier style and content (these are all taken from the book "Our Dumb Century"). Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes). Cynical horoscopes. Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes). Random and bizarre editorials.

    Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes). Point-Counterpoint. Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes). "Infographic"), with a bulleted list of items on a theme. Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes). The "Infograph" (a.k.a. Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes). "STATshot", an illustrated statistical snapshot which parodies "USA Today Snapshots".

    Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes). Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes). Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes). Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes).

    Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes). Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes). Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes). Robert Foxworth - Dr.

    Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes). - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes). Ed Begley, Jr. Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes).

    Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes). Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes). Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes). Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes).

    Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes). Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes). Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes). Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes).

    Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes). Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes). Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes). Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes).

    Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes). Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes). Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes). Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes).

    Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons). Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer). Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled). Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play).

    Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes). List of Six Feet Under episodes.

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