Six Feet Under

Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005.

Overview

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Hall. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Patrick).

The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005).

On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment.

The Fisher family in an earlier season.

In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005.

Setting

The Fisher & Sons Funeral Home in 2001.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself.

The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode.

Cast & Characters

List of episodes

  • List of Six Feet Under episodes

Guest Starring roles

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series.

Celebrity cameos

  • Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes)
  • Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play)
  • Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled)
  • Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer)
  • Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons)

Recurring cast

  • Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes)
  • Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes)
  • Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes)
  • Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes)
  • Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes)
  • Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes)
  • Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes)
  • Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes)
  • Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes)
  • Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes)
  • Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes)
  • Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes)
  • Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes)
  • Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes)
  • Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes)
  • Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes)
  • Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes)
  • Ed Begley, Jr. - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes)
  • Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes)
  • Robert Foxworth - Dr. Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes)
  • Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes)
  • Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes)
  • Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes)
  • Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes)
  • Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes)
  • Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes)
  • Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes)
  • Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes)
  • Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes)
  • Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes)
  • Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes)
  • Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Loretta Sibley (3 episodes)
  • Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes)
  • Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes)
  • Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes)
  • Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes)
  • Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes)
  • Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes)

Promotionals

Promotional for the 2005 season, which features Claire driving her trademark lime green hearse into the sunset.

As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:

  • Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]
  • Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]
  • Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4]
  • Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]

Episode Recaps

  • Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix.
  • The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

Soundtracks

Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:

  • Six Feet Under, 2002
  • Six Feet Under, Vol. 2: Everything Ends, 2005

Scheduling Changes

In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes.

Timeframe

The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired.

  • Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes)
  • Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes)
  • Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes)
  • Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes)
  • Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes)

Trivia

  • Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball.
  • The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America.
  • Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death.
  • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life.
  • The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode.
  • Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.
    • Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy.
    • Mathew St. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc.
    • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline.
  • Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot.
  • HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired.
  • Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. The show was cancelled after 11 episodes.
  • Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show.
  • Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles.
  • Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. David in the first two seasons. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons.
  • Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother.
  • Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams.
  • The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003).
  • Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series.
  • Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie.
  • Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. The Foot, The Dare.
  • Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait.
  • Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Hall (David Fisher) in real life.
  • The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes.

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Not to be confused with the actual year the episode originally aired. The company has also been sued by Sedona in connection with this trading. The following is a timeframe which features the year the particular episode is set in. The company had been implicated in "naked" short sales on the stock of a company called Sedona Corp., disclosed that it was negotiating the SEC and hoped to reach a settlement that would likely include an injunction against future violations and "payment of a substantial civil penalty." Refco put $5 million in reserve in anticipation of the settlement. Six Feet Under returned to its old timeslot on July 10, 2005 after having been in the new timeslot for only five episodes. On May 16, 2005, the company disclosed that it had received a "Wells Notice," indicating it might face charges related to improper short selling at its Refco Securities unit and other matters. The Monday night experiment ultimately failed due to decreased ratings and complaints. In 2001, the NFA ordered Refco to pay $43 million to 13 investors after their Refco broker used bogus order tickets to clear trades.

Much to the chagrin of loyal viewers since every episode prior had aired on a Sunday, it would be foolish to move the series during its final season. The 1978 "cattle futures" trading scandal in which Hillary Clinton was allowed to trade large positions on inadequate capital, and possibly the allocation of profitable trading by others into her account, was played out in Refco accounts. The reason being to add an additional night of programming to the HBO lineup for their upcoming summer season which included Entourage and The Comeback. According to the Wall Street Journal, it was "among the most cited brokers in the business, according to data provided by the NFA.". In March 2005, HBO announced that the final season of Six Feet Under would be moved to Monday evenings starting June 6. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the National Futures Association took action against Refco and its units more than 100 times since the firm's founding. Two soundtrack albums, featuring music that had appeared in the series, were released:. Refco has not enjoyed a clean reputation with regulators.

The following songs were played during the teaser trailers for the seasons following Season 1:. He is currently under investigation by regulators who suspect he may have known something about Bennett's malfeasance. Music, according to creator Alan Ball, plays an integral role in the life of Six Feet Under, as it depicts the mood of the Fishers. It is unclear why the firm's Chief Financial Officer had not spotted the loan, but the firm's previous CFO, Robert Trosten, left Refco in October 2004 with a $45 million payout that was not disclosed in the firm's IPO prospectus. The promos often depicted the mood that may have occurred in previous episodes or foretold future scenarios. This left the position on the books for James to find. As Six Feet Under gradually became a topic in pop culture after Season 1, HBO came up with very stylish promotional ads to promote the anticipation of upcoming seasons. Apparently, in the fiscal quarter before the story broke, Bennett failed to execute his temporary Liberty Strategies-hidden repayment of debt.

Six Feet Under has had several guest star appearances by Hollywood actors either portraying themselves or playing a character on the series. The apparent fraud was caught by Peter James, Refco's newly hired controller. In all cases, the story carries on from where it left off in the previous episode. The Austrian National Bank and Financial Market Authority are investigating Bawag's involvement with Refco. Sometimes six months passes between each episode; on other occasions, a day. The Refco stock that collateralized the loan is now worthless, and on November 16, Bawag joined the line of people suing Refco, demanding 350 million Euros plus punitive damages in compensation for the company's failure to disclose information that would have discouraged Bawag from lending the money to Bennett. The show devotes considerable attention to continuity. The loan was granted on October 10, and Bennett used it to pay off the hidden $430 million.

Some of the deaths in the series have occurred in other periods, such as the 1970s and the 1950s; in these cases, the story is brought up to date so that the plot revolves around the ramifications of the death, rather than the death itself. On October 5, before news of the hidden loan was made public, Phillip Bennett applied for a 350 million euro loan, to be collateralized with his shares in Refco. The next episode is set on January 8, 2001 [1]. In 1999, Bawag purchased 10% of Refco in a private transaction, and had an outstanding loan of 75 million euros to Refco at the time the firm collapsed. (played by Richard Jenkins) dies in the pilot, which begins on December 24, 2000. Group, an Austrian bank that lent Bennett the money to repay Refco. Nathaniel Fisher, Sr. Ross Capital is run by Wolfgang Flottl, whose father used to run Bawag P.S.K.

Six Feet Under, being a show about death, is also a show about time; each episode is set in a particular month in a "contemporary universe" that spans the period from 2000–2005. Ross Capital has also been named by the Wall Street Journal's anonymous sources as one of the firms with losses that somehow led to Bennett's $430 million debt. The series concluded after five seasons, with the finale airing on August 21, 2005. If Refco did suffer a loss, I am confident that it was quite minimal relative to the $460 million receivable said to have been a key link in the firm’s debacle, or to the actual sums that the principals and key players of the firm took out many years later." The story in the Journal implies that Refco settled Niederhoffer's debt for positions that were worth less than he owed them, or perhaps that they accrued trading losses unwinding those positions. The producers and writers felt that after 63 episodes they had told their "story". I don't know how much money Refco received for these assets, or how it accounted for the transaction, or whether it ended up with a profit or loss. In November 2004, series creator and executive producer Alan Ball announced that the fifth season would be the show's last. "Refco received considerable assets from us as part of our agreement.

The shift cannot be clearly distinguished from the normal flow of the scene until an abrupt cut brings us slightly back in time and reveals the imaginary nature of the past moment. "There were no debts, loans, or any other financial obligations left open between us," Niederhoffer said. In the later seasons, another device is also used where a real conversation between two living characters slips into the imaginary and becomes unrealistic. 29, 1997, in the presence of two major law firms and under the close scrutiny of regulators. They represent the living character's internal dialogue by exposing it as an external conversation. Niederhoffer said on his Web site in response to these news articles that Refco wanted to take over the assets in his accounts and assume all the liabilities in order to meet capital requirements, and that he and Refco signed a formal agreement to that effect on Oct. Sometimes, the conversation is with other recurring dead characters, notably Nathaniel Fisher Sr., and, more recently, Nate's late wife Lisa. Though no detailed report on Bennett's transactions has been made public, anonymous sources cited by the Wall Street Journal and other publications have stated that the debt stemmed from losses in as many as 10 customer trading accounts, including that of Ross Capital, and the widely reported October 27, 1997, trading losses of hedge fund manager Victor Niederhoffer.

A recurring plot device consists in a character having an imaginary conversation with the person who died at the beginning of the episode. The hearing on Refco's request is scheduled for February 14. The only other episode that did not feature an opening death scene was the series finale, Everyone's Waiting, which instead began with a birth, and ended with the future death scenes of all of the main characters. On January 25, 2006, Refco asked the bankruptcy court to approve appointment of Christie's auction house to sell Refco's prized art collection, which includes photographs by Charles Ray and Andy Warhol. In Season 5, the episode All Alone was the first ever to open without a death, focusing instead on a death revealed at the end of the previous episode. The purchased Refco units will cease the use of the Refco name on Monday, November 28th. Each episode begins with a death—anything from drowning or heart attack to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome—and that death usually sets the tone for each episode, allowing the characters to reflect on their current fortunes and misfortunes in a way that is illuminated by the death and its aftermath. The company is an arm of the UK-based Man Group.

At the same time, it is a show that is distinguished by its unblinking focus on the topic of death, which it explores on multiple levels (personal, religious, and philosophical), rather than treating it as a convenient impetus for the solution of a murder. The company's bankruptcy auction of its commodities and futures business ended on November 10th, with the final purchaser being announced as Man Financial, a rival in the commodities and futures fields. On one level, the show is a conventional family drama, dealing with such issues as relationships, infidelity, homosexuality, and religion. Lee Partners, Grant Thornton, Credit Suisse First Boston, and Goldman Sachs. The show revolves around the world of Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home, a fictitious mortuary set in present day Los Angeles, California (2000–2005). As of October 27, shareholders of Refco have filed class action lawsuits against Refco, Thomas H. Patrick). Lee Partners, L.P., a highly regarded buyout fund, and the reputation of its managers has been similarly sullied.

Other regulars include mortician and family friend Federico Diaz (Freddy Rodriguez), Nate's longtime girlfriend and eventual wife Brenda Chenowith (Rachel Griffiths), and David's boyfriend and eventual husband Keith Charles (Mathew St. Their largest private investor was Thomas H. The Fisher clan also includes mother Ruth (Frances Conroy) and sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose). Their auditors, Grant Thornton, and the investment banks that handled the IPO, Credit Suisse First Boston, Goldman Sachs, and Bank of America Corp., all supposedly completed due diligence on the company, and all missed the CEO's hiding $430 million in bad debts. Hall. Refco had sold shares to the public in a public offering only two months before revealing the apparent fraud. The show, created by Alan Ball, stars Peter Krause as Nathaniel ("Nate") Fisher, Jr., the son of a funeral director who reluctantly becomes a partner in the family funeral business with his brother David, played by Michael C. Though of much smaller size, the regulatory impact of the scandal will be larger than for probably any other corporate failure except for Enron.

. However, the bankruptcy judge in charge of the case decided that the break-up fee was unjustified due to the other interested parties not demanding a similar fee, leading to the Flowers group withdrawing their bid. It first aired on June 3, 2001 and concluded its fifth and final season run in the USA on August 21, 2005. These offers were for a time rebuffed, as the Flowers-led group would receive a "break-up" fee if Refco were to sell itself to one of these other parties. Six Feet Under was a critically acclaimed and popular television drama produced by HBO. However, other bidders have emerged, including Interactive Brokers and Dubai Investments, the investment division of the country of Dubai, who have offered to buy the entire company. The series finale, Everyone's Waiting is the longest episode of the series clocking in at 75 minutes. LLC for about $768 million.

Hall (David Fisher) in real life. Flowers & Co. Amy Spanger who played Holly Duncan, (the death of the week's sister) in Static is the wife of Michael C. Refco also announced a tentative agreement to sell its regulated futures and commodities business, which isn't covered by the bankruptcy filing, to a group led by J.C. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz), Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher), Peter Facinelli (Jimmy) and Eric Balfour (Gabriel Dimas) were all in the 1998 movie, Can't Hardly Wait. However, the company subsequently submitted a revised document, claiming it had $16.5 billion in assets and $16.8 billion in liabilities. The Foot, The Dare. At the time, it declared assets of around $49 billion, which would have made it the fourth largest bankruptcy filing in American history.

Every episode written by writer and cartoonist, Bruce Eric Kaplan begins with the word "The" in the episode's title, e.g. filed for chapter 11 for a number of its businesses, to seek protection from its creditors on Monday, October 17, 2005. Holmes did not get the job but was called back to read for George's daughter, Maggie. Refco, Inc. Tina Holmes (Maggie Sibley) originally auditioned for the minor role of "Marci", Bettina's daughter in The Black Forest. Before the halt, the shares were trading for more than $28 per share, and as of October 19, they had dropped (on the pink sheets) to $0.80 per share. Justina Machado (Vanessa Diaz) became a series regular in 2005 after being in a guest starring role since Episode 2 of the series. As of October 19, trading of Refco's shares has been halted on the New York Stock Exchange, which is moving to permanently delist the shares.

The series converted to HDTV (16:9 widescreen) during the third season (2003). His lawyer has said that Bennett plans to fight the charges. Only two episodes of the series have been co-written: Episode 30, Nobody Sleeps and Episode 49, The Black Forest, which is very odd for a series since many writers on other shows are paired up into writing teams. mail, interstate commerce, and securities exchanges to lie to investors. Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) is only 12 years older than Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), despite playing his mother. Bennett was arrested and charged with one count of securities fraud for using U.S. Nate and Lisa during the third season and Claire in the fourth and fifth seasons. This announcement triggered a number of investigations, and on October 12 Mr.

David in the first two seasons. should no longer be relied upon.". Each Fisher sibling has lived in the Fisher coach house during the duration of the series. LLC and Refco Finance Inc. Caskets for the show are made by ABC Caskets in Los Angeles. 28, 2005, and May 31, 2005, taken as a whole, for each of Refco Inc., Refco Group Ltd. Rachel Griffiths' (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) second pregnancy in 2004 was written into the show. 28, 2004, Feb.

The show was cancelled after 11 episodes. 28, 2003, Feb. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) had a recurring role on Alan Ball's ABC series, Oh, Grow Up! which aired in 1999, two years prior to Six Feet Under. 28, 2002, Feb. Kathy Bates who was a director during the first three seasons went on to pursue a recurring role on the series as Ruth's friend, Bettina. As a result, Refco said, "its financial statements, as of, and for the periods ended, Feb. HBO renewed the series for a second season a week after the pilot aired. The law requires that such financial connections between corporation and its own top officers be shown as what is known as a related-party transaction in various financial statements.

Alan Ball had 13 days to shoot the pilot. On October 20, they announced plans to sue Refco. Freddy Rodriguez (Federico Diaz) appeared in 62 episodes, missing one episode 1.09 "Life's Too Short" due to Federico's storyline. Bennett secretly controlled. Patrick (Keith Charles) did not appear in three episodes of the series due to his Season 1 story arc. It is not yet clear if Liberty knew it was hiding sham transactions; management of the fund has claimed that they believed it was borrowing from one Refco subsidiary and lending to another Refco sub, and not lending to an entity that Mr. Mathew St. Bennett's company then paid the money back to Refco, leaving Liberty as the apparent borrower when financial statements were prepared.

Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) did not appear in four episodes of Season 3 due to her 2002 pregnancy. He arranged at the end of every quarter for a Refco subsidiary to lend money to a hedge fund called Liberty Corner Capital Strategy, which then lent the money to Refco Group Holdings. Hall (David Fisher), Frances Conroy (Ruth Fisher) and Lauren Ambrose (Claire Fisher) appeared in all 63 of the series' episodes.

    . Apparently, Bennett had been buying bad debts from Refco in order to prevent the company from needing to write them off, and was paying for the bad loans with money borrowed by Refco itself. Peter Krause (Nate Fisher), Michael C. Bennett, in the amount of approximately US$430 million. This was intended to be a recurring feature throughout the series but was dropped after the first episode. Refco said that through an internal review over the preceding weekend it discovered a receivable owed to the company by an unnamed entity that turned out to be controlled by Mr.

    The pilot episode features several spoof commercials for funeral homes and products. Bennett had hidden $430 million in bad debts from the company's auditors and investors, and had agreed to take a leave of absence. Rachel Griffiths (Brenda Chenowith Fisher) has a strong Australian accent in real life. entered crisis on Monday, October 10, 2005 when it announced that its chief executive officer and chairman, Phillip R. Alan Ball considers Los Angeles the world capital of the denial of death. Refco, Inc. in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, the actual location of The Filipino Federation of America. .

    The Fisher & Diaz Funeral Home is located at 2302 West 25th St. Investors had been pleased to buy shares because of Refco's history of profit growth -- they had reported 33% average annual gains in earnings over the four years before their initial public offering. HBO entertainment president, Carolyn Strauss proposed the idea to Ball. It closed the day over 25% higher than that, valuing the entire company at about $3.5 billion. Alan Ball conceived the premise to create the show after the death of his sister and father. Refco became a public company on August 11, 2005 with the sale of $26.5 million shares to the public at $22. Season 5: 2004 (2 episodes), 2005 (10 episodes). Though these filings have since been disowned by the company, they are probably roughly accurate in showing the firm's level of leverage.

    Season 4: 2003,(4 episodes), 2004 (8 episodes). The firm's balance sheet at the time of the collapse showed about $75 billion in assets and a roughly equal amount in liabilities. Season 3: 2002 (1 episode), 2003 (12 episodes). Friedman and Co." Prior to its collapse in October, 2005, the firm had over $4 billion in approximately 200,000 customer accounts, and it was the largest broker on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Season 2: 2001 (8 episodes), 2002 (5 episodes). It was founded in 1969 as "Ray E. Season 1: 2000 (pilot), 2001 (12 episodes). Refco (OTCBB: RFXCQ) is a New York-based financial services company, primarily known as a broker of commodities and futures contracts.

    2: Everything Ends, 2005. Six Feet Under, Vol. Six Feet Under, 2002. The song played during each episode recap is a 1995 single titled: Nothing Lies Still Long by Pell Mell.

    Seasons 1 & 5 feature the original version of the song while Seasons 2, 3, 4 feature the Rae & Christian remix. Trailers for upcoming episodes feature the Six Feet Under theme. Season 5: Breathe Me by Sia Furler [5]. Season 4: Feeling Good by Nina Simone [4].

    Season 3: A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay [3]. Season 2: Heaven by Lamb [2]. Molly Parker - Rabbi Ari Hoffman (2 episodes). Harriet Sansom Harris - Catherine Collins (2 episodes).

    Lee Garlington - Fiona Kleinschmidt (2 episodes). Illeana Douglas - Angela (2 episodes). Jenna Fischer - Sharon Kinney (2 episodes). Bobby Cannavale - Javier (3 episodes).

    Loretta Sibley (3 episodes). Janice Lynde - Woman In Turquoise/Mrs. Julie White- Mitzi Dalton-Huntley (4 episodes). Michelle Trachtenberg - Celeste (4 episodes).

    Ricardo Antonio Chavira - Ramon Diaz (4 episodes). Catherine O'Hara - Carol Ward (4 episodes). Steffani Brass - Michaela Woodworth (5 episodes). Matt Malloy - Roger Pasquese (6 episodes).

    Chris Messina - Ted Fairwell (6 episodes). Anne Ramsay - Jackie Feldman (6 episodes). Patricia Clarkson - Sarah O'Connor (6 episodes). Kellie Waymire - Melissa (6 episodes).

    Jeff Yagher - Hoyt Woodworth (6 episodes). Julie Dretzin - Barb Woodworth (6 episodes). Bernard Chenowith (6 episodes). Robert Foxworth - Dr.

    Mena Suvari - Edie (7 episodes). - Hiram Gunderson (8 episodes). Ed Begley, Jr. Idalis DeLeon - Sophia Morales (8 episodes).

    Justin Theroux - Joe (8 episodes). Melissa Marsala - Angelica Suarez (8 episodes). Garrison Hershberger - Matthew Gilardi (8 episodes). Peter Facinelli - Jimmy (9 episodes).

    Kathy Bates - Bettina (10 episodes). Sprague Grayden - Anita Miller (12 episodes). Tina Holmes - Maggie Sibley (13 episodes). Rainn Wilson - Arthur Martin (13 episodes).

    Peter Macdissi - Olivier Castro-Staal (15 episodes). Ed O'Ross - Nikolai (18 episodes). Richard Jenkins - Nathaniel Fisher (20 episodes). Joanna Cassidy - Margaret Chenowith (20 episodes).

    Ben Foster - Russell Corwin (22 episodes). Lili Taylor - Lisa Kimmel Fisher (23 episodes). Jeremy Sisto - Billy Chenowith (29 episodes). Brenna and Bronwyn Tosh - Maya Fisher (37 episodes).

    Susie Bright (Episode 57, The Rainbow of Her Reasons). Chris Harrison (Episode 52, A Coat of White Primer). Nicole Richie (Episode 51, Untitled). Ellen DeGeneres (Episode 42, Parallel Play).

    Leeza Gibbons (Episode 22, Someone Else's Eyes). List of Six Feet Under episodes.

08-05-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.