Oprah Winfrey

It has been suggested that Legends Weekend be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)

Oprah Winfrey (born January 29, 1954) is an American talk show host and an Academy Award nominated actress. She is one of the most successful entrepreneurs and television personalities in the world. She is currently involved in many business ventures, but is most identified with her massively popular and eponymous talk show. She is currently ranked as the most powerful celebrity by Forbes magazine[1] as well as the ninth most powerful woman in the world.[2]She is the first African-American woman to become a billionaire.

Youth and early career

Winfrey was born Orpah Winfrey in Kosciusko, Mississippi to a moderately wealthy, Baptist family. The name on Winfrey's birth certificate is Orpah, after the Moabite woman in the Old Testament Book of Ruth, but her family and neighbours would often transpose the R and the P when pronouncing and writing her name; as a result, Oprah eventually became her accepted name.

Her mother, Vernita Lee, was a housemaid, and her father, Vernon Winfrey, a coal miner and later a barber. Her parents were unmarried and still teenagers when Oprah was born. After Winfrey was born, her mother travelled north for better job opportunities, and Winfrey spent her first six years living with her grandmother. Winfrey's grandmother taught her to read and took her to the local church, where she was nicknamed "The Preacher" for her ability to recite Bible verses.

As a child, Oprah showed signs of extraordinary intelligence and drive, such as learning to read at age two. At age six, Winfrey moved in with her mother, who was less supportive and encouraging than her grandmother. While there, she suffered abuse from her comparitively darker skin, such as being forced to sleep on the porch in the cold and other forms of verbal abuse based on her features. Oprah was raped at age 9, and was repeatedly molested by her mother's cousin's boyfriend. Oprah became progressively sexually premiscuous, and at age 14, she became pregnant and her mother sent her to live in better conditions with her father, Vernon, in Nashville, Tennessee. Winfrey gave birth to a premature boy who soon died. Vernon was strict but encouraging, and made her education a priority. Winfrey became an honors student and received a full scholarship to Tennessee State University, a historically Black institution, where she studied communications. At age 18, Winfrey won the Miss Black Tennessee beauty pageant.

Winfrey's grandmother has said that ever since Oprah could talk, she was "on stage". In her youth she played games interviewing her corncob doll and the crows on the fence of her family's property. But her true media career began at age seventeen, working at her high school radio show.

Working in local media, she was both the youngest news anchor and the first black female news anchor at Nashville's WTVF-TV. She moved to Baltimore's WJZ-TV in 1976 to co-anchor the six o'clock news. She was then recruited to join Richard Sher as co-host of WJZ's local talk show, People Are Talking, which premiered on August 14, 1978.

Career and success

Television

Oprah on the first national broadcast of The Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986.

In 1983, Winfrey relocated to Chicago, Illinois to host WLS-TV's low-rated half-hour morning talk show, AM Chicago. Her first episode aired on January 2, 1984. With Winfrey as the host, the show was so successful that it was renamed The Oprah Winfrey Show, expanded to a full hour, and broadcast nationally beginning September 8, 1986. Originally, the show followed traditional talk show formats. By the mid-1990s the shows adopted a more serious format, addressing issues that Winfrey thought were of direct importance and of crucial consequence to women. Winfrey began to do a lot of charity work, and her show featured people suffering from poverty or the victims of unfortunate accidents.

The Oprah Winfrey Show is extremely successful and popular, in large part due to the fact that Oprah is able to relate to her audience. She overcame numerous difficulties in her childhood, including sexual abuse, which has made her want to be an advocate for children as well as women. She often interviews celebrities or other issues that involve the celebrity in some way, such as cancer, charity work, or substance abuse, although more often she focuses on ordinary people that have done extraordinary things or been involved in important current issues. Oprah frequently features the plight of others around the world in her show, and uses the show to promote charitable causes. Oprah's trademark in recent years has been her "Wildest Dreams" tour, which fulfills the dreams of many deserving people, be it a new house, an encounter with a favourite performer, or a guest role on a popular TV show, who have been reported to her producers by loving friends and family. As well as the hour-long regular show, she tapes informal discussions or Q&A sessions with celebrity guests after the show, which are broadcast as Oprah After The Show on her Oxygen network.

During a lawsuit against Winfrey (see Influence), she hired Dr. Phil McGraw's company Courtroom Sciences, Inc. to help her analyze and read the jury. Dr. Phil made such an impression on Winfrey that she invited him to appear on her show. He accepted the invitation and was a resounding success. McGraw appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show for several years before launching his own show, Dr. Phil, in 2004, which is produced by Winfrey's production company, Harpo Productions.

Perhaps Oprah's most famous recent show was the first episode of the nineteenth season of The Oprah Winfrey Show in the fall of 2004. During the show each member of the audience received a new Pontiac G6 Sedan; the 276 cars were donated by Pontiac as part of a publicity stunt.

Winfrey recently made a deal to extend her show until the 2010 – 2011 season, by which time it will have been on the air for twenty-five years. She plans to host 140 episodes per season, until her final season, when it will return to its current number, 130. [3]

The 2004 Nobel Peace Prize Concert was hosted by Oprah and Tom Cruise. There were musical performances by Patti Labelle, Andrea Bocelli, Joss Stone, Chris Botti, Diana Krall, Tony Bennett and others. The concert was broadcasted in the United States on Dec. 23, 2004 by E!. An unofficial Oprah fanclub, also organized a petition drive [4] in 2005, to nominate Oprah for the Nobel Peace Prize.

As well as hosting and appearing on television shows, Winfrey co-founded the women's cable television network Oxygen. She is also the president of Harpo Productions (Oprah spelled backwards).

Film

In 1985, Winfrey co-starred in Steven Spielberg's epic adaptation of Alice Walker's award-winning novel The Color Purple. She earned immediate acclaim as Sofia, the distraught housewife. The following year Winfrey was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, but she lost to Anjelica Huston. Many believe this was due in part to the Academy's "anti-Spielberg" bias, thinking the film would have been better directed by an African-American. The Color Purple has now been made into a Broadway musical and opened late 2005, with Oprah credited as a producer.

In October 1998, Oprah produced and starred in the film Beloved, based upon Toni Morrison's Pulitzer Prize winning novel of the same name. To prepare for her role as Sethe, the protagonist and former slave, Oprah experienced a 24-hour simulation of the experience of slavery, which included being tied up and blindfolded and left alone in the woods. Critics said this would not even come close to the experience. In the run-up to filming, and in an attempt to break the only field she hadn't conquered -- film stardom -- Oprah lost a great deal of weight and underwent rejuvenative plastic surgery, becoming the Oprah that the public is now accustomed to seeing. However, despite major advertising, including two episodes of her talk show dedicated solely to the film, it opened to sour critical reviews and poor box-office results, losing approximately $30 million.

In 2005, Harpo Productions released another film adaptation of a famous American novel, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). The made-for-television film Their Eyes Were Watching God was based upon a teleplay by Suzan-Lori Parks, and starred Halle Berry in the lead female role.

Winfrey was the recipient of the first Bob Hope Humanitarian Award at the 2002 Emmy Awards for services to television and film. In 2004, Oprah and her team filmed and episode of her show entitled Oprah's Christmas Kindness, in which Oprah, her best friend Gail, Stedman, and some crew members travelled to South Africa to bring attention to the plight of young children affected by poverty and AIDS. During the 21-day whirlwind trip, Oprah and her crew visited schools and oprhanages in poverty-stricken areas, and at different set-up points in the areas they visited distributed christmas presents to 50,000 children, with dolls for the girls and soccer balls for the boys. In addition, each child was given a backpack full of school supplies and received two sets of school uniforms for their sex, two sets of socks, two sets of underwear, and a pair of shoes. Throughout the show, Oprah appealed to viewers to donate money to Oprah's Angel Network for poverty-stricken and AIDS-affected children in Africa, and she personally would oversee where that money is spent. From that show alone, viewers around the world donated over (US)$7,000,000.

Books and magazines

Winfrey publishes her own magazines, O, The Oprah Magazine and O at Home. She is also a prolific author.

Online

Oprah.com is a premiere women's lifestyle website, offering advice on everything from the mind, body and spirit to food, home and relationships. It provides comprehensive resources related to The Oprah Winfrey Show and exclusive interactive content based on O, The Oprah Magazine. In addition, the website has unique original content, including Oprah's Book Club, which offers free in-depth reading guides for each book selection, online discussion groups and Q&A sessions with literary experts. In 2003, Winfrey relaunched Oprah's Book Club with an online component and it quickly became the largest book club in the world, attracting more than 670,000 members. That same year, Oprah.com also launched Live Your Best Life, an interactive multimedia workshop based on her sold-out national speaking tour that features Oprah's personal life stories and life lessons along with a workbook of thought-provoking exercises.

Since then, Winfrey has also used Oprah.com to continue her crusade to help those in need and against pedophiles by raising over 3 million dollars for Katrina victims and helping to capture 3 convicted child predators. Oprah.com averages more than 100 million page views and more than three million users per month. The book club has since grown to over 800,000 members.

Future projects

Winfrey's latest television project will be developing and producing a new talk show for popular Food Network celebrity chef, Rachael Ray, which will begin airing sometime in 2006.

Recently, Winfrey has been interviewed several times by Anderson Cooper, with whom she has completed several side projects. This has fueled a rumour that Winfrey and Cooper are planning to make a movie together.

Personal life

Oprah Winfrey is believed to own a net worth over $1.3 billion USD according to the 2005 Forbes Magazine Issue. She currently lives on "The Promised Land", her 42 acre (170,000 m²) ocean view estate in Montecito, California, outside of Santa Barbara. Rumors state that Winfrey was at a party the previous owners were throwing and so fell in love with the estate that she was reported to have purchased it by writing a personal check for $50,000,000 USD, although it was not for sale. Winfrey also owns a house in Lavalette, New Jersey.

Winfrey has never married but it is widely assumed that she has lived with her partner Stedman Graham for almost twenty years. The relationship of Oprah and Stedman has been documented through the years with numerous romantic tabloid articles often accompanied by color spreads of the couple at home and on lavish vacations. While most people are convinced the relationship is genuine, some speculate that it is more likely a matter of public relations, and, in fact, Graham is the co-founder and owner of his own public relations firm.

Her celebrity status notwithstanding, the billionaire Winfrey served on the jury of a murder trial jury in 2004. The trial was held in Chicago, Illinois, and involved a man accused of murder after an argument over a counterfeit fifty-dollar bill. The jury voted to convict the man of murder.[5] [6]

In June 2005, Winfrey was allegedly denied access to the Hermès company's flagship store in Paris, France. Winfrey arrived fifteen minutes after the store's closing time, and the doors were locked while the last of the shoppers were being attended to. Winfrey felt she could enter the store after closing time, but when told that they were indeed closed, she claimed she was mistaken for a poor black woman and denied entrance because the store had been "having problems with North Africans lately." In September 2005, Hermès USA CEO Robert Chavez was a guest on The Oprah Winfrey Show and sincerely apologized for not catering to "O" on behalf of the store. In a later show, Winfrey changed her report of the event and no longer claimed she was denied entrance on account of her race.

On December 1, 2005, Oprah appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman to promote the new Broadway musical The Color Purple, of which she was a producer, joining the host for the first time in sixteen years. The episode was hailed by some as the "television event of the decade" and helped Letterman attract his largest audience in more than 11 years: 13.45 million viewers.[7] Although a much-rumored feud was said to have been the cause of the rift, both Winfrey and Letterman balked at such talk. "I want you to know, it's really over, whatever you thought was happening," said Winfrey.

In 1998, Oprah began Oprah's Angel Network, a charity aimed at encouraging people around the world to make a difference in the lives of underprivileged others. Accordingly, Oprah's Angel Network supports charitable projects and provides grants to nonprofit organizations around the world that share this vision. To date, Oprah's Angel Network has raised more than (US)$27,000,000. Oprah personally covers all administrative costs associated with the charity, so 100% of all funds raised go to charity programs. The Angel Network

Oprah's show is based in Chicago, Illinois, so she spends time there but otherwise resides in California. Reportedly, she has recently purchased several properties on Maui, Hawaii.

Influence

Winfrey's prominence as a media personality has led her to be highly influential, both intentionally and unwittingly.

In the late 1990s, Winfrey introduced a new segment on her television show: Oprah's Book Club. The segment focused on new books and classics, and often brought obscure novels to popular attention. The book club became such a powerful force that whenever Winfrey introduced a new book as her book-club selection, it instantly became a best-seller (known as the Oprah Effect); for example, when she selected the classic John Steinbeck novel East of Eden, it soared to the top of the book charts. Being recognized by Oprah often means a million additional book sales for an author.

The sign in front of Oprah Winfrey's Chicago based Harpo Studios.

Oprah's show often contributes to the fabric of American pop culture. Many of her guests have become instant celebrities.

Such heavy influence upon both America and the world has led many to become conscious of her effect on culture. Some feel as if Oprahs influence is irresponsible. Either way, there seems to be no slowing down for Oprah whose followers seem to support her no matter what. During a show about mad cow disease with Howard Lyman (aired on April 16, 1996), Winfrey exclaimed, "It has just stopped me cold from eating another burger!" Texas cattlemen sued her and Lyman in early 1998 for "false defamation of perishable food" and "business disparagement," claiming that Winfrey's remarks subsequently sent cattle prices tumbling, costing beef producers some USD$12 million. After a trial spanning over two months in an Amarillo, Texas court in the thick of cattle country, the jury found on February 26 that Winfrey was not guilty, did not act with malice, and was not liable for damages. After the trial, she received a postcard from Rosie O'Donnell reading, "Congratulations, you beat the meat!"

Criticism

Some believe there to be a gender bias in some of Winfrey's shows. Those about infidelity, for example, often focus either on cheating men or on cheated-on wives. Some critics say Winfrey makes inadequate reference to women who cheat or may only make cursory comments.

Oprah's Book Club has occasionally chosen books which have proven to be modestly controversial. Most notably, one of its attempted selectees, Jonathan Franzen objected to his book The Corrections being chosen, believing that its selection as an Oprah's Book Club book would demean his literary reputation. "She's picked some good books, but she's picked enough schmaltzy, one dimensional ones that I cringe. . ." he said in a www.Powells.com interview.

Oprah confronts James Frey, January 26, 2006

In a more recent controversy, Winfrey's selection of the drug rehab book A Million Little Pieces is under scrutiny, with the online publication The Smoking Gun arguing that its author James Frey is guilty of subterfuge and deceit in composing his allegedly autobiographical memoir. While Winfrey initially supported Frey, she reversed only ten days later, confronting him on her show with barely concealed outrage. She also expressed dismay with the publisher for not telling her about the embellishments. Winfrey removed the references to Frey's work on the main page of her webpage but left references in the Oprah's Book Club section earlier in the week.

It has also been noted that the occasions on which various guest celebrities on her show "reach out" and perform charitable acts (such as performing for sick children) seem to nearly always coincide with a release of a project in which they have a prominent role (such as starring in a movie or releasing a music album). Some have said that this trivializes and degrades the various causes they help by turning them into vessels for marketing and have even suggested that it verges on exploitation, especially when children are involved.

Winfrey is also charged with being too self-focused and also very insecure. For instance, Harpo Productions makes employees sign contracts prohibiting them from disclosing anything about their time employed with her. Many staffers have said off the record that she can be egotistical and difficult to work with.

Works

Television

  • Before Women Had Wings (1997) (also producer)
  • There Are No Children Here (1993)
  • Lincoln (1992) (documentary) (narrator)
  • Brewster Place (1990-1991)
  • The W Brewster Place (1989) (also executive producer)

Movies

  • Bee Movie (2007) (voice) (currently in pre-production)
  • Charlotte's Web (2006) (voice) (currently filming)
  • Emmanuel's Gift (2005) (documentary) (narrator)
  • Brothers of the Borderland (2004) (short subject) (narrator)
  • Unchained Memories: Readings from the Slave Narratives (2003) (documentary) (narrator)
  • Beloved (1998)
  • The Lives of Quincy Jones (1990) (documentary)
  • Throw Momma from the Train (1987) (Cameo)
  • Native Son (1986)
  • The Color Purple (1985)

Books by Oprah

  • Make the Connection : Ten Steps to a Better Body and a Better Life, by Bob Greene and Oprah Winfrey, 1999; ISBN 0786882980.
  • Journey to Beloved, by Oprah Winfrey and Ken Regan, 1998; 0786864583.
  • The Uncommon Wisdom of Oprah Winfrey : A Portrait in Her Own Words, by Bill Adler (ed) and Oprah Winfrey, 1997; ISBN 1559724196.
  • A Journal of Daily Renewal : The Companion to Make the Connection, by Bob Greene and Oprah Winfrey, 1996; ISBN 0786882158.
  • In The Kitchen With Rosie: Oprah's Favorite Recipes, by Rosie Daley and Oprah Winfrey, 1994; ISBN 0679434046.

Books about Oprah

Oprah has many books written about her such as

The Gospel according to Oprah by Marcia Z. Nelson


This page about oprah includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about oprah
News stories about oprah
External links for oprah
Videos for oprah
Wikis about oprah
Discussion Groups about oprah
Blogs about oprah
Images of oprah

Nelson. Bud Grant coached four Vikings losses in the 1970s, Marv Levy coached four consecutive losses with the Buffalo Bills in the 1990s, and Dan Reeves coached four losses between two teams (three with the Denver Broncos and one with the Atlanta Falcons). The Gospel according to Oprah by Marcia Z. Don Shula, Bill Parcells, Dan Reeves, Dick Vermeil, and Mike Holmgren all took more than one team to the Super Bowl. Oprah has many books written about her such as. And recently, Bill Belichick won three with the Patriots. Many staffers have said off the record that she can be egotistical and difficult to work with. Joe Gibbs also won three Super Bowls with the Washington Redskins.

For instance, Harpo Productions makes employees sign contracts prohibiting them from disclosing anything about their time employed with her. Bill Walsh won three with the San Francisco 49ers. Winfrey is also charged with being too self-focused and also very insecure. Chuck Noll won four in the 1970's with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Some have said that this trivializes and degrades the various causes they help by turning them into vessels for marketing and have even suggested that it verges on exploitation, especially when children are involved. Tom Landry also coached two winners and three losers with the Dallas Cowboys. It has also been noted that the occasions on which various guest celebrities on her show "reach out" and perform charitable acts (such as performing for sick children) seem to nearly always coincide with a release of a project in which they have a prominent role (such as starring in a movie or releasing a music album). Don Shula coached two different teams: a loss with the Baltimore Colts and two wins and three losses with the Miami Dolphins.

Winfrey removed the references to Frey's work on the main page of her webpage but left references in the Oprah's Book Club section earlier in the week. Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers won the first two. She also expressed dismay with the publisher for not telling her about the embellishments. Super Bowl wins and losses tend to cluster around a few head coaches. While Winfrey initially supported Frey, she reversed only ten days later, confronting him on her show with barely concealed outrage. The most recent is the Philadelphia Eagles, who lost Super Bowl XXXIX to the New England Patriots in the 2004 season (played on February 6, 2005), who posted a 6 wins, 10 losses, no ties record in the 2005 season. In a more recent controversy, Winfrey's selection of the drug rehab book A Million Little Pieces is under scrutiny, with the online publication The Smoking Gun arguing that its author James Frey is guilty of subterfuge and deceit in composing his allegedly autobiographical memoir. There are notable exceptions to this pattern, such as the Buffalo Bills who went to the Super Bowl and lost four years in a row, from XXV to XXVIII.

." he said in a www.Powells.com interview. This effect can be traced to the loss of momentum a team has built up, accumulating injuries, losing successful free agents between seasons, and the aging of talented players. "She's picked some good books, but she's picked enough schmaltzy, one dimensional ones that I cringe. The season after a Super Bowl loss, a team usually returns with a losing, or mediocre at best, record. Most notably, one of its attempted selectees, Jonathan Franzen objected to his book The Corrections being chosen, believing that its selection as an Oprah's Book Club book would demean his literary reputation. Commentators and sports analysts note a tendency for teams that have made it to the Super Bowl and lost, to collapse the following season. Oprah's Book Club has occasionally chosen books which have proven to be modestly controversial. With the new television contracts beginning in 2006, NBC, which last telecast Super Bowl XXXII in 1998, will take ABC's place in the network rotation starting with Super Bowl XLIII in 2009.

Some critics say Winfrey makes inadequate reference to women who cheat or may only make cursory comments. Super Bowl XXXVIII was shown on CBS, Super Bowl XXXIX was shown on FOX, and Super Bowl XL will be shown on ABC, which will be the final NFL game broadcast on that network for the foreseeable future. Those about infidelity, for example, often focus either on cheating men or on cheated-on wives. In the United States it is currently shared among three of the four major television networks: ABC, CBS, and FOX. Some believe there to be a gender bias in some of Winfrey's shows. The television network showing the game changes from year to year. After the trial, she received a postcard from Rosie O'Donnell reading, "Congratulations, you beat the meat!". While most home teams in the Super Bowl choose to wear their colored jerseys, only the Cowboys in XIII and XXVII, the Washington Redskins in XVII, and the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XL have worn white as the home team.

After a trial spanning over two months in an Amarillo, Texas court in the thick of cattle country, the jury found on February 26 that Winfrey was not guilty, did not act with malice, and was not liable for damages. The Dallas Cowboys wore their rarely used blue uniform tops in Super Bowl V, and lost to the then-Baltimore Colts, which has led to the widely held belief that the Cowboys do not play well in their blue shirts. During a show about mad cow disease with Howard Lyman (aired on April 16, 1996), Winfrey exclaimed, "It has just stopped me cold from eating another burger!" Texas cattlemen sued her and Lyman in early 1998 for "false defamation of perishable food" and "business disparagement," claiming that Winfrey's remarks subsequently sent cattle prices tumbling, costing beef producers some USD$12 million. Prior to that, the home team always wore the dark jerseys. Either way, there seems to be no slowing down for Oprah whose followers seem to support her no matter what. The home team is given the choice of either wearing their colored jerseys or their white ones; this started with Super Bowl XIII. Some feel as if Oprahs influence is irresponsible. The designated "home team" alternates between the NFC team in odd-numbered years (the Philadelphia Eagles in 2005), and the AFC team in even-numbered years (the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2006).

Such heavy influence upon both America and the world has led many to become conscious of her effect on culture. Neither of these stadiums has ever been a home to an NFL team. Many of her guests have become instant celebrities. However, Super Bowl XIV (which involved the then-Los Angeles Rams) was played at nearby Pasadena's Rose Bowl stadium; and Super Bowl XIX (which involved the San Francisco 49ers) was played at the nearby Stanford Stadium on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto. Oprah's show often contributes to the fabric of American pop culture. Coincidentally, no NFL team has ever played the Super Bowl on its own home turf. Being recognized by Oprah often means a million additional book sales for an author. Louis, Missouri.

The book club became such a powerful force that whenever Winfrey introduced a new book as her book-club selection, it instantly became a best-seller (known as the Oprah Effect); for example, when she selected the classic John Steinbeck novel East of Eden, it soared to the top of the book charts. The last time the Los Angeles area hosted the game was Super Bowl XXVII in 1993; the area is currently not considered a possible venue after the league's two teams vacated the city in 1995: the Raiders moved back to Oakland, California, and the Rams moved to St. The segment focused on new books and classics, and often brought obscure novels to popular attention. After Hurricane Katrina damaged the Louisiana Superdome and the city, the game might never return to New Orleans. In the late 1990s, Winfrey introduced a new segment on her television show: Oprah's Book Club. Miami has been selected to host two future games: Super Bowl XLI in 2007 and Super Bowl XLIV in 2010. Winfrey's prominence as a media personality has led her to be highly influential, both intentionally and unwittingly. Over half of the Super Bowls have been played in one of the following three cities: New Orleans, Louisiana (9 times), Miami, Florida (8 times) and the Greater Los Angeles Area (7 total, 5 times at Pasadena's Rose Bowl stadium and twice at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum).

Reportedly, she has recently purchased several properties on Maui, Hawaii. The only three cold-winter-climate cities to have hosted the Super Bowl are Pontiac, Michigan, Detroit, Michigan and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Oprah's show is based in Chicago, Illinois, so she spends time there but otherwise resides in California. To this date, Super Bowls have either been played in cities with mildly warm winter climates, or in domed stadiums where weather is not an issue. The Angel Network. Cities compete to host the game in a selection bidding process similar to ones used by the Olympic Games and soccer's World Cup. Oprah personally covers all administrative costs associated with the charity, so 100% of all funds raised go to charity programs. The location of the Super Bowl is chosen by the NFL well in advance, usually 3 to 5 years before the game.

To date, Oprah's Angel Network has raised more than (US)$27,000,000. This also led to the FCC cracking down on indecency and fining CBS $225,000 for the incident, as well as fining each of CBS's then twenty owned and operated stations. Accordingly, Oprah's Angel Network supports charitable projects and provides grants to nonprofit organizations around the world that share this vision. The NFL, embarrassed from the incident, permanently banned MTV from doing another halftime show in any capacity. In 1998, Oprah began Oprah's Angel Network, a charity aimed at encouraging people around the world to make a difference in the lives of underprivileged others. It also didn't help matters that the game was airing on CBS, and their then-corporate sister company within Viacom, MTV, produced the halftime show. "I want you to know, it's really over, whatever you thought was happening," said Winfrey. Many conspiracy theorists think that this was done intentionally to get everyone's attention, possibly so that Janet could get the attention away from her brother Michael Jackson, who was facing child molestation charges at the time.

The episode was hailed by some as the "television event of the decade" and helped Letterman attract his largest audience in more than 11 years: 13.45 million viewers.[7] Although a much-rumored feud was said to have been the cause of the rift, both Winfrey and Letterman balked at such talk. In 2004, it was during halftime at Super Bowl XXXVIII that Janet Jackson had her now-infamous wardrobe malfunction after Justin Timberlake "accidentally" ripped off a piece of her top, exposing her right breast with a star-like ring surrounding the nipple. On December 1, 2005, Oprah appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman to promote the new Broadway musical The Color Purple, of which she was a producer, joining the host for the first time in sixteen years. John will perform the national anthem; and The Rolling Stones will play during the halftime show. In a later show, Winfrey changed her report of the event and no longer claimed she was denied entrance on account of her race. Super Bowl XL in 2006 is scheduled to feature Stevie Wonder, Joss Stone, and John Legend during the pregame ceremonies; Aaron Neville, Aretha Franklin, and Dr. Winfrey felt she could enter the store after closing time, but when told that they were indeed closed, she claimed she was mistaken for a poor black woman and denied entrance because the store had been "having problems with North Africans lately." In September 2005, Hermès USA CEO Robert Chavez was a guest on The Oprah Winfrey Show and sincerely apologized for not catering to "O" on behalf of the store. Because of the large number of viewers that the Super Bowl generates, a number of popular singers and musicians have performed during its pregame ceremonies, the halftime show, or even just singing the national anthem of the United States, "The Star-Spangled Banner".

Winfrey arrived fifteen minutes after the store's closing time, and the doors were locked while the last of the shoppers were being attended to. [5]. In June 2005, Winfrey was allegedly denied access to the Hermès company's flagship store in Paris, France. If the television show Las Vegas stays on the air when NBC gets their next Super Bowl Broadcast (which will be Super Bowl XLIII in 2009), they may not be allowed to promote the series during the entire block of programming. The jury voted to convict the man of murder.[5] [6]. Many groups are denied the chance to run Super Bowl ads on various grounds, but Las Vegas is the only city to be denied in such a fashion; the NFL has stated that it does not want the Super Bowl to be associated with the perception of Las Vegas as a gambling mecca. The trial was held in Chicago, Illinois, and involved a man accused of murder after an argument over a counterfeit fifty-dollar bill. The ban includes the game, as well as the pre-game and post-game shows.

Her celebrity status notwithstanding, the billionaire Winfrey served on the jury of a murder trial jury in 2004. In recent years, the NFL has denied the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority the opportunity to run Super Bowl ads for the city as a tourist destination. While most people are convinced the relationship is genuine, some speculate that it is more likely a matter of public relations, and, in fact, Graham is the co-founder and owner of his own public relations firm. Many people tune in to the Super Bowl solely to watch the very creative commercials. The relationship of Oprah and Stedman has been documented through the years with numerous romantic tabloid articles often accompanied by color spreads of the couple at home and on lavish vacations. Prices have increased each year, with reports citing a record $2.5 million (US) for a 30 second spot during Super Bowl XL in 2006. Winfrey has never married but it is widely assumed that she has lived with her partner Stedman Graham for almost twenty years. Famous commercial campaigns include the Budweiser "Bud Bowl" campaign, and the 1999 and 2000 dot-com ads.

Winfrey also owns a house in Lavalette, New Jersey. Following Apple Computer's 1984 commercial introducing the Apple Macintosh computer, directed by Ridley Scott, the broadcast of the Super Bowl became the premier showcase for high concept or simply extravagantly expensive commercials. Rumors state that Winfrey was at a party the previous owners were throwing and so fell in love with the estate that she was reported to have purchased it by writing a personal check for $50,000,000 USD, although it was not for sale. [4] Although the proliferation of cable and satellite television has undercut broadcast ratings somewhat in recent years, the game is still so popular that a number of networks actually schedule original programming, such as independently produced halftime entertainment, during the game, simply to take advantage of a large audience already in front of the television. She currently lives on "The Promised Land", her 42 acre (170,000 m²) ocean view estate in Montecito, California, outside of Santa Barbara. Super Bowl XVI is #4 on Nielsen's list of top-rated programs of all time, and 3 other Super Bowls (XII, XVII, XX) made the top 10. Oprah Winfrey is believed to own a net worth over $1.3 billion USD according to the 2005 Forbes Magazine Issue. The highest rated game according to Nielsen was Super Bowl XVI in 1982 which was watched in 49.1% of households (73 share) or 40,020,000 households at the time.

This has fueled a rumour that Winfrey and Cooper are planning to make a movie together. [3]. Recently, Winfrey has been interviewed several times by Anderson Cooper, with whom she has completed several side projects. Approximately half of the remaining 2 million worldwide viewers watched from the United Kingdom. Winfrey's latest television project will be developing and producing a new talk show for popular Food Network celebrity chef, Rachael Ray, which will begin airing sometime in 2006. In actual fact, Super Bowl XXXIX in 2005 was watched by 93 million viewers in total, of which 98 percent were in North America [2]. The book club has since grown to over 800,000 members. There is a popular urban myth regarding the Super Bowl — that the game is watched in 234 countries by 1 billion people [1], a fact unlikely to be true considering the time of the event, and the lack of popularity American Football has outside of the United States.

Oprah.com averages more than 100 million page views and more than three million users per month. It is also estimated that 130-140 million tune into some part of the game. Since then, Winfrey has also used Oprah.com to continue her crusade to help those in need and against pedophiles by raising over 3 million dollars for Katrina victims and helping to capture 3 convicted child predators. This means that on average, 80 to 90 million Americans are tuned into the Super Bowl at any given moment. That same year, Oprah.com also launched Live Your Best Life, an interactive multimedia workshop based on her sold-out national speaking tour that features Oprah's personal life stories and life lessons along with a workbook of thought-provoking exercises. households, and 60 percent of all homes tuned into television during the game). In 2003, Winfrey relaunched Oprah's Book Club with an online component and it quickly became the largest book club in the world, attracting more than 670,000 members. The game tends to have high Nielsen television ratings which usually come in around a 40 rating and 60 share (i.e., on average, 40 percent of all U.S.

In addition, the website has unique original content, including Oprah's Book Club, which offers free in-depth reading guides for each book selection, online discussion groups and Q&A sessions with literary experts. By any measure, the Super Bowl is one of the most watched television programs of the year. It provides comprehensive resources related to The Oprah Winfrey Show and exclusive interactive content based on O, The Oprah Magazine. Following his death in September 1970, the trophy was named the Vince Lombardi Trophy, first awarded at Super Bowl V in Miami. Oprah.com is a premiere women's lifestyle website, offering advice on everything from the mind, body and spirit to food, home and relationships. The winning team gets the Vince Lombardi Trophy, named for the coach of the Green Bay Packers, who won the first two Super Bowl games. She is also a prolific author. The game remains his crowning achievement and was an important factor in him being selected by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most important people of the 20th century.

Winfrey publishes her own magazines, O, The Oprah Magazine and O at Home. His leadership guided them into the merger agreement and cemented the preeminence of the Super Bowl. From that show alone, viewers around the world donated over (US)$7,000,000. The NFL commissioner at that time, Pete Rozelle, is often considered the mastermind of both the merger and the Super Bowl. Throughout the show, Oprah appealed to viewers to donate money to Oprah's Angel Network for poverty-stricken and AIDS-affected children in Africa, and she personally would oversee where that money is spent. As of December 2005, former AFL teams have won 10 Super Bowls, pre-1970 NFL teams have won 23 games, and two games have been won by teams created after 1970. In addition, each child was given a backpack full of school supplies and received two sets of school uniforms for their sex, two sets of socks, two sets of underwear, and a pair of shoes. Since then, the Super Bowl has featured the champions of the AFC and NFC.

During the 21-day whirlwind trip, Oprah and her crew visited schools and oprhanages in poverty-stricken areas, and at different set-up points in the areas they visited distributed christmas presents to 50,000 children, with dolls for the girls and soccer balls for the boys. When the NFL and AFL merged into one combined league for the 1970 season, three NFL teams joined the 10 AFL teams to form the American Football Conference (AFC), and the other 13 teams became the National Football Conference (NFC). In 2004, Oprah and her team filmed and episode of her show entitled Oprah's Christmas Kindness, in which Oprah, her best friend Gail, Stedman, and some crew members travelled to South Africa to bring attention to the plight of young children affected by poverty and AIDS. One year later, the American Football League's Kansas City Chiefs defeated the NFL Minnesota Vikings 23-7 and won Super Bowl IV in New Orleans, the last World Championship game played between the champions of two leagues. Winfrey was the recipient of the first Bob Hope Humanitarian Award at the 2002 Emmy Awards for services to television and film. That all changed with perhaps the biggest upset in American sports history, the AFL's New York Jets defeat of the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III in Miami. The made-for-television film Their Eyes Were Watching God was based upon a teleplay by Suzan-Lori Parks, and starred Halle Berry in the lead female role. After the NFL's Green Bay Packers convincingly won the first two Super Bowls, some team owners feared for the future of the merger, since many doubted that AFL teams could compete with their NFL counterparts.

In 2005, Harpo Productions released another film adaptation of a famous American novel, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). Starting with the third contest in January 1969, the name "Super Bowl" became official. However, despite major advertising, including two episodes of her talk show dedicated solely to the film, it opened to sour critical reviews and poor box-office results, losing approximately $30 million. Not surprisingly, fans and media tended to use the shorter, unofficial name. In the run-up to filming, and in an attempt to break the only field she hadn't conquered -- film stardom -- Oprah lost a great deal of weight and underwent rejuvenative plastic surgery, becoming the Oprah that the public is now accustomed to seeing. Not having thought of one, the owners named the contest the AFL-NFL World Championship Game. Critics said this would not even come close to the experience. Hunt only meant his suggested name to be a stopgap until a better one could be found.

To prepare for her role as Sethe, the protagonist and former slave, Oprah experienced a 24-hour simulation of the experience of slavery, which included being tied up and blindfolded and left alone in the woods. The name was feasible because postseason college football games had long been known as "bowl games" (the term originates from the Rose Bowl Game, which was in turn named for the bowl-shaped stadium in which it is played). In October 1998, Oprah produced and starred in the film Beloved, based upon Toni Morrison's Pulitzer Prize winning novel of the same name. The ball is now on display at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. The Color Purple has now been made into a Broadway musical and opened late 2005, with Oprah credited as a producer. During the discussions to iron out the details, AFL founder and Kansas City Chiefs owner Lamar Hunt had jokingly referred to the proposed interleague championship as the "Super Bowl." Hunt thought of the name after seeing his daughter playing with a toy called a Super Ball. Many believe this was due in part to the Academy's "anti-Spielberg" bias, thinking the film would have been better directed by an African-American. One of the conditions of the AFL-NFL Merger was that the winners of each league's championship game would meet in a contest to determine the "world champion of football".

The following year Winfrey was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, but she lost to Anjelica Huston. The intense competitive war for players and fans led to serious merger talks between the two leagues in 1966. She earned immediate acclaim as Sofia, the distraught housewife. After its inception in 1920, the NFL fended off several rival leagues before the AFL began play in 1960. In 1985, Winfrey co-starred in Steven Spielberg's epic adaptation of Alice Walker's award-winning novel The Color Purple. The Super Bowl was created as part of the merger agreement between the National Football League (NFL) and its rival, the American Football League (AFL). She is also the president of Harpo Productions (Oprah spelled backwards). .

As well as hosting and appearing on television shows, Winfrey co-founded the women's cable television network Oxygen. food consumption day next to Thanksgiving. An unofficial Oprah fanclub, also organized a petition drive [4] in 2005, to nominate Oprah for the Nobel Peace Prize. This is the largest U.S. 23, 2004 by E!. In addition, many popular singers and musicians have performed during the Super Bowl's pre-game and halftime ceremonies. The concert was broadcasted in the United States on Dec. The last true day game (which ended before local sunset) of the series was Super Bowl XI in January 1977.

There were musical performances by Patti Labelle, Andrea Bocelli, Joss Stone, Chris Botti, Diana Krall, Tony Bennett and others. This has caused the starting time of the game to be pushed back later and later, to ensure the Sunday night prime time audience on the East Coast. The 2004 Nobel Peace Prize Concert was hosted by Oprah and Tom Cruise. The Super Bowl is one of the most-watched American television broadcasts of the year, attracting many companies to spend millions of dollars on commercials. [3]. Since then, the game has been played annually on a Sunday following the playoffs, originally early to mid-January, then late January, and in 2002, the first Sunday in February. She plans to host 140 episodes per season, until her final season, when it will return to its current number, 130. After both leagues merged in 1970, the Super Bowl became the NFL's championship game.

Winfrey recently made a deal to extend her show until the 2010 – 2011 season, by which time it will have been on the air for twenty-five years. The game began in January 1967 as the AFL-NFL World Championship Game in which the NFL championship team played against the champion of the younger, rival American Football League (AFL) for the "World Championship of Professional Football". During the show each member of the audience received a new Pontiac G6 Sedan; the 276 cars were donated by Pontiac as part of a publicity stunt. The game and its ancillary festivities constitute Super Bowl Sunday (sometimes "Super Sunday"), which over the years has almost become a de facto American national holiday. Perhaps Oprah's most famous recent show was the first episode of the nineteenth season of The Oprah Winfrey Show in the fall of 2004. In professional American football, the Super Bowl is the championship game of the National Football League (NFL) in the United States. Phil, in 2004, which is produced by Winfrey's production company, Harpo Productions. New Orleans Saints.

McGraw appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show for several years before launching his own show, Dr. Jacksonville Jaguars. He accepted the invitation and was a resounding success. Houston Texans. Phil made such an impression on Winfrey that she invited him to appear on her show. Detroit Lions - NFL championship in 1935, 1952, 1953, and 1957. Dr. Cleveland Browns - NFL championship in 1950, 1954, 1955, and 1964
(This refers to the team that the league officially views as one continuous franchise that began in 1946 but suspended operations from 1996-1998, and resumed play in 1999.).

to help her analyze and read the jury. Arizona Cardinals - NFL champions in 1925 and 1947. Phil McGraw's company Courtroom Sciences, Inc. NFL league champions prior to Super Bowl I

    . During a lawsuit against Winfrey (see Influence), she hired Dr. Pittsburgh Coach, Bill Cowher, wins his first Super Bowl title. As well as the hour-long regular show, she tapes informal discussions or Q&A sessions with celebrity guests after the show, which are broadcast as Oprah After The Show on her Oxygen network. Ben Rothlisberger became the youngest QB to ever win a Super Bowl, completing 9 of 21 passes for 123 yards and 2 interceptions.

    Oprah's trademark in recent years has been her "Wildest Dreams" tour, which fulfills the dreams of many deserving people, be it a new house, an encounter with a favourite performer, or a guest role on a popular TV show, who have been reported to her producers by loving friends and family. The Steelers become the first team to not get a first down in the first quarter of a Super Bowl. Oprah frequently features the plight of others around the world in her show, and uses the show to promote charitable causes. The Pittsburgh Steelers become the first AFC team to ever win a Super Bowl aired on the ABC network as well as becoming the first sixth seed to ever win a Super Bowl. She often interviews celebrities or other issues that involve the celebrity in some way, such as cancer, charity work, or substance abuse, although more often she focuses on ordinary people that have done extraordinary things or been involved in important current issues. Super Bowl XL: The Pittsburgh Steelers win over the Seattle Seahawks, who had their first Super Bowl apperance at Super Bowl XL. She overcame numerous difficulties in her childhood, including sexual abuse, which has made her want to be an advocate for children as well as women. The Eagles had a chance to win the game on their final drive, but a New England interception ended the game.

    The Oprah Winfrey Show is extremely successful and popular, in large part due to the fact that Oprah is able to relate to her audience. All three of New England's Super Bowl victories have been decided by three points. Winfrey began to do a lot of charity work, and her show featured people suffering from poverty or the victims of unfortunate accidents. Super Bowl XXXIX: The New England Patriots win their third Super Bowl in four years when they defeat the Philadelphia Eagles 24-21 in Jacksonville, Florida. By the mid-1990s the shows adopted a more serious format, addressing issues that Winfrey thought were of direct importance and of crucial consequence to women. Two years later, Vinatieri would kick another game-winning field goal at the end of Super Bowl XXXVIII to defeat the Carolina Panthers. Originally, the show followed traditional talk show formats. Super Bowl XXXVI: Placekicker Adam Vinatieri kicks a 48-yard field goal as time expires to lift the New England Patriots to a 20-17 victory over the Rams, and the first of 3 Super Bowl wins in four years.

    With Winfrey as the host, the show was so successful that it was renamed The Oprah Winfrey Show, expanded to a full hour, and broadcast nationally beginning September 8, 1986. After the Rams score a 73 yard touchdown to lead 23-16, the Titans drive, and in a close finish, wide receiver Kevin Dyson catches a short pass but is tackled by linebacker Mike Jones at the 1 yard line as he stretches for the end zone with no time left on the clock, and the Rams hold on to win 23-16. Her first episode aired on January 2, 1984. Louis Rams, rallied behind quarterback Steve McNair and running back Eddie George to tie the game at 16-16. In 1983, Winfrey relocated to Chicago, Illinois to host WLS-TV's low-rated half-hour morning talk show, AM Chicago. Super Bowl XXXIV: In a classic game, the Tennessee Titans, down 16-0 to the St. She was then recruited to join Richard Sher as co-host of WJZ's local talk show, People Are Talking, which premiered on August 14, 1978. Denver will also win the Super Bowl XXXIII against Atlanta.

    She moved to Baltimore's WJZ-TV in 1976 to co-anchor the six o'clock news. Super Bowl XXXII: After four superbowl losses, the Denver Broncos win their first title, defeating the defending champion Green Bay Packers 31-24 and becoming the first AFC Super Bowl champion in 14 years. Working in local media, she was both the youngest news anchor and the first black female news anchor at Nashville's WTVF-TV. Shades of Super Bowl XIII, this game decided which of these two teams would be the first to win five Super Bowls and thus be the second NFL team to do so. But her true media career began at age seventeen, working at her high school radio show. The Cowboys' Charles Haley became the first player to win 5 Super Bowls, after winning two with San Francisco (XXIII and XXIV) and two with Dallas (XXVII and XXVIII). In her youth she played games interviewing her corncob doll and the crows on the fence of her family's property. The victory also tied the Cowboys with the San Francisco 49ers for the most Super Bowl victories (5).

    Winfrey's grandmother has said that ever since Oprah could talk, she was "on stage". Super Bowl XXX: The Dallas Cowboys make a record 8th Super Bowl appearance, winning 27-17 over the Pittsburgh Steelers, and become the first NFL team to win 3 Super Bowls in a 4 year span. At age 18, Winfrey won the Miss Black Tennessee beauty pageant. A game with no turnovers by either team and only one 5 yard penalty, it remains the only Super Bowl to be decided by a single point. Winfrey became an honors student and received a full scholarship to Tennessee State University, a historically Black institution, where she studied communications. Super Bowl XXV: As time expires, the Buffalo Bills' Scott Norwood attempts a 47-yard field goal but misses wide to the right, and the New York Giants win 20-19. Vernon was strict but encouraging, and made her education a priority. The 55 points are the most scored by any team in a Super Bowl.

    Winfrey gave birth to a premature boy who soon died. Super Bowl XXIV: The San Francisco 49ers defeat the Denver Broncos 55-10, the largest margin of victory in Super Bowl history. Oprah became progressively sexually premiscuous, and at age 14, she became pregnant and her mother sent her to live in better conditions with her father, Vernon, in Nashville, Tennessee. Super Bowl XXIII: San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana leads a 92 yard fourth quarter drive, as the 49ers score the game-winning touchdown with 34 seconds left and defeat the Cincinnati Bengals 20-16. Oprah was raped at age 9, and was repeatedly molested by her mother's cousin's boyfriend. Super Bowl XXII: Washington Redskins after trailing 10-0 MVP quarterback Doug Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start a Superbowl, throws for 4 touchdowns in one quarter which leads to a 42 unanswered points and a rout of Denver. While there, she suffered abuse from her comparitively darker skin, such as being forced to sleep on the porch in the cold and other forms of verbal abuse based on her features. Simms is the games MVP with a Super Bowl completion record of 88.0%.

    At age six, Winfrey moved in with her mother, who was less supportive and encouraging than her grandmother. Super Bowl XXI: New York Giants quarterback Phil Simms completes 22 of 25 passing attempts, including all 10 of his attempts in the second half as New York defeats Denver 39-20. As a child, Oprah showed signs of extraordinary intelligence and drive, such as learning to read at age two. MVP Richard Dent led a Bears defense that limited New England to 7 rushing yards. Winfrey's grandmother taught her to read and took her to the local church, where she was nicknamed "The Preacher" for her ability to recite Bible verses. Super Bowl XX: After the New England Patriots (in their first Super Bowl) take a 3-0 lead on a field goal, the Chicago Bears (also in their first SB) played dominant offense and defense to take the game 46-10. After Winfrey was born, her mother travelled north for better job opportunities, and Winfrey spent her first six years living with her grandmother. In the fourth quarter, in one of the most dramatic runs in Super Bowl history, MVP John Riggins ran for the first down, broke a tackle from Miami cornerback Don McNeal and ran 43 yards for a touchdown giving the Redskins a lead they never relinquished.

    Her parents were unmarried and still teenagers when Oprah was born. Super Bowl XVII: After the spending the entire game trailing the Miami Dolphins, the Washington Redskins were faced with fourth down and one to go on Miami 42 yard line. Her mother, Vernita Lee, was a housemaid, and her father, Vernon Winfrey, a coal miner and later a barber. It marks one of the Steelers' four Super Bowl titles obtained during the 1970s. The name on Winfrey's birth certificate is Orpah, after the Moabite woman in the Old Testament Book of Ruth, but her family and neighbours would often transpose the R and the P when pronouncing and writing her name; as a result, Oprah eventually became her accepted name. This game decided which of these two teams would be the first NFL team to win three Super Bowls. Winfrey was born Orpah Winfrey in Kosciusko, Mississippi to a moderately wealthy, Baptist family. Super Bowl XIII: The Pittsburgh Steelers defeat the Dallas Cowboys 35-31 in the second Super Bowl matchup between the two teams.

    . Super Bowl VII: Coach Don Shula and the Miami Dolphins complete the only undefeated season in NFL history, defeating the Washington Redskins 14-7. She is currently ranked as the most powerful celebrity by Forbes magazine[1] as well as the ninth most powerful woman in the world.[2]She is the first African-American woman to become a billionaire. The Jets defeat the Colts, 16-7. She is currently involved in many business ventures, but is most identified with her massively popular and eponymous talk show. Super Bowl III: Speaking to the press in the week before the game, New York Jets quarterback "Broadway" Joe Namath guarantees a victory over the Baltimore Colts. She is one of the most successful entrepreneurs and television personalities in the world. The game is also notable as it was broadcast on both NBC and CBS.

    Oprah Winfrey (born January 29, 1954) is an American talk show host and an Academy Award nominated actress. Only 61,946 attend the game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, making it the only non-sellout Super Bowl. In The Kitchen With Rosie: Oprah's Favorite Recipes, by Rosie Daley and Oprah Winfrey, 1994; ISBN 0679434046. The Packers outscore the Chiefs 21-0 in the second half after struggling in the first half. A Journal of Daily Renewal : The Companion to Make the Connection, by Bob Greene and Oprah Winfrey, 1996; ISBN 0786882158. Super Bowl I: In the first matchup of the AFL and NFL champions, the NFL's Green Bay Packers, led by coach Vince Lombardi and quarterback Bart Starr, defeat the Kansas City Chiefs, 35-10. The Uncommon Wisdom of Oprah Winfrey : A Portrait in Her Own Words, by Bill Adler (ed) and Oprah Winfrey, 1997; ISBN 1559724196. The infamous "I'm Going to Disney World!" Advertising campaign did not take place at Super Bowl XXXIX for the first time since it started at Super Bowl XXI.

    Journey to Beloved, by Oprah Winfrey and Ken Regan, 1998; 0786864583. This indicator has been surprisingly accurate (around 85% correct) over the past years. Make the Connection : Ten Steps to a Better Body and a Better Life, by Bob Greene and Oprah Winfrey, 1999; ISBN 0786882980. Super Bowl Indicator, An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in the stock market for the coming year, and that a win for a team from the old NFL (NFC division) means the stock market will be up for the year. The Color Purple (1985). Wild card teams are 5-4 in the Super Bowl, with the Chiefs, Raiders, Broncos, Ravens, and Steelers winning their respective games. Native Son (1986). They include the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl IV, the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl X, the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XV, the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX, the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXVII, the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII, the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV, the Baltimore Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV, and the Pittsburgh Steelers, the only sixth-seeded team to make it, in Super Bowl XL.

    Throw Momma from the Train (1987) (Cameo). Overall, nine teams have advanced to the Super Bowl after entering the playoffs as wild card teams (teams that entered the playoffs without winning its division). The Lives of Quincy Jones (1990) (documentary). Eastern starting with Super Bowl XXXVII. Beloved (1998). The kickoff has been since moved back to 6:30 p.m. Unchained Memories: Readings from the Slave Narratives (2003) (documentary) (narrator). Eastern Standard Time.

    Brothers of the Borderland (2004) (short subject) (narrator). Since the early 1980s Super Bowls have been starting at around 6 p.m. Emmanuel's Gift (2005) (documentary) (narrator). This is also the last Super Bowl which was played outside to not end in dusk. Charlotte's Web (2006) (voice) (currently filming). Eastern Standard Time was Super Bowl XI which was played in Pasadena. Bee Movie (2007) (voice) (currently in pre-production). The last Super Bowl to start at 3:30 p.m.

    The W Brewster Place (1989) (also executive producer). The AFC broke the streak in 1998 in Super Bowl XXXII when Denver beat the defending champion Packers. Brewster Place (1990-1991). The NFC won 13 Super Bowls in a row from 1985 to 1997, starting with Super Bowl XIX. Lincoln (1992) (documentary) (narrator). The next closest an AFC team that came to winning the Super Bowl on that network was when the Buffalo Bills lost to the New York Giants 20-19 in Super Bowl XXV. There Are No Children Here (1993). The Pittsburgh Steelers were the first AFC team to ever win a Super Bowl (XL) that was broadcast on ABC (The NFC is currently 6-1).

    Before Women Had Wings (1997) (also producer). Super Bowl XXXIX was the first such game to be tied after three quarters of play. Louis Rams. The winning play was a 48-yard field goal kicked by Adam Vinatieri of the New England Patriots to lift them to a 20-17 victory over the St. Super Bowl XXXVI was also the first Super Bowl to be decided by a score on the last play of the game.

    Also, because of the attacks, the Super Bowl is now a National Special Security Event (NSSE). With the exception of Super Bowl XXXVII on January 26, 2003, all of the succeeding Super Bowls have been scheduled for February. This was the first Super Bowl to be played in February. But the game was moved back one week to February 3, 2002 because of the September 11, 2001 attacks.

    Super Bowl XXXVI was originally scheduled to be played on January 27, 2002. As a result, additional settings were necessary to grant exceptions for other uses of "XXX". Many proxy servers' filters were configured to block the text string "XXX" whenever occurring to prevent access to pornography. In the months leading up to Super Bowl XXX (or Super Bowl Thirty), some Internet proxy servers were blocking the web site for the upcoming event.

    Louis Rams were the first NFL team who plays their home games in a fully enclosed stadium, the Edward Jones Dome, to win the Super Bowl. In 2000, the St. The jerseys they wore paid tribute to the 1957 team. Since it was the league's 75th season, every team wore a throwback jersey during the season and San Francisco decided to continue to wear their jerseys all the way through the playoffs and into Super Bowl XXIX.

    In 1994, the 49ers became the first team to wear a throwback jersey during the Super Bowl. For example, the New England Patriots, winners of Super Bowl XXXIX are the champions of the 2004 NFL season, even though the championship game was played in February 2005. The NFL season spreads over two calendar years, so identifying the games by the year of the Super Bowl could cause some confusion. The Super Bowl uses Roman numerals to identify each game, rather than the year it was held.

05-30-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory