Microsoft Office

Microsoft Office is a suite of productivity programs created by Microsoft and developed for Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh operating systems. As well as the office applications, it includes associated servers and Web-based services. Recent versions of Office are now called the 'Office System' rather than the 'Office Suite' to reflect the fact that they include Servers as well.

Office made its first appearance in the early '90s, and was initially a marketing term for a bundled set of applications that were previously marketed and sold separately. The main selling point was that buying the bundle was substantially cheaper than buying each of the individual applications on their own. The first version of Office contained Word, Excel and Powerpoint. Additionally, a "Pro" version of Office included Microsoft Access and Schedule Plus. Over the years the Office applications have grown substantially closer together from a technical standpoint, sharing features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. In recent years, Microsoft has attempted to position Office as a development platform in its own right, but has had mixed results with this.

Office is currently the most popular office suite in the world and considered to be the de facto standard for productivity programs, although its market share is currently decreasing with the rise of viable free and open source alternatives. It has certain features not present in other suites, and other programs have capabilities Office lacks. The next version, 12.0, will have a radically different user interface from the older versions.


Office programs

These programs are included in all editions of Microsoft Office 2003, except Microsoft Office Basic Edition 2003. Microsoft Office Basic Edition includes Word, Excel and Outlook only.

Office Word

Microsoft Word is a word processor. It is considered to be the main program of Office. It possesses a dominant market share in the word processor market. Its proprietary DOC format is considered a de facto standard, although its most recent version, Word 11.0/2003, also supports an XML-based format. Word is also available in some editions of Microsoft Works. It is available for the Windows and Macintosh platforms. Its main competitors are OpenOffice.org Writer, StarOffice, Corel WordPerfect, Apple Pages and AbiWord.

Office Excel

Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet program. Like Microsoft Word, it possesses a dominant market share. It was originally a competitor to the dominant Lotus 1-2-3 but it eventually outsold it and became the de facto standard. It is available for the Windows and Macintosh platforms. Its main competitors are OpenOffice.org Calc, StarOffice, Corel Quattro Pro and Gnumeric. SPSS is often used for advanced statistical applications.

Office Outlook

Microsoft Outlook, not to be confused with Outlook Express, is a personal information manager and e-mail communication software. The replacement for Microsoft Mail starting in the 1997 version of Office, it includes an e-mail client, calendar, task manager and address book. Its e-mail program's main competitors are Mozilla Thunderbird/Mozilla, and Eudora. Its personal information manager's main competitors are Mozilla, Lotus Organizer, and Novell Evolution. It is available for Windows; a version is also included with most Pocket PC handhelds. Its Macintosh equivalent is Microsoft Entourage.

Office PowerPoint

Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular presentation program for Windows and Macintosh. It is used to create slideshows, composed of text, graphics, movies and other objects, which can be displayed on-screen and navigated through by the presenter or printed out on transparencies or slides. Windows Mobile 2005 (Magneto) will have a version of this program. It possesses a dominant market share. Its main competitors are OpenOffice.org Impress, Corel WordPerfect and Apple Keynote.

Other programs included in the Windows versions

An office dinosaur, as depicted in a Microsoft Office ad encouraging businesses to update.
  • Microsoft Access – database manager. For the 2003 version, included in Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003, and Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 2003.
  • Microsoft InfoPath – application that enables users to design rich XML-based forms. Included in Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 2003.
  • Microsoft Publisher – Desktop publishing software. For the 2003 version, included in Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003, Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003, and Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 2003.
  • Microsoft FrontPage – web design software (also requires its own server program). Offered only as a stand-alone program for the 2003 version (not part of the office suite).
  • Microsoft Visio – diagram software.
  • Microsoft Office Picture Manager – basic photo management software (similar to a basic version of Google's Picasa or Adobe's Photoshop Elements).
  • Microsoft Photo Editor – photo editing/raster graphics software in older Office versions, and again in XP. It was temporarily supplemented by Microsoft PhotoDraw in Office 2000 Premium edition.
  • Microsoft Project – project manager.
  • Microsoft OneNote – note taking software for use with tablet PCs or regular PCs.
  • Microsoft Office Communicator 2005 - [1]
  • Developer Tools – (included only with developer editions)

Other programs included in the Mac versions

  • Microsoft Entourage – Personal information manager and communication software for Macintosh only (similar to Outlook).
  • Virtual PC – Emulates a standard PC and its hardware. Included with Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2004

Web services associated with Microsoft Office

  • Microsoft Update – Web site. Similar to Windows Update, but also encompasses other Microsoft applications.
  • Microsoft Office Live – Web service. An online Office suite as part of Microsoft's Windows Live initiative.
  • Microsoft Office Online – Web site. Included in all versions of Microsoft Office 2003.
  • Microsoft Office Update – Web site. Patch detection and installation service for Office 2000, XP, and 2003. - [2]

Older programs no longer included

  • Microsoft Binder – incorporates several documents into one file.
  • Microsoft Schedule Plus – released with Office 95. It featured a Planner, To do list, and Contact Information. Its functions were incorporated into Microsoft Outlook.
  • Microsoft Mail – mail client (in old versions of Office, later replaced by Microsoft Outlook).
  • Microsoft Outlook Express – mail client (in Office 98 Macintosh Edition, later replaced by Microsoft Entourage).
  • Microsoft Vizact 2000 – a program that "activated" documents using HTML, adding effects such as animation. The main reason for its unpopularity was because many people had no idea what it did by looking at its box alone, and therefore did not buy it.

Since 1997 Office has included Office Assistant, a system that uses animated characters to offer unrequested context-sensitive suggestions to users and access to relevant parts of the help system. Intended to make the software less intimidating to new users, it is typically disabled by experienced users. The Assistant is often dubbed "Clippy" or "Clippit," due to its default to a paperclip character, coded as CLIPPIT.ACS. The Assistant is the main use of Microsoft Agent technology.

Also, beginning with Macintosh Office 4.2, the Macintosh and Windows versions of Office share the same file format. Consequently, any Macintosh with Office 4.2 or later can read documents created with Windows Office 4.2 or later, and vice-versa.

Office 11.0/2003 introduced a new, optional file format for the entire suite, built on XML technology. Office X for Mac is also built to handle this file format.

Other related companion servers

  • Microsoft Office Live Communications Server - real time communications server
  • Microsoft Office Project Server - project management server
  • Microsoft Office SharePoint Portal Server collaboration server

Editions

The Windows version of Microsoft Office 11.0/2003 is available in six editions: (Please note that for the most part, pricing reflects installation on only a single computer.)

  • Microsoft Office Student and Teacher Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $149 US)
  • Microsoft Office Basic Edition 11.0/2003 (bundled with new computers only)
  • Microsoft Office Standard Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $399 US; Upgrade Price $239 US)
  • Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $449 US; Upgrade Price $279 US)
  • Microsoft Office Professional Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $499 US; Upgrade Price $329 US)
  • Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 11.0/2003 (volume licensing only)

The Macintosh version, Microsoft Office for Mac 2004, is available in three editions. All include Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Entourage. They are identical except for pricing and the inclusion of Virtual PC in the Professional Edition.

  • Office for Mac 2004 Standard Edition (MSRP New User Price $399 US; Upgrade Price $239 US)
  • Office for Mac 2004 Student and Teacher Edition (MSRP New User Price $149 US)
  • Office for Mac 2004 Professional Edition (MSRP New User Price $499 US; Upgrade Price $329 US)

Pricing as of April 9, 2005 [3] [4]

Cross-platform use

Microsoft develops Office primarily for Windows and secondarily for Macintosh. However, most versions of the suite can also be run on Unix-like operating systems through the use of a compatibility layer such as CrossOver Office or WINE.

The older, simpler versions tend to run considerably better on WINE than newer ones. However, all versions are known to work to some extent.

Versions

Major Microsoft Windows versions

  • Office 3.0 (CD-ROM version: Word 2.0c, Excel 4.0a, PowerPoint 3.0, Mail) - released August 30, 1992 (repackaged as Office 92)
  • Office 4.0 (Word 6.0, Excel 4.0, PowerPoint 3.0) - released January 17, 1994
  • Office for NT 4.2 (Word 6.0 [32-bit, i386 and Alpha], Excel 5.0 [32-bit, i386 and Alpha], PowerPoint 4.0 [16-bit], "Microsoft Office Manager") - released July 3, 1994
  • Office 4.3 (The last 16-bit version; Word 6.0, Excel 5.0, PowerPoint 4.0 and in the pro version: Access 2.0) - released June 2, 1994
  • Office 7.0/'95 (Word '95, etc.) - released August 30, 1995
  • Office 8.0/'97 (Word '97, etc.) - released December 30, 1996 (was published on CD-ROM as well as on a set of 45 3½-inch floppy disks)
  • Office 9.0/2000 (Word 2000, etc.) - released January 27, 1999
  • Office 10.0/2002/XP (Word 2002, etc.) - released May 31, 2001
  • Office 11.0/2003 (Word 2003, etc.) - released November 17, 2003
  • Office 12.0 - due to be released simultaneously, or near simultaneously with Windows Vista, Microsoft's next major consumer operating system.

There are variants of more recent versions such as Small Business Edition, Student and Teacher Edition, Professional Edition and Developer Edition with different collections of applications and pricing points.

Apple Macintosh versions

  • Office 1 (Word 3, etc.) - released 1990
  • Office 2 (Word 4, etc.) - released 1992
  • Office 3 (Word 5, etc.) - released 1993
  • Office 4.2 (The first Power Mac-aware version; Word 6.0, etc.) - released June 2, 1994
  • Office 98 (Word 98, etc.) - released March 15, 1998
  • Office 2001 (Word 2001, etc.) - released October 11, 2000
  • Office v.X (The first Mac OS X/Aqua edition; Word X, etc.) - released November 19, 2001
  • Office 2004 (Word 2004, etc.) - released May 11, 2004

Add ins

A major feature of applications in the Office suite is the ability for users and third party companies to write Office COM add-ins. Component Object Model (COM) add-ins are supplemental programs that extend the capabilities of an application by adding custom commands and specialized features that can accommodate specific tasks.

Trivia

Screenshot of Word 97 running on Windows NT 3.51

For some reason, most versions of Microsoft Office (including 97 and later, and possibly 4.3) use their own widget set, and as a result do not exactly match the native operating system.

Whereas Windows uses "Service Packs", Office used to release "Service Releases". However, after Office 2000 Service Release 1, Office releases only Service Packs. Service Releases are not cumulative (i.e. it is necessary to install each release in turn) whereas Service Packs are. This means that any copy of the original Office 2000 ("RTM" or "Gold" in Microsoft documentation) requires Service Release 1 to be installed before a Service Pack can be installed.

Alternatives

There are also several alternative office suites available, including:

  • OpenOffice.org, a completely free and open-source suite available for download to Windows, Linux, and Macintosh users. It includes practically full compatibility with Microsoft Office (with the exception of lack of full support for Microsoft Office Publisher (pub) files and a lack of a mail client à la Microsoft Office Outlook, however, there are many alternative mail clients to choose from.)
    • NeoOffice, an open-source OpenOffice.org port for Mac OS X that integrates into its Aqua interface.
    • StarOffice, based on the OpenOffice code.
  • Corel's WordPerfect Office.
  • iWork, Apple's Mac-only office suite. Includes Pages, for word-processing, and Keynote, for presentations.
  • KOffice, an open-source office suite which is part of the KDE Desktop Environment.
  • GNOME Office, a loosely coupled group of open-source applications including Abiword and Gnumeric, which is targetted for the GNOME desktop environment.
  • Lotus SmartSuite, provided by IBM contains a word-processing program called Word Pro, spreadsheet program called Lotus 1-2-3, a program similar to Microsoft's PowerPoint, Lotus Freelance Graphics and a database program called Lotus Approach. Lotus Notes provides the email/PIM portion of the Lotus offering.
  • ThinkFree Office, a free web-based alternative office suite. It is almost fully compatible with Microsoft Office files.

Microsoft Office Converters and Viewers, provided by Microsoft. It is not designed to replace MS Office, and has only compatibilities of reading Office files. It is for Windows, free-of-charge. [5]


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[5]. http://pyroreview.com/ http://www.pyrouniverse.com/forum/ http://pyrofreedom.kicks-ass.net/. It is for Windows, free-of-charge. Yet, many events are populated with the use of fireworks around the world. It is not designed to replace MS Office, and has only compatibilities of reading Office files. Because fireworks produces smoke that have heavy metal compounds and other toxic chemicals, some countries are against the use of fireworks, arguing that they cause major pollution. Microsoft Office Converters and Viewers, provided by Microsoft. Since commercial-grade fireworks are so much larger and more powerful, setup and firing crews are always under great pressure to ensure they safely set up, fire and clean up after a show.

There are also several alternative office suites available, including:. If the setup is wired electrically, the electrical matches are usually plugged into a "firing rail" or "breakout box" which runs back to the main firing board; from there, the Firing Board is simply hooked up to a car battery, and can proceed with firing the show when ready. This means that any copy of the original Office 2000 ("RTM" or "Gold" in Microsoft documentation) requires Service Release 1 to be installed before a Service Pack can be installed. Wiring the shells is a pain-staking process; whether the shells are being fired manually or electronically, any "chain fusing" or wiring of electrical ignitors, care must be taken to prevent the fuse (an electrical match, often incorrectly called a squib) from igniting. it is necessary to install each release in turn) whereas Service Packs are. Loading of shells is a delicate process, and must be done with caution, and a loader must ensure not only the mortar is clean, but also make sure that no part of their body is directly over the mortar in case of a premature fire. Service Releases are not cumulative (i.e. Setup of mortars in Canada require that a minimum angle of 10 to 15 degrees down-range with a safety distance of at least 200 meters down-range and 100 meters surrounding the mortars.

However, after Office 2000 Service Release 1, Office releases only Service Packs. The mortars are generally made of FRE (Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy) or HDPE (High-Density Polyethelene), some older mortars are made of Sheet Steel, but have been banned by most countries due to the problem of shrapnel produced during a misfire. Whereas Windows uses "Service Packs", Office used to release "Service Releases". Setup of these fireworks involves the placement and securing of mortars on wooden or wire racks; loading of the shells; and if electronically firing, wiring and testing. For some reason, most versions of Microsoft Office (including 97 and later, and possibly 4.3) use their own widget set, and as a result do not exactly match the native operating system. As well, since commercial-grade fireworks are a shell which is loaded into separate a mortar by hand, great care must be taken, during all stages of setup. Component Object Model (COM) add-ins are supplemental programs that extend the capabilities of an application by adding custom commands and specialized features that can accommodate specific tasks. Unlike their consumer counterpart, commercial-grade fireworks function differently, and come in a wide range of sizes from 2 inches up to 12 or more inches in diameter.

A major feature of applications in the Office suite is the ability for users and third party companies to write Office COM add-ins. The use, storage and sale of commercial-grade fireworks in Canada is licensed by Natural Resources Canada's Explosive Regulatory Division (ERD). There are variants of more recent versions such as Small Business Edition, Student and Teacher Edition, Professional Edition and Developer Edition with different collections of applications and pricing points. Fireworks safety is considered to be extremely important in countries such as Canada. However, all versions are known to work to some extent. Each year, there are many raids on individuals suspected of having "illegal" fireworks. The older, simpler versions tend to run considerably better on WINE than newer ones. Many states in the United States have laws on further restrict access to and use of consumer fireworks, and some of these states vigorously enforce them.

However, most versions of the suite can also be run on Unix-like operating systems through the use of a compatibility layer such as CrossOver Office or WINE. Together with US Customs and BATFE, they are very proactive in enforcing these rules, intercepting imported fireworks that don't comply and issuing recalls on unacceptable consumer fireworks that are found to have "slipped through". Microsoft develops Office primarily for Windows and secondarily for Macintosh. The Consumer Product Safety Commission has established strict guidelines regarding the construction and composition of consumer fireworks. Pricing as of April 9, 2005 [3] [4]. Safety advocates urge people to "Leave it to the professionals": in the US, you are more likely to be injured driving in your car to or from a professional fireworks show than you are to be injured by using consumer fireworks in your backyard. They are identical except for pricing and the inclusion of Virtual PC in the Professional Edition. A careful reading of the literature reveals that nearly all fatalities from consumer fireworks are due to the users not following the directions printed on the label.

All include Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Entourage. Meanwhile, those who support more liberal fireworks laws look at the same statistics as the critics and conclude that, when used properly, consumer fireworks are a safer form of recreation than riding bicycles or playing soccer. The Macintosh version, Microsoft Office for Mac 2004, is available in three editions. There are numerous incidents of consumer fireworks being used in a manner that is extremely disrespectful of the communities and neighborhoods where the users live. The Windows version of Microsoft Office 11.0/2003 is available in six editions: (Please note that for the most part, pricing reflects installation on only a single computer.). Complaints about excessive noise created by fireworks and the large amounts of debris and fallout left over after shooting are also used to support this position. Office X for Mac is also built to handle this file format. Critics and safety advocates point to the numerous injuries and accidental fires that are attributed to fireworks as justification for banning or at least severely restricting access to fireworks.

Office 11.0/2003 introduced a new, optional file format for the entire suite, built on XML technology. Availability and use of consumer fireworks are hotly debated topics. Consequently, any Macintosh with Office 4.2 or later can read documents created with Windows Office 4.2 or later, and vice-versa. It has become part of the culture and tradition for the Hong Kong Chinese to go to the promenades along the two sides of the harbour to see the fireworks, or to watch the broadcast on television. Also, beginning with Macintosh Office 4.2, the Macintosh and Windows versions of Office share the same file format. Fireworks are displayed annually on the second day of the first moon in the Chinese calendar since 1982 in the Victoria Harbour. The Assistant is the main use of Microsoft Agent technology. Deepavali brings the spirit of goodwill and brotherhood and is celebrated across all religions in India.

The Assistant is often dubbed "Clippy" or "Clippit," due to its default to a paperclip character, coded as CLIPPIT.ACS. In smaller towns, the large temples of the town typically have public fireworks displays. Intended to make the software less intimidating to new users, it is typically disabled by experienced users. People have access to a variety of fireworks and most of them in urban areas set it off on the public roads running in front of their houses. Since 1997 Office has included Office Assistant, a system that uses animated characters to offer unrequested context-sensitive suggestions to users and access to relevant parts of the help system. Unlike Western nations, retail of fireworks is largely unrestricted in India. Its main competitors are OpenOffice.org Impress, Corel WordPerfect and Apple Keynote. During the night the houses are adorned with small lit oil lamps and colorful lights and then the entire family participates in the display of fireworks.

It possesses a dominant market share. Customary traditions include offering prayers to the Gods in the morning and exchanging sweets with friends and neighbors. Windows Mobile 2005 (Magneto) will have a version of this program. Deepavali (or Diwali) is the most popular festival of India, which broadly celebrates the triumph of good over evil primarily symbolized in the mythological epic of Ramayana in which the Hindu God Rama defeats his demonic adversary Ravana. It is used to create slideshows, composed of text, graphics, movies and other objects, which can be displayed on-screen and navigated through by the presenter or printed out on transparencies or slides. This leads to some illegal trafficking of fireworks from Belgium to the Netherlands. Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular presentation program for Windows and Macintosh. Also the fireworks sold in Belgium contain more gunpowder than is allowed in the Netherlands.

Its Macintosh equivalent is Microsoft Entourage. In the Netherlands for example the sale of fireworks is restricted to a few days before New-Year's eve, but in Belgium the sale of fireworks is legal throughout the year. It is available for Windows; a version is also included with most Pocket PC handhelds. The retail of fireworks in Western Europe is also restricted, but the limitations differ from country to country. Its personal information manager's main competitors are Mozilla, Lotus Organizer, and Novell Evolution. In Western Europe the use of fireworks by the general public is usually restricted to a few hours after midnight on New Year's eve. Its e-mail program's main competitors are Mozilla Thunderbird/Mozilla, and Eudora. As a consequence the most popular fireworks are still those that go off with a big bang or with a bright flash.

The replacement for Microsoft Mail starting in the 1997 version of Office, it includes an e-mail client, calendar, task manager and address book. Although it is now just a custom to fire off fireworks on New-Year's eve, in the past the idea was to scare 'bad forces' so they would not enter the new year. Microsoft Outlook, not to be confused with Outlook Express, is a personal information manager and e-mail communication software. Major cities around the world host spectacular firework display on New Year's eve. SPSS is often used for advanced statistical applications. Legality Note: Current federal law states that (without appropriate BATF license) the ownership and/or sale of any firecrackers or salutes containing in excess of 50-milligrams of explosive powder is a violation of federal statutes, including the 1966 Child Protection Act. Its main competitors are OpenOffice.org Calc, StarOffice, Corel Quattro Pro and Gnumeric. Banned Fireworks.

It is available for the Windows and Macintosh platforms. Legal Fireworks. It was originally a competitor to the dominant Lotus 1-2-3 but it eventually outsold it and became the de facto standard. The types fireworks sold at retail stands and stores include, but are not limited to:. Like Microsoft Word, it possesses a dominant market share. The type of fireworks sold at retail outlets vary widely, from "bootlegged fireworks" which are banned nationwide, to "Safe & Sane" varieties for personal use. Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet program. Some Native American tribes on reservation lands show similar behavior, often selling fireworks that are not legal for sale outside of the reservation.

Its main competitors are OpenOffice.org Writer, StarOffice, Corel WordPerfect, Apple Pages and AbiWord. Differences in legislation among states have led many fireworks dealers to set up shop along state borders in order to attract customers from neighboring states where fireworks are restricted. It is available for the Windows and Macintosh platforms. For example, fireworks stands in South Carolina sell more potent varieties ("firecrackers") and are generally open year-round. Word is also available in some editions of Microsoft Works. On the other hand, some states such as South Carolina are more lenient. Its proprietary DOC format is considered a de facto standard, although its most recent version, Word 11.0/2003, also supports an XML-based format. Citing concerns over fireworks safety, some states, such as Nevada, have enacted legislation restricting fireworks usage.

It possesses a dominant market share in the word processor market. Popular types of legal fireworks include Roman candle "snakes" and Saturn missile batteries. It is considered to be the main program of Office. Each year before the American Independence Day, the Fourth of July, retailers across the nation experience a surge in fireworks sales. Microsoft Word is a word processor. Along the same lines, in Canada, during Halloween, many fireworks displays are seen throughout. Microsoft Office Basic Edition includes Word, Excel and Outlook only. Fireworks cannot be sold to people under the age of 18 and setting them off between 11pm and 7am is only allowed at specific times of the year, including New Year and Bonfire night.

These programs are included in all editions of Microsoft Office 2003, except Microsoft Office Basic Edition 2003. Licensing for firework introduced in the United Kingdom. . Examples of recent figures are: the Pope, Margaret Thatcher and George Bush.
. Local groups, 'bonfire societies' conduct torch-lit marches around the town, vying with each other for the best fancy-dress outfits and topical celebrity figures that are later burnt. The next version, 12.0, will have a radically different user interface from the older versions. The town of Bonfire Night [1].

It has certain features not present in other suites, and other programs have capabilities Office lacks. That night is now celebrated as bonfire night by filling the sky with exploding fireworks, and by burning an effigy of Guy Fawkes on a bonfire. Office is currently the most popular office suite in the world and considered to be the de facto standard for productivity programs, although its market share is currently decreasing with the rise of viable free and open source alternatives. On 5 November, Fawkes was arrested and Parliament was saved. In recent years, Microsoft has attempted to position Office as a development platform in its own right, but has had mixed results with this. In 1605 Guy Fawkes and his fellow conspirators attempted to blow up the British Parliament with 36 barrels of gunpowder in the cellars of Westminster Hall. Over the years the Office applications have grown substantially closer together from a technical standpoint, sharing features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Today, the world's most prominent industry competition for fireworks manufacturers is L’International des Feux Loto-Québec in Montreal.

Additionally, a "Pro" version of Office included Microsoft Access and Schedule Plus. (Walt Disney Company, 2004). The first version of Office contained Word, Excel and Powerpoint. The advantages of compressed air launch are a reduction in fumes, and much greater accuracy in height and timing. The main selling point was that buying the bundle was substantially cheaper than buying each of the individual applications on their own. The display shell is detonated in the air using an electronic timer. Office made its first appearance in the early '90s, and was initially a marketing term for a bundled set of applications that were previously marketed and sold separately. In 2004, Disneyland in Anaheim, California, started using aerial fireworks launched with compressed air rather than black powder, the first time that such a launch system was used commercially.

Recent versions of Office are now called the 'Office System' rather than the 'Office Suite' to reflect the fact that they include Servers as well. This early fascination with their noise and color continues today. As well as the office applications, it includes associated servers and Web-based services. In 1789, George Washington's inauguration was also accompanied by a fireworks display. Microsoft Office is a suite of productivity programs created by Microsoft and developed for Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh operating systems. The very first celebrations of Independence Day were in 1777, six years before Americans knew whether the new nation would survive the war; fireworks were a part of those festivities. It is almost fully compatible with Microsoft Office files. Fireworks and black powder were used to celebrate important events long before the American Revolutionary War.

ThinkFree Office, a free web-based alternative office suite. America's earliest settlers brought their enthusiasm for fireworks to the United States. Lotus Notes provides the email/PIM portion of the Lotus offering. Musick for the Royal Fireworks was composed by George Frideric Handel in 1749 to celebrate the peace of Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, which had been declared the previous year. Lotus SmartSuite, provided by IBM contains a word-processing program called Word Pro, spreadsheet program called Lotus 1-2-3, a program similar to Microsoft's PowerPoint, Lotus Freelance Graphics and a database program called Lotus Approach. Since then, any event—a birth, death, wedding, coronation, or New Year's Eve celebration—has become a fitting occasion for noisemakers. GNOME Office, a loosely coupled group of open-source applications including Abiword and Gnumeric, which is targetted for the GNOME desktop environment. Some scholars believe fireworks were developed in the Sui and Tang Dynasties (581–907), but others believe there were no fireworks until the Northern Song Dynasty (10th century).

KOffice, an open-source office suite which is part of the KDE Desktop Environment. The discovery of gunpowder and the invention of the first true fireworks are traditionally credited to the Chinese, although India is also a likely source. Includes Pages, for word-processing, and Keynote, for presentations. In the Northern and Southern Dynasties (AD 420–581) the firecrackers were used not only to dispel evil but also to pray for happiness and prosperity. iWork, Apple's Mac-only office suite. In the Chinese Han Dynasty (206 BC–AD 220) firecrackers were made by roasting bamboo to produce the loud sound (known as "bian pao") that was intended to frighten evil spirits. Corel's WordPerfect Office. .

StarOffice, based on the OpenOffice code. Fireworks competitions are also regularly held at a number of places. NeoOffice, an open-source OpenOffice.org port for Mac OS X that integrates into its Aqua interface. A fireworks event (also called a fireworks display or fireworks show) is a spectacular display of the effects produced by firework devices on various occasions. It includes practically full compatibility with Microsoft Office (with the exception of lack of full support for Microsoft Office Publisher (pub) files and a lack of a mail client à la Microsoft Office Outlook, however, there are many alternative mail clients to choose from.)

    . Display Fireworks Manual (March 2002 Edition). OpenOffice.org, a completely free and open-source suite available for download to Windows, Linux, and Macintosh users. Natural Resources Canada, Explosive Regulatory Division.

    Office 2004 (Word 2004, etc.) - released May 11, 2004. Press Release. Office v.X (The first Mac OS X/Aqua edition; Word X, etc.) - released November 19, 2001. Disney debuts new safer, quieter and more environmentally-friendly fireworks technology. Office 2001 (Word 2001, etc.) - released October 11, 2000. Walt Disney Company (June 28, 2004). Office 98 (Word 98, etc.) - released March 15, 1998. mortars (loaded with greater than 1.75-inch shells).

    Office 4.2 (The first Power Mac-aware version; Word 6.0, etc.) - released June 2, 1994. cakes containing over 500 grams of powder. Office 3 (Word 5, etc.) - released 1993. M-1000 salutes. Office 2 (Word 4, etc.) - released 1992. M-100 salutes. Office 1 (Word 3, etc.) - released 1990. M-80 salutes.

    Office 12.0 - due to be released simultaneously, or near simultaneously with Windows Vista, Microsoft's next major consumer operating system. Torpedoes. Office 11.0/2003 (Word 2003, etc.) - released November 17, 2003. Silver salutes. Office 10.0/2002/XP (Word 2002, etc.) - released May 31, 2001. Cherry bombs. Office 9.0/2000 (Word 2000, etc.) - released January 27, 1999. Firecracker packs (see this link for various brand/label images).

    Office 8.0/'97 (Word '97, etc.) - released December 30, 1996 (was published on CD-ROM as well as on a set of 45 3½-inch floppy disks). 100 to 500-gram cakes (multi-shot aerial devices). Office 7.0/'95 (Word '95, etc.) - released August 30, 1995. flares & fountains. Office 4.3 (The last 16-bit version; Word 6.0, Excel 5.0, PowerPoint 4.0 and in the pro version: Access 2.0) - released June 2, 1994. spinners. Office for NT 4.2 (Word 6.0 [32-bit, i386 and Alpha], Excel 5.0 [32-bit, i386 and Alpha], PowerPoint 4.0 [16-bit], "Microsoft Office Manager") - released July 3, 1994. sykrockets.

    Office 4.0 (Word 6.0, Excel 4.0, PowerPoint 3.0) - released January 17, 1994. Bottle rockets. Office 3.0 (CD-ROM version: Word 2.0c, Excel 4.0a, PowerPoint 3.0, Mail) - released August 30, 1992 (repackaged as Office 92). single shot & reloadable aerial shot mortars up to 1.75-inch shells. Office for Mac 2004 Professional Edition (MSRP New User Price $499 US; Upgrade Price $329 US). Office for Mac 2004 Student and Teacher Edition (MSRP New User Price $149 US).

    Office for Mac 2004 Standard Edition (MSRP New User Price $399 US; Upgrade Price $239 US). Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 11.0/2003 (volume licensing only). Microsoft Office Professional Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $499 US; Upgrade Price $329 US). Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $449 US; Upgrade Price $279 US).

    Microsoft Office Standard Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $399 US; Upgrade Price $239 US). Microsoft Office Basic Edition 11.0/2003 (bundled with new computers only). Microsoft Office Student and Teacher Edition 11.0/2003 (MSRP New User Price $149 US). Microsoft Office SharePoint Portal Server collaboration server.

    Microsoft Office Project Server - project management server. Microsoft Office Live Communications Server - real time communications server. The main reason for its unpopularity was because many people had no idea what it did by looking at its box alone, and therefore did not buy it. Microsoft Vizact 2000 – a program that "activated" documents using HTML, adding effects such as animation.

    Microsoft Outlook Express – mail client (in Office 98 Macintosh Edition, later replaced by Microsoft Entourage). Microsoft Mail – mail client (in old versions of Office, later replaced by Microsoft Outlook). Its functions were incorporated into Microsoft Outlook. It featured a Planner, To do list, and Contact Information.

    Microsoft Schedule Plus – released with Office 95. Microsoft Binder – incorporates several documents into one file. - [2]. Patch detection and installation service for Office 2000, XP, and 2003.

    Microsoft Office Update – Web site. Included in all versions of Microsoft Office 2003. Microsoft Office Online – Web site. An online Office suite as part of Microsoft's Windows Live initiative.

    Microsoft Office Live – Web service. Similar to Windows Update, but also encompasses other Microsoft applications. Microsoft Update – Web site. Included with Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2004.

    Virtual PC – Emulates a standard PC and its hardware. Microsoft Entourage – Personal information manager and communication software for Macintosh only (similar to Outlook). Developer Tools – (included only with developer editions). Microsoft Office Communicator 2005 - [1].

    Microsoft OneNote – note taking software for use with tablet PCs or regular PCs. Microsoft Project – project manager. It was temporarily supplemented by Microsoft PhotoDraw in Office 2000 Premium edition. Microsoft Photo Editor – photo editing/raster graphics software in older Office versions, and again in XP.

    Microsoft Office Picture Manager – basic photo management software (similar to a basic version of Google's Picasa or Adobe's Photoshop Elements). Microsoft Visio – diagram software. Offered only as a stand-alone program for the 2003 version (not part of the office suite). Microsoft FrontPage – web design software (also requires its own server program).

    For the 2003 version, included in Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003, Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003, and Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 2003. Microsoft Publisher – Desktop publishing software. Included in Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 2003. Microsoft InfoPath – application that enables users to design rich XML-based forms.

    For the 2003 version, included in Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003, and Microsoft Office Professional Enterprise Edition 2003. Microsoft Access – database manager.

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