New Orleans, Louisiana

Nickname: "The Big Easy"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.cityofno.com/
Location


Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States

Government
Country
State
Parish
United States
Louisiana
Orleans Parish, Louisiana
Mayor C. Ray Nagin (D)
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 350.2 km²
Land 180.6 km²
Water 169.7 km²
Population
Total (2000) 484,674
Metro area 1,337,726
Density 534.4/km²
Latitude {{{latitude}}}
Longitude {{{longitude}}}
Coordinates 29°57′53″ N
90°4′14″ W
Elevation 3.3 m
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

New Orleans (local pronunciations: /nuːˈɔɹliːnz/, /nuːˈɔɹliːənz/, or /nuːˈɔɹlənz/) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced /la nuvɛl ɔʀleɑ̃/ in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. It is in southeastern Louisiana along the Mississippi River, just south of Lake Pontchartrain, and is coextensive with Orleans Parish. New Orleans is named after the historical Duke of Orléans, Regent of France and is one of the oldest and most historic cities in the United States.

New Orleans is a Southern city known for its multicultural heritage (especially French, Spanish and African American influences) as well as its music and cuisine. It is a world-famous tourist destination thanks to its many festivals and celebrations; the most noteworthy annual events are Mardi Gras ("Fat Tuesday"), Jazz Fest, Essence Festival (moved to Houston, TX for 2006), Voodoo Fest, Southern Decadence, and college football's Sugar Bowl (although the bowl game has been moved to Atlanta for the 2006 game).

The most recent U.S. census put New Orleans's population at 484,674 and the population of Greater New Orleans at 1,337,726. Since the devastation of the city in conjunction with Hurricane Katrina, the population has been significantly less, due to the majority of surviving residents either taking temporary shelter elsewhere or relocating indefinitely. Estimates as of late 2005 cite fewer than 150,000 residing in the city, and projections of the city's eventual population following reconstruction are highly speculative.

As of mid-December 2005, efforts continue to aid survivors, clean up debris, and restore infrastructure. While most of the city has reopened to residents, and areas which suffered moderate damage have substantially resumed functioning, the parts of town most severely damaged - such as some neighborhoods of the lower 9th Ward - are open only during daylight hours for residents to salvage items from their formerly flooded homes.

New Orleans remains a major port city due to its location near the Gulf of Mexico and along the Mississippi River, making it a hub for goods which travel to and from Latin America. The petroleum industry is also of great importance to the New Orleans economy; many oil rigs are located in the Gulf. The Port of New Orleans is the largest U.S. port for several major commodities including rubber, cement and coffee. The Port of South Louisiana is based in the New Orleans metropolitan area and has been ranked the fifth largest port in the world in terms of raw tonnage, and among the largest U.S. ports for exporting grain. The two ports together would be the fourth largest port in the world.

New Orleans was founded by the French in 1718 and has played an important role in the history of the United States. The city was named in honor of Philip II, Duke of Orléans, who was regent and ruler of France when the city was founded (much as New York was named in honor of James, Duke of York, heir to the throne of England).

The city's several nicknames describe various characteristics of the city, including the "Crescent City" (describing its shape around the Mississippi River), "The Big Easy" (a reference by musicians to the relative ease of finding work in the city) and "The City that Care Forgot" (associated with the easy going, carefree nature of many of the local residents). The city's unofficial motto, "Laissez les bons temps rouler" ("Let the good times roll") describes the party-like attitude of many residents.

The city's name is often abbreviated NOLA. Residents of the city are referred to as New Orleanians.

History

Main article: History of New Orleans

Colonial era

New Orleans is a historic city. Sign at Jackson Square in the French Quarter

New Orleans was founded in 1718 by the French as La Nouvelle-Orléans, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. The site was selected because it was a rare bit of natural high ground along the flood-prone banks of the lower Mississippi, and was adjacent to a Native American trading route and portage between the Mississippi and Lake Pontchartrain via Bayou St. John (known to natives as Bayou Choupique). A community of French fur trappers and traders had existed along the bayou (in what is now the middle of New Orleans) for more than a decade before the official founding of the city. Nouvelle-Orléans became the capital of French Louisiana in 1722, replacing Biloxi.

In 1763, the colony was ceded to the Spanish Empire and remained under Spanish control for 40 years.

The Great Fire of 1788 destroyed many of the existing structures in the city (800 houses were destroyed), which were made of wood. As a result of this, and a subsequent fire in 1795 (another 200 houses destroyed), much of 18th century architecture still present in the French Quarter was built under Spanish rule and demonstrates Spanish colonial characteristics, wood was replaced with bricks.

The three most impressive buildings of New Orleans come from the Spanish times: St. Louis Cathedral, the Cabildo and the Presbytere.

In 1795, Spain granted the United States "Right of Deposit" in New Orleans, allowing Americans to use the city's port facilities. Louisiana reverted to French control in 1801 after Napoleon re-acquired the territory from Spain by treaty. But in 1803, Napoleon sold Louisiana (which then included portions of more than a dozen present-day states) to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. At this time the city of New Orleans had a population of about 10,000.

19th century

In its early days it was noted for its cosmopolitan polyglot population and mixture of cultures. The city grew rapidly, with influxes of Americans, French and Creole French, many of the latter fleeing from the revolution in Haiti. During the War of 1812 the British sent a force to try to conquer the city, but they were defeated by forces led by Andrew Jackson some miles down river from the city at Chalmette, Louisiana on January 8, 1815 (commonly known as the Battle of New Orleans).

1888 German map of New Orleans.

The population of the city doubled in the 1830s, and by 1840 the city's population was around 102,000, fourth-largest in the U.S, the largest city away from the Atlantic seaboard, as well as the largest in the South after Baltimore. However, population growth was at times plagued by yellow fever epidemics, such as the great scourge of 1853 that killed nearly 10,000 people in New Orleans.

New Orleans was the capital of the state of Louisiana until 1849, then again from 1865 to 1880. As a principal port it had a leading role in the slave trade, while at the same time having North America's largest community of free persons of color. Early in the American Civil War it was captured by the Union (by David Farragut -son of Spanish emigrants- later named the first US Navy Vice-Admiral) without a battle, and hence was spared the destruction suffered by many other cities of the American South. It was the first captured city in the American South. It retains a historical flavor with a wealth of 19th century structures far beyond the early colonial city boundaries of the French Quarter. The city hosted the 1884 World's Fair, called the World Cotton Centennial. An important attraction in the late 19th and early 20th centuries was the famous red light district called Storyville.

20th century

New Orleans panorama from 1919. Canal Street, looking away from the river, 1920s A view across Uptown New Orleans, with the Central Business District in the background, 1990s

Much of the city is located below sea level between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain, so the city is surrounded by levees. Until the early 20th century, construction was largely limited to the slightly higher ground along old natural river levees and bayous, since much of the rest of the land was swampy and subject to frequent flooding. This gave the 19th century city the shape of a crescent along a bend of the Mississippi, the origin of the nickname The Crescent City. In the 1910s engineer and inventor A. Baldwin Wood enacted his ambitious plan to drain the city, including large pumps of his own design which are still used. All rain water must be pumped up to the canals which drain into Lake Pontchartrain. Wood's pumps and drainage allowed the city to expand greatly in area. However, pumping of groundwater from underneath the city has resulted in subsidence. The subsidence greatly increased the flood risk, should the levees be breached or precipitation be in excess of pumping capacity (as was the case in 2005 in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina). There were many warnings in the late 20th century that a major hurricane or a Mississippi flood could create a lake in the central city as much as 9 m (30 ft) deep, which could take months to pump dry. This warning was augmented by vestigial fears from Hurricane Betsy, and the lasting stories of the Army Corps of Engineers blasting the flooding levees, drowning the poorer neighborhoods of the lower ninth Ward. The Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, (HCNA) respresenting a substantial group of the aforementioned lower ninth ward, created a lobby against the Army Corps of Engineers furthering work on the levees which might endanger the neighborhoods. The HCNA sent Jamal Morelli, activist and New Orleans artist, to respresent them in Washington, D.C. Jamal Morelli's struggle for the neighborhood was successful in protecting the lower ninth ward. (2000-2004)

In 1905 Yellow Fever was reported in the city, which had suffered under repeated epidemics of the disease in the previous century. As the role of mosquitos in spreading the disease was newly understood, the city embarked on a massive campaign to drain, screen, or oil all cisterns and standing water (breeding ground for mosquitos) in the city and educate the public on their vital role in preventing mosquitos. The effort was a success and the disease was stopped before reaching epidemic proportions. President Theodore Roosevelt visited the city to demonstrate the safety of New Orleans. The city has had no cases of Yellow Fever since.

New Orleans was hit by major storms in the 1909 Atlantic hurricane season and the 1915 Atlantic hurricane season.

In the 1920s an effort to "modernize" the look of the city removed the old cast-iron balconies from Canal Street, the city's commercial hub. In the 1960s another "modernization" effort replaced the Canal Streetcar Line with buses. Both of these moves came to be regarded as mistakes long after the fact, and the streetcars returned to a portion of Canal Street at the end of the 1990s, and construction to restore the entire line was completed in April 2004.

The suburbs saw great growth in the second half of the 20th century; the largest suburb today is Metairie, which borders New Orleans to the west. Metairie is not incorporated and is a part of Jefferson Parish.

Much of the city flooded in September of 1947 due to the 1947 Fort Lauderdale Hurricane.

In 1965 the city was damaged by Hurricane Betsy, with catastrophic flooding of the city's Lower 9th Ward.

In 1969 the city was brushed by Hurricane Camille but was spared from the catastrophic flooding it had seen in Hurricane Betsy and later in Hurricane Katrina. Because of Camille's tightly wound rings, the storm actually pulled water from the then impending fate they believed was imminent from Lake Ponchartrain and Lake Borgne, and veered toward her landfall point, approximately 50 miles away at Pass Christian, Mississippi, which is believed to have received a 28 foot storm surge.

While long one of the USA's most-visited cities, tourism boomed in the last quarter of the 20th century, becoming a major force in the local economy. Areas of the French Quarter and Central Business District which were long oriented towards local residential and business uses switched to largely catering to the domestic and international tourist industry.

A century after the Cotton Centennial Exhibition, New Orleans hosted another World's Fair, the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition.

The city experienced severe flooding in the May 8th 1995 Louisiana Flood when heavy rains suddenly dumped over a foot of water on parts of town faster than the pumps could remove the water.

21st Century (Hurricane Katrina)

An aerial view of the flooded areas in part of the New Orleans Central Business District

The city suffered from the effects of Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall on August 29, 2005 on the gulf coast near the city. New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin issued a mandatory evacuation of the entire city, the first such order ever issued in New Orleans. Many residents chose to stay or were stranded in the city by a lack of available transportation. The eye of the storm passed within 10 to 15 miles of New Orleans, bringing strong winds that downed trees, shattered windows, and hurled debris around the area. Heavy rains and flooding immediately affected the eastern areas of the city.

The situation worsened when levees along three canals were breached. These canals were the 17th Street Canal, the Industrial Canal, and the London Avenue Canal. As much as 80% of the city, much of which is below sea level, flooded, with water reaching a depth of 25 feet (7.6 meters) in some areas. As of November 2005, the Times Picayune article states that, in addition to 1,050 confirmed deaths, there are 5,000 missing residents of the city. Early estimates of the cost of physical damage from the storm have exceeded 100 billion USD. Subsequent investigations showed that the levee failures which flooded the majority of the city were the result of what has been called "the largest civil engineering disaster in the history of the United States" [1]

The city government declared the city off-limits to residents while clean-up efforts began and warned that those remaining could be removed by force, for their health and safety. On September 15, several of the suburban towns started allowing residents to return. The mayor announced a "phased repopulation" plan to start bringing residents of the city back in the next two weeks. Concern about the fragility of the city's flood defences and transportation caused repopulation efforts to be postponed due to Hurricane Rita. [2]. New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward was reflooded when a storm surge from Rita overcame one of the repaired levees on the Industrial Canal [3]. By October 1, parts of the city accounting for about one-third of the population of New Orleans had been reopened, including the French Quarter.[4] As of October 1, only 5% of the city remained underwater.

Geography and climate

Vertical cross-section of New Orleans, showing maximum levee height of 23 feet (7 m).

New Orleans is located at 29°57′53″N, 90°4′14″W (29.964722, -90.070556)GR1 on the banks of the Mississippi River, approximately 100 miles upriver from the Gulf of Mexico at 30.07°N, 89.93°W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 907.0 km² (350.2 mi²). 467.6 km² (180.6 mi²) of it is land and 439.4 km² (169.7 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 48.45% water.

The city is located in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, between the Mississippi River in the south and Lake Pontchartrain in the north. The area along the river is characterized by ridges and hollows. Fields atop the ridges along the river are referred to as the "frontlands." The land contour slopes away from the frontlands to the "backlands", comprised of clay and silt. The Mississippi Delta, at the mouth of the Mississippi River, covers about 13,000 square miles (about 1/4 of Louisiana) and consists of silt deposited by the river, and is the most fertile area of Louisiana.

The city of New Orleans actually contains the lowest point in the state of Louisiana, and one of the lowest points in the United States, after Death Valley and the Salton Sea. Much of the city is actually located between 1 and 10 feet (0.3 to 3 m) below sea level, and as such, is very prone to flooding. Some 45% of the city is above sea level; these higher areas were developed before 1900; the lowest areas only being developed more recently. Rainwater is continually pumped out of the city and into Lake Pontchartrain across a series of canals lined by levees and dikes. Before the 20th century pumping system, if it rains more than 1 inch, or more recently if there is a major storm surge, such as that caused by a hurricane, greater flooding can occur. Because of the city's high water table most of the cemeteries in the city use above ground crypts as opposed to underground burial.

The New Orleans Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the 37th largest in the United States, includes the Louisiana parishes of Orleans (contiguous with the city of New Orleans), Jefferson, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, and St. Tammany.

Cityscape

New Orleans contains many distinctive neighborhoods.

The Central Business District of New Orleans is located immediately north and west of the Mississippi River, and is historically called the "American Quarter." Most streets in this area fan out from a central point in the city. Major streets of the area include Canal Street and Poydras St. The term "downtown" refers to those parts of town that are downriver from the central business district. "Uptown" refers to those parts of town that are upriver from the central business district. Parts of the city that are located downtown include the world famous French Quarter (most noted as the central tourist district, with its array of shops, bars, and nightclubs along Bourbon Street), Storyville (now defunct), Treme, Faubourg Marigny, Bywater, the 7th Ward, and the Lower 9th Ward. Parts of the city that are located uptown include the Garden District, the Irish Channel, the University District, Carrollton, Gert Town, Fontainebleau, and Broadmoor. Its tallest building is the 50-story One Shell Square.

Other major districts within the city include Bayou St. John, Mid City, Gentilly, Lakeview, Lakefront, New Orleans East, The upper 9th Ward and Algiers.

Parishes located adjacent to the city of New Orleans include St. Tammany Parish to the northeast, St. Bernard Parish to the south, Plaquemines Parish to the southwest, and Jefferson Parish to the west.

A true-color satellite image of New Orleans taken on NASA's Landsat 7

Tallest Buildings

Climate

The climate of New Orleans is subtropical, with mild winters and hot, humid summers. In January, morning lows average around 43 °F (6°C), and daily highs around 62°F (17°C). In July, lows average 74°F (23°C), and highs average 91°F (33°C). The lowest recorded temperature was 11.0°F (-11.6°C) on December 23, 1989. The highest recorded temperature was 102.0°F (38.9°C) on August 22, 1980. The average precipitation is 59.74 inches (1520 mm) annually.

On rare occasions, snow will fall. Most recently, a trace of snow fell on Christmas in 2004, during the 2004 Christmas Eve Snowstorm. On December 25, a combination of rain, sleet, and snow fell on the city, leaving some bridges icy. Before that, the last white Christmas was in 1954, and brought 4.5 inches (110 mm). The last significant snowfall in New Orleans fell on December 22, 1989, when most of the city received 1 or 2 inches of snow.

People and culture

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 484,674 people, 188,251 households, and 112,950 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,036.4/km² (2,684.3/mi²). There were 215,091 housing units at an average density of 459.9/km² (1,191.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was:

The population of Greater New Orleans stood at 1,337,726 in 2000, making it the 35th largest metropolitan area in the United States. These population statistics are based on legal residents of the city. But due to the enormous annual tourist flow, the amount of people inside the city at a given time, such as Mardi Gras season, tends to exceed these numbers sometimes by the hundreds of thousands.

There were 188,251 households out of which:

The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the city the population was spread out with:

The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 88.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $27,133, and the median income for a family was $32,338. Males had a median income of $30,862 versus $23,768 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,258. 27.9% of the population and 23.7% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 40.3% of those under the age of 18 and 19.3% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

The population of New Orleans reached its highest point in the summer of 1965, when its population reached 702,108. The population was stunted in the late sixties, a decade which saw storm surge from Hurricane Betsy flooded much of the Lower 9th Ward Since the late sixties, the population of New Orleans/Orleans Parish has experienced a steady decline while surrounding parishes such as Jefferson and St. Tammany registered strong increases in population.

An analysis by Brown University sociologist John R. Logan in January of 2005 suggests that as many as 50% of whites and 80% of blacks relocated from New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath may relocate permanently.

New Orleans is well known for its Creole culture and the persistence of Voodoo practice by a few of its residents, as well as for its music, food, architecture, and spirit of celebration.

Pronunciation

New Orleans is usually pronounced by locals as "Noo Or-lins," "Noo Awlee-enz," or "Noo Aw-lins." The pronunciation "N'Awlins" is not generally used by locals but has been popularized by the tourist trade. The distinctive local accent is unlike either Cajun or the stereotypical Southern accent so often misportrayed by film and television actors. It does, like earlier Southern Englishes, feature frequent deletion of post-vocalic "r". It is similar to a New York "Brooklynese" accent to people unfamiliar with it. There are many theories to how the accent came to be, but it likely results from New Orleans' geographic isolation by water, and the fact that New Orleans was a major port of entry into the United States throughout the 19th century. Many of the immigrant groups who reside in Brooklyn also reside in New Orleans, with Irish, Italians, and Germans being among the largest groups. The prestige associated with being from New Orleans by many residents is likely a factor in the linguistic assimilation of the ethnically divergent population. This distinctive accent is dying out generation by generation in the city (but remains very strong in the surrounding Parishes). As with many sociolinguistic artifacts, it is usually attested much more strongly by older members of the population. One subtype of the New Orleans accent is sometimes identified as Yat (from "Where y'at). This word is not used as a generalized term for the New Orleans accent, and is generally reserved for the strongest varieties. Also notable are lexical items specific to the city, such as "lagniappe" (pronounced LAN-yap) meaning "a little something extra," "makin' groceries" for grocery shopping, or "neutral ground" for a street median.

Media

The major daily newspaper is the New Orleans Times-Picayune, publishing since 1837. Other alternative weekly publications include the Louisiana Weekly and the Gambit Weekly.

Greater New Orleans is well served by television and radio. The market is the 43rd largest Designated Market Area (DMA) in the U.S., serving 672,150 homes and 0.610% of the U.S. Major television network affiliates serving the area include WWL 4 (CBS), WGNO 26 (ABC), WDSU 6 (NBC), WVUE 8 (FOX), WNOL 38 (WB), WUPL 54 (UPN), and WPXL 49 (PAX). PBS stations include WYES 12 and WLAE 32. WHNO 20 also operates as an independent station in the area, providing mainly religious programming.

Radio stations serving Greater New Orleans include:

Television References

Several episodes of television series have referenced the city:

Museums and other attractions

Bourbon Street, New Orleans, in 2003, looking towards Canal Street.

Greater New Orleans has many major attractions, from the world-renowned Bourbon Street and the French Quarter's notorious nightlife, St. Charles Avenue (home of Tulane and Loyola Universities), and many stately 19th century mansions.

Favorite tourist scenes in New Orleans include the French Quarter (known locally as "the Quarter"), which dates from the French and Spanish eras and is bounded by the Mississippi River and Rampart Street, Canal Street and Esplanade Ave. The French Quarter contains many popular hotels, bars, and nightclubs, most notably around Bourbon Street. Other notable tourist attractions in the quarter include Jackson Square, St. Louis Cathedral, the French Market (including the Café du Monde, famous for café au lait and beignets), and Preservation Hall.

Also located near the French Quarter is the old New Orleans Mint, formerly a branch of the United States Mint, now operates as a museum. The National D-Day Museum is a relatively new museum (opened on June 6, 2000) dedicated to providing information and materials related to the allied invasion of Normandy, France. The Natchez is an authentic steamboat with a calliope tours the Mississippi twice daily.

Art museums in the city include the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) in City Park and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. The Audubon Park and the Audubon Zoo are also located in the city of New Orleans. New Orleans is also noted for its many beautiful cemeteries. Some notable cemeteries in the city include Saint Louis Cemetery and Metairie Cemetery.

The city is also world-famous for its food. Specialties include beignets, square-shaped fried pastries that are sometimes called French doughnuts (served with coffee and chicory "au lait"); Po'boy and Italian Muffaletta sandwiches; Gulf oysters on the half-shell and other seafoods; etouffee, jambalaya, gumbo, and other Creole dishes; and the Monday evening favorite of red beans and rice. (Louis Armstrong often signed his letters, "red beans and ricely yours.")

Significant gardens include Longue Vue House and Gardens and the New Orleans Botanical Garden.

Annual cultural events and fairs

See also: New Orleans Mardi Gras

Mounted Krewe Officers in the Thoth Parade during Mardi Gras.

Greater New Orleans is home to numerous year-around celebrations, including Mardi Gras, New Year's Eve celebrations, and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. New Orleans' most famous celebration is its Carnival Season. The Carnival season is often known (especially by out-of-towners) by the name of the last and biggest day, Mardi Gras (literally, "Fat Tuesday"), held just before the beginning of the Catholic liturgical season of Lent. Mardi Gras celebrations include parades and floats; participants toss strings of cheap colorful beads and doubloons to the crowds. The Mardi Gras season is kicked off with the only parade allowed through the French Quarter (Vieux Carré, translated Old Square), a walking parade aptly named Krewe du Vieux.

The largest of the city's many musical festivals is the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Commonly referred to simply as, "Jazz Fest", it is one of the largest music festivals in the nation, and features crowds coming from all over the world to experience music, food, arts, and crafts. Despite the name, it features not only jazz but a large variety of music, including both native Louisiana music and nationally-known popular music artists.

Music

Louis Armstrong, famous New Orleans Jazz musician.

New Orleans has always been a significant center for music with its intertwined European, Latin American, and African-American cultures. The city engendered jazz with its brass bands. Decades later it was home to a distinctive brand of rhythm and blues that contributed greatly to the growth of rock and roll. Its general atmosphere of Dionysian art has also resulted in both breeding and being a home to chaotic artists such as Crash Worship, Liquiddrone, and Jamal Morelli. In addition, the nearby countryside is the home of Cajun music, Zydeco music, and Delta blues.

The city also created its own spin on the old tradition of military brass band funerals; traditional New Orleans funerals with music feature sad music (mostly dirges and hymns) on the way to the cemetery and happy music (hot jazz) on the way back. Such traditional musical funerals still take place when a local musician, a member of a club, krewe, or benevolent society, or a noted dignitary has passed. Until the 1990s most locals preferred to call these "funerals with music," but out of town visitors have long dubbed them "jazz funerals." Younger bands, especially those based in the Treme neighborhood, have embraced the term and now have funerals featuring only jazz music.

Sports & Recreation

The Louisiana Superdome, home to the New Orleans Saints.

The city is the home to several professional, major league sports teams, including the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League and the New Orleans Hornets of the National Basketball Association which relocated from Charlotte, North Carolina, at the start of the 2002–2003 season. The Saints play in the Louisiana Superdome, and the Hornets play in the adjacent New Orleans Arena.

Due to the effects of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans, including damage both to the exterior and the interior of the Louisiana Superdome, the New Orleans Saints have played their "home" games in Baton Rouge and San Antonio, Texas. The football season began just a week after the storm hit, and the Saints played their first "home" game against the Giants at Giants Stadium. The Hornets will play 36 "home" games at the Ford Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, with the remaining 5 to be split between Norman (University of Oklahoma campus), Baton Rouge (LSU campus) and a March 2006 return to New Orleans for three home games.

The city also has an Arena Football League team, the New Orleans VooDoo, owned by the Saints' owner, Tom Benson. The New Orleans Zephyrs, AAA minor league baseball team plays in adjacent Metairie. They are currently affiliated with the Washington Nationals.

The city also hosts two college football bowl games annually: the New Orleans Bowl and the Sugar Bowl. Nine Super Bowls have been contested in New Orleans.

Historically, many teams have been formerly located in the city, including the New Orleans Pelicans baseball team (1887–1959), the New Orleans Breakers of the United States Football League, the New Orleans Night of the Arena Football League (1991–1992), and the New Orleans Brass ice hockey team (1997–2003). Former basketball teams were the New Orleans Buccaneers (c. 1967–1970), and the New Orleans Jazz (1974–1980) which became the Utah Jazz.

New Orleans is also home to Southern Yacht Club, located at West End on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. Established in 1849, it is the second oldest yacht club in the United States. The building was severely damaged, first by storm surge and then by fire, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Economy

A tanker on the Mississippi River in New Orleans.

New Orleans is an industrial and distribution center, and a major U.S. seaport. It is one of the busiest seaports in not only the United States, but also the world. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal in the mid 20th century to accommodate New Orleans' barge traffic.

Like Houston, New Orleans is located in proximity to the Gulf of Mexico and the many oil rigs lying just offshore. There are a substantial number of energy companies that have their regional headquarters in the city, including BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell Oil Company. The city is also home to one Fortune 500 company, Entergy Corporation, an electric power provider.

The federal government has a significant presence in the area. The NASA Michoud Assembly Facility is located in the eastern portion of Orleans Parish. The facility is operated by Lockheed-Martin and is a large manufacturing facility where external fuel tanks for space shuttles are produced. The Michoud Assembly Facility also houses the National Finance Center operated by the USDA.

Other companies with a significant presence or base in New Orleans include BellSouth, Hibernia Corp., IBM, Navtech, Harrah's (downtown casino), Popeye's Fried Chicken, and Zatarain's.

The Port of New Orleans handles about 84 million short tons of cargo a year. The Port of South Louisiana, located in the Metropolitan New Orleans Area, handles 199 million short tons. The two combined would be the 4th largest port in the world.

About 5,000 ships from nearly 60 nations dock at the Port of New Orleans annually. The chief exports are grain and other foods from the Midwestern United States and petroleum products. The leading imports include chemicals, cocoa beans, coffee, and petroleum. The port handles more trade with Latin America than does any other U.S. gateway, including Miami.

New Orleans is also a busy port for barges. The barges use the nation's two main inland waterways, the Mississippi River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, which meet at New Orleans. The port of New Orleans handles about 50,000 barges yearly.

There are also two ferries that cross the river near the Garden district and the French Quarter. These ferries are free of charge to pedestrians, but motorists pay a $1 fee to cross on them.

New Orleans is also one of the most visited cities in the United States, and tourism is a major staple in the area's economy. The city's colorful Carnival celebrations during the pre-Lenten season, centered on the French Quarter, draw particularly large crowds. Other major tourist events and attractions in the city include Mardi Gras, the Sugar Bowl, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, Southern Decadence (one of the largest annual Gay/Lesbian celebrations in the nation), and the Essence Festival.

Infrastructure

Government

New Orleans has a mayor-council government. The city council consists of five councilmembers who are elected by district and two at large councilmembers. Mayor C. Ray Nagin, Jr. was elected in May 2002.

The New Orleans Police Department provides professional police services to the public in order to maintain order and protect life and property. The Orleans Parish civil sheriff's employees serve (deliver) papers involving lawsuits. The Criminal Sheriff's department maintains the parish prison system.

The city of New Orleans and the parish of Orleans operate as a merged city-county government.GR6 Before the city of New Orleans became co-extensive with Orleans Parish, Orleans Parish was home to numerous smaller communities. Some of these communities within Orleans Parish have historically had separate identities from the city of New Orleans, such as Irish Bayou and Carrollton. Algiers, Louisiana was a separate city through 1870. As soon as Algiers became a part of New Orleans, Orleans Parish ceased being separate from the city of New Orleans.

Schools

New Orleans Public Schools, the city's school district, is one of the area's largest school districts. NOPS contains approximately 100 individual schools. The Greater New Orleans area has approximately 200 parochial schools.

Several institutions of higher education also exist within the city, including University of New Orleans, Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, Dillard University, Southern University at New Orleans, Xavier University of Louisiana, Louisiana State University Medical School, and Our Lady of Holy Cross College. Other schools include Delgado Community College, Nunez Community College, Culinary Institute of New Orleans, Herzing College, Commonwealth University, and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

Libraries

There are numerous academic and public libraries and archives in New Orleans, including Monroe Library at Loyola University, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University[7] and Earl K. Long Library at the University of New Orleans.[8]

The New Orleans Public Library includes 13 locations, most of which were damaged by Hurricane Katrina.[9] The main library includes a Louisiana Division housing city archives and special collections.[10]

Other research archives are located at the Historic New Orleans Collection[11] and the Old U.S. Mint.[12]

Transportation

The metropolitan area is served by Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (IATA: MSY, ICAO: KMSY), located approximately nine miles west of the city in the city of Kenner. It serves millions of passengers on approximately 300 nonstop flights per day to or from destinations throughout the United States, Canada, Latin America, and the Caribbean. The airport also handles a significant amount of charter operations from Europe. The airport also serves as a nonstop gateway to Mexico for Federal Express.

Within the city itself is Lakefront Airport, a small, general aviation airport, as well as the New Orleans Downtown Heliport, located on the roof of the Louisiana Superdome's parking garage. There are also several regional airports located throughout the metropolitan area.

The city is also served by rail via Amtrak. The New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal is the central rail depot, and it is served by three trains: the Crescent to New York City, the City of New Orleans to Chicago, Illinois, and the Sunset Limited from Orlando to Los Angeles.

In addition, the city is served by six Class I freight railroads. Union Pacific Railroad and BNSF Railway approach the city from the west, Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX from the east, and the Canadian National Railway and Kansas City Southern Railway from the north.

Public transportation in the city is operated by New Orleans Regional Transit Authority ("RTA"). In addition to the many bus routes connecting the city and suburban areas, there are three active streetcar lines moved by electric motors powered by DC wires overhead. The St. Charles line (green cars, formerly connecting New Orleans with the then independent suburb of Carrollton) is the oldest continuously operating streetcar line in New Orleans and a historic landmark. The Riverfront line (also known as the Ladies in Red since the cars are painted red) runs parallel to the river from Canal Street through the French Quarter to the Convention Center above Julia Street in the Arts District. The Canal Street line uses the Riverfront line tracks from Esplanade Street to Canal Street, then branches off down Canal Street and ends at the cemeteries at City Park Avenue with a spur running from the intersection of Canal and Carrollton Avenue to the entrance of City Park at Esplanade near the entrance to the New Orleans Museum of Art.

The city's streetcars were also featured in the Tennessee Williams play, A Streetcar Named Desire. The streetcar line to Desire Street became a bus line in 1948. There are proposals to revive a Desire light rail streetcar line.

Roads in the city are arranged in a radial grid pattern, emanating out to various parts of town from a central point north of the Central Business District. I-10 loops east-west through the city, and traverses the northern edge of the Central Business District, taking traffic west towards Baton Rouge, Louisiana and east-northeast to Slidell, Louisiana. The "Highrise" carries I-10 across the Industrial Canal.

Farther east, the I-10 connects New Orleans East with Slidell, bridging an arm of Lake Pontchartrain. This crossing, a dual causeway known as the "Twin Spans," was severely damaged by Hurricane Katrina. By October 2005 single lanes in each direction had been reopened on the eastbound span. The westbound span was reopened in early January 2006. The Twin Spans is to be replaced with a new six-lane bridge, expected to be completed in 2009.[13] As I-10 heads south from Metairie towards the Central Business District, it is called the Pontchartrain Expressway.

I-610 provides a direct shortcut across the northern central part of the city, allowing through traffic to bypass I-10's L-shaped route which traverses the more congested areas.

US 90 leaves the Central Business District and goes west through the city's Uptown neighborhood and crosses the Missisisppi River at the Huey P. Long Bridge near the suburb of Jefferson. I-10 is also connected to I-12, north of Lake Pontchartrain, via the tolled Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, consisting of two parallel bridges, which are also the longest in the world.

The interstate highways serving New Orleans were laid out in the middle of the 20th century, a time when a larger proportion of Gulf of Mexico freight traffic passed through New Orleans. I-10 goes west to Houston and beyond and east to Mobile and Florida, with I-59 and I-55 heading northward to Birmingham and Jackson, respectively. Later, I-12 created a shortcut that avoided crossing Lake Pontchartrain. In Slidell, I-59 and I-12 both end at an interchange with I-10, which turns southward toward New Orleans while I-12 continues straight to rejoin I-10 in Baton Rouge. There are also plans to extend I-49 from Lafayette to New Orleans. The route would follow U.S. Highway 90 and the Westbank Expressway, placing the southern terminus at I-10 behind the Superdome. The southern termini of US Highways 11 and 61 are in New Orleans, and US 51 terminates just west of the city, Laplace.

The Pontchartrain Expressway (U.S. Highway 90's business route), becomes the Westbank Expressway south of the Mississippi River. Along its route west then northwest from the Crescent City Connection bridge to its terminus at I-10 near the Superdome, the Pontchartrain Expressway follows the path of the former New Basin Canal, dug in the 19th century by thousands of immigrant (mostly Irish) laborers, and filled in in 1947. Some of the older warehouse structures still standing along the Pontchartrain Expressway can trace their roots to their days along the banks of the canal.

Roads along the Mississippi River were the first to carry overland traffic into New Orleans. US 51 (the "Old Hammond Highway"), US 90, and US 11 followed old Indian routes along slight ridges to become the first automotive highways. Louisiana governor Huey P. Long championed Airline Highway (US 61) to bypass the circuitous river road between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The route of today's US 90 east of New Orleans once included a ferry crossing at Fort Pike. Governor Long built public draw bridges at the Rigolets as political retaliation against the operators of a then-private toll bridge across Lake Pontchartrain. Long achieved his objective: the US 11 toll bridge failed commercially and is owned by the State. US 11 was the escape route for Ignatius J. Reilly at the end of John Kennedy Toole's novel, A Confederacy of Dunces.

West of New Orleans, the Ruddock exit at milepost 6 of I-55 is the only trace left of a thriving community that was literally washed away by the hurricane of September 1915. Frenier Beach Hurricane Storm Surge Revisited In the 1960s, a controversial "Dixie Freeway" that would have been designated I-410 would have created an "outer loop" encompassing St. Bernard Parish, the westbank areas of New Orleans and Jefferson, and back across the river in St. Charles Parish where I-310 now runs. Environmental concern for the wetlands south of New Orleans and economic considerations derailed those plans.

Sister cities

New Orleans has ten sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Juan-les-Pins (France), Maracaibo (Venezuela), Matsue (Japan), Mérida (Mexico), Innsbruck (Austria), Pointe Noire (Republic of Congo), San Miguel de Tucuman (Argentina), Tegucigalpa (Honduras), Caracas (Venezuela), and Holdfast Bay (Australia).


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(SCI): Juan-les-Pins (France), Maracaibo (Venezuela), Matsue (Japan), Mérida (Mexico), Innsbruck (Austria), Pointe Noire (Republic of Congo), San Miguel de Tucuman (Argentina), Tegucigalpa (Honduras), Caracas (Venezuela), and Holdfast Bay (Australia). Here is a rough chronology of the "Yarns":. New Orleans has ten sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. The Dwight-related stories fall in between these, with the short stories fleshing out the time between the main stories. Environmental concern for the wetlands south of New Orleans and economic considerations derailed those plans. While it was the first story written, The Hard Goodbye was not the first story chronologically, with the first section of That Yellow Bastard as the first. Charles Parish where I-310 now runs. Although there has been much fan speculation on specifics (as well as how many stories Miller will publish in total), few details have been verified thus far.

Bernard Parish, the westbank areas of New Orleans and Jefferson, and back across the river in St. The following have been mentioned:. Frenier Beach Hurricane Storm Surge Revisited In the 1960s, a controversial "Dixie Freeway" that would have been designated I-410 would have created an "outer loop" encompassing St. Frank Miller has confirmed that he is working on new Sin City storylines for the upcoming movies. West of New Orleans, the Ruddock exit at milepost 6 of I-55 is the only trace left of a thriving community that was literally washed away by the hurricane of September 1915. It reprints all the short stories, in the following order:. Reilly at the end of John Kennedy Toole's novel, A Confederacy of Dunces. Booze, Broads, & Bullets is a compilation of stories from the Sin City series of comic books by Frank Miller.

US 11 was the escape route for Ignatius J. We talk about all sorts of things.". Long achieved his objective: the US 11 toll bridge failed commercially and is owned by the State. A bright day dawns. Governor Long built public draw bridges at the Rigolets as political retaliation against the operators of a then-private toll bridge across Lake Pontchartrain. Fading into memory. The route of today's US 90 east of New Orleans once included a ferry crossing at Fort Pike. Miles behind us now.

Long championed Airline Highway (US 61) to bypass the circuitous river road between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. That rotten town. Louisiana governor Huey P. Those it can't soil, it kills. US 51 (the "Old Hammond Highway"), US 90, and US 11 followed old Indian routes along slight ridges to become the first automotive highways. Those it can't corrupt, it soils. Roads along the Mississippi River were the first to carry overland traffic into New Orleans. "That rotten town.

Some of the older warehouse structures still standing along the Pontchartrain Expressway can trace their roots to their days along the banks of the canal. The final words in the book are internal monologue by Wallace, stating:. Along its route west then northwest from the Crescent City Connection bridge to its terminus at I-10 near the Superdome, the Pontchartrain Expressway follows the path of the former New Basin Canal, dug in the 19th century by thousands of immigrant (mostly Irish) laborers, and filled in in 1947. He asks her why she wanted to jump and she responds "I was lonely". Highway 90's business route), becomes the Westbank Expressway south of the Mississippi River. Wallace and Esther drive out of town. The Pontchartrain Expressway (U.S. He seeks no revenge on Wallace or Liebowitz.

The southern termini of US Highways 11 and 61 are in New Orleans, and US 51 terminates just west of the city, Laplace. Wallenquist lets it all be square. Highway 90 and the Westbank Expressway, placing the southern terminus at I-10 behind the Superdome. Liebowitz shoots The Colonel in the head for hurting his son. The route would follow U.S. By this time, the police have launched a massive assault on the Colonel's factory, where the Colonel is captured. There are also plans to extend I-49 from Lafayette to New Orleans. Wallace takes Esther to the hospital as the many police are brought in on stretchers.

In Slidell, I-59 and I-12 both end at an interchange with I-10, which turns southward toward New Orleans while I-12 continues straight to rejoin I-10 in Baton Rouge. Jerry, a veteran, blasts it out of the sky. Later, I-12 created a shortcut that avoided crossing Lake Pontchartrain. When Wallace gets her, a police helicopter arrives. I-10 goes west to Houston and beyond and east to Mobile and Florida, with I-59 and I-55 heading northward to Birmingham and Jackson, respectively. She is at the Farm. The interstate highways serving New Orleans were laid out in the middle of the 20th century, a time when a larger proportion of Gulf of Mexico freight traffic passed through New Orleans. It's The Colonel, telling Wallace where Esther is.

I-10 is also connected to I-12, north of Lake Pontchartrain, via the tolled Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, consisting of two parallel bridges, which are also the longest in the world. At this point in his story, the phone rings in Liebowitz's apartment. Long Bridge near the suburb of Jefferson. Wallace escapes without saving anyone. US 90 leaves the Central Business District and goes west through the city's Uptown neighborhood and crosses the Missisisppi River at the Huey P. Wallace explains how he had a showdown with Mariah and a bunch of mercenaries. I-610 provides a direct shortcut across the northern central part of the city, allowing through traffic to bypass I-10's L-shaped route which traverses the more congested areas. Wallace discovers that the real scheme is an organ harvesting ring of which Liebowitz was unaware.

The Twin Spans is to be replaced with a new six-lane bridge, expected to be completed in 2009.[13] As I-10 heads south from Metairie towards the Central Business District, it is called the Pontchartrain Expressway. Wallace confronts Liebowitz and tries to get him to join the same side. The westbound span was reopened in early January 2006. He then threatens Liebowitz's family even further. By October 2005 single lanes in each direction had been reopened on the eastbound span. He even has Mariah break Liebowitz's son's arm. This crossing, a dual causeway known as the "Twin Spans," was severely damaged by Hurricane Katrina. The Colonel is killing anyone linking Wallace to him.

Farther east, the I-10 connects New Orleans East with Slidell, bridging an arm of Lake Pontchartrain. Mariah, another female mercenary working for the Colonel, is assigned to Delia's task. The "Highrise" carries I-10 across the Industrial Canal. They burn Captain's body. I-10 loops east-west through the city, and traverses the northern edge of the Central Business District, taking traffic west towards Baton Rouge, Louisiana and east-northeast to Slidell, Louisiana. He then meets up with another war buddy named Jerry. Roads in the city are arranged in a radial grid pattern, emanating out to various parts of town from a central point north of the Central Business District. As he does, he shoots her in the head and shoots Delia in the chest.

There are proposals to revive a Desire light rail streetcar line. At gunpoint, Wallace makes Maxine bring him out of his hallucination hell. The streetcar line to Desire Street became a bus line in 1948. Gordo kills Captain as Wallace shoots Gordo. The city's streetcars were also featured in the Tennessee Williams play, A Streetcar Named Desire. They find them at a gas station, refilling the Hummer they were driving. The Canal Street line uses the Riverfront line tracks from Esplanade Street to Canal Street, then branches off down Canal Street and ends at the cemeteries at City Park Avenue with a spur running from the intersection of Canal and Carrollton Avenue to the entrance of City Park at Esplanade near the entrance to the New Orleans Museum of Art. They torture the one remaining policeman and find out where Delia, Gordo, and Maxine were going.

The Riverfront line (also known as the Ladies in Red since the cars are painted red) runs parallel to the river from Canal Street through the French Quarter to the Convention Center above Julia Street in the Arts District. A battle ensues and Captain kills the police. Charles line (green cars, formerly connecting New Orleans with the then independent suburb of Carrollton) is the oldest continuously operating streetcar line in New Orleans and a historic landmark. The police show up, as does Captain. The St. He discovers a young girl dead in the trunk, intended to frame him. In addition to the many bus routes connecting the city and suburban areas, there are three active streetcar lines moved by electric motors powered by DC wires overhead. The car hits a tree.

Public transportation in the city is operated by New Orleans Regional Transit Authority ("RTA"). The whole portion of the comic where he is hallucinating is done in full colour. Union Pacific Railroad and BNSF Railway approach the city from the west, Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX from the east, and the Canadian National Railway and Kansas City Southern Railway from the north. Maxine gives him a huge dose of something strange and Wallace goes on a trip. In addition, the city is served by six Class I freight railroads. He wakes at the pits, where Delia, Gordo, and a drug wizard named Maxine are preparing to abandon his car in the pits. The New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal is the central rail depot, and it is served by three trains: the Crescent to New York City, the City of New Orleans to Chicago, Illinois, and the Sunset Limited from Orlando to Los Angeles. Just then, Wallace is drugged by a sniper for the second time.

The city is also served by rail via Amtrak. Wallace handcuffs her to the bed for what she believes is foreplay, when he reveals that he knows she can not be Esther's roommate since Esther's clothes would have the smell of Delia's cigarettes on them. There are also several regional airports located throughout the metropolitan area. He borrows a car from him and Wallace and Delia turn in for the night. Within the city itself is Lakefront Airport, a small, general aviation airport, as well as the New Orleans Downtown Heliport, located on the roof of the Louisiana Superdome's parking garage. Wallace meets up with a war buddy referred to only as Captain. The airport also serves as a nonstop gateway to Mexico for Federal Express. Wallace and Delia are attacked by snipers and mercenaries, but they escape.

The airport also handles a significant amount of charter operations from Europe. He finds her apartment occupied by Delia, who claims to be Esther's roommate. It serves millions of passengers on approximately 300 nonstop flights per day to or from destinations throughout the United States, Canada, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Wallace spends the night in the drunk tank, and upon his release seeks out Esther. The metropolitan area is served by Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (IATA: MSY, ICAO: KMSY), located approximately nine miles west of the city in the city of Kenner. Apparently, The Colonel and Liebowitz are a part of this conspiracy. Mint.[12]. They are ambushed by two men, who drug Wallace and kidnap Esther.

Other research archives are located at the Historic New Orleans Collection[11] and the Old U.S. She likes his art and they go out for a drink. The New Orleans Public Library includes 13 locations, most of which were damaged by Hurricane Katrina.[9] The main library includes a Louisiana Division housing city archives and special collections.[10]. It tells the story of Wallace, an artist/war hero/short order cook who saves a suicidal woman named Esther. Long Library at the University of New Orleans.[8]. Hell and Back is the longest of the Sin City stories, spanning 9 issues. There are numerous academic and public libraries and archives in New Orleans, including Monroe Library at Loyola University, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University[7] and Earl K. Hell and Back (a Sin City Love Story) was first published in (July 1999–April 2000).

Other schools include Delgado Community College, Nunez Community College, Culinary Institute of New Orleans, Herzing College, Commonwealth University, and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. Dwight is later reintroduced to the car that he was seen driving in Hell and Back. Several institutions of higher education also exist within the city, including University of New Orleans, Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, Dillard University, Southern University at New Orleans, Xavier University of Louisiana, Louisiana State University Medical School, and Our Lady of Holy Cross College. They confront him at his home in Sacred Oaks where he is brutally tortured and killed. The Greater New Orleans area has approximately 200 parochial schools. Miho, Dwight, and Daisy, Carmen's lover, realize that Don Giacco Magliozzi was behind the shooting. NOPS contains approximately 100 individual schools. It is finally revealed that Vito, a member of the Mafia, had accidentally killed Carmen, an Old Town hooker, and Old Town wants revenge.

New Orleans Public Schools, the city's school district, is one of the area's largest school districts. Watching out for him at every turn, the ninja Miho carves a relentless path of severed limbs on her trusty roller blades. As soon as Algiers became a part of New Orleans, Orleans Parish ceased being separate from the city of New Orleans. After getting the inside dirt from an aging starlet, he follows a lead through Basin City's underworld that ultimately brings him into the upper tiers of the mob and city hall. Algiers, Louisiana was a separate city through 1870. After one of the Old Town hookers is killed in the cross fire of a botched Mafia drive-by, Dwight starts asking questions at a run-down diner. Some of these communities within Orleans Parish have historically had separate identities from the city of New Orleans, such as Irish Bayou and Carrollton. Ladies' man Dwight and the silent killer Miho, stars of A Dame to Kill For and The Big Fat Kill, return for a gritty story of revenge and corruption.

The city of New Orleans and the parish of Orleans operate as a merged city-county government.GR6 Before the city of New Orleans became co-extensive with Orleans Parish, Orleans Parish was home to numerous smaller communities. Unlike the previous four stories, Family Values was released as a 128-page graphic novel rather than in serialized issues that would later be collected in a trade paperback volume. The Criminal Sheriff's department maintains the parish prison system. Family Values is the fifth "yarn" in Frank Miller's series of Sin City comic books published by Dark Horse Comics. The Orleans Parish civil sheriff's employees serve (deliver) papers involving lawsuits. Family Values was first published in (October 1997). The New Orleans Police Department provides professional police services to the public in order to maintain order and protect life and property. Marv kills the last one, but cannot seem to remember where he got his coat or gloves.

was elected in May 2002. He chases them to The Projects, where the overprotective tenants kill several of the kids. Ray Nagin, Jr. He gets drunk and steps outside to find some college kids burning drunks to death. Mayor C. He gets depressed seeing Nancy leave with Hartigan, seeing as how he always had a crush on Nancy. The city council consists of five councilmembers who are elected by district and two at large councilmembers. He lights one of the dead guys' cigarettes and thinks back; since it is Saturday, he realizes he must have been watching Nancy at Kadie's...

New Orleans has a mayor-council government. Marv regains consciousness in the projects, surrounded by dead young guys, unable to remember how he got there. Other major tourist events and attractions in the city include Mardi Gras, the Sugar Bowl, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, Southern Decadence (one of the largest annual Gay/Lesbian celebrations in the nation), and the Essence Festival. It is the story of what Marv was up to on the night Hartigan met back up with Nancy (from That Yellow Bastard). The city's colorful Carnival celebrations during the pre-Lenten season, centered on the French Quarter, draw particularly large crowds. It was later reprinted in a mass-market edition as Just Another Saturday Night (October 1998). New Orleans is also one of the most visited cities in the United States, and tourism is a major staple in the area's economy. Just Another Saturday Night was first published in Sin City #1/2 (August 1997), a limited mail-in comic available only through a special offer in Wizard (magazine) #73.

These ferries are free of charge to pedestrians, but motorists pay a $1 fee to cross on them. Her response is "Only the ones I really like.". There are also two ferries that cross the river near the Garden district and the French Quarter. "Delia-- do you plan to make love to each and every one of them?" he asks. The port of New Orleans handles about 50,000 barges yearly. Leaving the rear of the train, the Colonel waits for her. The barges use the nation's two main inland waterways, the Mississippi River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, which meet at New Orleans. When they're done, she snaps his neck and throws him off the train.

New Orleans is also a busy port for barges. Delia hits on him, and they make love near the back of the train. gateway, including Miami. His internal monologue explains that he had a flat tire. The port handles more trade with Latin America than does any other U.S. Eddie is riding the train. The leading imports include chemicals, cocoa beans, coffee, and petroleum. Wrong Track is the second story, which picks up soon after.

The chief exports are grain and other foods from the Midwestern United States and petroleum products. Delia explains that she has a train to catch. About 5,000 ships from nearly 60 nations dock at the Port of New Orleans annually. They throw him in as well and Gordo pushes the car into the pits. The two combined would be the 4th largest port in the world. They check the trunk of Phil's car and find his wife with six bullets in her belly. The Port of South Louisiana, located in the Metropolitan New Orleans Area, handles 199 million short tons. She meets up with the Colonel and Gordo at the entrance to the pits.

The Port of New Orleans handles about 84 million short tons of cargo a year. She sticks the heel of her shoe in his eye socket, killing him. Other companies with a significant presence or base in New Orleans include BellSouth, Hibernia Corp., IBM, Navtech, Harrah's (downtown casino), Popeye's Fried Chicken, and Zatarain's. Eddie was supposed to be driving a similar Studebaker, and looked very similar. The Michoud Assembly Facility also houses the National Finance Center operated by the USDA. He explains that he is a used car salesman named Phil, and she understands. The facility is operated by Lockheed-Martin and is a large manufacturing facility where external fuel tanks for space shuttles are produced. She claims he has a trunk-load of stolen jewels he plans to sell in Sacred Oaks, violating an exclusivity agreement with the Wallenquist Organization.

The NASA Michoud Assembly Facility is located in the eastern portion of Orleans Parish. She starts choking him and calls him by the name of Eddie. The federal government has a significant presence in the area. In the middle of it, he confesses that he is, in fact, married. The city is also home to one Fortune 500 company, Entergy Corporation, an electric power provider. She takes him to the pits, and they make love. There are a substantial number of energy companies that have their regional headquarters in the city, including BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell Oil Company. She asks if he is married, and he says that he is not.

Like Houston, New Orleans is located in proximity to the Gulf of Mexico and the many oil rigs lying just offshore. He offers to take her to the hospital, but she refuses. Army Corps of Engineers built the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal in the mid 20th century to accommodate New Orleans' barge traffic. He picks her up, and she tells him that she must have got struck by lightning. The U.S. He drives aimlessly in the rain, eventually finding Delia unconscious on a dirt road. It is one of the busiest seaports in not only the United States, but also the world. Wrong Turn is the first story, in which a man named Phil has just killed his wife.

seaport. The two stories take place on the same night, with the second taking place minutes after the first. New Orleans is an industrial and distribution center, and a major U.S. Sex & Violence was first published in March 1997 and only contains two stories, both of which feature Delia:. The building was severely damaged, first by storm surge and then by fire, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The sadistic war criminal stuffs rats in his oven to eat, and is killed by a mercenary in the exact same way. Established in 1849, it is the second oldest yacht club in the United States. [1].

New Orleans is also home to Southern Yacht Club, located at West End on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. It was adapted to a 2004 fan film of the same name. Former basketball teams were the New Orleans Buccaneers (c. 1967–1970), and the New Orleans Jazz (1974–1980) which became the Utah Jazz. Rats is the final story, it is about a disturbed war criminal who eats dog food. Historically, many teams have been formerly located in the city, including the New Orleans Pelicans baseball team (1887–1959), the New Orleans Breakers of the United States Football League, the New Orleans Night of the Arena Football League (1991–1992), and the New Orleans Brass ice hockey team (1997–2003). He gives her an assignment and she takes on the name Blue Eyes, which is what Jim used to call her. Nine Super Bowls have been contested in New Orleans. After killing Jim, the Colonel appears who was none other than the hitman.

The city also hosts two college football bowl games annually: the New Orleans Bowl and the Sugar Bowl. She wants to become a hitwoman, and she must first kill the only man she ever loved. They are currently affiliated with the Washington Nationals. She then attacks him, and explains that this is her test. The New Orleans Zephyrs, AAA minor league baseball team plays in adjacent Metairie. They go back to his place and make love. The city also has an Arena Football League team, the New Orleans VooDoo, owned by the Saints' owner, Tom Benson. Marv steals his drink.

The Hornets will play 36 "home" games at the Ford Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, with the remaining 5 to be split between Norman (University of Oklahoma campus), Baton Rouge (LSU campus) and a March 2006 return to New Orleans for three home games. The hitman enters the bar and Jim convinces Delia to leave with him. The football season began just a week after the storm hit, and the Saints played their first "home" game against the Giants at Giants Stadium. Marv is sitting next to them at the bar, and provides some comic relief. Due to the effects of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans, including damage both to the exterior and the interior of the Louisiana Superdome, the New Orleans Saints have played their "home" games in Baton Rouge and San Antonio, Texas. He runs into Kadie’s, where he is confronted by an ex-flame named Delia. The Saints play in the Louisiana Superdome, and the Hornets play in the adjacent New Orleans Arena. It begins as a man named Jim notices a hitman following him.

The city is the home to several professional, major league sports teams, including the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League and the New Orleans Hornets of the National Basketball Association which relocated from Charlotte, North Carolina, at the start of the 2002–2003 season. Blue Eyes, the second story, is the first appearance of Delia. Until the 1990s most locals preferred to call these "funerals with music," but out of town visitors have long dubbed them "jazz funerals." Younger bands, especially those based in the Treme neighborhood, have embraced the term and now have funerals featuring only jazz music. This was apparently a test, and the two buffoons get thrown several yards away as the explosion hits. Such traditional musical funerals still take place when a local musician, a member of a club, krewe, or benevolent society, or a noted dignitary has passed. Shlubb disagrees and pulls the boots off, to discover that there are no feet in them, and a ticking sound rings through their ears. The city also created its own spin on the old tradition of military brass band funerals; traditional New Orleans funerals with music feature sad music (mostly dirges and hymns) on the way to the cemetery and happy music (hot jazz) on the way back. Klump tells him that they're supposed to leave the body as it is.

In addition, the nearby countryside is the home of Cajun music, Zydeco music, and Delta blues. In this yarn, Shlubb's boots are in horrible shape, and he wishes to steal the shoes off a corpse, wrapped in a rug, that they're supposed to dump in the river. Its general atmosphere of Dionysian art has also resulted in both breeding and being a home to chaotic artists such as Crash Worship, Liquiddrone, and Jamal Morelli. However their wordy speeches are sprinkled with malapropisms. Decades later it was home to a distinctive brand of rhythm and blues that contributed greatly to the growth of rock and roll. Fat Man and Little Boy is a short three-page story about Douglas Klump and Burt Shlubb, who also appear in "That Yellow Bastard" and "Family Values." These characters use a large vocabulary to make it appear that they are more intelligent than they truthfully are. The city engendered jazz with its brass bands. First published December 1996, Lost, Lonely, & Lethal contains three stories:.

New Orleans has always been a significant center for music with its intertwined European, Latin American, and African-American cultures. The story closes with Daddy closing his hands around Johnny's throat. Despite the name, it features not only jazz but a large variety of music, including both native Louisiana music and nationally-known popular music artists. Daddy beats Johnny half to death and it becomes apparent that he is not only her father but also her lover and that the entire ruse was a sadistic form of sexual role-playing. Commonly referred to simply as, "Jazz Fest", it is one of the largest music festivals in the nation, and features crowds coming from all over the world to experience music, food, arts, and crafts. Temporarily overcome with remorse, Johnny realizes that it was all fake and the bullets he shot were blanks. The largest of the city's many musical festivals is the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Daddy refuses and Johnny shoots him with a revolver.

The Mardi Gras season is kicked off with the only parade allowed through the French Quarter (Vieux Carré, translated Old Square), a walking parade aptly named Krewe du Vieux. Torn by his emotions and manipulated by Amy, he attempts to confront her father first, asking for her hand in marriage. Mardi Gras celebrations include parades and floats; participants toss strings of cheap colorful beads and doubloons to the crowds. Amy insists that they can't be together and alludes to the solution that he kill her father. The Carnival season is often known (especially by out-of-towners) by the name of the last and biggest day, Mardi Gras (literally, "Fat Tuesday"), held just before the beginning of the Catholic liturgical season of Lent. Johnny is a middle-aged man who seems to be in love with a much younger girl by the name of Amy. New Orleans' most famous celebration is its Carnival Season. Daddy's Little Girl was first published in A Decade of Dark Horse #1 (July 1996) and reprinted in Tales to Offend #1 (July 1997), and Booze, Broads, and Bullets..

Greater New Orleans is home to numerous year-around celebrations, including Mardi Gras, New Year's Eve celebrations, and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Nancy -- who prior to this story had no last name -- was named "Callahan," presumably after Clint Eastwood's character in those films. See also: New Orleans Mardi Gras. In the DVD commentary, Frank Miller indicated that he was initially motivated to write That Yellow Bastard after his disappointment with The Dead Pool, the fifth and final film in the Dirty Harry series. Significant gardens include Longue Vue House and Gardens and the New Orleans Botanical Garden. Mort had been replaced by Bob when Hartigan is released from prison in the motion picture and the theatrical release omits an appearance by Carla Gugino as Lucille which is reinstated in the extended version released to DVD. (Louis Armstrong often signed his letters, "red beans and ricely yours."). Some notable differences exist in the film version.

Specialties include beignets, square-shaped fried pastries that are sometimes called French doughnuts (served with coffee and chicory "au lait"); Po'boy and Italian Muffaletta sandwiches; Gulf oysters on the half-shell and other seafoods; etouffee, jambalaya, gumbo, and other Creole dishes; and the Monday evening favorite of red beans and rice. In Rodriguez's adaptation, Bruce Willis stars as Hartigan, Jessica Alba as Nancy, Nick Stahl as the Yellow Bastard/Junior, Powers Boothe as Senator Roark and Michael Madsen as Hartigan's partner, Bob. The city is also world-famous for its food. In order to spare Nancy this fate, in an act of pure love, Hartigan commits suicide to protect her, blowing his brains out with his revolver. Some notable cemeteries in the city include Saint Louis Cemetery and Metairie Cemetery. Hartigan also realizes that Senator Roark would most likely target Nancy first, in order to make Hartigan suffer for killing his son. New Orleans is also noted for its many beautiful cemeteries. he has made a deadly enemy of Senator Roark, who would stop at nothing until Hartigan was dead.

The Audubon Park and the Audubon Zoo are also located in the city of New Orleans. With Nancy gone, Hartigan realizes that by killing Roark Jr. Art museums in the city include the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) in City Park and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Hartigan then tells Nancy to flee, lying to her that he will call up some old police friends of his to clean up the scene of the crime. The Natchez is an authentic steamboat with a calliope tours the Mississippi twice daily. Nancy and Hartigan share another kiss, this time without Hartigan's paternalistic feelings getting in the way. The National D-Day Museum is a relatively new museum (opened on June 6, 2000) dedicated to providing information and materials related to the allied invasion of Normandy, France. Hartigan suddenly pulls out a switchblade and stabs him in the chest, calls him a "sucker" and then proceeds to castrate Junior a second time with his bare hands and then brutally beat his head into pulp, killing him.

Also located near the French Quarter is the old New Orleans Mint, formerly a branch of the United States Mint, now operates as a museum. Junior shoves Nancy aside and decides to slice Hartigan up while he's on the floor. Louis Cathedral, the French Market (including the Café du Monde, famous for café au lait and beignets), and Preservation Hall. Hartigan has a heart attack and drops his gun. Other notable tourist attractions in the quarter include Jackson Square, St. Hartigan shows up, takes down a few corrupt police officers guarding the Farm and confronts Junior, who has Nancy at knife point. The French Quarter contains many popular hotels, bars, and nightclubs, most notably around Bourbon Street. At this time, Nancy is being flogged by Junior and, like Hartigan, won't give her torturer the pleasure of her pain by screaming.

Favorite tourist scenes in New Orleans include the French Quarter (known locally as "the Quarter"), which dates from the French and Spanish eras and is bounded by the Mississippi River and Rampart Street, Canal Street and Esplanade Ave. Racing to the Farm, Hartigan suffers a severe angina attack, but continues in order to save Nancy. Charles Avenue (home of Tulane and Loyola Universities), and many stately 19th century mansions. Junior's henchmen, who had shown up to dispose of Hartigan's body, are quickly subdued, and forced to tell Hartigan that Junior had fled to the Roark family farm (described as a place where bad things happen) with Nancy, presumably to rape her. Greater New Orleans has many major attractions, from the world-renowned Bourbon Street and the French Quarter's notorious nightlife, St. Hartigan, after seemingly giving up, awakes in his noose, wills himself back to life, and manages to break free from the rope by breaking a window and using a shattered glass shard to cut the rope around his hands. Several episodes of television series have referenced the city:. He then kicks the desk under Hartigan and escapes with Nancy.

Radio stations serving Greater New Orleans include:. Junior knocks Hartigan down, lynches him naked with a noose and tells of how in the past 8 years he raped and killed dozens of girls. WHNO 20 also operates as an independent station in the area, providing mainly religious programming. As a result, Junior lives, but as an unnatural abomination. PBS stations include WYES 12 and WLAE 32. Senator Roark used his vast financial resources to resurrect his son using means outside the boundaries of conventional science, hiring doctors, witch doctors, and gene therapists to bring Junior out of his coma and reconstitute his severed body parts. Major television network affiliates serving the area include WWL 4 (CBS), WGNO 26 (ABC), WDSU 6 (NBC), WVUE 8 (FOX), WNOL 38 (WB), WUPL 54 (UPN), and WPXL 49 (PAX). Hartigan, in the shower, is confronted once again by "That Yellow Bastard", who reveals himself to be Roark Jr.

The market is the 43rd largest Designated Market Area (DMA) in the U.S., serving 672,150 homes and 0.610% of the U.S. There, they share a kiss, where Nancy reveals she is in love with him; but Hartigan refuses to move any further because of the paternalistic nature of his relationship to Nancy. Greater New Orleans is well served by television and radio. Eventually, he and Nancy hide out in a motel. Other alternative weekly publications include the Louisiana Weekly and the Gambit Weekly. Accompanied by Nancy, Hartigan disovers the "Bastard's" foul-smelling blood everywhere, but no body. The major daily newspaper is the New Orleans Times-Picayune, publishing since 1837. Hartigan, with Nancy's revolver, fires a precise shot that hits the "Bastard" in the neck, and Hartigan insists on checking to see if he's been killed.

Also notable are lexical items specific to the city, such as "lagniappe" (pronounced LAN-yap) meaning "a little something extra," "makin' groceries" for grocery shopping, or "neutral ground" for a street median. With Nancy at the wheel, there is a high-speed pursuit with the "Bastard" close on their tail. This word is not used as a generalized term for the New Orleans accent, and is generally reserved for the strongest varieties. They leave Kadies' shortly and get into her car. One subtype of the New Orleans accent is sometimes identified as Yat (from "Where y'at). Hartigan and Nancy have a quick reunion when she recognizes him and jumps into his arms. As with many sociolinguistic artifacts, it is usually attested much more strongly by older members of the population. "That Yellow Bastard", the man who arrived at the cell with the envelope, has followed him, and he has revealed Nancy's position.

This distinctive accent is dying out generation by generation in the city (but remains very strong in the surrounding Parishes). Hartigan smells a set-up, and something far worse, the distinct odor of rotting garbage. The prestige associated with being from New Orleans by many residents is likely a factor in the linguistic assimilation of the ethnically divergent population. The envelope containing the finger was merely a ploy to get him to crack and lead Roark to Nancy. Many of the immigrant groups who reside in Brooklyn also reside in New Orleans, with Irish, Italians, and Germans being among the largest groups. Hartigan finds that she is no longer the little girl he rescued from a child-murderer 8 years ago, but is now a woman who works in the club as an exotic dancer and is unharmed. There are many theories to how the accent came to be, but it likely results from New Orleans' geographic isolation by water, and the fact that New Orleans was a major port of entry into the United States throughout the 19th century. He follows that lead to where Nancy, now nineteen, can be at or at least maybe get more leads.

It is similar to a New York "Brooklynese" accent to people unfamiliar with it. There's no clues to where she is except for a pack of matches from Kadie's bar. It does, like earlier Southern Englishes, feature frequent deletion of post-vocalic "r". He goes to her apartment, but finds it empty and in disarray. The distinctive local accent is unlike either Cajun or the stereotypical Southern accent so often misportrayed by film and television actors. He looks her name up in a phone book and learns she lives somewhere on North Culver. New Orleans is usually pronounced by locals as "Noo Or-lins," "Noo Awlee-enz," or "Noo Aw-lins." The pronunciation "N'Awlins" is not generally used by locals but has been popularized by the tourist trade. Back on the streets, the elderly ex-con/ex-cop sets off to find Nancy.

New Orleans is well known for its Creole culture and the persistence of Voodoo practice by a few of its residents, as well as for its music, food, architecture, and spirit of celebration. Hartigan is finally released on parole, apparently due to Senator Roark's satisfaction over his confession and submission. Logan in January of 2005 suggests that as many as 50% of whites and 80% of blacks relocated from New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath may relocate permanently. Hartigan knows it's a ruse to insult him, but to show sincerity that he's a reformed man, he asks Senator Roark for forgiveness for what he did to his son. An analysis by Brown University sociologist John R. At his parole hearing, he is humiliated again when Senator Roark acts like a good man who's willing to forgive Hartigan. Tammany registered strong increases in population. Much to his own lawyer's surprise and disgust, Hartigan decides to claim responsibility to the crimes he was accused of.

The population was stunted in the late sixties, a decade which saw storm surge from Hurricane Betsy flooded much of the Lower 9th Ward Since the late sixties, the population of New Orleans/Orleans Parish has experienced a steady decline while surrounding parishes such as Jefferson and St. He decides to find some way out, and contacts his lawyer, Lucille (the lesbian parole officer from The Hard Goodbye). The population of New Orleans reached its highest point in the summer of 1965, when its population reached 702,108. Believing Nancy to be in imminent danger, Hartigan's passive view of his current incarceration changes. Out of the total population, 40.3% of those under the age of 18 and 19.3% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. Except instead of a letter from her inside, it contains an index finger from the right hand of a nineteen-year-old girl. 27.9% of the population and 23.7% of families were below the poverty line. Hartigan awakens and discovers the same type of envelope Nancy always uses.

The per capita income for the city was $17,258. His fears are confirmed when a deformed, hairless visitor with sickly yellow skin who smells distinctly like a garbage can, arrives at his prison cell and punches him out. Males had a median income of $30,862 versus $23,768 for females. Although he initially believes Nancy has merely outgrown her childhood hero, Hartigan soon becomes increasingly worried that Senator Roark has finally found Nancy. The median income for a household in the city was $27,133, and the median income for a family was $32,338. For eight years, he drags himself through his jail time, his only respite being the letters his young admirer sends him, until finally the letters stop coming. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.3 males. Hartigan quickly develops a paternal love for little Nancy, and sees her as the daughter he never had.

For every 100 females there were 88.2 males. Afterwards, he finds himself alone in prison, and abandoned by his wife Eileen (who proceeds to re-marry and finally have children) and friends, he finds solace in the carefully disguised weekly letters he receives from Nancy. The median age was 33 years. Even amidst the hours of repeated punching and being tempted by prison luxuries and even sex with an Old Town prostitute, Hartigan doesn't crack under the pressure. In the city the population was spread out with:. Liebowitz in order to get him to sign a false confession. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.23. After his stint in the hospital, Hartigan is seen tied to a chair, cuffed and being beaten by Det.

There were 188,251 households out of which:. Before leaving, Nancy tells Hartigan she loves him. But due to the enormous annual tourist flow, the amount of people inside the city at a given time, such as Mardi Gras season, tends to exceed these numbers sometimes by the hundreds of thousands. Hartigan complies and says goodbye to her. These population statistics are based on legal residents of the city. She'll sign her name as "Cordelia" so no one who know who it's really from by Hartigan. The population of Greater New Orleans stood at 1,337,726 in 2000, making it the 35th largest metropolitan area in the United States. Hartigan tells her to stay away from him or else she'll be killed, so Nancy tells Hartigan she'll write him letters instead for forever.

The racial makeup of the city was:. The only one who Hartigan talked in the hospital was Nancy, who snuck out against her parents' wishes to see the man who saved her. There were 215,091 housing units at an average density of 459.9/km² (1,191.3/mi²). Despite his innocence and the pariah status he has achieved as a result of his conviction, he remains silent about his pain, knowing that Senator Roark would kill anyone who ever found out the truth. The population density was 1,036.4/km² (2,684.3/mi²). Hartigan finds himself framed for raping Nancy, is branded a pedophile and sentenced to a lengthy prison term amidst a public outcry that brands him one of Sin City's most hated citizens. As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 484,674 people, 188,251 households, and 112,950 families residing in the city. lapses into a coma from his injuries, and Senator Roark takes issue with the abuse of his son.

The last significant snowfall in New Orleans fell on December 22, 1989, when most of the city received 1 or 2 inches of snow. Roark Jr. Before that, the last white Christmas was in 1954, and brought 4.5 inches (110 mm). Before he can finish Junior off, Hartigan's corrupt partner Bob, who fears angering Senator Roark, shoots him in the back. On December 25, a combination of rain, sleet, and snow fell on the city, leaving some bridges icy. Hartigan succeeds in rescuing Nancy by disabling Junior's getaway car, and then proceeds to use his revolver to surgically shoot off Junior's left ear, right hand, and genitals. Most recently, a trace of snow fell on Christmas in 2004, during the 2004 Christmas Eve Snowstorm. It is Hartigan's mission to rescue Junior's latest quarry, skinny little Nancy Callahan.

On rare occasions, snow will fall. Roark Junior, son of one of the most powerful and corrupt officials in Basin City, is continuing his penchant for raping and murdering little girls. The average precipitation is 59.74 inches (1520 mm) annually. The story begins with a good-hearted cop, Hartigan (who has a bad heart condition) on his final mission before his forced retirement. The highest recorded temperature was 102.0°F (38.9°C) on August 22, 1980. That Yellow Bastard is currently under publication by Dark Horse Comics, the first edition was available in July 1997 (ISBN 1569712255). The lowest recorded temperature was 11.0°F (-11.6°C) on December 23, 1989. It follows the usual black and white noir style artistry of previous Sin City novels.

In July, lows average 74°F (23°C), and highs average 91°F (33°C). First published in February 1996–July 1996, That Yellow Bastard is a six-issue comic book miniseries, and the sixth in the Sin City series. In January, morning lows average around 43 °F (6°C), and daily highs around 62°F (17°C).
. The climate of New Orleans is subtropical, with mild winters and hot, humid summers. It was later revealed in the two disc special edition DVD that Becky died at the end of the film. Bernard Parish to the south, Plaquemines Parish to the southwest, and Jefferson Parish to the west. A notable difference from the comic version is that Becky survives the final gunfight by hiding in a nook in the alley, leaving her alive for the final "epilogue" scene of the movie.

Tammany Parish to the northeast, St. In the film, Clive Owen plays Dwight, Brittany Murphy plays Shellie, Benicio del Toro plays Jack, Rosario Dawson plays Gail, Devon Aoki plays Miho, Alexis Bledel plays Becky, and Michael Clarke Duncan plays Manute. Parishes located adjacent to the city of New Orleans include St. The story is one of three from Sin City related in the film Sin City. John, Mid City, Gentilly, Lakeview, Lakefront, New Orleans East, The upper 9th Ward and Algiers. Before any defensive measures can be taken, the men and Becky are gunned down. Other major districts within the city include Bayou St. The gangsters now realize they are in a trap as the girls of Old Town reveal themselves, heavily armed also, on the roof.

Its tallest building is the 50-story One Shell Square. Dwight then triggers the grenades stolen from the last mercenary, exploding the head. Parts of the city that are located uptown include the Garden District, the Irish Channel, the University District, Carrollton, Gert Town, Fontainebleau, and Broadmoor. Becky questions why the head is now bandaged when it wasn't before. Parts of the city that are located downtown include the world famous French Quarter (most noted as the central tourist district, with its array of shops, bars, and nightclubs along Bourbon Street), Storyville (now defunct), Treme, Faubourg Marigny, Bywater, the 7th Ward, and the Lower 9th Ward. As Dwight stands alone in an alley outside the gangsters' building with the head, outnumbered and outgunned, the trade is made: Gail being freed and the head, now bandaged up, handed over. "Uptown" refers to those parts of town that are upriver from the central business district. As the gangsters prepare to further torture Gail, and kill Becky, an arrow shoots through one of the henchmen with a note prompting a trade: Jack's head for Gail's life.

The term "downtown" refers to those parts of town that are downriver from the central business district. With the head in tow they go off to rescue Gail and Old Town. Major streets of the area include Canal Street and Poydras St. Dwight is caught off guard by more grenades and is about to be cut up until Miho arrives to finish Brian off. The Central Business District of New Orleans is located immediately north and west of the Mississippi River, and is historically called the "American Quarter." Most streets in this area fan out from a central point in the city. After dodging some grenades, Dwight corners Brian, the last mercenary, in the sewers. Tammany. Dallas rams the car into the mercenaries' and she ends up getting gunned down by one of them.

John the Baptist, and St. They cut through backroads to reach the Projects, where they catch up with their targets. Charles, St. Dwight, Dallas and Miho realize they must recover Jack's head. Bernard, St. Gail bites and rips a chunk off of Becky's neck in anger, vowing that she deserves worse. The New Orleans Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the 37th largest in the United States, includes the Louisiana parishes of Orleans (contiguous with the city of New Orleans), Jefferson, Plaquemines, St. It becomes clear that Becky had sold out Old Town for money and her mother's safety.

Because of the city's high water table most of the cemeteries in the city use above ground crypts as opposed to underground burial. Gail is tortured but refuses to "facilitate" the process of surrendering Old Town. Before the 20th century pumping system, if it rains more than 1 inch, or more recently if there is a major storm surge, such as that caused by a hurricane, greater flooding can occur. Back at Old Town, Gail has been ambushed and kidnapped by Manute, who has survived the assaults of Dwight and Miho. Rainwater is continually pumped out of the city and into Lake Pontchartrain across a series of canals lined by levees and dikes. Along with Miho and her driver, Dallas, he takes off in pursuit of the remaining mercenaries. Some 45% of the city is above sea level; these higher areas were developed before 1900; the lowest areas only being developed more recently. Miho rescues him and Dwight begins to figure out that there is a snitch in Old Town who informed the mob that a cop was murdered by the Old Town prostitutes.

Much of the city is actually located between 1 and 10 feet (0.3 to 3 m) below sea level, and as such, is very prone to flooding. The mercenaries decapitate Jack, taking the head and leaving Dwight for dead, sinking into the pits. The city of New Orleans actually contains the lowest point in the state of Louisiana, and one of the lowest points in the United States, after Death Valley and the Salton Sea. He quickly disposes of four of them, but is knocked out by a grenade and falls into the pit along with the car. The Mississippi Delta, at the mouth of the Mississippi River, covers about 13,000 square miles (about 1/4 of Louisiana) and consists of silt deposited by the river, and is the most fertile area of Louisiana. At the Pits Dwight is attacked by Irish mercenaries. Fields atop the ridges along the river are referred to as the "frontlands." The land contour slopes away from the frontlands to the "backlands", comprised of clay and silt. The cop then notifies Dwight that he's driving with a broken taillight, and lets him off with a warning.

The area along the river is characterized by ridges and hollows. Dwight tells the cop he's the designated driver. The city is located in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, between the Mississippi River in the south and Lake Pontchartrain in the north. The cop looks through Dwight's window and notices the corpse, believing it to be an unconscious, drunken friend. The total area is 48.45% water. Jack's body slumps forward, hiding the neck wound and the gun casing lodged in his head. 467.6 km² (180.6 mi²) of it is land and 439.4 km² (169.7 mi²) of it is water. As he contemplates whether or not to kill the cop, he brakes hard.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 907.0 km² (350.2 mi²). With his mind not completely focused, his driving suffers, attracting police attention again. New Orleans is located at 29°57′53″N, 90°4′14″W (29.964722, -90.070556)GR1 on the banks of the Mississippi River, approximately 100 miles upriver from the Gulf of Mexico at 30.07°N, 89.93°W. Although Dwight knows he is hallucinating, unlike Marv, he cannot quiet the gibbering corpse. By October 1, parts of the city accounting for about one-third of the population of New Orleans had been reopened, including the French Quarter.[4] As of October 1, only 5% of the city remained underwater. On the way there, Dwight begins to hallucinate that Jack is egging him on. New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward was reflooded when a storm surge from Rita overcame one of the repaired levees on the Industrial Canal [3]. After acquiring a car, slicing up all the bodies to stuff in the back trunk and leaving Jack in the front seat due to lack of space, Dwight begins the rainy drive to the Pits.

[2]. Finally, after a tense argument between Gail and Dwight, the girls agree to hide the bodies in the Pits as Dwight recommended. Concern about the fragility of the city's flood defences and transportation caused repopulation efforts to be postponed due to Hurricane Rita. Gail starts proclaiming they'll fight anyone who tries to take them out while Dwight tries to recommend disposing the bodies before anyone suspects anything. The mayor announced a "phased repopulation" plan to start bringing residents of the city back in the next two weeks. This new fact is bad for all of Old Town, as the shaky truce between the police and the girls is all but shattered. On September 15, several of the suburban towns started allowing residents to return. Then he realizes that Shellie was screaming "COP!".

The city government declared the city off-limits to residents while clean-up efforts began and warned that those remaining could be removed by force, for their health and safety. As the girls loot the corpses, Dwight searches Jack's person and finds a police badge revealing him to be "Iron" Jack Rafferty. Subsequent investigations showed that the levee failures which flooded the majority of the city were the result of what has been called "the largest civil engineering disaster in the history of the United States" [1]. Miho finishes him off by slicing his neck. Early estimates of the cost of physical damage from the storm have exceeded 100 billion USD. When Jack tries to shoot the intervening Dwight his gun backfires, sending the barrel into his forehead. As of November 2005, the Times Picayune article states that, in addition to 1,050 confirmed deaths, there are 5,000 missing residents of the city. As Dwight tries to make Jack quit his foolish game, Miho sabotages his gun by throwing a plug into the barrel.

As much as 80% of the city, much of which is below sea level, flooded, with water reaching a depth of 25 feet (7.6 meters) in some areas. Miho and Jack get in a standoff. These canals were the 17th Street Canal, the Industrial Canal, and the London Avenue Canal. During the attack, Dwight has an impending sense that something is wrong but can't place his finger on it. The situation worsened when levees along three canals were breached. Immediately afterward Miho throws a swastika-shaped projectile that cuts off Jack's hand, then descend on the car and quickly kills every man but Jack. Heavy rains and flooding immediately affected the eastern areas of the city. Instead of being scared or surprised, Becky is instead filled with pity, proclaiming that he has just done the dumbest thing in his life.

The eye of the storm passed within 10 to 15 miles of New Orleans, bringing strong winds that downed trees, shattered windows, and hurled debris around the area. He finally pulls out a handgun and aims it at her. Many residents chose to stay or were stranded in the city by a lack of available transportation. Meanwhile, Jack continues to pester Becky, escalating to outright anger at the egging on of his friends. New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin issued a mandatory evacuation of the entire city, the first such order ever issued in New Orleans. As Dwight spots Miho on the roof, he uncomfortably agrees and watches as the alley is closed off. The city suffered from the effects of Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall on August 29, 2005 on the gulf coast near the city. She advises Dwight to stay put and let the girls handle Jack themselves.

The city experienced severe flooding in the May 8th 1995 Louisiana Flood when heavy rains suddenly dumped over a foot of water on parts of town faster than the pumps could remove the water. Dwight follows close behind and is then caught off guard by Gail, one of Old Town's most experienced hookers and guardians. A century after the Cotton Centennial Exhibition, New Orleans hosted another World's Fair, the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition. As Jack spots a young girl named Becky walking alone in a dark alley, he follows beside her, asking coyly for her services and constantly being rejected. Areas of the French Quarter and Central Business District which were long oriented towards local residential and business uses switched to largely catering to the domestic and international tourist industry. A police car follows them both, but stops and turns around once the cars enter Old Town, the area of Sin City full of and run by the prostitutes of the area. While long one of the USA's most-visited cities, tourism boomed in the last quarter of the 20th century, becoming a major force in the local economy. As Dwight speeds toward Jack's car, his speeding has caught the attention of the police.

Because of Camille's tightly wound rings, the storm actually pulled water from the then impending fate they believed was imminent from Lake Ponchartrain and Lake Borgne, and veered toward her landfall point, approximately 50 miles away at Pass Christian, Mississippi, which is believed to have received a 28 foot storm surge. He jumps off the building, ignoring Shellie's muffled yell that sounds like "Stop!". In 1969 the city was brushed by Hurricane Camille but was spared from the catastrophic flooding it had seen in Hurricane Betsy and later in Hurricane Katrina. After ensuring her safety, Dwight becomes worried that Jack will cause more trouble and must be stopped somehow. In 1965 the city was damaged by Hurricane Betsy, with catastrophic flooding of the city's Lower 9th Ward. Shellie investigates the apartment and finds Dwight on the railing outside the building. Much of the city flooded in September of 1947 due to the 1947 Fort Lauderdale Hurricane. Jack awakens a few seconds later and storms out, demanding that his group not mention these events.

Metairie is not incorporated and is a part of Jefferson Parish. When Jack scoffs at the threat Dwight dunks his head into the toilet (where Jack had been urinating the minute before) until his body goes limp. The suburbs saw great growth in the second half of the 20th century; the largest suburb today is Metairie, which borders New Orleans to the west. Getting the jump on Jack, Dwight holds a knife to his neck and tells him to stop bothering Shellie. Both of these moves came to be regarded as mistakes long after the fact, and the streetcars returned to a portion of Canal Street at the end of the 1990s, and construction to restore the entire line was completed in April 2004. He then goes to the bathroom where Dwight is hiding in the shower stall. In the 1960s another "modernization" effort replaced the Canal Streetcar Line with buses. Shellie refuses and it culminates in Jack hitting her in the face.

In the 1920s an effort to "modernize" the look of the city removed the old cast-iron balconies from Canal Street, the city's commercial hub. The drunken man, named Jack, talks about his plans to have fun at every bar in town that night and insists Shellie call in some of her fellow co-workers to come along. New Orleans was hit by major storms in the 1909 Atlantic hurricane season and the 1915 Atlantic hurricane season. When the man outside threatens to break down her door, Shellie reluctantly opens it while Dwight hides in the toilet. The city has had no cases of Yellow Fever since. Dwight tells the barmaid to let the man, and his ensuing entourage, in. President Theodore Roosevelt visited the city to demonstrate the safety of New Orleans. Shellie is obviously scared, but is comforted by Dwight who has gotten a new face.

The effort was a success and the disease was stopped before reaching epidemic proportions. First published November 1994–March 1995, The Big Fat Kill opens in Shellie's apartment, where a drunken former fling is furiously rapping on her door, demanding to be let in. As the role of mosquitos in spreading the disease was newly understood, the city embarked on a massive campaign to drain, screen, or oil all cisterns and standing water (breeding ground for mosquitos) in the city and educate the public on their vital role in preventing mosquitos. Let's get you home." With the girl in his arms, he walks off into the distance, as the snow obscures his receding form. In 1905 Yellow Fever was reported in the city, which had suffered under repeated epidemics of the disease in the previous century. He retrieves the little girl, saying, "Your momma's been callin' after you, Kimberly. (2000-2004). It only then becomes apparent that the child was being sold for sex.

Jamal Morelli's struggle for the neighborhood was successful in protecting the lower ninth ward. Marv draws two pistols and kills the pair of henchmen, then executes the woman. The HCNA sent Jamal Morelli, activist and New Orleans artist, to respresent them in Washington, D.C. Through a small viewing slit, he can see a terrified little girl crouching in darkness in the room beyond. The Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, (HCNA) respresenting a substantial group of the aforementioned lower ninth ward, created a lobby against the Army Corps of Engineers furthering work on the levees which might endanger the neighborhoods. Marv hands her a wad of bills and is shown to a steel door in the far wall. This warning was augmented by vestigial fears from Hurricane Betsy, and the lasting stories of the Army Corps of Engineers blasting the flooding levees, drowning the poorer neighborhoods of the lower ninth Ward. He is met by two armed men and a leather-clad woman, who is apparently their boss.

There were many warnings in the late 20th century that a major hurricane or a Mississippi flood could create a lake in the central city as much as 9 m (30 ft) deep, which could take months to pump dry. He intimidates the bouncer, Fatman, with his sheer size and is led inside and down a flight of stairs. The subsidence greatly increased the flood risk, should the levees be breached or precipitation be in excess of pumping capacity (as was the case in 2005 in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina). Against a backdrop of heavy snow, Marv, a hulking, trenchcoat-clad figure, approaches a door in a dark alley. However, pumping of groundwater from underneath the city has resulted in subsidence. It is a 15-page story about Marv's rescue of a little girl, in which there is almost no dialogue; only one speech bubble appears in the entire story. Wood's pumps and drainage allowed the city to expand greatly in area. Silent Night is a one-shot short story that Frank Miller released in November 1994.

All rain water must be pumped up to the canals which drain into Lake Pontchartrain. She was not a hooker, rather a nun that had flirted with temptation before ultimately deciding to dedicate her life to God. Baldwin Wood enacted his ambitious plan to drain the city, including large pumps of his own design which are still used. He also receives a package from Mary. In the 1910s engineer and inventor A. Dwight reads up on the whole situation and realizes that Fargo was simply the scapegoat for illegal drug-related activities and had paid the ultimate price. This gave the 19th century city the shape of a crescent along a bend of the Mississippi, the origin of the nickname The Crescent City. He eventually receives a package from Fargo who had shipped it off before his untimely demise.

Until the early 20th century, construction was largely limited to the slightly higher ground along old natural river levees and bayous, since much of the rest of the land was swampy and subject to frequent flooding. He duels with both of them again and due to insistence from Mary decides to shoot them in the leg instead of killing them. Much of the city is located below sea level between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain, so the city is surrounded by levees. In the mean time, the Babe introduces herself as a hooker named Mary, but Dwight can tell she's lying. An important attraction in the late 19th and early 20th centuries was the famous red light district called Storyville. Although they successfully elude the pair, Dwight refuses to let them off easy, choosing rather to head to The Farm to deal with them. The city hosted the 1884 World's Fair, called the World Cotton Centennial. Under a barrage of sniper shots from Douglas Klump, Dwight and the Babe reach their car and speed off.

It retains a historical flavor with a wealth of 19th century structures far beyond the early colonial city boundaries of the French Quarter. He knocks out Shlubb and finds the titular character hiding in the shower. It was the first captured city in the American South. Dwight stumbles upon the hanging corpse of Fargo in his apartment and encounters Mr Shlubb, half of the recurring supporting duo, Douglas Klump and Burt Shlubb (aka Fat Man and Little Boy). Early in the American Civil War it was captured by the Union (by David Farragut -son of Spanish emigrants- later named the first US Navy Vice-Admiral) without a battle, and hence was spared the destruction suffered by many other cities of the American South. The Babe Wore Red centres around the character of Dwight and the murder of his friend Fargo. As a principal port it had a leading role in the slave trade, while at the same time having North America's largest community of free persons of color. The Customer, having connections, hires The Salesman to kill her.

New Orleans was the capital of the state of Louisiana until 1849, then again from 1865 to 1880. The mafia member then swore to her that she would die in the most terrible way possible, and when it is least expected. However, population growth was at times plagued by yellow fever epidemics, such as the great scourge of 1853 that killed nearly 10,000 people in New Orleans. Later information given by Frank Miller on the commentary of the Recut & Extended DVD Edition states that The Customer had an affair with a member of the mafia, and when she found out tried to break it off with him. The population of the city doubled in the 1830s, and by 1840 the city's population was around 102,000, fourth-largest in the U.S, the largest city away from the Atlantic seaboard, as well as the largest in the South after Baltimore. The reader is led to believe that The Customer had fallen into a serious and difficult situation and, with no other feasible alternative, hired The Salesman to kill her. During the War of 1812 the British sent a force to try to conquer the city, but they were defeated by forces led by Andrew Jackson some miles down river from the city at Chalmette, Louisiana on January 8, 1815 (commonly known as the Battle of New Orleans). A silenced gunshot stabs the night air to reveal that The Salesman has shot The Customer.

The city grew rapidly, with influxes of Americans, French and Creole French, many of the latter fleeing from the revolution in Haiti. It is unclear what their past involves even as they embrace in a passionate kiss. In its early days it was noted for its cosmopolitan polyglot population and mixture of cultures. The story involves an enigmatic tryst between two nameless characters; "The Customer" and "The Salesman." They meet on the terrace of a high rise building, hinting that although they seem to be acting like strangers, they do indeed have some sort of past. At this time the city of New Orleans had a population of about 10,000. The sequence served as the original proof of concept footage that director Robert Rodriguez filmed to convince Frank Miller to allow him to adapt Sin City to the silver screen. But in 1803, Napoleon sold Louisiana (which then included portions of more than a dozen present-day states) to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. The Customer is Always Right short served as the opening sequence for the movie Sin City, which featured Josh Hartnett and Marley Shelton.

Louisiana reverted to French control in 1801 after Napoleon re-acquired the territory from Spain by treaty. Although the Cowboy is willing to confess to the cops, the girls have other plans and invite Miho to finish the job. In 1795, Spain granted the United States "Right of Deposit" in New Orleans, allowing Americans to use the city's port facilities. The enigmatic "Cowboy" is captured by the allure of Wendy and subsequently shot and tied up by Gail. Louis Cathedral, the Cabildo and the Presbytere. And Behind Door Number Three? is a short story about Gail and Wendy (who's now wearing Marv's necklace) setting a trap for a man they suspect is 'carving up' girls in Old Town. The three most impressive buildings of New Orleans come from the Spanish times: St.
.

As a result of this, and a subsequent fire in 1795 (another 200 houses destroyed), much of 18th century architecture still present in the French Quarter was built under Spanish rule and demonstrates Spanish colonial characteristics, wood was replaced with bricks. It reprints a serial run in Previews:. The Great Fire of 1788 destroyed many of the existing structures in the city (800 houses were destroyed), which were made of wood. First published November 1994, The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories is a publication of short stories. In 1763, the colony was ceded to the Spanish Empire and remained under Spanish control for 40 years. Dwight finally sees through all the lies and kills Ava. Nouvelle-Orléans became the capital of French Louisiana in 1722, replacing Biloxi. Ava then tries telling Dwight that Manute had her under mind control to manipulate her and Damien and that it would be a cruel irony if he killed her now.

A community of French fur trappers and traders had existed along the bayou (in what is now the middle of New Orleans) for more than a decade before the official founding of the city. Manute falls through a window and upon landing, Miho stabs him in the arms, pinning him to the ground. John (known to natives as Bayou Choupique). Six bullets fail to kill him, and Manute aims at Dwight as Ava grabs one of Manute's guns, shooting Manute in his shoulder. The site was selected because it was a rare bit of natural high ground along the flood-prone banks of the lower Mississippi, and was adjacent to a Native American trading route and portage between the Mississippi and Lake Pontchartrain via Bayou St. Gail and Miho strike from Dwight's car, and Dwight shoots Manute with a hidden .25 he had up his left sleeve. New Orleans was founded in 1718 by the French as La Nouvelle-Orléans, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. Once inside Ava's estate, Manute sees past the new face and captures Dwight.

Main article: History of New Orleans. Dwight (with his new face), accompanied by Gail and Miho, poses as Wallenquist's man from Phoenix. . Wallenquist, unaffected by Ava's flirting, tells her to tie up her loose end with Dwight and has someone arriving from Phoenix soon to meet her about that. Residents of the city are referred to as New Orleanians. Ava, with her late husband's financial assets, is joining her corporation with the mob boss Wallenquist. The city's name is often abbreviated NOLA. Meanwhile, Dwight is recovering from his near-fatal wounds and calls Ava to inform her he's coming for her soon.

The city's unofficial motto, "Laissez les bons temps rouler" ("Let the good times roll") describes the party-like attitude of many residents. This culminates with Mort killing Bob, then committing suicide. The city's several nicknames describe various characteristics of the city, including the "Crescent City" (describing its shape around the Mississippi River), "The Big Easy" (a reference by musicians to the relative ease of finding work in the city) and "The City that Care Forgot" (associated with the easy going, carefree nature of many of the local residents). Bob doubts Ava considerably now, while Mort, still sleeping with Ava, becomes more on-edge towards his partner. The city was named in honor of Philip II, Duke of Orléans, who was regent and ruler of France when the city was founded (much as New York was named in honor of James, Duke of York, heir to the throne of England). When they speak with Dwight's landlord, she tells about letting Ava in and the resulting loud noises of the fight the night of Damien's murder. New Orleans was founded by the French in 1718 and has played an important role in the history of the United States. They interrogate Agamemnon, who tells how Dwight is an upright man who went clean after being such a wild alcoholic with a short temper in his younger days.

The two ports together would be the fourth largest port in the world. They believe her story, and Mort starts sleeping with her. ports for exporting grain. She claims that Dwight was a stalker psychopath who killed Damien out of jealousy. The Port of South Louisiana is based in the New Orleans metropolitan area and has been ranked the fifth largest port in the world in terms of raw tonnage, and among the largest U.S. Two detectives following up on Damien Lord's death, Mort and Bob, talk to Ava. port for several major commodities including rubber, cement and coffee. He convinces Gail and Miho, a deadly assassin he saved three years prior, to let him stay, and they operate further on him.

The Port of New Orleans is the largest U.S. The girls of Old Town perform surgery on Dwight's multiple bullet wounds, then ask him to leave. The petroleum industry is also of great importance to the New Orleans economy; many oil rigs are located in the Gulf. Upon Dwight's insistance, Marv drives him to Old Town, where Dwight has his old flame, Gail, help him. New Orleans remains a major port city due to its location near the Gulf of Mexico and along the Mississippi River, making it a hub for goods which travel to and from Latin America. Dwight once again falls out of a window and is picked up by Marv. While most of the city has reopened to residents, and areas which suffered moderate damage have substantially resumed functioning, the parts of town most severely damaged - such as some neighborhoods of the lower 9th Ward - are open only during daylight hours for residents to salvage items from their formerly flooded homes. She shoots Dwight six times, including once in the head.

As of mid-December 2005, efforts continue to aid survivors, clean up debris, and restore infrastructure. Ava appears, and explains how Dwight was all a part of her plan to get Damien murdered so she could inherit his estate. Estimates as of late 2005 cite fewer than 150,000 residing in the city, and projections of the city's eventual population following reconstruction are highly speculative. When he finds him, he beats him to death. Since the devastation of the city in conjunction with Hurricane Katrina, the population has been significantly less, due to the majority of surviving residents either taking temporary shelter elsewhere or relocating indefinitely. With Manute occupied, Dwight makes his way to Damien. census put New Orleans's population at 484,674 and the population of Greater New Orleans at 1,337,726. Marv rips Manute's right eye out.

The most recent U.S. Marv tackles the guards as a distraction and eventually takes on Manute. It is a world-famous tourist destination thanks to its many festivals and celebrations; the most noteworthy annual events are Mardi Gras ("Fat Tuesday"), Jazz Fest, Essence Festival (moved to Houston, TX for 2006), Voodoo Fest, Southern Decadence, and college football's Sugar Bowl (although the bowl game has been moved to Atlanta for the 2006 game). As they approach the mansion, Dwight insists Marv leave the punk's gun, which Marv has procured, in the car. New Orleans is a Southern city known for its multicultural heritage (especially French, Spanish and African American influences) as well as its music and cuisine. They drink together and watch Nancy dance. New Orleans is named after the historical Duke of Orléans, Regent of France and is one of the oldest and most historic cities in the United States. Dwight convinces Marv to help him storm Damien's estate.

It is in southeastern Louisiana along the Mississippi River, just south of Lake Pontchartrain, and is coextensive with Orleans Parish. One of them pulls a gun on Marv, who knocks him flat. state of Louisiana. Dwight arrives at Kadie’s, where Marv is in the middle of a squabble with some out-of-town punks. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. He awakens to find Manute driving off with Ava. New Orleans (local pronunciations: /nuːˈɔɹliːnz/, /nuːˈɔɹliːənz/, or /nuːˈɔɹlənz/) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced /la nuvɛl ɔʀleɑ̃/ in standard French accent) is a major U.S. Dwight is knocked out of his upper story apartment window, where he blacks out momentarily.


Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States. Manute arrives and violently beats a naked Dwight. In a 2005 episode of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit, the detectives pursue a child molester who kidnapped three young sisters from New Orleans after their parents were killed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. They eventually reconcile and make love. In 2005, American Idol held auditions in New Orleans. In his bedroom is a nude Ava. In a 2004 episode of Las Vegas called "New Orleans", Danny, Ed and Sam head to New Orleans in search of a big gambler who owes the casino money. As he arrives home, he finds his Ford Mustang returned and his door unlocked.

In a 2003 episode of The Drew Carey Show, Drew and his buddies set off on a road trip to New Orleans to find a girl he met after placing an ad on a beer bottle. Dwight calls Agamemnon for a ride home, and they stop to get pizza. In a 2001 episode of Seven Days, Parker goes to New Orleans to prove that his friend, who is scheduled to be executed, is innocent. Manute seemingly doesn't recognise him, but beats him brutally anyway. Season 9 (2000) of The Real World was set in New Orleans. He is discovered and claims that he is a Peeping Tom. The short-lived 1997 CBS series Orleans was set in New Orleans. He hops a fence and, using his photography equipment, scopes out the estate.

In a 1992 episode of The Simpsons called "A Streetcar Named Marge", Marge is cast in a musical version of "A Streetcar Named Desire" that featured a controversial parody song about New Orleans. He decides to check up on Ava and her new husband, Damien Lord. Urban/Urban Contemporary: KMEZ-FM (102.9), KNOU-FM (104.5), WQUE-FM (93.3), WYLD-FM (98.5). Dwight goes home, but cannot sleep. Talk: WSMB-AM (1350), WWL-AM (870), WTIX-AM (690). Ava arrives late and tries to persuade Dwight to take her back, claiming that her life is "a living Hell." Dwight refuses as a large black man named Manute arrives, taking Ava away. Sports: WODT-AM (1280). Marv is also there and greets Dwight.

Rock: KKND-FM (106.7), WRNO-FM (99.5), WEZB-FM (97.1), WKBU-FM (105.3). She had once broken his heart, but he agrees to meet her. Public: WTUL-FM (91.5), WRBH-FM (88.3). That night, he receives a call from a woman named Ava, asking him to meet her at a seedy bar called Club Pecos. Oldies: WTKL-FM (95.7), WJSH-FM (104.7). The story begins as Dwight McCarthy, working as a photographer for a grossly overweight man named Agamemnon, saves one of the Old Town prostitutes. Latino: KGLA-AM (1540), WFNO-FM (830). But Dwight begins to suspect that things aren't what they seem with Ava...

Gospel/Christian: KHEV-FM (104.1), WYLD-AM (940), WBSN-FM (89.1), WLNO-AM (1060), WSHO-FM (800), WOPR-FM (94.9), WVOG-AM (600). It chronicles Dwight's and attempts to rescue Ava Lord, Dwight's former fiancée from her husband and servant, who she says are sadistically torturing her. Contemporary: KLRZ-FM (100.3), WLMG-FM (101.9), WDVW-FM (92.3). First published November 1993–May 1994, A Dame To Kill For is the second compilation of the Sin City series. Country: WNOE-FM (101.1). With his last words, he defiantly mocks his executioners, asking if "That's the best you can do, you pansies?" They electrocute him again, which finally kills him. Jazz: WWNO-FM (88.9), WWOZ-FM (90.7). Finally, Marv is electrocuted in the electric chair, but survives.

11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. On his last night, he is visited by Wendy, who says that he can pretend that she's Goldie in one final moment of love. 20.9% from 45 to 64. Marv is sentenced to death, much to the glee of Basin City's inhabitants. 29.3% from 25 to 44. A hotshot Assistant District Attorney threatens to have Marv's mother killed if Marv doesn't confess to the crimes, so Marv breaks the ADA's arm in three places, then confesses. 11.4% from 18 to 24. Marv survives, is hospitalized, and ultimately is charged not only with the murders of the people he killed, but also of the serial killings committed by Kevin also.

26.7% under the age of 18. Marv proceeds to torture Cardinal Roark to death, but just as he's really getting it going, armed guards storm the room and fill Marv with machine gun fire. 9.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. Roark rationalizes that the killings were justified because the victims were merely hookers and nobodies. 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals. Goldie found out about Kevin, so Kevin killed her, and Roark sent in the police to kill Marv, frame him, and cover up Kevin's crimes. 40.0% were non-families. Roark confesses to envying Kevin's "gift", ultimately joining Kevin in his meals of murdered women in order to experience it for himself.

24.5% had a female householder with no husband present. Roark babbles on about how Kevin not only ate his victims' bodies, but also their souls, making him pure and clean. 30.8% were married couples living together. Roark, anguished over Kevin's death, confesses that he shielded the killer, because he had a "voice like an angel". 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them. Marv then presents Kevin's still smiling head to Roark, and demands an explanation. 3.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Marv kills Roark's guards and confronts the naked Cardinal in his bed.

1.28% from two or more races. Robbed of any satisfaction from Kevin's death, Marv goes on to sneak into Cardinal Roark's heavily guarded mission. 0.93% from other races. Marv decapitates Kevin's body and proceeds to take the unconscious Wendy back to Nancy's (after putting a call in to Kadie's for her) where Nancy patches him up, gives him beer and agrees to put Wendy on a plane at Sacred Oaks. 0.02% Pacific Islander. Even as his entrails are being devoured by his own pet, Kevin simply smiles calmly and doesn't utter a sound. 2.26% Asian. Marv proceeds to dismember Kevin with a hacksaw, then feeds his still-living torso to Kevin's pet wolf.

0.20% Native American. Wendy shows up with a gun, intending to kill Kevin; but Marv knocks her out, because he intends to torture Kevin first, and doesn't want Wendy to have nightmares from witnessing it. 28.05% White. Marv takes quite a beating, but keeps on fighting and eventually manages to outsmart Kevin by handcuffing him to himself, allowing him to knock out Kevin with a strong punch to the face. 67.25% African American. Kevin manages to avoid Marv's razor wires, and the two of them fight it out. Armed with gasoline, razor wire and his "mitts", Marv sets up a series of traps around the Farm, then flushes Kevin out by bombarding the Farm with a Molotov cocktail bomb.

Along with Wendy, Marv picks up the items he needs to confront Kevin. Marv convinces them that he is innocent (stating that no prostitute would let someone as ugly and fearsome-looking as him close enough to kill her), and they release him. Marv is soon captured by the Old Town prostitutes, led by Goldie's twin sister Wendy, who believe Marv is responsible for Goldie's death (and the other missing prostitutes Kevin killed and ate) and thus intend to torture and kill him. In trying to dig up more leads to who Goldie was, Marv went to Old Town.

Marv kills the cops and learns from torturing the lead detective that the man who wants him dead is Cardinal Roark, brother to Senator Roark and a member of the powerful and corrupt Roark family that founded and runs Basin City. The cops quickly kill her to eliminate any witnesses. Believing she has been rescued, Lucille attempts to convince them not to kill Marv. Unwilling to die in a shootout, Lucille knocks Marv down and runs towards the cops.

Marv and Lucille escape, but are intercepted by a SWAT team. From the cell, Marv watches the killer being picked up by a limousine, and learns that his name is Kevin. Lucille is understandably quite shaken, as the killer had previously forced her to watch while he sucked the flesh off her severed left hand. Also held in the cell is Lucille (his lesbian parole officer), who explains that the killer kills women so that he can dine on their flesh.

Marv wakes up in a holding cell, where he is greeted by the sight of several stuffed female heads, mounted on the wall like trophies. The killer is supernaturally silent and quick, and manages to sneak up, blind and beat Marv (quite a feat, as Marv is over 7', 300lbs, and had earlier shown he has amazing endurance by how he escaped from the police raid on his hotel room and surviving being hit multiple times by a speeding car). Marv finally encounters Goldie's killer: a small, shadowy figure with glowing glasses and a Charlie Brown-looking sweater. Marv's investigation eventually leads him to The Farm (the same place Detective Hartigan and Yellow Bastard had their final confrontation), where he defeats a pet wolf and discovers human remains.

At one point in his journey, Marv stops by the strip club Kadie's, where he watches the dancing act of Nancy Callahan and to send the message out through an informant named Weevil to anyone out looking for him that he's been at bars drinking heavily and lamenting Goldie's death. Finally, Marv knows from the police raid that whoever's behind Goldie's murder has deep underworld connections to set him up as Goldie's killer and have even go to his mother's home to see if Marv took refuge there. Second, he suffers from a medical condition in which he experiences vivid hallucinations, and wonders if he actually murdered Goldie (especially since the two of them were alone and he feels sure he would have known if anyone had entered the room to kill Goldie). First, he feels indebted to Goldie for her kindness and wishes to repay her by avenging her death.

As he roams the streets in pursuit of the truth, Marv has to deal with several issues. Heavily armored police officers (on duty officers wear SWAT gear possibly due to the high crime rate) from Basin City's corrupt police force storm the building, and Marv fights his way through them and escapes into the streets. The two of them have sex, and when Marv wakes up she is lying in the bed next to him, murdered. Later they meet in an equally run-down hotel room for a night together.

Marv, a huge, heavily scarred hulk of a man, is approached in a seedy saloon by a beautiful woman named Goldie. In the film version, Mickey Rourke plays Marv, Jaime King plays Goldie/Wendy, Carla Gugino plays Lucille, Elijah Wood plays Kevin, and Rutger Hauer plays Cardinal Roark. This story is one of three Sin City stories retold in the movie Sin City. The thirteen-part serial follows Marv on his brutal, single-minded quest to understand why Goldie was killed and bring revenge upon her murderers.

Marv wakes up after a one-night stand to discover Goldie, the woman he had just met and had sex with, has been killed in the night. The protagonist is Marv, a dangerous, possibly psychotic convict. It was originally titled simply Sin City when it was released in the Dark Horse Presents Fifth Anniversary Special and issues Dark Horse Presents #51-62 , but it was given its own title in trade paperback form. First published as Sin City in Dark Horse Presents issues #51-62 and 5th Anniversary Special (June 1991–June 1992), and reprinted as Sin City (The Hard Goodbye) (January 1993), The Hard Goodbye is the first comic book story that Frank Miller drew and wrote about the desperate denizens of Basin City/"Sin City".

The chronology of Sin City is described below. They are listed here in order of publication. These are the individual stories, usually referred to as "yarns", set in Frank Miller’s Sin City universe. As the various yarns progress, the audience gradually becomes familiar with key locations in and around Basin City.

In addition, the people in charge of the city remained in charge, running it as they saw fit. These women ended up forming the district of Old Town, the prostitutes' quarter. During the Gold Rush, The Roark Family brought a large number of women to keep the miners happy. Only a handful of the cops are still honest.

The Basin City Police are mostly lazy, cowardly, or corrupt. Usually twice a year, a downpour comes. It hardly ever rains, and if it rains it's mostly warm droplets of moist "that dissolve before it hits the ground". Basin City, almost universally referred to by the nickname Sin City, is a fictional town in the American Northwest, located somewhere 40 minutes outside of Seattle, WA.

. A TV Series based on the comics is reported to follow the second sequel. Rodriguez has expressed a desire to begin filming two sequels back-to-back starting February 2006 for release sometime in 2007. The Sin City graphic novels were reprinted with new covers and in a reduced size to coincide with the motion picture's theatrical release.

A movie adaptation of Sin City, co-directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller with "special guest director" Quentin Tarantino, was released on April 1, 2005. All stories take place in Basin City, with frequent recurring characters and intertwining stories. Several other stories of variable lengths have followed. The first story originally appeared in Dark Horse Presents from April of 1991 to June of 1992, under the title of Sin City, serialized in thirteen parts.

Sin City is the title for a series of stories by Frank Miller, told in comic book form in a film noir-like style. Eighteen months after the beginning of The Hard Goo. The Babe Wore Red occurs, and in the story Dwight states that Marv is on death row. Dwight kills Ava.

Dwight McCarthy (with a new face), Miho, and Gail raid Ava Lord’s estate, with Manute being gravely injured by both Miho and Dwight. Less than three months later, Ava and Wallenquist unite their criminal empires. A few days into Marv’s rampage, Bob (Hartigan's former partner in That Yellow Bastard) is shot dead by his partner Mort, who takes his own life (A Dame to Kill For). She tells them everything Gail briefed her on in Blue Eyes and sends them on their way.

On the same night, Mort and Bob arrive at 'Kadie’s' (mere seconds after Marv’s arrival) and interview Shellie about Dwight's whereabouts following the murder of Damien Lord. In the beginning of Marv’s rampage, he goes to “Kadie’s” to try and draw attention to himself. The Hard Goodbye begins with Marv waking up and finding Goldie’s lifeless body. Marv meets Goldie.

Marv is at the bar when Delia sweeps off with her prey. On this same night, Delia is inducted into the services of Wallenquist (Blue Eyes) placing her in league with Manute and the Colonel. Gail and the others tell Shellie that Dwight is still alive, and brief her on what she should tell the cops. Gail, Dwight, Miho and Shellie develop a plan to get revenge on Ava Lord.

Dwight begins to be rehabilitated at this point. After Damien is killed, Dwight is taken to Old Town. Marv fights Manute, and Manute loses his eye. Marv and Dwight attack the home of Damien and Ava Lord.

Shellie lectures Dwight at having not seen nor heard from him in six months. Fearing for her safety, Dwight goes to ‘Kadie’s’ and recruits the help of Marv. Manute interrupts their meeting. Ava mentions that it has been about four years since they last saw each other and Dwight agrees.

A few weeks later, Ava Lord contacts Dwight and asks to meet him. Almost four years after the events of That Yellow Bastard, the twins, Goldie and Wendy, take over Old Town. The remaining events of That Yellow Bastard play out within the next few hours or so. Marv witnesses the reunion of Nancy and Hartigan, as shown in the beginning of Just Another Saturday Night.

It is on this night that Dwight goes home with Shellie, and sleeps with her (he is seen whining to Shellie when Hartigan enters ‘Kadie’s’). Weeks later, Hartigan finds the 19-year-old Nancy Callahan when he is out on parole. Ava leaves Dwight and marries Damien Lord. Three years before A Dame to Kill For, Dwight rescues Miho from two gangsters.

He is placed into solitary confinement for eight years. Hartigan is framed as a pedophile and charged with raping Nancy Callahan. The first section of That Yellow Bastard, wherein Detective John Hartigan rescues Nancy Callahan from Roark Jr., resulting in Hartigan and Junior winding up in the hospital, occurs about 12 years before the events of The Hard Goodbye. A prequel story about Jack.

A story based in the World War II era (1940s-ish). A story with a brand new character. A prequel story about Hartigan. Miller has now confirmed that he will also produce a Graphic Novel of this story.

Miller says this will show "a whole new side of Nancy." This story has been confirmed as one of the main stories for the planned movie Sin City 2. Nancy avenges Hartigan's death by killing remaining members of the Roark family. The Babe Wore Red (from The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories). Wrong Track (from Sex and Violence).

Wrong Turn (from Sex and Violence). Daddy's Little Girl (from A Decade of Dark Horse #1 and also reprinted in Tales to Offend #1). Rats (from Lost, Lonely, & Lethal). Blue Eyes (from Lost, Lonely, & Lethal).

And Behind Door Number Three? (from The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories). Silent Night (from Silent Night). The Customer is Always Right (from The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories). Fat Man and Little Boy (from Lost, Lonely, & Lethal).

Just Another Saturday Night (from Sin City #1/2 and also reprinted in Just Another Saturday Night). Wrong Track (3 pages). Wrong Turn (23 pages). Rats (7 pages).

Blue Eyes (14 pages). Fat Man and Little Boy (3 pages). The Babe Wore Red (24 pages long). The Customer is Always Right (3 pages long).

And Behind Door Number Three? (4 pages long). He appears in The Big Fat Kill, where he is killed in an alleyway shootout. Is particularly skillful at inflicting pain with the use of his hands, without the necessity of any tool. Davis, Works for Wallenquist and specializes at torturing people.

Mariah kills him before killing Doctor Fredric. Shoots and incapacitates Wallace to abduct Esther. Orrin, Doctor's Fredric assistant. Mariah kills him and his companion, Orrin, to make sure that Wallace doesn't substract any valuable information from him.

Doctor Fredric, Kidnaps Esther under the Colonel's orders after incapacitating Wallace with narcotics in Hell and Back. He dies in the alley massacre. Schutz, another of Manute's henchmen. Miho shoots him twice with arrows in The Big Fat Kill, killing him humorously.

Stuka, a henchman of Manute's who has a swastika tattooed on his forehead. Was going to deliver Jackie Boy's head, when Miho snuck behind him and stabbed him. Brian, Irish mercenary and demolitions expert. Unintentionally gunned down in the Magliozzi hit on Bruno.

Carmen, Old Town prostitute with a traumatising past; lesbian lover to Daisy. Avenges her death by killing the remaining Magliozzi family members. Daisy, Carmen's lesbian lover. Killed by Daisy in Family Values.

Enemies with Wallenquist. Don Giacco Magliozzi, Leader of Mafia in Sacred Oaks. Lucca, Vitto's brother and one of Magliozzi's hitmen. Drives Dwight and Miho to Don Giacco Magliozzi.

Forced to shoot his brother Lucca. Vitto, Mobster who kills Carmen in Family Values. Helps Wallace rescue Esther. Good with missiles.

Jerry, Captain's lover and war vet. Helps Wallace snap out of his drugged up state to kill off Delia and Maxine. Aids him in saving Esther, giving his life in the process. Captain, A loyal war buddy of Wallace's.

Dies for her troubles. She administers drugs into Wallace's system, and later gives him the antidote at gunpoint. Maxine, Maxine works alongside Delia. Very dumb, and speaks in third-person.

Works alongside Delia to try and set-up Wallace's death. Gordo, The Colonel’s muscle. Held captive and was most likely going to be sold for sex, until Marv saved her. Kimberly, the little girl Marv saves in 'Silent Night'.

Johnny is lured into Amy's sick trap, as "Daddy" is really her lover, and Amy's victims are used to get a rise out of "Daddy". Amy and Daddy, Amy seduces Johnny and convinces him to kill her "father", so that they can be happy together. Unfortunately, he falls victim to Amy and "Daddy's" sick sexual role-playing. Johnny, Falls in love with a sweet girl named Amy, and in order to finally be with her, he must kill her controlling father.

Gets Dwight out of jams in exchange for food. Agamemnon, is a sort-of friend to Dwight, who gives Dwight photography jobs and lets him use his darkroom. Otto, the bartender of the diner in which Peggy hangs out. A valuable source of info to Dwight in Family Values.

Peggy, a single mother who hangs out in bars tempting men into buying her drinks, as she is an alcoholic. After his family is threatened, Liebowitz finally kills The Colonel. Brutally beats Hartigan upon his arrival in prison, and later is a puppet for The Colonel in Hell and Back. Liebowitz, Commissioner of the BCPD.

Seemingly hired the Salesman to kill her. The Customer, a beautifuk young woman and one of the many targets of the Salesman. It is assumed he kills Becky at the end of the movie adaptation. The Salesman, a shadowy, poetic freelance assassin who performs a lot of jobs for the Ladies, the Cops and the Mafia.

The primary victim of Ava's schemes. Damien Lord, Ava's rich husband whom she left Dwight for. Real names are Burt Schlubb (Fat Man) and Douglas Klump (Little Boy). Fat Man and Little Boy, a pair of low-rent hit men who use extravagant words in daily conversation to mask the fact that they're both incredibly stupid.

She gives Marv drinks for free because he has killed a number of people for her. Kadie: A middle-aged fat transexual that owns the eponymous bar where Nancy and Shellie work. By The Big Fat Kill, they appear to have reconciled. She is Dwight McCarthy's occasional girlfriend.

Shellie, a barmaid at Kadie's. Killed in an alleyway shootout. Becky, an young Old Town prostitute who works for the Colonel, mainly because she didn't want her mother to discover that she was a prostitute, partly because he offered her a considerable sum of money and a new life. Lucille, Marv's lesbian parole officer and Hartigan's lawyer.

Seduced and corrupted by Ava Lord, and eventually takes Bob's, and his own, life. Mort, Partners with Bob and an honest detective. Becomes more professional during A Dame to Kill For. Betrays him and later regrets it.

Bob, Hartigan’s corrupt partner. His goal is merely to achieve power and profit, regardless of what underhanded methods can lead him to that goal. Wallenquist aka the Kraut, the mysterious and potent leader of the Sin City mob. Has her nose broken by Wallace and manages to escape from Liebowitz's assault on the factory.

Works for Wallenquist. Also uses the powers of seduction, but can also fight with a bo (staff). Mariah, a trained assassin in league with Delia, although apparently less skilled. She herself is killed by Wallace.

She usually has sex with her victims before killing them. Uses the powers of seduction to lead unsuspecting men to their deaths. Delia aka "Blue Eyes", a trained assassin hired by The Colonel. His operations is eventually shut down by the Police and he is captured and shot by Commissioner Liebowitz.

Runs an organ harvesting ring as well as other organized crimes. Trains assassins, as well as being one himself. The Colonel, enforcer for Wallenquist. Manute is finally gunned down by Old Town hookers.

He is also well-nigh indestructible, having been crucified (by Miho), shot repeatedly (by Dwight), beat up numerous times (by Marv and Wallace), and relieved of an eye (again, by Marv). Manute, a huge black man who is very gentlemanly and polite in all situations, even while committing homicide, who served Ava Lord and is later recruited by the Colonel. The Senator's brother is Cardinal Roark. Senator Roark, a very corrupt politician with huge political and financial power, he has the influence to eliminate whomever he chooses.

He finally meets his well-deserved death by Hartigan (who beats Roark to a pulp as well as rip his genitals off a second time). Due to these treatments, however, his body cannot process waste properly, resulting in his skin turning bright yellow and making him smell like rotting meat. Roark pays millions in physical rehabilitation treatments. In That Yellow Bastard, Hartigan shoots off his ear, hand and genitals while rescuing his Nancy, and Sen.

He was handsome, young, and rich; as well also a sadistic child molester who raped and murdered pre-pubescent girls, a pastime that was covered up by his father and city police. Junior Roark aka That Yellow Bastard was the son of Senator Roark. His image later haunts Dwight's imagination. Miho kills him and his four buddies after they threaten Becky with a gun.

Jack "Iron Jack" Rafferty/Jackie Boy is Shellie's former (abusive) boyfriend. Det. An expert liar, she is considered a goddess by Manute and a manipulative witch by Dwight, who eventually kills her. Ava Lord, ex-lover of Dwight McCarthy who manipulates men through her good looks and her innocence.

He's killed by Marv in an unspecified (but incredibly gruesome) way. Roark occasionally uses Kevin as his personal assassin, and even joins him in his cannibalistic rituals. Cardinal Patrick Henry Roark, a Catholic Cardinal, who is brother to Senator Roark. Kevin is an agile, fast and skilled martial artist.

Marv kills him after an exhausting exchange of blows by chopping off his limbs and letting the wolf eat him. He is sheltered by Cardinal Roark. The leftovers go to his pet wolf. Kevin, an intentionally mute sociopath who resides at "The Farm", kills women, and cannibalises their remains.

She is a blade weapon and inline skate aficionado. Miho, a highly skilled, mute, Japanese assassin who works out for the Ladies Old Town. See Full Article. A good friend to Marv, whom often doubles as her protector.

According to Hartigan her free time is spent studying, reading, and writing, so she would seem to be highly intelligent as well. John Hartigan. Nancy Callahan, a 19-year-old stripper who works at Kadie's and was saved as a child by Det. Next to Miho & Kevin, he is among one of the deadlier people in Sin City, but prefers to not fight.

He is, however, a former Navy Seal with the Medal Of Honor. Wallace, a fit, long haired artist turned vigilante hero who saves Esther, and seems to be the most good natured person in Sin City. She has a love/hate relationship with Dwight McCarthy. She is six feet tall and is one of the authority figures of Old Town.

Gail, a prostitute whose speciality is knot-tying. Goldie and Wendy, the twin prostitutes who are currently in control of the Old Town. See Full Article. He has a distinguishing scar on his forehead.

John Hartigan, good-hearted 60-year-old ex-con/ex-cop. Det. See Full Article. Dwight McCarthy, a middle-aged photographer who, recently surgically bestowed with a new face, is deeply in debt to the women of Old Town and will go to great lengths to help them out.

See Full Article. He is a classic example of a noir anti-hero. His personal code of honour dictates the repayment of debts and a sort of chivalry towards women. He suffers from a mental condition that causes him to hallucinate.

Marv, a tough, violent, big bruiser of a man, who spends his time on the streets doing odd jobs for various people. This is where Dwight takes the corpses of Jackie Boy and his friends in The Big Fat Kill.. They are frequently used as a place to dump things you don't want found. The Pits, tar pits outside the city where dinosaur bones were excavated at some time.

Marv burns down one of the buildings, and the Farm is abandoned sometime after the initial Sin City storyline. It was also home to Kevin, a serial killer with ties to the Roark family. "The Farm") is located at North Cross and Lennox, this farm shows up in several stories, including The Hard Goodbye, That Yellow Bastard, and Hell And Back. Roark Family Farm (a.k.a.

Marv was born in the Projects. The Projects, the run-down and poor side of Sin City, is a tangle of high-rise apartments where crime runs rampant. Basin City Central Train Station, which has a direct connection to Phoenix. Kadie's, a stripper joint/bar where Nancy Callahan and Shellie work, and Dwight McCarthy and Marv hang out.

A university of some sort is also located there. This suburb lies outside the city proper, a half an hour drive uphill. Sacred Oaks, home to the rich and powerful of Basin City. This is where the city's population of prostitutes reside; it recently came under the control of the twins Goldie and Wendy.

Old Town is the red-light-district and is off limits to police.

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