Mappy

Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. In the U.S. it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware.

History

However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming.

Game play

The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. version) to retrieve stolen goods. The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. version) on every level. If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved.

Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen).

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath.

The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends.

The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors.

Ports and Sequels

A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. by Taxan). In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade.

Trivia

  • "Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman.
  • "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat".
  • Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. release.
  • Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom
  • In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64.
  • In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA.

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There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the terms used by other players beforehand. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. Every paintball field has its own lingo for various obstacles, bunkers, and landmarks that are unique to the site. In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. "Mercy" - This is yelled by the shooter if s/he holds an upper hand on an opponent within a close range; this is done to give the enemy a chance to surrender without being shot. by Taxan). "tricked out" - A term used to describe a gun that has numerous upgrades and enhancements, oftentimes providing dubious or non-existent performance benefits.

This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. The snake is a unique setup because it allows a player to advance a considerable distance while still being protected from being hit from most locations on the field. A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. "Snake" (n)- In hyperball, speedball, and airball a snake is a long, low structure (less then 1 meter/3 feet high) usually located either in the middle or to one or both sides of a field. The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors. This allows referees with sound-activated timers to monitor rate of fire during games. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends. In response to the popularity of ramping (and the difficulty of catching violators), some organizations have abandoned a strict semi-auto-only policy and adopted a 15 ball-per-second cap in its place.

Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. Many "ramp boards" also incorporate elaborate schemes to conceal this feature from tournament referees, including a simple "panic button" trigger press sequence to turn ramping off before a marker can be confiscated and tested, and randomized rate of fire to mask the fact that the trigger activity doesn't match the actual firing of paintballs. The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. "Ramping" (v)- A feature enabled in many aftermarket electronic marker 'mod boards' that functions as de-facto full-auto; while in ramping mode, pulling the trigger faster than a preset lower limit (typically 5 or more times a second) causes the marker to "ramp" to its maximum preset rate of fire, which can exceed 20 balls per second, or to fire as quickly as the hopper can supply balls to the breech. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath. "Maxed" (n)(v)- In tournament play, a team successfully eliminating all opposing players, losing none of their own players and successfully hanging the opponent's flag within the allotted game time is said to have "maxed" the other team (that is, they have achieved the maximum points possible in the game). However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. It can also be used to describe a situation in which an individual or team excercised a great advantage to defeat the other player or team.

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. It is often used to describe someone who has been marked several times. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen). "Lit up" - An expression connotating overwhelming victory. Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. These electronic laser systems help prevent chopping in markers and help markers reach higher rates of fire consistently. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved. If a ball enters the breech, the laser will be reflected back into the eye, indicating that a ball is ready to be fired.

If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. Reflective sends a laser across the breech from one eye. version) on every level. When a ball enters the breech of the marker, it breaks the laser, telling the marker that a ball is ready to be fired. In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. Breakbeam incorporates two eyes which send a laser across the breech to one another. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). There are two types; breakbeam and reflective.

The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. "eye/eyes/ACE" (n) - A laser detection system installed on electronic markers. version) to retrieve stolen goods. "chop a snake" - A process in which one player will fire over the head of an opponent located behind a snake, pinning him down, while another will advance along the lengh of the snake eliminating the opponent. The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. Many markers have special technology to prevent them from firing before a paintball has fed completely or to reduce the speed of the bolt so that it can't break a partially fed paintball. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming. Chops are usually caused by a marker shooting too fast for the speed at which the loader can feed it, or sometimes by misshapen paint that does not feed properly or low pressure or mechanical failure that causes the bolt to actuate more than once in quick succession.

Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. The force of the bolt of the marker moving forward will then cut the paintball in half inside the marker's chamber, creating a rather unpleasant mess that will prevent the marker from shooting accurately until cleaned. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. "chop" - Sometimes a marker may fire when a paintball has only fed partially into the breech. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Necessary because hits on hard equipment may not be noticed by the player, and hits that do not leave a mark do not count, so a player may need another person to check to see if a hit broke when it is on an area of the body the player cannot readily see. However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. "paint check" (v) - When an official or another player inspects a player for hits.

. If the teammates are looking the wrong way, or there are no teammates left, an opposing player can often run straight up to the player's bunker without the player seeing him and "bunker" the player by shooting directly over or around the side of the cover. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware. "bunker" (v) - When a player is behind a bunker, the bunker blocks that player's view of the field in front of him, forcing the player to occasionally look out from behind the bunker (and risk being hit) or rely on teammates to prevent opposing players from advancing through that area. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. In speedball, vrtually all objects placed on an otherwise empty grass field are "bunkers", and in most modern speedball tournaments, bunkers are inflatable vinyl obstacles (like river rafts with more basic and varied shapes). Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. In wooded play, a bunker may be a large fallen log, a collection of wood, a constucted obstacle of wood, barrels, or other material, or even a dug-out depression in the ground.

it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. "bunker" (n) - A non-natural obstacle on the field of play suitable for use as cover. In the U.S. Sometimes refered to as "Extra Love". Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. A player may receive bonus balls due to the increasingly fast rate of fire of markers in tournament play, walking through a spot another player is shooting, or occasionally by being intentionally shot by an opponent. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA. "bonus ball" (v)- Hits a player receives after being eliminated, usually while leaving the field of play.

In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. Paintball is ranked ahead of snowboarding by a large margin. They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64. According to the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association International's (SGMA) 2005 stats, paintball is the third most popular 'extreme sport' in the world, following skateboarding and inline skating. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". Growing Popularity. In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. Good equipment does lend a competitive edge, but it is possible to get good results with relatively inexpensive equipment, and skill trumps gear quality.

Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom. Many players believe that more expensive and higher quality equipment determines how well a person plays. release. Quality of Equipment. Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. Many fields forbid the use of full-auto markers, which are illegal in many countries (for example the UK). "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat". Paintball fields require anyone near the field to wear a face mask, and that markers shoot at a velocity of less than 300 feet per second.

"Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman. As long as the players follow the rules, paintball is an entirely safe sport. Recent statistics from various insurance companies have proven that paintball is actually safer than traditional sports, such as football. Another common misconception of paintball is that it is dangerous. Injury and Danger.

Tournaments include aspects of traditional sports: players wear bright colors as fans watch the action behind safety netting and film crews record nearly all top competitive events for DVD or TV. And "scenario" paintball games seek to re-enact historic wars and battles, not to encourage violence. Today's markers are generally not designed to mimic firearms. Paintball fields do not tolerate physical violence (contact with an opponent is usually forbidden) nor even verbal abuse.

The paintball community generally works to dispel this image, increasing the public's exposure to paintball is seen as crucial to breaking down stereotypes. Additionally, paintball has been used for close combat training by both law enforcement agencies and terrorist groups. One common misconception is that paintball simulates war and encourages violence, thanks largely to vandalism, and the small, but noticeable resemblance of markers to firearms and the donning of camouflage for woodsball. War and Violence.

Various misconceptions are held by players as well as people who have never seen a paintball marker. Paintball has proved to be an extremely safe sport and its good record comes from the uncompromising emphasis on safety. Chronographs or "Chronos" can be found from $60-250 and can greatly help the safety of everyone playing. It is recommended that everyone playing outlaw games, get their guns "chronoed" or speed check before playing.

Many players involved in outlaw games will tend to have their guns firing "hot" or above this speed. The allowed speeds usually range from around 250 Feet Per Second to the highest allowed speed of 300 FPS. This reduces the possibility of mask failure, and will leave less of an injury when you are hit. Besides mandatory use of masks, fields require that markers don't fire above certain speeds.

Do not be surprised if you are pushed down or otherwise covered by players and/or refs. Players or refs will come running to help. If your mask falls off during a game, drop to your knees and cover your eyes with your arm or hands while yelling for assistance and/or a ceasefire repeatedly. A ref or another player will lead you to a safe area.

If you find your mask is covered with paint, sweat, or dirt, and you cannot see well enough to safely get off the field, stand with both hands in the air and yell (usually "Fogged!") for assistance. Under no circumstances should eye protection ever be removed on a live field. This means players must wear only paintball-specific goggles and facemasks at all times while playing, even if they are out. Safety is paramount while playing paintball and is strictly enforced.

If you think you may have been hit the ref of the current game will run over and complete a "paint check" to evaluate whether you have been marked or not. The idea is to get as close to the opponent as possible, as fast as you can, so that you can catch the other player off guard, giving them little to no time to react, and giving you little to no chance to miss due to the close range. This refers to running/charging up to the bunker or barricade that an opposing player is behind and tagging them at very close range. Another popular move is "bunkering".

Moves such as a 'run through', where a player sprints down the field shooting as many of the opposing team as he can, have developed over time and are now very important plays. If you catch an opponent off guard, you are free to fire at him. In almost all tournament play, there is no surrender rule. Keep in mind that while waiting for a response you can still be hit by other opponents.

However, if they refuse and attempt any hostile action (such as turning to fire at you), you may fire upon them. If your opponent complies (verbally, see above or by raising their hand or marker), they are considered marked and are out of the match. Some fields require that if you are within a certain distance of an unaware opponent, you must demand their surrender (by yelling "Surrender!") before you may open fire. This is you and one other teammate are eliminated from the current round for cheating.

In most instances a penalty of 1 for 1 will be called. This is cheating in its lowest form and could get you banned from the field. Some people, when hit, will wipe off the paint and continue playing. If you believe that you have tagged another player, but they are not calling themeselves out, you can always shout for a paint check on that person.

If you are lucky, a paintball will simply bounce off of you, and will not count as a hit. You should always check to see if a paintball that has hit you has indeed broken. Remember that even if you are not marked, exclaiming "I'm hit" will eliminate you from the game. In some cases, depending on the field's rules, being checked by a referee does not make you invulnerable.

Usually, if there is any spot that isn't clearly a hit or larger than a quarter, it will not be considered a hit. A referee will come over and make a judgment call. If you believe the paintball broke before impact, or if you cannot see the area to confirm a hit, then you should call for a paint check (by yelling "paint check"). Generally if you are marked (hit) anywhere on your body, or on anything you are carrying (marker, hopper, pods) and the paintball broke upon impact, you have been marked.


. For information on tactics, see paintball strategy. These are the most common regulations, and do not include tips for playing. Variations of the following rules are in effect at most fields.

When playing at a field for the first time, be sure to check up on the field rules. Major scenario and tournament events may sometimes occur at other locations like fairgrounds, military bases, or stadiums, essentially creating a temporary paintball park, including the trained staff and insurance found at permanent commercial paintball parks. Private landowners may also be liable for injuries sustained on their property, especially if there are any fees for play. While less expensive, and often less structured than play at a commerical facility, due to the lack of standards, instruction, and oversight, the vast majority of injuries incured by paintball players occur in a "renegade" setting.

Some players play on private land, often refered to as "renegade" play. Commercial fields adhere to specific safety and insurance standards and have employed staff (often called referees) whose job is to make sure players are instructed in proper play and play in a manner that insures all participants' safety. Additionally, some commercial fields offer fast-paced indoor game play, often with multiple rooms. A paintball park may be an area of woods, a complex of speedball fields, or a combination.

Most players play, and most scenario games and tournaments occur, at commercial, insured paintball parks. While these two groups differ in style of play and appearance, the most devoted members of both groups may spend thousands of dollars per year not only on paintball equipment, but also on travel to paintball events. These frequent participants can generally be divided into two groups: Scenario players and tournament players. According to the Sporting Goods Manufacturer's Association, of the approximately 10 million people who participate in paintball annually, only about 15% (1.5 million) of them play 15 or more times per year.

Recreational players may play at commercial, insured paintball parks, or on private land (often referred to as "renegade"). The recreational class of player encompasses a range of levels of involvement in the sport, from occasional players like members of church groups or people attending birthday or bachelor parties, through more regular players who may own their own entry-level equipment, but do not play in tournaments. Players usually fall into three categories: recreational, scenario or big game, and tournament. The leagues consist of a whole circuit of paintball tournaments, but smaller regional and locally-sponsored tournaments are very common.

The major leagues are National Professional Paintball League (NPPL), Paintball Sports Promotions™ (PSP), and Millennium Series. Due to the competitive nature, most tournament players use high-end markers capable of higher rates of fire. There is a set number of people on each team (commonly three, five or seven), and modern tournament play is primarily speedball. Tournament paintball is played by the same rules as normal paintball, but in a more competitive environment.

The Millennium Series, the Nordic Series, the former European X-Ball League, the Centurio Circuit, the XSPL, the Paintball Association in the UK and many more leagues exist and draw large numbers of teams and fans. These aren't the only leagues, however, as most regions both inside and outside the USA have leagues. Current professional and semi-professional leagues, such as the NXL (National X-Ball League), NPPL (National Professional Paintball League), NCPA (National Collegiate Paintball Association), CFOA (Carolina Field Owners Association) the NEPL (New England Paintball League),the WPL (World Paintball League) and the SPPL (Scenario Paintball Players League), regularly hold high-class, well-organized events. Some paintball parks have added dedicated reball fields.

A reball is more expensive than a paintball, but since they can be reused, they are cheaper over the long term. While they do not break open to leave a paint mark on players, the lack of filling makes them useful for indoor locations where accumulation of paint from broken paintballs would be a problem. Reballs are approximately the same size and weight of a paintball, but do not contain a paint filling. A "reball" is a solid, dense-foam substitute for a paintball.

The first team to reach a set point total (commonly 5 or 7 points), or the team with the highest point total after game time has elapsed, wins the match. The X-Ball Light variant has one period, typically 15 minutes long. X-Ball has taken root at the national level, although variations are found in regional and local competition. Players who receive penalties are not permanently removed from the game, but placed in a hockey-like penalty box for several minutes.

Unlike most tournament formats that forbid players to communicate with people on the sidelines, X-Ball allows a coach to advise players on the field. Teams of up to 18 players field five players at a time. The winner is the team with the most victories after two 16- to 20-minute halves. A newer tournament format, X-Ball pits two teams against each other in multiple rounds of Center Flag played one after another until time runs out.

Popular non-Xball center-flag formats include:. Teams play several other teams, accumulating points in each game for acts such as being the first to get the flag, bringing the flag to the goal, eliminating opposing players, and having uneliminated players left at the end of the game. The most common tournament formats pit two teams of three, five, or seven players against each other. Woodsball tournaments, the original and once the most popular format, have largely given way to speedball fields, whose inflatable bunkers can be moved between matches or tournament stages.

Modern tournament paintball has developed in earnest since roughly 1990. The largest is probably "Oklahoma D-Day" which drew more than 3,500 in 2005, plays across 700 acres of land and includes some 15 "paintball tanks" and pontoon-built landing craft. Skirmish Paintball in Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania holds several every year, including The Battle of Stalingrad and the Battle of Normandy, which drew more than 3,000 attendees in 2005. Scenario games can last hours or even days, and bigger games often have player re-insertions at set intervals.

Scenario paintball games are often larger-scale re-enactments of historical battles involving hundreds of people, such as the Battle of Normandy, or modern scenarios such as storming a building and rescuing hostages. Most national and local tournaments and leagues are built around speedball. The close quarters foster a lot of movement and "bunkering", or running up to an opposing player's bunker and eliminating them from close range. Artificial barriers (bunkers), often inflatable, are placed throughout the field for players to move between and hide behind.

Speedball is a faster, closer-quarters game than woodsball and is played on a field about the size of a basketball court or two. Woodsball games generally take more time than speedball games. Woodsball, paintball's original format, is generally played in a wooded area large enough to hold dozens of players. The team that eliminates all of the players on the other team wins.

The winner is the team that brings the flag to the opponent's end of the field. Similar to Capture the Flag, the game starts with a single flag at the center of the field instead of one at each end. Victory is achieved by being the first team to hang the opponents' flag on the designated location at or near their own starting location. Teams start on opposing sides and attempt to acquire the opponents' flag while protecting their own.

The classic schoolyard game, with a paintball twist. . The first tournament with a cash prize was held in 1983. The first paintball game was played in New Hampshire in 1981 by Bob Gurnsey, Hayes Noel, Charles Gaines, and nine others, who used markers built to tag cattle or trees.

Once marked by a paintball, a player is eliminated from the game. Paintball is a sport whose participants use markers to shoot paintballs (roughly marble-sized, .68 caliber, gelatin capsules filled with colored polyethylene glycol) at other players. 90% of paintball players are 12-24 years old. 85% of paintball players are male.

Baseball — 9.7 million participants (just 1.01% more than paintball). Tackle Football — 5.4 million participants. Paintball had approximately 9.6 million participants in 2004

    . V ammo Cheap Alternative.

    Nerf is a hobby/sport similar to paintball in that many of the game types are the same, however instead of using marker it uses modified Nerf toys. Lasertag. Airsoft. In the 2002 movie 8 Mile starring Eminem, a scene was shot which depicted a drive by with a paintball gun.

    The game, Greg Hastings Tournament Paintball, was released in 2004, and a sequel of the game, Greg Hastings Tournament Paintball MAX'D, was released in 2005. A simulation of the sport of paintball, using NPPL-like tournament play, and featuring actual professional paintball players and licensed-equipment from actual paintball manufacturers, was created by game developer The Whole Experience. In 2005, rapper B-Real (of Cypress Hill), wrote the song Play it for Real about the sport of paintball. 10-man: Defunct format discontinued on the PSP in 2004.

    attention in 2000 and is played on the NPPL Super 7 and Millenium Series. 7-man: Popular in Europe, it gained much U.S. 5-man: Played on the PSP and CFOA circuits. Point scoring system.

    First to eliminate the opposing team and hang the flag in the middle on the other sides break point. 3-man: 3 Man paintball games.

08-04-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.