Mappy

Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. In the U.S. it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware.

History

However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming.

Game play

The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. version) to retrieve stolen goods. The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. version) on every level. If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved.

Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen).

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath.

The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends.

The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors.

Ports and Sequels

A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. by Taxan). In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade.

Trivia

  • "Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman.
  • "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat".
  • Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. release.
  • Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom
  • In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64.
  • In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA.

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There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade. Note: Anchors are listed by their main and most regular job only. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. While doubtless a traumatic experience for the corporation, an ICM poll in April 2003 indicated that it had sustained its position as the best and most trusted provider of news. In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Davies was followed by Director General Greg Dyke the following day and Gilligan on January 30. by Taxan). BBC News faced an important test, reporting on itself with the publication of the report, but by common consent managed this both independently and impartially.

This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. Due to the level of criticism of the corporation in the Hutton report, Davies resigned on the day of publication. A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. The Board of Governors, under BBC Chairman Gavyn Davies' guidance, accepted that further investigation of the Government's complaints were unnecessary. The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors. Davies had then told the BBC Board of Governors that he was happy with the story and told the Prime Minister that a satisfactory internal inquiry had taken place. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends. The BBC Director of News, Richard Sambrook, the report said, had accepted Gilligan's word that his story was accurate rather than checking Gilligan's records more thoroughly.

Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. In particular, it specifically criticised the chain of management that caused the BBC to defend its story. The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. In his report on January 28, 2004, Lord Hutton concluded that Gilligan's original accusation was "unfounded" and the BBC's editorial and management processes were "defective". If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath. Kelly took his own life.". However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. An inquiry led by Lord Hutton was announced by the British government the following day to investigate the circumstances leading to Kelly's death, concluding that "Dr.

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. Kelly was found dead, apparently by suicide, in a field close to his home early on 18 July. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen). Following intense media speculation, David Kelly was finally named in the press as the source for Gilligan's story on 9 July 2003. Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. In subsequent weeks the corporation stood by the report, saying that it had a reliable source. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved. The Government angrily denounced the reports and accused the corporation of poor journalism.

If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. Three BBC News reports (Andrew Gilligan's on Today, Gavin Hewitt's on The Ten O'Clock News and another on Newsnight) quoted an anonymous source that stated the British government (particularly the Prime Minister's office) had embellished the September Dossier with misleading exaggerations of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction capabilities. version) on every level. BBC News was at the centre of one the largest political controversies in recent years. In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. Most notable examples have been in Uzbekistan [2], China [3] [4], Sri Lanka [5], Zimbabwe [6] and Pakistan in 2005 [7], . Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). BBC News has been banned in several countries primarily for unbiased reporting which has been unfavourable to the ruling government.

The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Notable examples have been Stop castrating the language, published in The Observer, and The Disgrace of the BBC, published in The Weekly Standard. version) to retrieve stolen goods. Alternative views are also expressed in print from time to time. The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. The BBC is frequently complimented in the public arena, both in the United Kingdom and globally. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming. Certain radio broadcasts are available for download as podcasts as part of the BBC's download trial.

Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. The same is available with BBC News television bulletins and radio programmes. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Certain BBC current affairs programmes such as Newsnight and Question Time are available to view on the site after they have been broadcast. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Many reports are accompanied by audio and video from the BBC's television and radio news services. However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. The website contains exhaustive international news coverage as well as entertainment, sport, science, and political news.

. Launched in November 1997, it is one of the most popular news websites in the UK with around 15 million visitors every month. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware. BBC News Online is the BBC's news website. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. The BBC World Service broadcasts to some 150 million people in 40 languages across the globe. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. BBC News does not produce the BBC's regional news bulletins, which are produced by the BBC nations and regions.

it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. BBC Radio News produces bulletins for the BBC's national radio stations and provides content for local BBC radio stations via the General News Service (GNS). In the U.S. The full directory of all the BBC's regional news programmes can be found here. Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. The position of editor of the Ten O'Clock News is currently being advertised. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA. On the 16th of December 2005, the News 24 editor was named as Kevin Bakhurst, whilst Amanda Farnsworth became editor of the One and Six O'Clock bulletins.

In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. On the 8th of November 2005, it was announced that a controller of BBC News 24 would be appointed and that a single editor for the One O'Clock and Six O'Clock news programmes would be used rather than two individuals. They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64. In 2003, following another relaunch of the corporation's output, all title music and graphics were altered with Lowe remaining as composer. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". Lowe was also responsible for the music on Radio One's "Newsbeat". In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. The general theme was used not only on bulletins on BBC One but News 24, BBC World and local news programmes in the BBC's Nations and Regions.

Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom. It was part of the extensive rebranding which commenced in 1999. release. The distinctive music on all BBC television news programmes was introduced in 1999 and composed by David Lowe. Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. BBC News provides 22 hours of programming each day for the international news and current affairs channel BBC World. "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat". It also provides news on Ceefax and the BBC News Website.

"Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman. The Television News section of BBC News is responsible for the main news bulletins on BBC One and BBC Two, news output on BBC Three and BBC Four and the news networks BBC News 24 and BBC Parliament. The building is planned to have the largest live newsroom in the world. In 2008 all BBC News, national radio and BBC World Service broadcasts will be moved to Broadcasting House in central London. In 1998 most of BBC Radio News joined BBC Television News at TVC in the new "News Centre" complex at the front of the building.

Regional headlines were also added to the one o'clock news, and the main evening news, when it moved from nine o'clock to ten o'clock. Over the next few years the regional news programmes began adopting a unified look in line with the national news. The English regions lost some time, however, as these regions now rejoined London for a national round-up at 6.55. Regional stories were incorporated into the six o'clock news headlines.

It also caused changes to regional news. Most significantly BBC regional news programmes adopted the new corporate image for the first time, giving a common style across local, national and international BBC television news. In 1997 the programme titles were altered slighlty to incorporate the new corporate logo and in 1999 the biggest relaunch occurred, with BBC One bulletins, BBC World and BBC News 24 adopting a common style. Likewise the style of the theme changed, from a bright and driving theme for Breakfast News to an authoritative and more sombre version for the Nine O'Clock News.

The colour of the sets varied, getting progressively darker throughout the day. The titles commenced with the BBC News logo imposed on a spinning globe, widening to reveal a glass sculpture of the BBC coat of arms (again computer generated) in front of a panoramic view of the studio. The new set was a small one which took advantage of Silicon Graphics systems to create a virtual studio which appeared to be huge. The times of the main bulletins —one o'clock, six o'clock and nine o'clock, were, however unchanged, and the music, whilst consistent in style, was based on the previous theme adopted by each programme.

A major relaunch of BBC television news output in 1993 included abolition of variation in sets and titles in favour of a single set with a common theme. Several variations in how the main news programmes were named and shown occurred with programmes such as Nationwide coming and going. These were adapted as Television Newsreel programmes. Newsreels had been in use for some time, shown at cinemas and other places of public gathering.

The BBC television service originally carried news in the form of images with a newsreader narrating but off camera, having decided that a newsreader on screen would distract viewers from the stories. The BBC celebrated 50 years of Television News on July 5, 2004. On July 5, 1954, the first television news bulletin was broadcast. The British Broadcasting Company broadcast its first radio bulletin on November 14, 1922.

. In 2005, it was announced that the Six O'Clock News was the most popular daily news programme whilst the corporation's 24 hour rolling news channel, BBC News 24, was the most popular 24 hour news channel in Britain [1]. However, research has shown that for coverage of major events such as the Iraq war and September 11th attacks viewers turn to the BBC. Within the United Kingdom, BBC News faces stiff competition from Sky News and ITN.

It is, however, not free from controversies, the most recent being the Hutton Report which led to a shakeup of the corporation's operations. BBC News output has won critical acclaim worldwide and praise for its unbiased and balanced reporting. The annual budget of BBC News is £350 million. The News department consists of 3,500 staff of which 2,000 are journalists.

Due to the non-central location of TVC, however, in 2008 the News Centre is due to move to BBC Radio's headquarters, BBC Broadcasting House at Portland Place in Central London. Political coverage is based at the Millbank Studios in Westminster. Of these bureaux, 41 are based overseas. BBC News is based at the News Centre at Television Centre (TVC), Wood Lane, W12 and operates regional centres across the United Kingdom as well as 44 newsgathering bureaux around the world.

BBC News carries out a key objective of the BBC's Royal Charter: to "collect news and information in any part of the world and in any manner that may be thought fit". The current director is Helen Boaden. It claims to be the largest broadcast news gathering operation in the world and produces almost 100 hours of output daily. BBC News and Current Affairs (sometimes abbreviated BBC NCA) is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporation's newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online.

Maxine Mawhinney. Matthew Amroliwala. Fiona Bruce. Huw Edwards.

Sophie Raworth, on long-term leave. Natasha Kaplinsky. George Alagiah. Jane Hill.

Darren Jordan. Anna Ford. Moira Stuart. Simon McCoy.

Mishal Hussein. Bill Turnbull. Sian Williams. Dermot Murnaghan.

Home Affairs Editor: Mark Easton. Middle East Editor: Jeremy Bowen. Europe Editor: Mark Mardell. Business Editor: Robert Peston.

Economics Editor: Evan Davis. World Affairs Editor: John Simpson. Political Editor: Nick Robinson.

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