Mappy

Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. In the U.S. it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware.

History

However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming.

Game play

The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. version) to retrieve stolen goods. The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. version) on every level. If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved.

Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen).

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath.

The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends.

The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors.

Ports and Sequels

A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. by Taxan). In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade.

Trivia

  • "Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman.
  • "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat".
  • Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. release.
  • Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom
  • In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64.
  • In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA.

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There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade.
. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s.
. In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. (For a comprehensive catalogue of his works visit the On-Line Picasso Project). by Taxan). On May 4, 2004 Picasso's painting Garçon à la pipe was sold for USD $104 million at Sotheby's, thus establishing a new price record (see also List of most expensive paintings).

This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. Several paintings by Picasso rank among the most expensive paintings in the world. A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. In 1999, Picasso's Les Noces (The Marriage of Pierrette) sold for more than USD $51 million. The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors. Anthony Hopkins played Picasso in the movie. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends. The film Surviving Picasso was made about Picasso in 1996, as seen through the eyes of Françoise Gilot.

Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. In 2003, relatives of Picasso inaugurated a museum dedicated to him in his birthplace, Málaga, Spain, the Museo Picasso Málaga. The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. These works form the core of the immense and representative collection of the Musée Picasso in Paris. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath. Since Picasso left no will, his death duties, or estate tax to the French state, were paid in the form of his works and others from his collection. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. In addition, Picasso had a considerable collection of the work of other famous artists, some his contemporaries, such as Henri Matisse, with whom he had exchanged works.

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. At the time of his death, he had many paintings, as he had kept off the art market what he didn't need to sell. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen). His final words were "drink to me". Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Jacqueline Roque prevented his children Claude and Paloma from attending the funeral. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved. Pablo Picasso died on April 8, 1973, and was interred at Castle Vauvenargues' park, in Vauvenargues, Bouches-du-Rhône.

If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. Only later, after Picasso's death, when the rest of the art world had moved on from abstract expressionism, did the critical community come to see that Picasso had already discovered neo-expressionism and was, as usual, ahead of his time. version) on every level. One long time admirer, Douglas Cooper, called them "the incoherent scribblings of a frenetic old man". In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. At the time these works were dismissed by most as pornographic fantasies of an impotent old man or the slapdash works of an artist who was past his prime. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). Devoting his full energies to his work, Picasso became more daring, his works more colourful and expressive, and from 1968 through 1971 he produced a torrent of paintings and hundreds of copperplate engravings.

The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Picasso's final works were a mixture of styles, his styles and periods changing right until the end of his life. version) to retrieve stolen goods. To a man for whom this was such an important part of life, this was a serious life change and Picasso seems to have dealt with it by redoubling his already prolific artistic output. The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. In his 80s and 90s, Picasso, no longer quite the energetic dynamo he had been in his youth, became more and more impotent. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming. Picasso refused to be paid $100,000 for it, donating it to the people of Chicago.

Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. The sculpture, one of the most recognizable landmarks of downtown Chicago was unveiled in 1967. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. What the figure is exactly is not known; it could be a bird, a horse, a woman or a totally abstract shape. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. He approached the project with a great deal of enthusiasm, designing a sculpture which was ambiguous and became somewhat controversial. However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. He was commissioned to make a maquette for a huge 50 foot high sculpture to be built in Chicago, Illinois, known usually as the Chicago Picasso.

. The media would give him much attention, though they were often more interested in his personal life than his art. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware. Picasso had constructed a huge gothic structure and could afford large villas in the south of France, at Notre-dame-de-vie on the outskirts of Mougins, in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. During this time he lived at Cannes and in 1955 helped make the film Le Mystère Picasso (The Mystery of Picasso) directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. He also based paintings on works on art by Goya, Poussin, Manet, Courbet and Delacroix.

it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. He made a series of works based on Velazquez's painting of Las Meninas. In the U.S. In the 1950s his style changed once again as he began looking at the art of the great masters, and making new art about it. Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. Picasso always played himself in his film appearances. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA. In addition to his manifold artistic accomplishments, Picasso had a film career, including a cameo appearance in Jean Cocteau's Testament of Orpheus.

In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. Picasso then secretly married Roque after Gilot had filed for divorce in order to exact his revenge for her leaving him. They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64. With Picasso's encouragement, she had arranged to divorce her then husband, Luc Simon, and marry Picasso to secure her children's rights. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". Gilot had been seeking a legal means to legitimize her children with Picasso, Claude and Paloma. In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. Their marriage was also the means of one last act of revenge against Gilot.

Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom. The two remained together for the rest of Picasso's life, marrying in 1961. release. Roque worked at the Madoura Pottery, where Picasso made and painted ceramics. Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. Picasso was not long in finding another lover, Jacqueline Roque. "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat". A number of ink drawings from this period explore this theme of the hideous old dwarf as buffoonish counterpoint to the beautiful young girl, including several from a six-week affair with Geneviève Laporte, who in June 2005 auctioned off the drawings Picasso made of her.

"Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman. He went through a difficult period after Gilot's departure, coming to terms with his advancing age and his perception that he was an old man, now in his 70s, who was no longer attractive, but rather grotesque to young women. This came as a severe blow to Picasso. Uniquely among Picasso's women, Gilot left Picasso in 1953, allegedly because of abusive treatment and infidelities. The two eventually became lovers, and had two children together, Claude, and Paloma.

After the liberation of Paris in 1944, Picasso began to keep company with a young art student, Françoise Gilot. The two were closest in the late 1930s and early 1940s and it was Maar who documented the painting of Guernica. The photographer and painter Dora Maar was also a constant companion and lover of Picasso. Marie-Thérèse lived in the vain hope that Picasso would one day marry her and hanged herself four years after Picasso's death.

Picasso carried on a long-standing affair with Walter and fathered a daughter, Maia, with her. The two remained legally married until Khoklova's death in 1955. Picasso's marriage to Khoklova soon ended in separation rather than divorce, as French law required an even division of property in the case of divorce and Picasso did not want Khoklova to have half his wealth. In 1927 Picasso met 17 year old Marie-Thérèse Walter and began a secret affair with her.

Khoklova's insistence on social propriety clashed with Picasso's bohemian tendencies and the two lived in a state of constant conflict. The two had a son, Paulo, who would grow up to be a dissolute motorcycle racer and chauffeur to his father. Khoklova introduced Picasso to high society, formal dinner parties, and all the social niceties attendant on the life of the rich in 1920s Paris. In 1918, Picasso married Olga Khoklova, a ballerina with Sergei Diaghilev's troupe, for whom Picasso was designing a ballet, Parade, in Rome.

Humbert was diagnosed with cancer and during her rapid deterioration, Picasso administered to her every need, making daily trips across Paris to visit her in the hospital. Picasso included declarations of his love for Eva in many Cubist works. After garnering fame and some fortune, Picasso left Olivier for Marcelle Humbert, whom Picasso called Eva. It is she who appears in many of the Rose period paintings.

In the early years of the twentieth century, Picasso, still a struggling youth, began a long term relationship with Fernande Olivier. Picasso married twice and had four children by three women. In Paris, in addition to having a distinguished coterie of friends in the Montmartre and Montparnasse quarters, including André Breton, Guillaume Apollinaire, writer Gertrude Stein and others, he usually maintained a number of mistresses in addition to his wife or primary partner. Picasso hated to be alone when he wasn't working.

His beliefs tended towards anarcho-communism. But party criticism of a portrait of Stalin as insufficiently realistic cooled Picasso's interest in Communist politics, though he remained a loyal member of the Communist Party until his death. After the Second World War, Picasso rejoined the French Communist Party, and even attended an international peace conference in Poland. In 1992 the painting hung in the Madrid's Reina Sofía Museum when it opened.

In 1981 Guernica was returned to Spain and exhibited at the Casón del Buen Retiro. Guernica hung in New York's Museum of Modern Art for many years. The act of painting was captured in a series of photographs by Picasso's most famous lover, Dora Maar, a distinguished artist in her own right. This large canvas embodies for many the inhumanity, brutality and hopelessness of war.

Arguably Picasso's most famous work is his depiction of the German bombing of Guernica, Spain — Guernica. While the Germans outlawed bronze casting in Paris, Picasso was still able to continue because of the French resistance who would smuggle bronze to him. He retreated into his studio, continuing to paint all the while. The Nazis hated his style of painting, so he was not able to show his works during this time.

During the Second World War, Picasso resided in Paris when the Germans occupied the city. No political movement seemed to compel his support to any great degree. He also remained aloof from the Catalan independence movement during his youth despite expressing general support and being friendly with activists within it. While Picasso expressed anger and condemnation of Franco and the Fascists through his art he did not take up arms against them.

In the Spanish Civil War, service for Spaniards living abroad was optional and would have involved a voluntary return to the country to join either side. As a Spanish citizen living in France, Picasso was under no compulsion to fight against the invading Germans in either world war. Some of his contemporaries though (including Braque) felt that this neutrality had more to do with cowardice than principle. Picasso never commented on this but encouraged the idea that it was because he was a pacifist.

Picasso remained neutral during the Spanish Civil War, World War I and World War II, refusing to fight for any side or country. The Guinness Book of Records names Picasso as the most prolific painter ever – In his lifetime, he produced around 13,500 paintings, 100,000 prints and engravings, 34,000 book illustrations and 300 sculptures. His use of the minotaur came partly from his contact with the surrealists, who often used it as their symbol, and appears in Picasso's Guernica. During the 1930s, the minotaur replaced the harlequin as a motif which he used often in his work.

A comedic character usually depicted in checkered patterned clothing, the harlequin became a personal symbol for Picasso. Picasso used harlequins in many of his early works, especially in his Blue and Rose Periods. There are many precise and detailed figure studies done in his youth under his father's tutelage, as well as rarely seen works from his old age that clearly demonstrate Picasso's firm grounding in classical techniques. The Museu Picasso in Barcelona features many of Picasso's early works, created while he was living in Spain, as well as the extensive collection of Jaime Sabartés, Picasso's close friend from his Barcelona days who, for many years, was Picasso's personal secretary.

Although Picasso attended art schools throughout his childhood, often those where his father taught, he never finished his college-level course of study at the Academy of Arts (Academia de San Fernando) in Madrid, leaving after less than a year. It was from his father that Picasso learned the basics of formal academic art training, such as figure drawing and painting in oil. Picasso's father, José Ruiz y Blasco, was himself a painter, and for most of his life a professor of art at the School of Fine Arts and Crafts and a curator of a local museum. Pablo Diego José Santiago Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno Crispín Crispiniano de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz Picasso was born on October 25, 1881 in Málaga, Spain, the first child of José Ruiz y Blasco and María Picasso y López.

While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are: Image:Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.jpg. Picasso's work is often categorized into "periods". . He famously rendered complex scenes as just a few geometric shapes in his mixed-media cubist works, but also produced masterful realist portraits.

He worked mainly with paint, but had equal facility in oil, watercolour, pastels, charcoal, pencil and ink. One of the most recognized figures in 20th century art, he is best known as the co-founder, along with Georges Braque, of cubism. Pablo Ruiz Picasso (Full name) (October 25, 1881 in Málaga, Spain – April 8, 1973) was a Spanish painter and sculptor. 30 pict (biography).

173 p. London 2005. PICASSO, PABLO. Danto.

by Arthur C. Introd. Mary Ann, Caws. ISBN 3-79133-149-3 (biography).

320 p. 2004. Prestel Publ. PICASSO: The Real Family Story.

Olivier Widmaier Picasso (grandson of Picasso (Maya's son)). 2005. Santiago de Chile: Red Internacional del Libro. La Sintaxis de la Carne: Pablo Picasso y Marie-Thérèse Walter.

Mallen, Enrique. 2003. Berlin: Peter Lang. Berkeley Insights in Linguistics & Semiotics Series.

The Visual Grammar of Pablo Picasso. Mallen, Enrique. ISBN 0-87070-519-9. 1980.

New York. William Rubin, chronology by Jane Fluegel. Ed. Pablo Picasso, a retrospective.

The Museum of Modern Art. List of Picasso artworks 1971-1973. List of Picasso artworks 1961-1970. List of Picasso artworks 1951-1960.

List of Picasso artworks 1941-1950. List of Picasso artworks 1931-1940. List of Picasso artworks 1921-1930. List of Picasso artworks 1911-1920.

List of Picasso artworks 1901-1910. List of Picasso artworks 1889-1900. Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919), involving the use of collage and cut paper, the first time collage had been used in fine art. Picasso and Braque's paintings at this time are very similar to each other.

Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), a style of painting he developed along with Braque using monochrome brownish colours, where they took apart objects and "analyzed" them in terms of their shapes. African-influenced Period (1908–1909), influenced by the two figures on the right in his painting of Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, he used African artifacts as the inspiration for his work. He met Fernande Olivier,a model for sculptors and artists, in Paris at this time, and many of these paintings are influenced by his warm relationship with her, in addition to his exposure to French painting. Rose Period (1905–1907), characterized by a more cheerful style with orange and pink colors, and again featuring many harlequins.

Blue Period (1901–1904), consisting of somber, blue-tinted paintings influenced by a trip through Spain and the recent death of a friend, often featuring depictions of acrobats, harlequins, prostitutes, beggars and artists.

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