Mappy

Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. In the U.S. it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware.

History

However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming.

Game play

The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. version) to retrieve stolen goods. The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. version) on every level. If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved.

Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen).

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath.

The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends.

The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors.

Ports and Sequels

A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. by Taxan). In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade.

Trivia

  • "Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman.
  • "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat".
  • Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. release.
  • Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom
  • In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64.
  • In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA.

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There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade. Other titles:. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. Garfield was also transported into video games, the first being a never-released Atari 2600 prototype, in 1983, and there was also an NES game of Garfield made in Japan in 1989. In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Several early-reader adventure novels featuring Garfield were published in the late 1990's:. by Taxan). Additionally, adaptations of Garfield television specials have been published in comic format:.

This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. Newer versions of the books will be released in paperback only, and in full color for every cartoon, not just the Sunday strips. A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. They are currently being reprinted in a larger format, showing the Sunday strips to be formatted in a size as they usually are, instead of shrunken-down to meet the book size. The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors. These books introduced the "Garfield format" in publishing, whereby the books are horizontally oriented to match comic strip dimensions. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends. The titles of these books were styled as double entendres alluding to Garfield's weight or his habits.

Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. These books were originally printed in black and white, but recent ones have been in color, each book covers approximately six months of comics, including the larger weekend comics (in black and white in all except the recent editions). The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. These books, generally released twice a year, contain reprints of the comic as it appears in newspapers daily. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath. It can tint memories of the past, shade perceptions of the present, or paint a future so vivid that it can entice...or terrify, all depending on how we conduct ourselves today.". However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. This is revealed to have been a dream of some kind, and ends with this narration: "An imagination is a powerful tool.

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. It depicts Garfield awakening in a future in which the house is abandoned and he no longer exists. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen). One storyline, which lasted a week from October the 23rd, 1989 (possibly to coincide with Halloween, although the 31st actually fell the following week), is unique in that it is not humorous. Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Jokes are introduced seasonally, with snow-related gags common in January or February and beach or heat themed jokes in the summer. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved. Occasionally the strip celebrates Halloween as well with scary-themed jokes.

If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. Every week before June 19th, the strip focuses on his birthday, which Garfield dreads. version) on every level. Most of December is spent preparing for Christmas, with a predictable focus on presents. In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. Another particular theme is the "National Fat Week", where Garfield spends the week making fun of skinny people. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). Some more unique themes are things like "Garfield's Believe It or Don't", "Garfield's Law", "Garfield's History", which show the world, history, and science from Garfield's point-of-view.

The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Garfield's often engages in week-long interactions with a minor character, event, or thing, such as Nermal, Arlene, the mailman, an alarm clock, a scale, the TV, Pooky, spiders, mice, coffee, hamburgers, balls of yarn, rubber chickens, dieting, shedding, pie throwing, fishing, Mondays, Clive, lasagna, the "Caped Avenger", sweaters, colds, etc. version) to retrieve stolen goods. Occasionally, Garfield ventures elsewhere and when goes somewhere else, he usually spends a week or two in that area. The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. Usually, the standard setting is Garfield standing on a table or floor, always flat. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming. Major characters in Garfield include:.

Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. [4]. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. [2] Chris Sullentrop of Slate accuses Davis of creating Garfield merely for the merchandising [3] while internet humorist "Maddox" charges Davis with "traumatizing millions with his bland humor week after tragic week". If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Watterson, when asked for his opinion of fellow cartoonists, including Jim Davis, once tactfully described Garfield as "consistent". However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. Garfield's inoffensive, merchandising-oriented approach has been widely criticized by many commentators including Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson, whose views against merchandising were explained at great detail in The Calvin and Hobbes Tenth Anniversary Book.

. While this is not unique to Garfield, as Calvin in Calvin and Hobbes and the children of Peanuts never age, other strips such as For Better or For Worse, Cathy, and Doonesbury maintain a continuity with characters who develop, age, and may even die as the strip proceeds. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware. The characters and situations are constant, with no change or development for the past several years. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. Jim Davis consciously disavowed social commentary in an interview published at the beginning of one of the book compilations, joking that he once believed that OPEC was a denture adhesive. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. Although a couple of strips in 1978 addressed inflation and, arguably, organized labor, as well as Jon frequently smoking a pipe or subscribing to a "bachelor magazine", these elements were ultimately pruned from the product with the intent of maintaining a more universal appeal.

it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. The strip is deliberately written to be inoffensive, typically avoiding the social or political commentary present in some of Garfield's contemporaries, such as Boondocks, Doonesbury, Dilbert, and Cathy. In the U.S. Davis spends most of his time managing the business and merchandising aspects of Garfield. Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. Jim Davis's company, Paws Inc., employs cartoonists and writers who do most of the work of scripting, drawing, and inking the strip, while Davis's work is usually confined to approving and signing the finished strip. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA. Like many comic strips, Garfield is not exclusively drawn and written by its creator.

In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. For his work on the strip, creator Jim Davis received the National Cartoonist Society Humor Strip Award for 1981 and 1985, and their Reuben Award for 1989. They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64. Prior to Murray being cast, it was widely reported that actor John Goodman had been picked to provide Garfield's voice for the film. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". Murray became the fourth actor to provide a voice for the Garfield: Tommy Smothers voiced the role in a cat food commercial, and an unnamed Music soundalike was used in another TV spot. In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. Murray's laid-back, deadpan delivery has often been compared to Music's; indeed, Music provided the voice of Murray's Peter Venkman character in the cartoon version of Ghostbusters.

Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom. Lorenzo Music had passed away prior to the filming of the movie, and Bill Murray was cast as the voice of Garfield. release. The film employed a computer-animated Garfield and live-action Odie. Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. A live-action movie version of the comic strip, Garfield: The Movie had its debut in the United States on June 11, 2004. "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat". On June 7, 1999, newspapers began to be offered full-color Garfield weekday strips.

"Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman. Twelve television specials were made (through 1991) as well as a television series, Garfield and Friends, which ran from 1988 to 1995. Soul singer Lou Rawls provided musical accompaniment. Actor Lorenzo Music, previously known as the voice of Carlton the doorman on the show Rhoda, was hired to portray the voice of Garfield. The comic strip was turned into a cartoon special for television in 1982 called Here Comes Garfield.

Davis is no longer the sole, or even principal, artist. A number of the strip's readers feel that the quality of the writing has lessened, even as the artwork retained a consistent level of quality. By this time, Garfield was walking on two feet, and the strip emphasized sitcom situations such as Garfield making fun of Jon's stupidity and Jon's inability to make social connections. By 1983, his familiar appearance—featuring oval-shaped eyes—had taken shape.

Later, his appearance was slimmed down and his eyes enlarged. Initially, he was drawn grossly obese with flabby jowls and small round eyes. Over the course of the strip, Garfield's behavior and appearance evolved. Garfield apparently is able to type and a few times has written messages that Jon has read and understood (typically letters to Santa Claus), however this happens very rarely.

Most of the other animals (Arlene, Nermal, mice, and the other dogs) are capable of a two-way conversation with Garfield. Odie understands what Garfield says to him, but in general can not communicate back to Garfield except by barking. However, Garfield is able to talk to Odie and the other animals. Garfield is able to understand anything that Jon or other humans say, but is unable to talk to humans (he communicates to the reader in thought balloons).

Garfield also struggles with human problems, such as diets, loathing of Mondays, apathy, boredom, and so on. The strip pokes fun at pet owners and their relationship with their pets often portraying the pet as the true master of the home. Garfield had its debut on June 19, 1978, which is also considered Garfield's birthday. .

president James Garfield. The main character is named after Davis' grandfather, James Garfield Davis, who was named after former U.S. The popularity of the strip has led to a children's cartoon show, several television specials and a feature-length film, as well as a large amount of Garfield-related merchandise. As of 2006, it is syndicated in roughly 2,570 newspapers and journals and it currently holds the Guinness World Record for being the world's most widely syndicated comic strip [1].

Garfield is a comic strip created by Jim Davis featuring the cat Garfield, the pet dog Odie, and their socially inept owner Jon Arbuckle. Garfield 2 (2006) — same cast. Garfield: The Movie (2004) — Breckin Meyer, Jennifer Love Hewitt, and Bill Murray as the voice of Garfield. Garfield Bound for Home (2006) for Nintendo DS.

Garfield a tale of two kitties (2006) for Nintendo DS. Garfield his nine lives (2006) for GBA. Garfield: The Search for Pooky (2005) for GBA. Garfield's Mad About Cats (2005), for PC.

Garfield (2004), for PC and PS2. Garfield: Caught in the Act (1995), for Genesis , Game Gear and PC. Garfield no Isshukan (1989) for the NES. Garfield: A Winter's Tail (1989) for Atari ST (Will not work on Atari STe computers), Amiga, ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64.

Garfield: A Big Fat Hairy Deal (1987) for ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64. Create With Garfield [5] (1985) for Apple II and Commodore 64. Garfield and the Wicked Wizard (1999). Garfield and the Teacher Creature (1998).

Garfield and the Mysterious Mummy (1998). Garfield and the Beast in the Basement (1998). Garfield Travel Adventures (2005) collects three previous books:. A Garfield Christmas (1987).

Garfield and the Santa Spy. Garfield's Big Book of Excellent Excuses (2000). Give Me Coffee and No One Gets Hurt (discontinued). Garfield Crazy about Numbers (sticker book).

Garfield book of Cat Names (1988). Garfield's Guide to Everything (2004). Garfield and the Truth About Cats (1991). Garfield: His 9 Lives (1984) - graphic novel, later made into a TV special.

The format is slightly different, as the strips are presented in a vertical style. In the UK, over 60 Garfield books, mainly 'Pocket Books' or paperbacks, have been published by Ravette. Garfield Pigs Out: His 42nd Book 2006. Garfield Older and Wider: His 41st Book 2005.

Garfield Survival of the Fattest: His 40th Book 2004. Garfield Eats Crow: His 39th Book 2003. Garfield Gets Cookin': His 38th Book 2001. Garfield Beefs Up: His 37th Book 2000.

Garfield Hogs the Spotlight: His 36th Book 2000. Garfield Feeds the Kitty: His 35th Book 1999. Garfield Life to the Fullest: His 34th Book 1999. Garfield Throws His Weight Around: His 33rd Book 1998.

Garfield Thinks Big: His 32nd Book 1997. Garfield Hams it Up: His 31st Book 1997. Garfield Bigger and Better: His 30th Book 1996. Garfield Tons of Fun: His 29th Book 1996.

Garfield Life in the Fat Lane: His 28th Book 1995. Garfield Dishes it Out: His 27th Book 1995. Garfield Pulls his Weight: His 26th Book 1994. Garfield Hits the Big Time: His 25th Book 1993.

Garfield Takes His Licks: His 24th Book 1993. Garfield Keeps His Chins Up: His 23rd Book 1992. Garfield By the Pound: His 22nd Book 1992. Garfield Says a Mouthful: His 21st Book 1991.

Garfield Takes Up Space: His 20th Book 1991. Garfield Hangs Out: His 19th Book 1990. Garfield Goes to Waist: His 18th Book 1990. Garfield Chews the Fat: His 17th Book 1989.

Garfield Rounds Out: His 16th Book 1988. Garfield World Wide: His 15th Book 1988. Garfield Swallows His Pride: His 14th Book 1987. Garfield Food for Thought: His 13th Book 1987.

Garfield Out to Lunch: His 12th Book 1986. Garfield Rolls On: His 11th Book 1985. Garfield Makes it Big: His 10th Book 1985. Garfield Loses His Feet: His Ninth Book 1984.

Garfield Tips the Scales: His Eighth Book 1984. Garfield Sits Around the House: His Seventh Book 1983. Garfield Eats His Heart Out: His Sixth Book 1983. Garfield Takes the Cake: His Fifth Book 1982.

Garfield Weighs In: His Fourth Book 1982. Garfield Bigger than Life: His Third Book 1981. Garfield Gains Weight: His Second Book 1981. Garfield At Large: His First Book 1980.

Here Comes Garfield (animated special) 1982. Garfield on the Town (animated special) 1983. Garfield in the Rough (animated special) 1984. Garfield's Halloween Adventure (animated special) 1985.

Garfield in Paradise (animated special) 1986. A Garfield Christmas (animated special) 1987. Garfield Goes Hollywood (animated special) 1987. Garfield: His 9 Lives (animated special) 1988.

Garfield's Babes and Bullets (animated special) 1989. Garfield's Thanksgiving (animated special) 1989. Garfield's Feline Fantasies (animated special) 1990. Garfield Gets a Life (animated special) 1991.

Garfield and Friends (Animated cartoon series, 1988–1995). His Fantasy Books: Garfield and friends appear in a series of fantasy books called Garfield's Pet Force where Garfield, Nermal, Arlene, Odie and Pooky were given super powers in an alternate dimension. The concept was created after an idea trade with Scott Adams in 1990, which involved what type of object could hold the thing other than sticky items. His suction-cupped kitties: "Stuck on You" phenomenon across America and takes several years for production met the demand.

His album: Am I Cool or What?. This is paralleled in the used refrigerator store and used Christmas tree lot which appear later. Jon always gets conned by the overly clever and sneaky salesman, while Garfield knows it all along. The used car lot is an entertaining scene that parodies the business.

This results in comical displays of stupidity by Jon and his family, and their interactions. Jon periodically visits his parents and brother on the farm. Sometimes Jon joins him. The window is a setting showing Garfield looking from inside the house, making comments on events going on outside.

The food is terrible, and is the center of most of the jokes, along with the poor management. Irma is a chirpy, but slow-witted and unattractive waitress/manager, and one of Jon's few friends. Irma's diner was visited often early on, but not as much as the series progressed. This theme will often show up in the summer.

Garfield hates the beach simply because it has no TV, and is too hot. The Beach is frequented by Garfield and company, and is another site at which Jon fails at finding girls. They also introduce new scenarios, which are usually rare in this strip. These are funny because they portray Jon's inability to get along with people normally.

Early in the series, Garfield had to sneak along in the suitcase, but at some point Jon gave up and took him along as an equal. Vacations are taken by Jon and his pets every so often, usually to exotic places. Jon tries to meet girls in the park, but always fails miserably and humorously. Sometimes Jon takes Garfield to the park.

At the end of one date, Jon got a kiss, currently his only on-screen kiss in the comic. In this setting, Jon always tries to get a date with Liz, the vet, and usually fails badly, his failures causing Garfield to snicker. Occasionally, Garfield will be taken to the vet's office, a place he loathes. One time, Jon got stuck up the tree trying to rescue him.

A firefighter usually has to save him on the last day of the week. Garfield knows not to climb, but ironically can never overcome the urge. Up the tree is another area where Garfield often traps himself. He does sometimes get applause from his audience, though one time the audience consisted solely of his mother.

Garfield, however, loves the attention he receives, and once complained that he thought a joke deserved more than a single shoe. Garfield is frequently the target of disgusted fans, who throw shoes, rotten vegetables, and houseplants at him and once burned down his fence with burning arrows (Garfield's temporary replacement, a plastic flamingo, just "didn't feel the same"). Odie joins the act from time to time, once as a ventriloquist's dummy, and once as "Mr Skins", who accompanied Garfield on the drums. The Fence in the Alley is an area where Garfield often tells bad jokes or caterwauls, in a homage to vaudeville.

After this, Jon bought Venetian blinds (which Garfield, somehow, still manages to get stuck in). This was one of the few storylines in which a Sunday strip was part of the regular story arc. This culminated in a two-week storyline in which Garfield, Odie, Jon, two complete strangers, and even a street lamp (Odie had to go) all got trapped in the blinds. Early in the series, Garfield would spend time on the window ledge and always get trapped in the roll-up blinds.

He finds it a lot easier to capture flowers though, and often eats them. Garfield tries to capture birds in the bird fountain, often unsuccessfully (However, unlike Tom in Tom and Jerry, Garfield does occassionally kill and consume his prey). "Beware of Dog" signs are abound, and Garfield often tries to torment the chained-up dogs as some kind of revenge. Outside, Garfield has confrontations with various characters, such as dogs (more vicious than Odie), birds, worms, and even conscious flowers.

Many of the shows mentioned are absurd and stupid, and give Jim Davis an opportunity to comment on pop-culture. The TV Chair is one of Garfield's favorite places, where he entertains himself with shows such as Binky the Clown and others.

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