Mappy

Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. In the U.S. it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware.

History

However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming.

Game play

The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. version) to retrieve stolen goods. The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. version) on every level. If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved.

Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen).

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath.

The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends.

The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors.

Ports and Sequels

A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. by Taxan). In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade.

Trivia

  • "Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman.
  • "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat".
  • Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. release.
  • Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom
  • In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64.
  • In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA.

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There is also a version called Mappy Arrangement which was released in 1995 as part of Namco Classic Collection vol.1 for the arcade. Prominent columnists and journalists who write for The Sydney Morning Herald include Robert Manne, Doug Anderson, Paul Sheehan, Anthony Dennis, Mark Riley, Miranda Devine, Adele Horin, Michael Idato, Julia Baird, Mike Carlton, Gerard Henderson, Alan Ramsey, Peter FitzSimons, David Marr, Roy Masters, Keith Austin, Deborah Smith, Maggie Alderson and Richard Glover. Also, Mappy had several Japan-only sequels, including Hopping Mappy in 1986 for the arcades and Mappy Kids for the Famicom in the late 1980s. It also owns various other newspapers and magazines throughout Australia and New Zealand, including The Age (a similar broadsheet newspaper published in Melbourne). In the late 90s, it was released as part of Microsoft's Revenge of the Arcade PC collection. The company also owns the The Sun-Herald, the Sunday counterpart to the Herald, and a number of community newspapers in Sydney. by Taxan). It is currently controlled by John Fairfax Holdings.

This was followed by a console-only sequel called Mappy Land in 1986 (released in the U.S. The Fairfax family owned the newspaper for 149 years but lost control of it on December 11, 1990 following financial misadventure of Warwick Fairfax. A Japan-only port of the game was released for the Famicom (Japanese version of the NES) in 1984. We have no wish to mislead; no interest to gratify by unsparing abuse or indiscriminate approbation.". The player uses a left-right joystick to move Mappy and a single button to operate the doors. Its editorial policies were based "upon principles of candour, honesty and honour. A bonus is awarded if all the balloons are popped before the music ends. It became a daily newspaper in 1840, and in 1842 changed its name to The Sydney Morning Herald.

Mappy, unbothered by the cats, must bounce across a series of trampolines, popping suspended balloons along the way. A decade later it was bought by Charles Kemp and John Fairfax. The third level and every fourth level after that is a bonus round. The paper was named after Scotland's Glasgow Herald, and was founded by three Englishmen, Alfred Stephens, Frederick Stokes and William McGarvie. If Mappy bounces on a trampoline four consecutive times without landing on a floor, it breaks, and he dies unless there is another trampoline underneath. It only had four pages and a circulation of 750 copies. However, he can safely pass them in the air while jumping on the trampolines. The Sydney Morning Herald began its life as a weekly newspaper, the Sydney Herald.

If Mappy gets caught by the Mewkies or Nyamco in the hallways he dies. Since the advent of the Internet, the Herald has developed an comprehensive online presence with all major news stories available for online viewing and retained online for some time. Some of these are special "microwave doors" which release a wave which sweeps away any cat in its path (even off the edge of the screen). Tabloid newspapers, such as its competitor The Daily Telegraph, are considerably smaller, with each page having a size of approximately A3. Many of the hallways have doors which Mappy can slam open or shut to temporarily knock out the Mewkies or Nyamco. The Herald is a broadsheet, meaning that each page is approximately A2 in size. A level is completed when all the loot is retrieved. Column 8 is another long-running institution.

If Mappy tarries too long, the fearsome ancestral cat coin (Gosenzo) shows up. The cryptic crossword in the Sydney Morning Herald is popular. version) on every level. It also produces two colour magazines, the weekly Good Weekend, and the monthly the(sydney)magazine. In addition to the Mewkies, there is also the boss cat Nyamco (Goro in the U.S. They currently include a motoring section, Drive, a food and lifestyle section, Good Living, a property section, Domain, and a television section, The Guide. Mappy and the Mewkies can move between the floors by jumping on trampolines at the ends and middle of the hallways, and landing on a floor on the way up (but not on the way down). The Sydney Morning Herald publishes a number of daily sections, as large-format magazines, some of which have been part of the newspaper's infrastructure for more than two decades.

The mansion has six floors of long hallways in which the items are stashed. Like The Age, the demographics of its readers are more attractive to many advertisers than its tabloid competitor. version) to retrieve stolen goods. In the coverage of Fairfax's business affairs, this revenue has often been referred to as "rivers of gold". The player guides Mappy the police mouse through the mansion of the cats called Mewkies (Meowky in the U.S. The Saturday edition of the Herald carries a massive classified section - a popular selling point and a powerful source of cash revenue for the company. This incident was selected as #2 "MGM Goes Cop" in GameSpy's The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming. The Herald sells 375,000 copies to the Telegraph's 345,000.

Ironically, it was MGM/UA that previously won a lawsuit declaring Tom and Jerry was in the public domain. The Saturday editions of both papers are more closely matched. Namco's lawyer, Howard Lincoln, who would go on to become a Senior Vice President of the company, discovered that MGM didn't own the copyright to Tom and Jerry either, and was able to not only win the lawsuit, but got MGM to pay the legal costs. Its circulation is smaller than the Telegraph; according to circulation data published in the first half of 2004, the Herald sells about 221,000 copies per weekday compared to around 409,000 copies of the Telegraph. If victorious, this lawsuit would have crushed Namco of America, and the history of videogames would have been drastically altered. The Fairfax papers (the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age), seen as centrist, are often contrasted with the News Limited papers (The Australian, The Daily Telegraph and the Herald Sun), which tend to be more right-leaning, and "the Fairfax press" is often used pejoratively by conservative commentators. However, MGM/UA sued Namco over copyright violations, claiming that Mappy was a copy of Tom and Jerry. Historically the paper was characterised as a right of centre, old-school conservative organ of the Establishment, providing a counter-point within Fairfax's holdings to the liberal Melbourne Age, especially during David Syme's tenure as editor of the latter, and it did not editorialise in favour of Labor at a state election until 2003.

. The Herald attempts to maintain editorial balance, with both left leaning contributors like David Marr and cartoonist Michael Leunig, and conservative writers such as Miranda Devine and Gerard Henderson. Mappy runs on Namco Super Pac-Man hardware. It is often seen as the paper of the educated middle class. It was re-released as part of the Famicom Mini Series in 2004, only in Japan. The Sydney Morning Herald is recorded as being read by a stronger representation of the so-called, "AB demographic", (the highest demographic in terms of education, income and occupation) than its main competitor, the only other major daily newspaper in Sydney, the Murdoch-owned The Daily Telegraph. Mappy is a side-scrolling platformer that features cute cartoony characters. .

it was manufactured and distributed by Bally/Midway. Since then, over 51,000 editions have been produced. In the U.S. It is also the oldest Australian newspaper, having been continuously published since 1831. Mappy is a 1983 arcade game by Namco. The Sydney Morning Herald is a major Australian broadsheet newspaper published daily in Australia's oldest and most populous city, Sydney. In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, "Micro Mouse Mappy" is a racing team that can be selected from the get-go, but Ridge Racer 64 requires that you win Stage 4 (the novice "EXTRA" courses) and beat the car in a Car Attack on Ridge Racer Novice EXTRA.

In R4: Ridge Racer Type 4, there is a racing team that uses this game's name, and in Ridge Racer 64 there is a car that shares this game sponsor used in R4: Ridge Racer Type 4. They were used in Ridge Racer, Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer, Ridge Racer Revolution, and Ridge Racer 64. The blue car is named "RT Blue Mappy" while the pink car is named "RT Pink Mappy". In Ridge Racer, there are two cars that share the racing team name of this game.

Mappy's hat is an equippable item in Namco x Capcom. release. Nyamco was renamed "Goro" in the U.S. "Nyamco", besides being a play on "Namco", comes from nyanko, the Japanese equivalent of "kitty cat".

"Mappy" is likely derived from mappo, a Japanese slang term (slightly insulting) for a policeman.

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