Lidl

A Lidl in Cornwall, UK

Lidl (either leed-ul as pronounced in recently-launched British TV commercials, or lid-ul) is a European discount supermarket chain of German origin that operates 5,000 stores. In Germany it is the most important competitor of Aldi. The full name of the company is Lidl Stiftung & Co KG. It belongs to the holding group Schwarz, which also owns the store chains Handelshof and Kaufland.

It was founded in the 1930s by a member of the Schwarz family, then called Schwarz Lebensmittel-SortimentsgroƟhandlung. In the 1970s the first Lidl stores of today's incarnation opened.

Lidl is the fifth largest supermarket chain in Germany (2004), and has established itself in over 17 countries around the world.

Criticism of Lidl

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Lidl has received critical attention in Germany over their treatment of workers, with trade unionists said to be blacklisted (refusal to employ union members). Lidl faces allegations about unpaid overtime, low wages and management by threats. The German trade union Ver.di has taken Lidl to task for its supposed bad labour practices.

Lidl is also said to use aggressive strategies against their suppliers to enforce low prices.

Countries with Lidl shops

Current

  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Republic of Ireland
  • Italy
  • The Netherlands
  • Norway (the first ten stores opened September 23, 2004)
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Slovakia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • United Kingdom

Planned

  • Canada
  • Croatia
  • Estonia
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Romania
  • Slovenia
  • Switzerland

Competitors

  • Aldi (7000 stores)
  • Netto (1200 stores)
  • Kwiksave (UK only)

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Lidl is also said to use aggressive strategies against their suppliers to enforce low prices. She has responded with exasperation to questions about her use of her clothing as a billboard. The German trade union Ver.di has taken Lidl to task for its supposed bad labour practices. At the post-match conference for her 2005 Wimbledon Championships 2nd round defeat to Svetlana Kuznetsova the writing said: "Well-behaved women rarely make history". Lidl faces allegations about unpaid overtime, low wages and management by threats. Following her loss to Sharapova in the 4th round she had changed this to "Don't Get in My Way". Lidl has received critical attention in Germany over their treatment of workers, with trade unionists said to be blacklisted (refusal to employ union members). For her post-match conference after the 2nd round of 2005 US Open her shirt asked "I'm Cute?".

. Personalised text on her t-shirts have also sometimes attracted attention. Lidl is the fifth largest supermarket chain in Germany (2004), and has established itself in over 17 countries around the world. However, when playing tennis, her dress is typical of contemporary women tennis players. In the 1970s the first Lidl stores of today's incarnation opened. When off the court Mirza wears the traditional Salwar Kameez, a nose ring and several ear rings complete her wardrobe. It was founded in the 1930s by a member of the Schwarz family, then called Schwarz Lebensmittel-SortimentsgroƟhandlung. According to the September 10 Hindustan Times report[3], Board Chairman Mirza Mohammad Athar asserted that "Sania had committed no sin by wearing her choice of dresses on field," and had asked "clerics not to interfere in matters pertaining to sports.".

It belongs to the holding group Schwarz, which also owns the store chains Handelshof and Kaufland. The All-India Shia Muslim Personal Law Board quickly responded with a statement that called the fatwa "unnecessary and uncalled for". The full name of the company is Lidl Stiftung & Co KG. The Guardian later identified[2] the scholar as Haseeb-ul-hasan Siddiqui, a leading cleric with the Sunni Ulema Board. In Germany it is the most important competitor of Aldi. According to a Hindustan Times report[1] published September 8, 2005, an unnamed religious scholar had issued a fatwa, saying that her attire is contrary to what is permitted by Islam. Lidl (either leed-ul as pronounced in recently-launched British TV commercials, or lid-ul) is a European discount supermarket chain of German origin that operates 5,000 stores. Hackles have been raised in some quarters supposedly due to her attire not being in line with her Muslim background.

Kwiksave (UK only). Mirza is also the first Indian sportswoman to feature on the cover of Time magazine (South Asian edition) and was included in its 2005 list of Asia's 50 heroes. Netto (1200 stores). Watching her performance in Acura Classics, tennis legend Pancho Segura, Ecuador-born American player who roamed the courts in the 1940s and 50s, felt that Sania's hard-hitting game resembled that of Romanian tennis legend Ilie Nastase - Segura said that Mirza had a natural way of hitting the ball and that she hit it hard, like Nastase. Aldi (7000 stores). She has defeated two top 10 players, Svetlana Kuznetsova and Nadia Petrova. Switzerland. The Government of India honoured her with Padma Shri, the fourth highest civilian award in 2006.

Slovenia. In 2005, she was awarded the Arjuna award in tennis for the year 2004. Romania. $ 0.35 million per brand per annum. Lithuania. The media termed the phenomenon Sania Mania. She reportedly has sponsorships to the tune of U.S. Latvia. Mirza has earned a large fan following in India as she is one of the very few young women from that country to have done well at the highest levels of sport.

Estonia. Sania won the Wimbledon Championships Girls' Doubles title in 2003, teaming up with Alisa Kleybanova of Russia. Croatia. On February 12, 2005, she became the first Indian woman to win a WTA singles title defeating Alyona Bondarenko of Ukraine in the Hyderabad Open Finals. Canada. Having secured a wild card entry to the 2005 Australian Open Mirza reached the third round, losing to eventual champion Serena Williams. United Kingdom. She became the first Indian woman to reach the 4th round of a Grand Slam tournament at the 2005 US Open, defeating Mashona Washington, Maria Elena Camerin and Marion Bartoli.

Sweden. Her year-end rank in 2004 was 206. Spain. As of October 2005, she also ranked 2nd among Asian women. Slovakia. Her original goal had been to enter the top 100 by the end of 2005, but she revised this to entering the top 50 after good performances at the beginning of the year. Portugal. She is the highest ranked female tennis player ever from India - ranked 31 in singles and 109 in doubles by mid-October 2005.

Poland. "After a month, he called my parents to say he'd never seen a player that good at such a young age." WTA interview. Norway (the first ten stores opened September 23, 2004). tall. The Netherlands. 7 in. Italy. "My mother took me to a coach, who initially refused to coach me because I was too small," said Mirza, who is 5 ft.

Republic of Ireland. Coached by her father Imran Mirza, Sania, a Muslim, began playing tennis at the age of six, turning professional in 2003. Hungary. . Greece. Sania Mirza (born November 15, 1986, Mumbai and now residing in Hyderabad) is a professional tennis player from India. Germany. 2003 Wimbledon Championships Juniors doubles: Won the tournament (partnering with Alisa Kleybanova) to become the youngest Indian and the first Indian woman to win a junior Grand Slam title.

France. entered the singles as wild card but lost in the first round to the eventual winner Nicole Pratt. Finland. 2004 Hyderabad Open doubles: Won the tournament (partnering with Liezel Huber) to become the youngest Indian to win a WTA or ATP tour title and the first Indian woman to capture a WTA tour title. Denmark. 2005 Australian Open singles: 3rd round: Became first Indian woman to reach the 3rd round of a Grand Slam tournament. Czech Republic. 2005 Hyderabad Open singles: Won the tournament defeating Alyona Bondarenko of Ukraine 6-4, 5-7, 6-3 in the final and became the first Indian woman to capture a WTA singles title.

Belgium. 2005 Dubai Tennis Championships: Upset reigning US Open Champion Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-4, 6-2 in 2nd round to reach the quarter-finals. Austria. By beating the 8th-ranked Petrova, she breaks into top 50 in world rankings for the first time ever. 2005 Acura Classic: upsets Nadia Petrova in 2nd round but loses in the third round to Akiko Morigami of Japan (2-6,6-4,4-6). 2005 Forest Hills Women's Tennis Classic, New York: reaches her second WTA final but fails to win.

Voted Best Player of the day on the 3rd day for winning her 2nd round match despite bleeding toes. 2005 US Open: reaches 4th round by defeating Marion Bartoli of France in straight sets (7-6(4), 6-4) before losing to top seed Maria Sharapova 6-2, 6-1. 2005 Japan Open: reaches the semi-finals of women's singles and doubles (partnering Shahar Peer of Israel); reaches her highest doubles ranking of 114.

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