Japanese cuisine

One course of a multi course Kaiseki meal, showing a careful arrangement of the foods

There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II.

Food individual to the country

Barrels of sake, a traditional Japanese alcoholic drink

Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu.

Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea.

This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets.

Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine.

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock.

Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. Salamander is eaten as well in places.

Traditional Japanese table settings

The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century.

Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes.

Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き).

Dishes for special occasions

In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. Major such combinations include:

  • Osechi - New Year.
  • Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri.
  • botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.
  • Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival.
  • Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival.
  • Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general.
  • Soba - New Year's Eve. This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba").

In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi).

Japanese ingredients

  • Rice
    • Short or medium grain white rice
    • Mochi rice (glutinous rice)
  • Vegetables:
    • nira (Chinese chives),
    • spinach,
    • cucumber,
    • eggplant,
    • gobo (burdock),
    • daikon,
    • sweet potato,
    • renkon (lotus root),
    • takenoko (bamboo shoots),
    • negi (Welsh onion),
    • fuki (butterbur),
    • moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts)
    • Sansai (wild vegetables)
    • Konnyaku (shirataki)
  • Mushrooms:
    • shiitake,
    • matsutake,
    • enokitake,
    • nameko,
    • shimeji.
  • Tsukemono (pickled vegetables)
  • seaweed:
    • nori,
    • konbu,
    • wakame,
    • hijiki,
    • others; see Category:Sea vegetables
  • Processed seafood:
    • chikuwa,
    • niboshi,
    • dried cuttlefish,
    • kamaboko,
    • Satsuma-age.
  • Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen)
  • Eggs (chicken, quail)
  • Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat)
  • Beans (soy, adzuki)
  • Bean products:
    • Edamame,
    • Miso,
    • Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),
    • Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),
    • Yuba
  • Fruits:
    • persimmon,
    • chestnut,
    • nashi pear,
    • loquat
  • Citrus fruits:
    • daidai,
    • iyokan,
    • kabosu,
    • kumquat,
    • mikan,
    • natsumikan (amanatsu),
    • sudachi,
    • yuzu.
  • Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour
  • Fu (wheat gluten)

See also Category:Japanese ingredients.

Japanese flavorings

It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi.

  • Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake.
  • Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi.
  • Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion)
  • Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress.
  • Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba).

Famous Japanese foods and dishes

Deep-Fried dishes (Agemono)

  • Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings.
  • Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer.
  • Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat.
  • Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu).

Donburi

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings

  • Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon)
  • Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe
  • Gyūdon - seasoned beef
  • Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods

Grilled and pan-fried dishes (Yakimono)

  • Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables
  • Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone
  • Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs
  • Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants)
  • Omu-Raisu - i.e. "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette
  • Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling
  • Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside
  • Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce
  • Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel
  • Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles
  • Yakitori - chicken kebabs

Nabemono (one pot cooking)

  • Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake
  • Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating
  • Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base
  • Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea
  • Oden
  • Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew.

Noodles (men-rui)

Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets.

  • Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth
  • Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan
  • Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth
  • Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
  • Somen
  • Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork

Other

  • Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth
  • Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box
  • Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish
  • Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year
  • Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai
  • Shiokara - salty fermented viscera
  • Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard

Rice (gohanmono)

  • Mochi - soft rice cake
  • Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored
  • Onigiri - Japanese rice balls
  • Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans
  • Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
  • Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan
  • Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice"
  • Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo

Sashimi

Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken.

  • Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura
  • Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty
  • Rebasashi - usually liver of beef
  • Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan

Soups (suimono and shirumono)

  • Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
  • Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
  • Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc.
  • Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood

Sushi

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood.

  • Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
  • Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
  • Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside.
  • Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish.

Sweets

  • Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets
    • Amanatto
    • Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert
    • Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center
    • Dango - rice dumpling
    • Ginbou
    • Hanabiramochi
    • Higashi
    • Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit
    • Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
    • Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping.
    • Kompeito - crystal sugar candy
    • Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
    • Matsunoyuki
    • Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon
    • Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass
    • Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake
    • Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour
    • Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste
  • Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
    • Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
    • Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth
    • Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
    • Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors
  • Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy
    • Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
    • Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe
  • Other Snack
    • Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans
    • Hello Panda
    • Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream
    • Pocky

Chinmi

  • Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni
  • Karasumi
  • Konowata

Japanese influence on other cuisines

United States

Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii.

Imported and adapted foods

A Japanese children's book. The food and utensils depicted, however, are Western.

Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce.

Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:

  • Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan')
  • Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce)
  • Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor
  • Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria.

In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus.

Washoku and yōshoku

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Western cuisine. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. Chinese recipe.

A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. Western cuisine restaurants. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin.

Tempura

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. As such, it is considered washoku. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen.

Fusion foods

In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants.


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Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants. As well, "International" versions generally have multiple languages on all versions, and all versions of a given "International" title can play against each other via game link. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. The Japanese Game Boy Advance games with "Expert" or "International" in the title follow the rules of the OCG/TCG much more closely than the ones without. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. Each game generally includes a few promotional cards (usually 3) for use with the Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG. It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. The Japanese version of the game, if any, is stated in the bracket.

Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". The newest game in each particular plaform is listed first, followed by the second newest, etc. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. The English version video games generally use the 4Kids English anime names, as opposed to the Viz English manga names. In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. All Yu-Gi-Oh!-related video games are produced by Konami. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen. All books are published by Shueisha and credit Kazuki Takahashi as the author.

Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. Several books based on the manga and anime have been released in Japan and outside of Japan. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. These volumes have no bearing on the 2nd series TV series as aired in the United States, which is the source of all US merchandising attempts. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. Manga fans argue that the first several volumes are not merchandising-based. As such, it is considered washoku. The merchandising of Yu-Gi-Oh!-related products and games has drawn criticism from adults and anime fans, and the series is widely described as toyetic.

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. The October 27, 2001 issue of TV Guide named Yu-Gi-Oh! one of this season's top 10 best new kids' shows. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin. in 2001, the English version of Yu-Gi-Oh! instantly became the number 1 Saturday morning show for kids on network television, and has consistently maintained its lead with strong ratings among boys, leading Kids' WB! to expand the show to six days a week beginning April 1, 2002. Western cuisine restaurants. Upon its airing in the U.S. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. But so far, only three of the seven boosters in Japanese version have been released, with the last one released in June 2003.

Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. On March 29, 2003, Mattel released the English version of the first booster of Dungeon Dice Monsters in America, under the title DragonFlame. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. Among the three, only Dungeon Dice Monsters has been released as a real collectible game, but the game wasn't popular, and currently no more new figures are released. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. Apart from Magic & Wizards, there are also other games that were originally created as fictitious games for Yu-Gi-Oh! manga and was later turned into video games, the most famous ones being:. A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Currently, Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG/TCG have been released in more than 40 countries.

Chinese recipe. for Gameboy Color, known as Yu-Gi-Oh! Dark Duel Stories. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. Later on in the same year (March 19), Konami released its first Yu-Gi-Oh! videogame in the U.S. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. by Upper Deck Entertainment under the new name, Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game, with the release of its first set, Legend of Blue-Eyes White Dragon. Western cuisine. And on March 1, 2002, the English version of the game was brought to the U.S.

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Succeeding the popular Carddas version, Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG was an instant hit. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus. The gaming rule of this version is much more sophisticated and mature compared with the Carddas version, while at the same time does a much better job in preserving the style and feeling of M&W. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. The third version, Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG, was first released on February 4, 1999, by Konami. In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. They cannot be used in the later-released Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG.

The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria. Only 10 cards were released for this version, and Konami didn't have any gaming rules for these cards, as they were intended for collection purpose only. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. The two versions are different in terms of design, with the looks of the former closer to those in the manga, to an extent that their effect texts are all directly quoted from the manga. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. These cards are not to be mixed up with those of Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG released later by the same company. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. The second version of the Yu-Gi-Oh! cards was released by Konami on December 16, 1998, included as special pack-in cards in the first Yu-Gi-Oh! video game, Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters [7].

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. The game was popular, although it used a simplified and modified version[6] of the gaming rule used in the manga, and is less faithful to the manga compared with Konami's versions of the game. Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:. Only three boosters had been released for this version before the license of the card game was sold to Konami later. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce. The first version, known as the Carddas version, was first released by Bandai in September 1998. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. Magic & Wizards has been brought to life in three versions, by two different companies.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. Crawford (Maximillion Pegasus in the English versions), whom both share the same number of letters. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese. The name of Magic's creator is mirrored through the creator of Duel Monsters, Pegasus J. Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. The similarities between the games, of note card design (brown with an oval on back), effects and terminology (discarding, graveyard, sacrifice), usage, and pictures (including occult or religious based icons, alluding to the early days of Magic: The Gathering) are all there. Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). With the advance of the manga, the game continued to evolve, becoming more complicated.

Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii. Takahashi realized that he had hit on something, so he modified the storyline to feature more of the card game. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. After the first appearance of the game in the manga (in Volume 2, Duel 9), the reader response on it was enormous[5], and Shonen Jump started getting calls from readers who wanted to know more about the game. Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. The original plan of Takahashi was to phase out M&W, which took him only one night[4] to design, in just two episodes. United States. According to the author, the game was designed as such because he felt that the rules of Magic were too complicated, and he wanted to create something similar but simpler[3].

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood. Compared with its predecessor, M&W was very simple when it was first introduced in the manga: there were only two types of cards (Monster & Magic Cards); the result of a monster battle only relied on the Attack and Defense Points of the monsters and the effects of Magic Cards (which only appeared occasionally). Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken. Designed by Kazuki Takahashi, Magic & Wizards (M&W), is a popular card game worldwide. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets. Different names can be used to refer to the game depending on where it appears:. Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. The Yu-Gi-Oh! anime and manga series introduces an original card game created by Takahashi.

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings. There are several games in the Yu-Gi-Oh! anime and manga that were originally created as fictitious games for the series and was later turned into real games or video games. It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi. The story goes on as Jaden faces challenges from different students in Duel Academy, and later finds himself entangled in a conflict related to the hidden secrets of the academy. See also Category:Japanese ingredients. Jaden, receiving low marks in his admission tests, is placed in the Slifer Red dormitory (Osiris Red) reserved for students with the lowest grades. In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi). Yu-Gi-Oh! GX follows the story of Jaden Yuki (Judai Yuki in the Japanese version), a young talented duelist who is given the card "Winged Kuriboh" by Yugi before Jaden's admission to Duel Academy (Duel Academia in the Japanese version), an elitist boarding school established by Seto Kaiba.

Major such combinations include:. As the story goes on, the two of them, together with Yugi's friends, Anzu Mazaki, Katsuya Jonouchi, Hiroto Honda, etc., try to find the secret of the Pharaoh's lost memories and his name, - by the card game Duel Monsters (Magic & Wizards in the original Japanese manga and Yu-Gi-Oh! R) which is mirrored in the shadow games (Yami no Game in Japanese). In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. Upon completing the Puzzle, he is possessed by another personality which is later discovered to be the spirit of a 3000-year-old (or, in the English anime, 5000-year-old) Pharaoh, who forgot everything from his time. Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き). Yu-Gi-Oh! (all anime, manga and movies except Yu-Gi-Oh! GX) tells the tale of Yugi Mutou, a shorter-than-normal high school student who was given an ancient Egyptian artifact known as the Millennium Puzzle in pieces by his grandfather. Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes. The Duel Monsters themselves, as the primary battle agents in the series' card duels, can also be considered major characters, especially the three God Cards: Obelisk the Tormentor or The God of the Obelisk ("Giant Soldier - God of Obelisk" in the Japanese version), The Winged Dragon of Ra or The Sun Dragon Ra ("Winged Dragon - God of Ra"), and Slifer the Sky Dragon ("Saint Dragon - God of Osiris").

Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). The main character of Yu-Gi-Oh! GX is Jaden Yuki (Judai Yuki in the Japanese version), an energetic boy who possesses great talents in Duel Monsters. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Yugi's best friends Katsuya Jonouchi (Joey Wheeler), Anzu Mazaki (Téa Gardner), and Hiroto Honda (Tristan Taylor) are also primary characters, as well as Dark Yugi's main rival, Seto Kaiba. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. His true name is revealed to be "Atem"), a darker personality held in the Puzzle. Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. The main characters of Yu-Gi-Oh! (all anime, manga and movies except Yu-Gi-Oh! GX) are Yugi Mutou (Yugi Muto in the English anime), a shy, pure-hearted high school student and gaming expert who possesses an ancient Egyptian relic called the Millennium Puzzle; and the Nameless Pharaoh, otherwise known as Dark Yugi (Yami Yugi) (Dark Yugi is also known as "the other Yugi" and the "Nameless Pharaoh" (Namonaki Pharaoh in Japanese).

Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century. See also:. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Main articles:. The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. or Japan) got 1 of 4 free Yu-Gi-Oh! cards. Salamander is eaten as well in places. People who attended the movie during its premiere (U.S.

In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. The movie was then aired on TV Tokyo on January 2, 2005. Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. The Japanese version of the movie premiered in special screenings in Japan on November 3, 2004 and normal theaters on Christmas Eve, 2004, under the title Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters: Pyramid of Light (遊戯王デュエルモンスターズ 光のピラミッド). Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock. In the movie, Yugi faces Anubis, his arch-rival from his time. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. Its characters are from the second series Yu-Gi-Oh! anime.

Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. The movie was developed specifically for Western audiences based on the overwhelming success of the Yu-Gi-Oh! franchise in the U.S. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. The second movie, often referred to as simply "Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie", was first released in North America on August 13, 2004. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie: Pyramid of Light. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Yugi tries to bring Shougo's courage out in a duel with Seto Kaiba, who has his eyes on Shougo's rare card.

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. The movie is about a boy named Shougo Aoyama who is too timid to duel even after he got a powerful rare card, the legendary Red-Eyes Black Dragon, in his Deck. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine. Its characters are from the first series Yu-Gi-Oh! anime. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. A 30-minute movie produced by Toei Animation, it was first shown in theaters on March 6, 1999. Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. Known as simply "Yu-Gi-Oh!", this first movie of Yu-Gi-Oh! has been released only in Japan.

There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets. The translator of the English manga is Anita Sengupta. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. As of June 2005, the Egypt arc can be found in Shonen Jump. This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. The Duelist Kingdom and Battle City arcs is released as Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist, while the Egypt arc is released as Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium World. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea. Viz released volumes 1 through 7 of the Yu-Gi-Oh! manga under its original title.

The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Published in its original right-to-left format, the manga is largely unedited, especially compared to the English anime. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. Maximillion Pegasus) and the Duel Monsters cards. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. The original Japanese character names are kept for most of the characters (Yugi, Jonouchi, Anzu, and Honda, for instance), while the English names are used for a few characters (e.g. This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. The English version of the Yu-Gi-Oh! manga is released by VIZ Media in both the Shonen Jump magazine and in individual graphic novels.

The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). It has not aired on Ireland TV since only showing epsodes 1-4, where only 3-4 where seen and made note off. Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. The Japanese version might premier in Japan first before the US release. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu. According to a 4kids representive, however, the first DVD volume of the series will be released in the US in Spring/Summer 2006, with a TV broadcast in the Fall. Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. Not much else is known about Capsule Monsters so far - it has not yet premiered in the United States or Japan and there is no information on it on the 4Kids website as of February 5th, 2006.

. After initial confusion amongst fans - particularly over the discovery of the series in such an unlikely place - information was gathered from 4Kids that clarified the nature of the show. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II. Historically, it was not unusual for RTE to premiere episodes of the Yu-Gi-Oh! dub some time ahead of other markets, but their lack of any kind of promotion or fanfare in doing so meant that Capsule Monsters was unknown right up until (what is believed to be) the third episode was accidentally stumbled across by Livejournal user Angryhamster, who posted the news and screencaps to a Livejournal community, Play the Damn Card. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. The first mention of Capsule Monsters came on the retailer website, Talkin' Sports in December 2005, but this information was not widespread, and the existence of the project remained unknown to almost the entire fanbase until February 2006, when the Irish television network RTE 2 began to air the episodes. There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. It is similar to the Virtual RPG arc in many respects, but it doesn't seem to have anything to do with the early Capsule Monster Chess game featured in early volumes of the original manga.

Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth. They find monster capsules that they can use to summon monsters. Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor. Set before the end of the second Yu-Gi-Oh! anime series (Yu-Gi-Oh: Duel Monsters) - apparently somewhere in season 5 - Capsule Monsters involves Yugi, Joey (Jonouchi), Téa (Anzu), Tristan (Honda), and Yugi's grandfather (Sugoroku) being pulled into a world where Duel Monsters are real. Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce). Yu-Gi-Oh! Capsule Monsters is a twelve-episode mini-series commissioned, produced, and edited by 4Kids (much like Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie - Pyramid of Light). Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan'). Yu-Gi-Oh! GX premiered on Cartoon Network in October 2005.

Konowata. Like the second series, it is licensed by 4Kids and has many of the same edits and names changes. Karasumi. Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters GX has an English version, titled Yu-Gi-Oh! GX in North America. Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni. Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! GX
. Pocky. Some people mistake Toei's series for a lost first season of the TV show, and refer to it as "Season (or Series) 0".

Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream. 4Kids has not translated the 27 episodes produced by Toei that make up the first series Yu-Gi-Oh! anime. Hello Panda. Each DVD contains three episodes. Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans. Both language tracks use the original Japanese music. Other Snack

    . These DVDs include the original, unedited Japanese animations and Japanese dialogue tracks with English subtitles, as well as all-new English dubs with translations closer to the original dialogues.

    Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe. On October 19, 2004, 4Kids, in association with FUNimation, released uncut Yu-Gi-Oh! DVDs after years of petitions from Yu-Gi-Oh! fans. Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake. Like many anime originally created for the Japanese market, a number of changes (including the names of most of the characters) were made when the English Yu-Gi-Oh! anime was released. Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy

      . In the United States it is broadcast on Kids' WB! and on Cartoon Network; in Canada, it is broadcast on YTV; while in the United Kingdom and Australia, it is broadcast on Nickelodeon. Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors. The English Yu-Gi-Oh! anime is broadcast on many channels.

      Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce. So Season 3 is known as Yu-Gi-Oh! Enter the Shadow Realm, Season 4 is known as Yu-Gi-Oh! Waking the Dragons, the first part of Season 5 is known as Yu-Gi-Oh! Grand Championship, and the second part of Season 5 is known as Yu-Gi-Oh! Dawn of the Duel. Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth. Starting from Season 3, a subtitle was added to the series title. Also called Karumeyaki. (NOTE: the second opening started on January 11, 2003). Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. So far, four seasons have been released:.

      Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets

        . The English Yu-Gi-Oh! anime is divided into a number of seasons. Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste. and released their dubbed version of the anime on Kids' WB! on September 29, 2001, under the title Yu-Gi-Oh!. Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour. They partnered up with Warner Bros. Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake. merchandising and television rights to Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters from Konami.

        Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass. On May 8, 2001, 4Kids Entertainment obtained the U.S. Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon. See also: Yu-Gi-Oh! (second series anime). Matsunoyuki. It currently airs in the US on Cartoon Network as part of its Miguzi program block at 5:00 pm Monday-Friday. Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center. Also produced by NAS, it was first aired on TV Tokyo on October 6, 2004.

        Kompeito - crystal sugar candy. The series mainly focuses on the life in a duelist academy known as Duel Academia. Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping. version), and a new plotline that is not based on the original manga (the "GX" in the title stands for "Generation neXt"). Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same. Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters GX (遊戯王デュエルモンスターズGX), often known as "Yu-Gi-Oh! GX", is an anime spin-off of the original Yu-Gi-Oh! franchise, with a new protagonist, Judai Yuki (renamed Jaden Yuki in the U.S. Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit. Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! GX.

        Higashi. Mainly based on Yu-Gi-Oh! manga volume 8 and onward, the series ended its 224-episode run in Japan on September 29, 2004. Hanabiramochi. Produced by NAS, it was first aired on TV Tokyo on April 18, 2000, and later translated into more than 20 languages and airs in more than 60 countries. Ginbou. Often referred to as simply "Yu-Gi-Oh!" or the "second series" of the Yu-Gi-Oh! anime, the series, titled Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters (遊戯王デュエルモンスターズ) in Asia and Yu-Gi-Oh! elsewhere, is the series that introduced Yu-Gi-Oh! to the Western world. Dango - rice dumpling. Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! (second series anime).

        Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center. First aired on TV Asahi on April 4, 1998, the series ended its run on October 10, 1998. Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert. It is not connected in any way to Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters, another Yu-Gi-Oh! anime series made by Nihon Ad Systems (NAS), but is often referred to as the "first series" to distinguish it from the latter. Amanatto. Produced by Toei Animation, this 27-episode anime is based on Yu-Gi-Oh! manga volumes 1-7, which do not focus much on Magic & Wizards. Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets

          . Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! (first series anime).

          Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish. The comic is illustrated by Naoyuki Kageyama. Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! GX
          The Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters GX manga series is actually a manga adaptation of the Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters GX (titled Yu-Gi-Oh! GX in English speaking countries) television series. Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces. Although there is no explicit explanation on the meaning of "R" in the title, the letter probably stands for "Reverse", "Revolution", "Rebirth", or 'Retold[2]. Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice. The manga was first published in Shueisha's monthly magazine V-Jump on April 21, 2004.

          Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood. Illustrated by Akira Itou, one of the artists who illustrated the original Yu-Gi-Oh! manga, and supervised by Takahashi, Yu-Gi-Oh! R (遊☆戯☆王R) is a spin-off of the original Yu-Gi-Oh! franchise, with most of the same characters in a new plotline, which takes place between the Battle City arc and the Egypt arc. Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc. Main article: Yu-Gi-Oh! R. Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots. Starting around the eighth volume, the Duelist Kingdom arc starts and the plot shifts to a Duel Monsters-centered universe. Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients. The plot starts out as fairly episodic and there are only three instances of Magic and Wizards in the first seven volumes.

          Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan. The manga originally focused on Yugi Mutou as he uses games designed by himself to fight various villains, and gets into misadventures with his friends Katsuya Jonouchi, Anzu Mazaki, and Hiroto Honda. Rebasashi - usually liver of beef. Running from 1996 to March 8, 2004, the Yu-Gi-Oh! manga created by Kazuki Takahashi was one of the most popular titles featured in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump. Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. The Yu-Gi-Oh! universe consists of two manga series (the original series is split into three parts in the English translations), three anime series, and two movies. Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura. .

          Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo. Begun as a manga in Japan in 1996, the Yu-Gi-Oh! franchise has since grown to an immensely successful global brand, spawning various manga and anime series, a real-life version of the card game featured in the story, video games, toys, and many other products. Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice". See the section "Card game" below for different names of the game) wherein each player purchases and assembles a deck of Monster, Magic, and Trap Cards in order to defeat one another. Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan. Yu-Gi-Oh! (遊☆戯☆王 Yūgiō, Japanese for "King of Games"[1]) is a popular Japanese anime and manga franchise from Kazuki Takahashi that mainly involves characters who play a card game called Duel Monsters (originally called Magic & Wizards in the manga. Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot.
          .

          Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans. Shueisha. Onigiri - Japanese rice balls. Yu-Gi-Oh! R (遊☆戯☆王R) Volume 1. Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored. Akira Itou (2005). Mochi - soft rice cake. ISBN 4-08-782134-X.

          Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard. Shueisha. Shiokara - salty fermented viscera. 64. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai. ^  Yu-Gi-Oh! Official Card Game Duel Monsters Master Guide (遊戯王オフィシャルカードゲームデュエルモンスタース MASTER GUIDE), p. Often eaten for breakfast. Yu-Gi-Oh! Carddas version (A Japanese page).

          Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. ^  DOP (September 25, 2002). Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year. Time Magazine. Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish. 'I've Always Been Obessed With Games' . Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box. ^  Lisa Takeuchi Cullen (June 4, 2001).

          Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth. Shueisha. Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork. Yu-Gi-Oh! (遊☆戯☆王) Volume 30. Somen. ^  Kazuki Takahashi (2003). Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students. Macromedia Shockwave is required to play the game.

          Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth. Click "CLICK HERE", then click "ゲームスタート" and complete the puzzle to see words from the author concerning M&W (or see it in the discussion page). Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. ^  Words from the Millennium Puzzle Game (A Japanese site. Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth. ^  In volume 1 of the Yu-Gi-Oh! R manga, Akira Itou explains the manga, which describes a hidden story that does not appear in the original Yu-Gi-Oh! manga, as a "reverse" (リバース) of the original one, in an effort to expand the Yu-Gi-Oh! world. Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew. ^  Yūgi (遊戯) means "game"; Ō (王) means "king".

          Oden. Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters II: Dark Duel Stories. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea. Yu-Gi-Oh! Monster Capsule GB. Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters 4: Battle of Great Duelist. Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base. Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters (no official website available).

          Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating. Yu-Gi-Oh! The Dawn of Destiny. Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake. Yu-Gi-Oh! The Duelists of the Roses (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! True Duel Monsters II: Succeeded Memories). Yakitori - chicken kebabs. Yu-Gi-Oh! Capsule Monster Coliseum (Yu-Gi-Oh! Capsule Monster Coliseum). Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles. Yu-Gi-Oh! Forbidden Memories (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! True Duel Monsters: Forbidden Memories).

          Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel. Yu-Gi-Oh! Power of Chaos: Yugi the Destiny (North America and Europe only). Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce. Yu-Gi-Oh! Power of Chaos: Kaiba the Revenge (North America and Europe only). Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. Yu-Gi-Oh! Power of Chaos: Joey the Passion (North America and Europe only). Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling. Yu-Gi-Oh! Online (website).

          "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette. Yu-Gi-Oh! Nightmare Troubadour (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters: Nightmare Troubadour). Omu-Raisu - i.e. Yu-Gi-Oh! The Falsebound Kingdom (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! Falsebound Kingdom). Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants). Yu-Gi-Oh! Dark Duel Stories (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters III: Tri-Holygod Advent). Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs. Yu-Gi-Oh! GX Duel Academy (Yu-Gi-Oh Duel Monsters GX: Mezase Duel King).

          Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone. Yu-Gi-Oh! The Eternal Duelist Soul (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters 5: Expert 1) (English version uses "Duel Monsters 6" interface). Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables. Yu-Gi-Oh! Dungeon Dice Monsters (Yu-Gi-Oh! Dungeon Dice Monsters). Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods. Yu-Gi-Oh! Worldwide Edition: Stairway to the Destined Duel (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters 6: Expert 2, Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters International ~Worldwide Edition~). Gyūdon - seasoned beef. Yu-Gi-Oh! The Sacred Cards (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters 7: The Duelcity Legend).

          Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe. Yu-Gi-Oh! World Championship Tournament 2004 (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters: Expert 3). Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon). Yu-Gi-Oh! Reshef of Destruction (website) (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters 8: Reshef of Destruction). Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu). Yu-Gi-Oh! Destiny Board Traveler (Yu-Gi-Oh! Sugoroku's Sugoroku). Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat. Yu-Gi-Oh! 7 Trials to Glory: World Championship Tournament 2005 (Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters International 2).

          Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer. Yu-Gi-Oh! Character Guide Book - The Gospel of Truth (遊戯王キャラクターズガイドブック―真理の福音― Yūgiō Kyarakutāzu Gaido Bukku Shinri no Fukuin) - ISBN 4-08-873363-0 - This book is a character guide related to the manga. Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings. Volume 5 ISBN 4-08-782053-X. Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba). Volume 4 ISBN 4-08-782047-5. Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress. Volume 3 ISBN 4-08-782135-8.

          Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion). Volume 2 ISBN 4-08-782041-6. Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi. Volume 1 ISBN 4-08-782764-X. Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake. Yu-Gi-Oh! Official Card Game Duel Monsters Official Card Catalog The Variable Book - This is a collection of card catalogues.

            . Fu (wheat gluten). This also has a Q & A related to certain cards, and the book comes with the "multiply" card.

            Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour. Yu-Gi-Oh! Official Card Game Duel Monsters Official Rule Guide -- The Thousand Rule Bible - ISBN 4-08-782134-X - This is a rule book and strategy guide for the Junior and Shin Expert rules. yuzu. Yu-Gi-Oh! (novel) - ISBN 4-08-703086-5 - This is a novelization of the first two story arcs of the manga. sudachi,. Yu-Gi-Oh! Enter the Shadow Realm: Mighty Champions by Jeff O'Hare - ISBN 0439671914 - Published by Scholastic Press - A book with puzzles and games related to Yu-Gi-Oh!. natsumikan (amanatsu),. Yu-Gi-Oh!: Monster Duel Official Handbook by Michael Anthony Steele - ISBN 0439651018 - Published by Scholastic Press - A guide book to Yu-Gi-Oh! cards and characters.

            mikan,. Video game: Dungeon Dice Monsters. kumquat,. Dungeon Dice Monsters (DDM), known in the Japanese manga as Dragons Dice & Dungeons (DDD) — a dungeon crawl boardgame where the tiles are created by unfolding the faces of 6-sided dice. kabosu,. Video game: Monster Capsule GB (available in Japanese only). iyokan,. Monster World — a role-playing chess game.

            daidai,. Video game: Capsule Monster Coliseum. Citrus fruits:

              . Capsule Monster Chess (Capmon) — a sort of pre-Mage Knight collectible miniatures game. loquat. Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game (Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG) — used in places where Upper Deck Entertainment distributes Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG. nashi pear,. Yu-Gi-Oh! Official Card Game: Duel Monsters (Yu-Gi-Oh! OCG) — the original name of the real Yu-Gi-Oh! card game released by Konami, used mostly in Asia.

              chestnut,. The name is introduced to replace Magic & Wizards, probably due to its similarity to Magic: The Gathering. persimmon,. Duel Monsters — used in Toei Animation's Yu-Gi-Oh! anime, the second series Yu-Gi-Oh! anime (Japanese and English versions), manga (English version only), and movies. Fruits:

                . In the case of the English manga, the game is renamed Duel Monsters in later-released chapters. Yuba. Magic & Wizards (M&W) — the original name of the card game, used in the original Yu-Gi-Oh! (Japanese and English versions) manga, and Yu-Gi-Oh! R.

                Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),. Yu-Gi-Oh! media and release information. Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),. The Ceremonial Battle. Miso,. Millennium World (also known as "Dawn of the Duel"). Edamame,. Grand Championship.

                Bean products:

                  . Waking the Dragons. Beans (soy, adzuki). Virtual World. Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat). Battle City. Eggs (chicken, quail). Duelist Kingdom.

                  Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen). Shadow Realm. Satsuma-age. Shadow Game. kamaboko,. Orichalcos. dried cuttlefish,. Millennium Items.

                  niboshi,. Sacred Beast Cards. chikuwa,. God Cards. Processed seafood:

                    . Yu-Gi-Oh! GX (for characters in Yu-Gi-Oh! GX). others; see Category:Sea vegetables. Yu-Gi-Oh! R (for characters in Yu-Gi-Oh! R).

                    hijiki,. Yu-Gi-Oh! anime, manga or movie only characters. wakame,. Yu-Gi-Oh! anime and manga characters. konbu,. Yu-Gi-Oh! main characters. nori,. Season 5 (episode 185-224), aired from August 27, 2005 to present.

                    seaweed:

                      . Season 4 (episode 145-184), aired from September 11, 2004 to May 28, 2005. Tsukemono (pickled vegetables). Season 3 (episode 98-144), aired from November 1, 2003 to September 4, 2004. shimeji. Season 2 (episode 50-97), aired from November 16, 2002 to November 1, 2003. nameko,. Season 1 (episode 1-49), aired from September 29, 2001 to November 9, 2002.

                      enokitake,. matsutake,. shiitake,. Mushrooms:

                        .

                        Konnyaku (shirataki). Sansai (wild vegetables). moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts). fuki (butterbur),.

                        negi (Welsh onion),. takenoko (bamboo shoots),. renkon (lotus root),. sweet potato,.

                        daikon,. gobo (burdock),. eggplant,. cucumber,.

                        spinach,. nira (Chinese chives),. Vegetables:

                          . Mochi rice (glutinous rice).

                          Short or medium grain white rice. Rice

                            . This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba"). Soba - New Year's Eve.

                            Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general. Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival. Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival. botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.

                            Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri. Osechi - New Year.

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