Japanese cuisine

One course of a multi course Kaiseki meal, showing a careful arrangement of the foods

There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II.

Food individual to the country

Barrels of sake, a traditional Japanese alcoholic drink

Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu.

Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea.

This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets.

Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine.

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock.

Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. Salamander is eaten as well in places.

Traditional Japanese table settings

The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century.

Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes.

Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き).

Dishes for special occasions

In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. Major such combinations include:

  • Osechi - New Year.
  • Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri.
  • botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.
  • Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival.
  • Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival.
  • Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general.
  • Soba - New Year's Eve. This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba").

In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi).

Japanese ingredients

  • Rice
    • Short or medium grain white rice
    • Mochi rice (glutinous rice)
  • Vegetables:
    • nira (Chinese chives),
    • spinach,
    • cucumber,
    • eggplant,
    • gobo (burdock),
    • daikon,
    • sweet potato,
    • renkon (lotus root),
    • takenoko (bamboo shoots),
    • negi (Welsh onion),
    • fuki (butterbur),
    • moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts)
    • Sansai (wild vegetables)
    • Konnyaku (shirataki)
  • Mushrooms:
    • shiitake,
    • matsutake,
    • enokitake,
    • nameko,
    • shimeji.
  • Tsukemono (pickled vegetables)
  • seaweed:
    • nori,
    • konbu,
    • wakame,
    • hijiki,
    • others; see Category:Sea vegetables
  • Processed seafood:
    • chikuwa,
    • niboshi,
    • dried cuttlefish,
    • kamaboko,
    • Satsuma-age.
  • Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen)
  • Eggs (chicken, quail)
  • Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat)
  • Beans (soy, adzuki)
  • Bean products:
    • Edamame,
    • Miso,
    • Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),
    • Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),
    • Yuba
  • Fruits:
    • persimmon,
    • chestnut,
    • nashi pear,
    • loquat
  • Citrus fruits:
    • daidai,
    • iyokan,
    • kabosu,
    • kumquat,
    • mikan,
    • natsumikan (amanatsu),
    • sudachi,
    • yuzu.
  • Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour
  • Fu (wheat gluten)

See also Category:Japanese ingredients.

Japanese flavorings

It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi.

  • Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake.
  • Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi.
  • Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion)
  • Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress.
  • Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba).

Famous Japanese foods and dishes

Deep-Fried dishes (Agemono)

  • Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings.
  • Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer.
  • Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat.
  • Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu).

Donburi

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings

  • Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon)
  • Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe
  • Gyūdon - seasoned beef
  • Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods

Grilled and pan-fried dishes (Yakimono)

  • Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables
  • Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone
  • Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs
  • Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants)
  • Omu-Raisu - i.e. "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette
  • Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling
  • Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside
  • Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce
  • Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel
  • Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles
  • Yakitori - chicken kebabs

Nabemono (one pot cooking)

  • Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake
  • Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating
  • Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base
  • Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea
  • Oden
  • Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew.

Noodles (men-rui)

Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets.

  • Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth
  • Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan
  • Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth
  • Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
  • Somen
  • Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork

Other

  • Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth
  • Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box
  • Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish
  • Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year
  • Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai
  • Shiokara - salty fermented viscera
  • Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard

Rice (gohanmono)

  • Mochi - soft rice cake
  • Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored
  • Onigiri - Japanese rice balls
  • Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans
  • Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
  • Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan
  • Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice"
  • Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo

Sashimi

Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken.

  • Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura
  • Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty
  • Rebasashi - usually liver of beef
  • Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan

Soups (suimono and shirumono)

  • Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
  • Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
  • Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc.
  • Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood

Sushi

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood.

  • Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
  • Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
  • Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside.
  • Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish.

Sweets

  • Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets
    • Amanatto
    • Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert
    • Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center
    • Dango - rice dumpling
    • Ginbou
    • Hanabiramochi
    • Higashi
    • Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit
    • Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
    • Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping.
    • Kompeito - crystal sugar candy
    • Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
    • Matsunoyuki
    • Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon
    • Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass
    • Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake
    • Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour
    • Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste
  • Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
    • Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
    • Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth
    • Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
    • Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors
  • Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy
    • Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
    • Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe
  • Other Snack
    • Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans
    • Hello Panda
    • Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream
    • Pocky

Chinmi

  • Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni
  • Karasumi
  • Konowata

Japanese influence on other cuisines

United States

Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii.

Imported and adapted foods

A Japanese children's book. The food and utensils depicted, however, are Western.

Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce.

Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:

  • Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan')
  • Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce)
  • Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor
  • Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria.

In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus.

Washoku and yōshoku

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Western cuisine. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. Chinese recipe.

A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. Western cuisine restaurants. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin.

Tempura

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. As such, it is considered washoku. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen.

Fusion foods

In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants.


This page about japanese restaurant includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about japanese restaurant
News stories about japanese restaurant
External links for japanese restaurant
Videos for japanese restaurant
Wikis about japanese restaurant
Discussion Groups about japanese restaurant
Blogs about japanese restaurant
Images of japanese restaurant

Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants. The disc contained Star Wait, a documentary about Star Wars fans who had waited in line for Episodes II and III. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. Target stores also offered a bonus disc with the Revenge of the Sith DVD. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. The footage used contains no scenes from Revenge of the Sith nor does it have the changes contained in the 2004 DVD Special Edition releases. It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. The DVD version contains the content from the first two discs: The Story of Anakin Skywalker and The Story of Luke Skywalker.

Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". Presented in full frame with Dolby Digital 2.0 sound and running 1 hour in total, it was originally produced and released in 2004 as a 3-disc collection for the VideoNow Color personal video player. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. The sticker on the cover describes it as "R2-D2 and C-3P0's chronicles of Luke and Anakin Skywalker". In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. [5] As with many previous Star Wars "history" featurettes, it is hosted with newly shot footage by the droid duo, R2-D2 and C-3PO. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen. Wal-Mart stores included an exclusive bonus disc, entitled The Story of Star Wars, with some copies of Revenge of the Sith, when it arrived on DVD.

Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. Disc 2:. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. Disc 1:. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. [4]. As such, it is considered washoku. Together with Star Wars: Battlefront II, the DVD has earned around $280 million as of November 8, 2005.

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. A playable demo of Star Wars: Battlefront II was also included on the DVD. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin. The 15 part web documentary series, "Making Episode III", is also included in the set. Western cuisine restaurants. The DVD includes a new full-length documentary as well as two featurettes, one which explores the prophecy of Anakin Skywalker as the Chosen One, the other looking at the movie's stunts. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. The DVD was a two-disc set, with picture and sound mastered from the original digital source material.

Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith was released on DVD on November 1, 2005 in the United States. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. In the latter mode, two players team up to combat increasingly difficult waves of enemies. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. In the first mode, two players fight with characters of their choice against each other in a lightsaber duel to the death. A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. It also has a form of multiplayer mode, which includes both "VS" and "Co-Player" mode.

Chinese recipe. After the death of Obi-Wan, Anakin proceeds to kill Palpatine, and take over the galaxy. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. One unique and popular aspect of the game was that it included an alternate ending, which functioned as such to both the game and the movie, which involved Anakin killing Obi-Wan, instead of Obi-Wan defeating Anakin as in the movie. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. The style of the game was mostly lightsaber combat and fighting as Obi-Wan or Anakin. Western cuisine. However, many sections of the game featured cut scenes from the movie, or entirely new scenes for the game.

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. The game followed the movie's storyline, for the most part, integrating scenes from the movie. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus. A video game, based on the film, was released on May 5, 2005, two weeks before the film. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. In addition to this, the siege of the Jedi Temple is slightly more violent than the cinematic version is. In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. For example, during the Battle of Coruscant, Anakin's callsign is Red 5, a reference to Luke's callsign in the Battle of Yavin.

The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria. The novel includes many little details that some Star Wars fans are likely to appreciate. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. The novelization includes much more dialog than the movie, including a conversation between Count Dooku and Darth Sidious, where the reader learns Palpatine lied to Dooku about what the Empire would truly be. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. A book version of the movie was written by Matthew Stover. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. This album was chosen as one of Amazon.com's Top 100 Editor's Picks of 2005 (#83).

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. The DVD features 16 music videos set to remastered selections of music from all six film scores, set chronologically through the saga. Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:. The soundtrack also came with a collectors' DVD, Star Wars: A Musical Journey, at no additional cost. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce. A music video titled A Hero Falls was created for the film's theme, Battle of the Heroes, featuring footage from the film. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. John Williams was also composer and conductor of the score for the other five films in the Star Wars saga.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. The music was composed and conducted by John Williams, and performed by the London Symphony Orchestra and London Voices. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese. The soundtrack to the film was released by Sony Classical on May 3, 2005, more than two weeks before the release of the film. Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. Lucas' coverage of the exterior cityscapes, skylines and interior isolation is similar to the cinematography and mis-en-scene of Roman Polanski, particularly in The Pianist, The Tenant and Rosemary's Baby, a film in which a husband makes a literal pact with the devil. Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). Midway in the film, Lucas intercuts between Anakin and Padmé by themselves, thinking about one another in the Jedi Temple and their apartment, respectively during sunset, in a sequence without dialog and complimented by a moody, synthesized soundtrack.

Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii. McDiarmid, Lucas, and others have also called Anakin's journey to the dark side faustian in the sense of making a "pact with the devil" for short-term gain. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. In both cases, jealousy drives the husband to strangle his wife. Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. In Revenge of the Sith, Vader comes to believe that his wife, Padmé, has betrayed him to his former master, Obi-Wan. United States. In Othello, the title character is led to believe by Iago that his wife has committed adultery with his confidante and lieutenant.

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood. Palpatine's scheming manipulations of Anakin have been compared by many, including McDiarmid himself, to those of Iago, the villain of Shakespeare's Othello. Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken. Lucas' editing schemes during Order 66, the slaughter of the Separatists and the declaration of the Galactic Empire is reminiscent of the montage of massacres during the christening scene of The Godfather, a film directed by mentor Francis Ford Coppola. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets. The close-ups on Grievous's and Obi-Wan's eyes is likely an homage to the work of Sergio Leone, whose protracted gunfights featured such extreme close-ups, especially in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. The lightsaber duel between Obi-Wan and the four-armed skeletal cyborg General Grievous echoes similar fight sequences in Ray Harryhausen's filmography, particularly the fights involving animated skeletons and multi-armed statues in Jason and the Argonauts and the Sinbad the Sailor series.

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings. Based on the scene in the opera, it has been speculated that either Palpatine or Plagueis manipulated the Force to create Anakin, thus being Anakin's "father", but this has been neither confirmed nor denied, and was purposefully left ambiguous. It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi. Also, Rotwang builds the android whose appearance heavily influenced the image of Lucas' C-3PO, who was built, in The Phantom Menace, by Anakin. See also Category:Japanese ingredients. Both Anakin and Rotwang wear a menacing leather glove on one hand and concentrate on saving —or resurrecting— a lost loved one. In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi). Anakin also bears a resemblance to a villainous character played by Klein-Rogge from a film by Lang —the mad scientist Rotwang from the classic film Metropolis.

Major such combinations include:. Mabuse, particularly as portrayed by German actor Rudolph Klein-Rogge in director Fritz Lang's films. In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. Palpatine's appearance and actions are also reminiscent of Dr. Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き). The very idea of the individual slaughter of the Jedi, order 66, is reminiscent of the coup of the Knights Templar by Pope Clement V on Friday the thirteenth, 1307. Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes. In Lucas' film, the wife herself is a liberal senator.

Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). In Frankenheimer's film, the wife is the daughter of a liberal senator. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Also, in both films, the brainwashed assassin eventually murders —or is led to believe he has murdered— his own wife. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. Palpatine's fabrication of a Jedi "coup d'etat" is comparable to the plot of the John Frankenheimer thriller Seven Days in May, while his conversion of Anakin to the dark side and motivating him to assassinate his political enemies in order to aid his ascent to dictatorial powers are more close to the content of Frankenheimer's previous film, The Manchurian Candidate. Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. Anakin's execution of Dooku mimics the scissor-beheadings of Ridley Scott's film Gladiator, and the subsequent run across the elevator shaft walls while the spaceship is falling in battle echoes the disastrous situations of The Poseidon Adventure.

Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century. Early on the Jedi navigate their way through General Grevious' ship by traversing elevator shafts, thematically and visually echoing the tradition of post-Die Hard action movies and Lars von Trier's mini-series Riget (The Kingdom). Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Throughout Revenge of the Sith Lucas refers to a wide range of films and other sources drawing on political, military and mythological motifs to enhance the impact of his story. The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Worldwide gross eventually reached $848,466,209, ranking 12th all-time and the 2nd worldwide in 2005, right behind Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.. Salamander is eaten as well in places. Revenge of the Sith was released in 115 countries.

In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. history.). Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. (Taking ticket-price inflation into account, it is the 55th highest grossing movie in U.S. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock. Its total of $380,270,577 ranks it 7th all-time domestically, the highest-grossing movie of 2005, outgrossing second-place Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by nearly $100 million. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. It apparently stopped running in domestic theaters on October 20, 2005.

Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. It was the third fastest (after Shrek 2 and Spider-Man) to reach $350 million. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. It became the only film to tie Spider-Man 2's record of eight days to $200 million, and with $25,088,336 in its third weekend (June 3-5) it had passed $300 million on Saturday, its 17th day, surpassing the record of 18 days held by Shrek 2. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. It joins Spider-Man, The Matrix Reloaded and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire as the only movies to make $100 million in three days. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. It totaled $158.5 million in its first four-day period, surpassing the previous four-day record held by The Matrix Reloaded ($134.3 million) and making it the second highest grossing movie of 2005 after just four days in release (behind Hitch, $177.6 million, which it passed on its fifth day).

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. According to the box office prediction and analysis site Box Office Mojo, Revenge of the Sith set domestic records for highest gross in a given number of days for each of at least its first twelve days of release except for the seventh and eighth, where the record is narrowly held by Spider-Man 2. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine. This broke several box office records:. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. In total, it earned a record $50 million on its opening day. Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. The film earned an estimated $16.5 million from 2,900 midnight screenings in North America upon its release.

There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets. One nomination:. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. One nomination:. This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. Though some critics saw it as the best of the series, others saw it as pretty much on par with the other prequels. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea. It is also often said to contain plot holes, though they are all more or less disputable.

The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Other criticisms included the usual ones raised against the prequels, such as "wooden" acting, overuse of flashy and colorful computer-generated special effects, and an attempt to be both childish and mature all at once (including many slapstick moments along with a large number of severed limbs and heads). The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. In contrast with the previous two prequels, these flaws are generally seen as minor and not obtrusive to the film. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. As with earlier prequels, many felt that Lucas did not draw out the potential of Natalie Portman's performance, but this is partially because her entire sub-plot (as a founding member of the Rebel Alliance, alongside Bail Organa and Mon Mothma) was cut from the film-- it's restored in the DVD, however. This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. Many critics were pleased with the acting, however, with Christensen's depiction of a more mature Anakin Skywalker and Ian McDiarmid's charismatic turn as the ascendant Chancellor Palpatine receiving the most acclaim.

The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). Despite the generally positive reception, many critics asserted Lucas' continued weakness with dialogue in general, particularly with the romantic plot-line. Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. Lucas has directed," and equal to The Empire Strikes Back as "the richest and most challenging movie in the cycle.". Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu. Scott of the New York Times concluded that it was "the best of the four episodes Mr. Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. O.

. A. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II. Some critics have noted that they view it to be the best of the prequels, while other reviewers have judged it to be the best Star Wars film since Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Film review site Rotten Tomatoes gave it a rating of 82% based on 229 reviews, compared to the 63% and 65% received by Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace and Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, respectively. There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. Critical reaction towards the film was largely enthusiastic, especially in comparison to the two previous prequels.

Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth. A New Hope also contained a very mild amount of what some consider adult language, such as "damn" and "hell." Revenge of the Sith contains no such content. Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor. A New Hope was originally rated G, but its rating was deliberately pushed up in order to attract a broader audience. Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce). All previously released films in the series, except for A New Hope, were rated PG. Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan'). Due to its dark undertones and scenes of violence, Revenge of the Sith is the first and only Star Wars film to receive a PG-13 rating from the MPAA.

Konowata. Both rips are widely spread and available in popular P2P networks. Karasumi. Then, on June 4th, 2005, an Internal Xvid Rip version of the film was leaked into P2P file sharing networks as well, which was the final, theatrical cut of the movie seen in theaters, and was a much higher fidelity version of the film than the workprint one, although still not quite as good as the theatrical release, and was also wasn't a Telecine transfer yet, due to vibrations and frame-skips during certain moments in the movie. Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni. The movie was a time-stamped workprint, suggesting it may have come from within the industry rather than from someone who videotaped an advance screening. Pocky. A copy of the movie leaked into P2P file sharing networks just hours after opening in theaters.

Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream. Most of them took advantage of an offer to see the film at a nearby cinema, the Arclight. Hello Panda. However, a line of people stood there for more than a month hoping to convince someone to change this. Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans. Grauman's Chinese Theatre, a traditional venue for the Star Wars films, did not show it. Other Snack

    . The global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas claimed before the premiere that it may have cost the US economy approximately US$627 million because of employees who took a day off or reported in sick.

    Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe. It was released in most other countries on May 19, six years to the day after the release of The Phantom Menace (A New Hope and Return of the Jedi were also released on the same day, six years apart). Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake. Revenge of the Sith premiered at the Cannes Film Festival (out of competition) on 15 May 2005. Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy

      . The Revenge of the Sith novel was released two months before the premiere and the actual script was leaked on the Internet a few days later. Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors. Many times the stars, and Lucas himself, were spotted on the cam.

      Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce. Not only did Hyperspace members receive special articles, but they also received many other benefits, such as a webcam, which transmitted a new image every 20 seconds during the time it was on from Fox Studios Australia. Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth. Members of Hyperspace, the Official Star Wars Fan Club, received a special look into the production. Also called Karumeyaki. According to an interview with Hayden Christensen in Playboy magazine, playwright Tom Stoppard did an uncredited rewrite and dialogue polish on the script. Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. It is rumored that the scenes he worked on included the Yoda/Palpatine battle and a part of the Mustafar duel.

      Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets

        . Lucas sent over an animatics artist to assist him. Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste. This happened when a project of his fell through and he had some spare time. Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour. Lucas confirmed in an interview that Steven Spielberg tinkered with several action sequences in Sith. Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake. The long process of post-production continued until weeks before the film was released in 2005.

        Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass. George Lucas finished the script of the film only five days before the beginning of principal photography. Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon. Principal photography on the film occurred from June 30 to September 17, 2003 at Fox Studios Australia. Matsunoyuki. The film was produced with a budget of US$113 million, making it the least expensive of the three prequel films. Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center. It was later adapted into a script from 2003 to 2004.

        Kompeito - crystal sugar candy. The film's story was written by Lucas, in the form of a basic plot outline, in 1973. Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping. She claimed this was because she posed for the June 2005 issue of Playboy magazine, whose appearance on newsstands coincided with the movie's May release, but Lucas denied this, stating that the cut had been made more than a year earlier, and that he had cut his own daughter's scenes as well. Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same. Bai Ling filmed minor scenes for the film playing the role of a senator, but her role was cut during editing. Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit. (However, the final storyline in the Republic comic series reveals that Vos escaped this initial attack.).

        Higashi. Expanded Universe character Quinlan Vos' death scene was never filmed, though his death was implied (but not explicitly shown) in the comic adaptation. Hanabiramochi. The death scene of Shaak Ti is a DVD deleted scene. Ginbou. The deaths of Barriss Offee and Luminara Unduli were either cut from the film or never filmed in the first place. Dango - rice dumpling. Many Order 66 scenes were cut.

        Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center. The scene where Yoda arrives on Dagobah to begin his self-imposed exile was also cut, but is featured in a deleted scene in the DVD release. Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert. (Due to the dating supported by Expanded Universe sources, and the fact that Chewbacca is still on Kashyyyk at the time, the pilot of the Falcon in the cameo is the previous owner(s) to Lando Calrissian and Han Solo, as Lando and Han were children at the time.) It is one of the ships landing in the background. Amanatto. However, the Millennium Falcon makes an appearance in the scene in which Anakin and Obi-wan return to Coruscant. Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets

          . George Lucas wrote early drafts of the script in which a 10-year-old Han Solo appeared, but the role was never cast or shot.

          Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish. Scenes with Captain Needa and Mon Mothma were deleted. Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Another theory is that he had already played an alien character whose similarites were too close to the Grievous character, in 1997's Lost in Space. Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces. Ultimately, his audition was never chosen. Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice. According to him, Gary Oldman is a friend of Rick McCallum, and recorded an audition as a favor to him.

          Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood. Matthew Wood, who ultimately voiced Grievous, disputed this story at Celebration III, held in Indianapolis. Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc. Out of respect and solidarity with the other members of the guild, he chose to back out of the role rather than violate the union's rules. Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots. However, complications arose during contract negotiations after Oldman learned the film was to be made outside of the Screen Actor's Guild, of which he is a member. Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients. Gary Oldman was originally approached to provide the voice of General Grievous, and he accepted.

          Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan. Also in the movie was Jeremy Bulloch (Boba Fett in the original trilogy), who played a speaking role as Captain Colton, the pilot of the Rebel Blockade Runner Tantive IV. Rebasashi - usually liver of beef. Nick Gillard, the stunt coordinator, plays a character named Cin Drallig (his name spelled backwards). Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. Much of the crew also make cameos in the film. Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura. His three children also play cameos: his son, Jett, as a young Jedi-in-training called Zett Jukassa killed defending the Jedi Temple against clone troopers; his daughter, Amanda, as a character called Terr Taneel, seen in the security hologram; and daughter Katie as a blue-skinned alien called Chi Eekway, visible when Palpatine arrives at the Senate after being saved by the Jedi, and talking to Baron Papanoida at the Opera House.

          Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo. It marks Lucas' first and only appearance in any of the Star Wars films. Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice". George Lucas makes an appearance at the Coruscant Opera House as a blue faced being named Baron Papanoida, that can be seen outside Palpatine's box. Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan. The film concludes with Beru, Luke, and Owen staring out over the desert at Tatooine's twin suns. Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot. In space, onboard a Star Destroyer, Darth Vader and the Emperor oversee what is either the construction of the first Death Star or the Death Star prototype.[1] Leia is brought to Alderaan to live with the Queen, and Luke is brought to Tatooine to live with Owen and Beru.

          Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans. On Naboo, Padme's parents hold her funeral. Onigiri - Japanese rice balls. Obi-Wan and Yoda will watch and wait until the time is ready for the Skywalker children to do their part in the battle against the Sith. Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored. Aboard the Tantive IV, Obi-Wan, Yoda, and Bail Organa agree to keep the children hidden and separated. Mochi - soft rice cake. When Palpatine tells Vader that he killed Padmé, Vader unleashes a furious scream in a rage that distorts and destroys droids and equipment in the room.

          Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard. On Coruscant, occurring simultaneously in the film with the birth of his children, Vader is put in his classic armor, which allows him to survive his terrible injuries. Shiokara - salty fermented viscera. Just before she dies, Padmé says there is still good in Anakin. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai. Padmé gives them the names Luke and Leia. Often eaten for breakfast. However, they manage to save her babies—she delivers twins, a boy and a girl.

          Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. Padmé is given medical assistance, but although she is physically intact, her will to live is gone and she dies. Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year. Later, Palpatine arrives at Mustafar with a squad of clone troopers, and they rescue Vader from the brink of death. Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish. After picking up Vader's lightsaber, Obi-Wan leaves Mustafar with the badly-injured Padmé. Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box. He ignites into flames, sustaining near-fatal third-degree burns and severe lung damage.

          Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth. Vader tumbles down the embankment and rolls to a stop at the edge of the lava. Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork. Obi-Wan soon gains the advantage of higher ground, and, when Vader attempts to jump over his former master, Obi-Wan cuts off both of his legs and his left arm. Somen. The fierce lightsaber duel continues between Obi-Wan and Darth Vader. Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students. With clone troopers coming to aid Palpatine, Yoda makes the heart-wrenching decision to retreat, and escapes with the help of Bail Organa.

          Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth. In a ferocious contest of Force powers both are flung apart, Yoda falling to the floor of the Senate chamber. Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. In the Senate building, Yoda confronts Palpatine and the two engage in a fierce battle. Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth. Obi-Wan and Vader break into a ferocious lightsaber duel. Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew. Enraged, he uses the Force to choke Padmé unconscious.

          Oden. Vader sees Obi-Wan emerge from Padmé's ship, and suspects her of betraying him to his former Master. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea. Horrified, Padmé realizes that Obi-Wan's story was true. Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Padmé wants to leave public life to live together and raise their child, but Vader tells her that he has brought peace to the Republic, and that he can overthrow Palpatine so he and Padmé can rule the galaxy together. Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base. When the couple reunite on Mustafar, they embrace.

          Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating. Unbeknown to her, Obi-Wan secretly boards the ship just before it takes off. Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake. Padmé later departs to Mustafar to see her husband. Yakitori - chicken kebabs. Obi-Wan meets with Padmé and tells her that Anakin has turned to the Dark Side, but Padmé refuses to reveal where Vader is. Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles. On Mustafar, Vader is initially greeted by Viceroy Nute Gunray, however Vader immediately attacks the Separatist leaders and their small force of guards, ending the slaughter by killing Gunray.

          Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel. Yoda says they have no choice but to destroy the Sith. Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce. Obi-Wan looks into the security recordings and sees Vader slaughtering the Jedi and then kneeling to Palpatine. Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. In the Jedi Temple, Obi-Wan and Yoda reconfigure a signal to warn all Jedi to keep away. Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling. Palpatine informs the Senate of a Jedi plot to overthrow the Republic and announces that the Republic will be reorganized into the Galactic Empire.

          "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette. Senator Bail Organa rescues Obi-Wan and Yoda, and brings them to the Jedi Temple before heading to the Senate building. Omu-Raisu - i.e. Vader later goes to Padmé and tells her the Jedi have tried to take over the Republic. Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants). With a battalion of clone troopers, Darth Vader eradicates the Jedi in the Jedi Temple. Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs. Ki-Adi-Mundi, Aayla Secura, Barriss Offee, Luminara Unduli, Plo Koon, Stass Allie, and other numerous Jedi across the galaxy are exterminated, but Yoda and Obi-Wan barely manage to survive.

          Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone. Palpatine orders clone troopers across the galaxy to turn against their Jedi Generals. Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables. Palpatine orders Vader to go to the Jedi Temple and kill all the Jedi within, then to go to the Mustafar system and kill Viceroy Gunray and the other Separatist leaders. Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods. Palpatine takes Anakin as his Sith apprentice, and christens him with the Sith name Darth Vader. Gyūdon - seasoned beef. Shocked, in pain, and caught off guard, Windu is consumed by Palpatine's Force lightning, forcing him out the window and killing him.

          Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe. Sensing that Palpatine was trying to corrupt Anakin, Mace tells Anakin not to believe him, but Anakin believes that the only way to save his wife is to keep the Chancellor alive, so he attacks Windu by cutting off his weapon hand. Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon). Just as Windu is about to kill the Chancellor, Palpatine tries to convince Anakin that the Jedi were really trying to take over. Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu). As Palpatine and Windu engage in a lightsaber duel, Anakin arrives. Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat. Windu attempts to arrest the Chancellor, but Palpatine lunges with a fierce lightsaber attack which kills Agen Kolar, Kit Fisto, and Saesee Tiin (who were assigned to accompany him).

          Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer. Anakin tells Jedi Master Mace Windu about Palpatine's true identity. Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings. Upon realizing this, Anakin threatens to kill Palpatine, but instead decides to expose him to the Jedi Council. Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba). Meanwhile, Anakin discovers that Palpatine is the Sith Lord, Darth Sidious. Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress. Obi-Wan retrieves the droid's blaster and shoots the General several times in the chest, killing him, then tosses the blaster on the ground, muttering that it was, "so uncivilized.".

          Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion). Obi-Wan manages to break open Grievous's loose chestplate, exposing the living organs in his chest. Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi. General Grievous attempts to shoot Obi-Wan with a blaster he had in a hidden holster, but Obi-Wan knocks it away from him. Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake. After a long chase through the Utapauian city, Obi-Wan catches Grievous at his private hangar, where they yet again fight. Fu (wheat gluten). At this moment, the Clone Army arrives, forcing Grievous to retreat on his Wheel Bike.

          Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour. Undaunted by the General's four-saber technique, Obi-wan quickly finds an opening in Grievous's defences and slices off much of two of his four hands. yuzu. After witnessing an argument between Grievous and Nute Gunray, he emerges from the shadows on top of a walkway and quickly disposes of Grievous's personal bodyguards before engaging Grievous himself. sudachi,. Obi-Wan is sent to Utapau to find General Grievous. natsumikan (amanatsu),. This intrigues Anakin, due to his nightmares regarding Padmé.

          mikan,. Palpatine says the ability to save people from death is something that can be learned, but not from a Jedi. kumquat,. Palpatine subtly manipulates Anakin in their discussions, making him distrust the Jedi. kabosu,. Later at an opera house, Anakin arrives and Palpatine tells him the story of an old Sith legend; the story of Darth Plagueis the wise. iyokan,. As the Chancellor's bodyguard, Anakin builds a close friendship with Palpatine.

          daidai,. Later, Obi-Wan privately tells Anakin that the Council wants him to spy on the Chancellor because they believe that he is corrupt. Citrus fruits:

            . This enfuriates Anakin, who believes it to be an insult. loquat. The Council agrees with the Chancellor's appointment, however Anakin is not made a Jedi Master. nashi pear,. Chancellor Palpatine makes Anakin his representative on the Jedi Council.

            chestnut,. However, Anakin is troubled by visions of Padmé dying in childbirth, visions like those he had of his mother before she died. persimmon,. Despite Padmé's worries, as they have kept their love and their marriage secret, Anakin is overjoyed at this news, and the couple make plans to raise their child. Fruits:

              . Upon his return planetside, Anakin is reunited with his wife, Padmé Amidala, and she informs him of her pregnancy. Yuba. Unable to leave the cruiser, which has been damaged in an engagement with the Republic fleet, Anakin crash-lands the ship on one of Coruscant's landing tracks.

              Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),. In the process of his escape, he decides to launch all of the cruiser's escape pods, therefore trapping the Jedi and the Chancellor on a fiery descent to the planet below. Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),. Anakin and Obi-Wan try to capture Grievous, eliminating most of the bridge crew in the process; Grievous escapes, however, in an escape pod. Miso,. Anakin, Obi-Wan, and the Chancellor attempt to escape the ship, but are captured by General Grievous, leader of the droid army, and taken to the bridge. Edamame,. Palpatine reassures him that Tyranus was too dangerous to be kept alive.

              Bean products:

                . Anakin immediately expresses regret; to kill a foe who surrenders is not the way of the Jedi. Beans (soy, adzuki). Palpatine urges Anakin to kill Tyranus, and despite Anakin's reservations, he does. Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat). In the ensuing lightsaber duel, Anakin defeats Tyranus by amputating his hands. Eggs (chicken, quail). They make their way to the observatory were Chancellor Palpatine is being held captive by Darth Tyranus (Count Dooku).

                Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen). During the space battle, Obi-Wan's ship is damaged by several buzz droids and the two Jedi crash into the hangar of the The Invisible Hand, where the Chancellor is held hostage. Satsuma-age. The camera tracks down from a blinding Coruscanti sun, to reveal a Venator-class Star Destroyer, with two Jedi Starfighters flying alongside it. kamaboko,. Jedi Knights Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi lead a mission to rescue him. dried cuttlefish,. Chancellor Palpatine has been kidnapped by the Separatists second-in-command, General Grievous.

                niboshi,. The opening crawl reveals that the galaxy is in the midst of war. chikuwa,. . Processed seafood:

                  . It broke several box office records in its opening week, and went on to earn over US$ 850 million worldwide, making it the highest grossing film of 2005 in the U.S., the 2nd highest grossing film of 2005 worldwide (right behind Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire), and the 12th highest grossing worldwide film of all time. others; see Category:Sea vegetables. Released on May 19, 2005, the film was generally positively received by critics, especially in contrast to the two previous prequels.

                  hijiki,. As the final film to be released in the series, it bridges the gap between the original trilogy and prequel trilogy of the Star Wars epic. wakame,. When the sinister Sith, led by Darth Sidious, unveil a thousand-year-old plot to rule the galaxy, the fate of Anakin Skywalker, the Jedi order, and the entire galaxy is at stake. konbu,. Three years after the onset of the Clone Wars, the noble Jedi Knights have been leading a massive clone army into a galaxy-wide battle against the Separatists. nori,. Among fans, it is commonly referred to as ROTS.

                  seaweed:

                    . It was the sixth and final film to be released in the Star Wars saga, but it is the third part of the series by chronology of events. Tsukemono (pickled vegetables). Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is a 2005 science fiction film written and directed by George Lucas. shimeji. Until a further source fully explains this, the issue remains disputed. nameko,. Anderson's novels Jedi Search and Champions of the Force explain that a prototype Death Star was built in preparation of construction of the first Death Star in A New Hope, which would give another explanation for why the first Death Star took so long to build, in contrast with the second Death Star from Return of the Jedi.

                    enokitake,. However, Kevin J. matsutake,. He goes on to say that it would be "a bit of a stretch," but explains that due to "union disputes and supply problems," it took 19 years to build. shiitake,. He explains that it was the exact same one as seen in A New Hope. Mushrooms:

                      . ^ In the DVD commentary for Revenge of the Sith, Lucas makes an offhand comment regarding the first Death Star.

                      Konnyaku (shirataki). Halbfinger, New York Times, May 19, 2005. Sansai (wild vegetables). ^ Latest 'Star Wars' Movie Is Quickly Politicized by David M. moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts). ^ Box Office Mojo - Star Wars: Episode III. fuki (butterbur),. DVD-ROM content includes a free trial of Hyperspace.

                      negi (Welsh onion),. Production photo gallery. takenoko (bamboo shoots),. Trailers and TV spots. renkon (lotus root),. Poster and print campaign. sweet potato,. "A Hero Falls" music video.

                      daikon,. Star Wars: Empire at War PC game trailer. gobo (burdock),. Star Wars: Battlefront II trailer and Xbox game demo. eggplant,. A 15-part collection of Lucasfilm's Web documentaries. cucumber,. "It's All for Real: The Stunts of Episode III".

                      spinach,. "The Chosen One" featurette: George Lucas traces the myth of Darth Vader through episodes 1-6. nira (Chinese chives),. "Within a Minute" documentary film about the making of the Mustafar battle. Vegetables:

                        . Exclusive deleted scenes with introductions by George Lucas and Rick McCallum. Mochi rice (glutinous rice). Commentary by writer-director George Lucas, producer Rick McCallum, animation director Rob Coleman, and ILM visual effects supervisors John Knoll and Roger Guyett.

                        Short or medium grain white rice. Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 5.1 EX), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround). Rice

                          . Available subtitles: English. This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba"). Instead it contained a rap video with a dancing Yoda and clone troopers. Soba - New Year's Eve. This was the first release not to contain a secret blooper reel of footage from filming as an easter egg.

                          Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general. This has caused some backlash from fans collecting both the VHS versions, complaining that their VHS set will not be complete without Episode III. Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival. This release is notable because, due to marketing issues, it was the first Star Wars film never to be released on VHS (except in Australia and the United Kingdom). Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival. Additionally, Anakin is missing the scar on his right eye on the DVD cover. botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox. The DVD cover art is the only cover of the six films not to include a central character brandishing a lens flare-boasting lightsaber blade towards the viewer.

                          Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri. Unlike any other film directed by Lucas, Revenge of the Sith was released on DVD without any noticeable alterations from the film's original theatrical cut. Osechi - New Year. In all of the other films, the two characters were played by at least two different people. This was the first Star Wars film in which Anakin Skywalker and the suited Darth Vader were played by the same actor in the same film. As confirmed by the DVD-ROM commentary, during the scene in which Yoda departs Kashyyyk and bids farwell to Chewbacca and Tarfful, Tarfful's growls are actually Itchy's growls from The Star Wars Holiday Special.

                          In a wide shot of Darth Vader's half-done operated body and a claw with his mask moving closer to put the mask on near the end of the film, it is apparent that he doesn't have his voice amplifier piece or his neck plating on, but after the shot with the mask lowering , the neck plate is attached. However, after making the suggestion and others agree by saying "aye," he too says "aye", suggesting his line was meant to be spoken by a different character. At one point in the film, Ki-Adi-Mundi makes a motion that Obi-Wan Kenobi should lead the search on Utapau for General Grievous. Lucas's friend and fellow filmmaker Steven Spielberg was confirmed to have worked on some of the conceptual work and animatics for the film, focusing mainly on the Yoda/Palpatine fight and the Mustafar duel.

                          On the DVD cover, Anakin's scar (the result of a lightsaber duel with Asajj Ventress in Star Wars: Clone Wars) on his right eye is missing completely. In Padme's Wardrobe site, the costume used on the poster is called the Peacock Gown, and the costume used on the DVD cover is called the Green Cut Velvet Robe. In the movie, this costume appears with the hood down. A different costume was used on the DVD cover, however this costume appears in the same way as on the cover only in the deleted scenes.

                          However, the costume does appear in some of the deleted scenes. On the poster, Padmé wears an outfit that does not appear in the movie itself. .that business on Cato Neimoidia doesn't count." This was going to be a running gag throughout the film, but all subsequent uses were eventually cut. After returning Supreme Chancellor Palpatine to Coruscant, Obi-Wan tells Anakin ".

                          This is the first film in the Star Wars Saga in which a dream is literally depicted on camera. Episode III features the longest opening continuing shot in the entire Star Wars saga (over two minutes long). According to the filmmakers in the audio commentary, the speed in which Anakin and Obi-Wan engage their lightsaber duel on Mustafar is the speed in which the duel was filmed, and was not digitally accelerated. Several lava explosions, seen in Mustafar at the fight scene between Anakin and Obi-Wan Kenobi, were in fact real life explosions shot from Mount Etna's eruption which were later combined with computer generated effects to create the impressive and real-life atmosphere.

                          Copies of the film titled Charlotte are valued more than standard releases. The more common file is called something relating to Revenge of the Sith. This was done intentionally by those who created the DVD, in order to keep it a secret as to which exact DVD would be used for the main release. On early discs with the DVD release, the file containing the film and the file with the bonus features were each named a variation of "CHARLOTTE," rather than something relating to the movie itself.

                          (DVD audio commentary). Lucas stands on screen left talking with his youngest daughter, and his oldest daughter is in center screen, talking to her boyfriend. George Lucas's daughters, who make cameos at the opera house, refused to be in the scene unless their father was in the scene with them. This echoes the frequent references to World War Two in the Clone Wars TV series.

                          There are markings on Obi-Wan's starfighter counting the number of kills he scored, a reference to World War II, where pilots often placed markings on their planes to personalize them. This is the only episode that does not have R2-D2 and/or C-3PO in the closing shot. The original soundtrack is the only one in the prequel trilogy that does not have a shot of Tatooine as its backdrop. The scene where Amidala meets up with Anakin on Mustafar was parodied for the 2005 MTV Movie Awards.

                          Incidentally, an action figure of Palpatine was also produced holding a blue lightsaber, but later corrected to red (the hilt remains incorrect). It never occurred to the effects crew that they hadn't inserted the correct hilt during post-production. Further revelations in The Making of Revenge of the Sith show that the scene originally had Anakin present, with Palpatine using the Force to borrow Anakin's lightsaber to duel. The reason for this is revealed in one of the documentaries on Disc 2, where Ian McDiarmid is seen using the Anakin lightsaber prop while rehearsing the scenes.

                          Throughout the Palpatine/Mace fight, Palpatine's hilt periodically switches to Anakin's saber hilt. Palpatine's lightsaber is also the only lightsaber that touches Mace Windu's saber blade. Palpatine's lightsaber is the only Sith lightsaber that is seen coming in contact with a purple-bladed lightsaber. This is the first and only Star Wars film where Palpatine wields his lightsaber.

                          It can be heard when Obi-Wan arrives at Owen and Beru's house. Composer John Williams included a small 11-tone musical cue in the scene reminiscent of his score for Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (2001). The final scene on Tatooine, where Obi-Wan Kenobi delivers the infant Luke to his aunt and uncle, is often referred to as the "Harry Potter scene". Eventually, however, the film's casting director was able to find a very close lookalike, Wayne Pygram.

                          Unfortunately, the footage of Cushing was deemed unusable, and the idea was scrapped. George Lucas originally intended to have Peter Cushing reprise his role as Tarkin, years after his death, through the use of stock footage and digital technology. Palpatine's line, "I am the Senate," may be a reference to a quote by King Louis XIV- "I am the state.". George Lucas was not put off by this and enjoyed rubbing Natalie's buzzed hair.

                          Natalie Portman surprised many people by showing up to the film's premieres with a shaved head (for her part in V for Vendetta). The interior of the Tantive IV was done entirely on a practical set, without the use of any bluescreen. It can be heard briefly during the battle scene over Coruscant. Composer John Williams added to his opening score an homage to composer Joel McNeely's work from the score to Shadows of the Empire, a book written to take place between Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.

                          The audio effects for the coughing were taken from George Lucas, who had a cough during principal photography. John Knoll even acknowledges and points out this fact in the Revenge of the Sith DVD commentary. To reconcile the differences between the two presentations, Mace Windu "force-grips" Grievous towards the end of the show's third season (volume two) as the General was making off with Palpatine, crushing the cyborg's chest panel. Grievous has prevously appeared in Star Wars: Clone Wars before many of his personality traits and quirks had been finalized.

                          General Grievous' breathing problems were intended to emphasize his organic nature as well as the flaws of cyborg prosthetics. Coppola also owns a Tucker Torpedo. In addition to owning one of the 51 Torpedoes built, George Lucas executive produced the 1988 biopic, Tucker: The Man and His Dream, starring Jeff Bridges as Preston Tucker, and directed by Lucas' old friend, director Francis Ford Coppola. The speeder car driven by Senator Bail Organa (Jimmy Smits) is based on the revolutionary, but ill-fated, 1948 Tucker Torpedo automobile.

                          George Lucas requested this of the animators as an homage to Takashi Shimura's signature gesture in Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai. Yoda rubs his head while deep in thought. This is the only Star Wars film in which the opening crawl has an exclamation point in it. In the two shots where the wookies roar just before their battle, the varactyl's (the lizard-mount used by Obi-Wan elsewhere in the film) bark can be heard.

                          In the film, Yoda pronounces the word differently than Anakin (in a later scene where the Jedi Council is voting where Yoda is in a hologram); Anakin's pronunciation of Utapau in the film is the correct pronunciation by Thai nationals and tourists. Although parts of Episode III were filmed in Thailand, the Lucas spelling of Utapau is a romanized spelling of a Thai military base in Sattahip, Thailand within 50 miles of Bangkok. The name Utapau was originally intended for Tatooine and then Alderaan in the early drafts of A New Hope, and then for Naboo in The Phantom Menace, until it became the sinkhole planet seen in Revenge of the Sith. The limestone mountains depicting Kashyyyk were filmed in Phuket, Thailand (which was later damaged by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami).

                          In the first scene between Anakin and Padmé, Padmé has her hair styled in the infamous Princess Leia Danish-buns-over-the-ears method. One of the film's many rumored subtitles was Rise of the Empire. Coincidentally, the Return of the Jedi novelization refers to Obi-Wan Kenobi as Owen's brother. Ewan McGregor's stunt double was Nash Edgerton (the brother of Joel Edgerton, who plays Owen Lars).

                          On the call sheets, Natalie Portman was listed as "Debbie Gibson.". Instead it contained a rap video with a dancing Yoda and clonetroopers. This was the first DVD release not to contain a secret blooper reel of footage from filming. The DVD cover art is the only cover of the six films not to include a central character brandishing a lightsaber towards the viewer.

                          However, VHS copies are for sale in stores in the United Kingdom and Australia. This has caused some backlash from fans collecting both the DVD and VHS versions, complaining that their VHS set will not be complete without Episode III. It is only available on DVD. When the film was released on home video in November 2005, it became the only Star Wars film never to be released on VHS in the US.

                          Even though it didn't make it into the film, it is available on the bonus disc of the Revenge of the Sith DVD as one of the deleted scenes, and Rick McCallum has reported that it may be put back into a future release of the film. One of the scenes deleted from the film was Yoda's arrival on Dagobah. Revenge of the Sith has the world record for most special effects used in a single film—over 3500. It also required Christensen (who is six-foot-one or 1.85 metres, while David Prowse is six-foot-seven or 2 meters) to look through the mouthpiece of the helmet [3].

                          The new costume featured shoe lifts and a muscle suit [2]. The Darth Vader costume used in the film was created specifically to fit Hayden Christensen, rather than use the old one from the original trilogy. Plot elements shown in the game include Vader activating the Jedi beacon, killing the librarian Jocasta Nu, and dueling with Cin Drallig and his Padawan Serra Keto (see Cameo appearances above). Its completion then unlocks an alternate short ending where the uninjured Darth Vader kills the Emperor and usurps control of the Galaxy.

                          After the completion of the movie plotline the game unlocks a level that allows the player to go back and replay the final duel from Vader's point of view. The Revenge of the Sith video game closely follows the film, but for reasons of gameplay greatly expands a number of the action sequences. One of them screams a classic "Wilhelm scream". When the ship Anakin and Obi-Wan are on, at the start, begins firing on an enemy ship, there is some footage of explosions and people being thrown into the air.

                          There is no blue-bladed lightsaber in Return of the Jedi.). In Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, Obi-Wan was initially equipped with a blue-bladed lightsaber and used it during most of the duel, but it fell into the chasm on Naboo, and in the last seconds, he had to finish off Darth Maul with Qui-Gon's green-bladed lightsaber. This is also the only film to feature a combatant with a blue-bladed lightsaber come out victorious at the end of a duel (A combatant with a blue-bladed lightsaber usually loses a duel to a combatant with a red-bladed lightsaber. Obi-Wan).

                          It is also the only instance of a blue-bladed and green-bladed lightsaber to come into contact with each other (the aforementioned Grievous vs. Darth Vader; combatants in both instances using blue lightsabers). Obi-Wan, and more notably Obi-Wan vs. This is the only time where two lightsabers of the same color (blue) come into contact (Grievous vs.

                          The line appears to be the same recording used in The Phantom Menace, when Jar Jar excuses himself after burping. Jar Jar Binks appears in this film, but has only one line of dialog; when he nearly bumps into a larger senator who mutters "watch it," to which Binks barely audibly replies "Excuse me". An early, and later proved to be fake, plot leak said that Mace Windu would not die at the hands of Palpatine, but he would be killed by Boba Fett, who was avenging the death of his father, Jango Fett, in the previous film at the hands of Mace Windu. This is the first Star Wars film not to be nominated for an Academy Award for best Visual Effects.

                          Matthew Woodring Stover, George Lucas, ISBN 0-7126-8427-1. Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith - Novelization, 1st edition hardcover, 2005. Later, when Luke and Vader duel, Luke jumps up on a platform and instead of following him Vader throws his lightsaber, having learned from his previous error. At the end of Obi-wan and Anakin's duel, Obi-wan wins because he has the high ground.

                          He does the same thing to Luke in A New Hope after the Sand People attack him. When Anakin releases Padmé after choking her, Obi-Wan puts his hand on her head for a while. Although Motti is not killed from this choke, both Motti and Tarkin die near the end of the film, when Luke destroys the Death Star. Moff Tarkin then tells Vader to halt the Force chokehold.

                          This parallels a scene from A New Hope, where Vader uses the Force to choke Admiral Romodi Motti in the Death Star for his lack of faith in Vader. Although Padmé does not die from the choke, she later dies of the loss of will to live near the end of the film. However, Obi-Wan then tells him to halt the Force chokehold. Vader uses the Force to choke Padmé on Mustafar, as he believes she has turned against him.

                          According to his action figure, Obi-Wan's is Red Leader, which in Episode VI is used by Wedge Antilles, played by Ewan McGregor's uncle Denis Lawson. In the novelization, Anakin's callsign is Red Five, the same as his son Luke in Episode IV. Both Anakin's and Obi-Wan's callsigns reference their family connections to the original trilogy. Examples include the Jedi Starfighters having small resemblance to the TIE Fighters and Interceptor.

                          More Republic equipment resembles that of Imperial equipment. The music is also the same in all three cases (the Force Theme). The final shot of Owen and Beru holding Luke and looking into the Tatooine twin sunset mirrors a similar scene with Luke in A New Hope (as well as a similar scene of Anakin in Attack of the Clones). The last line spoken in Episode III is "Oh no!", also by C-3PO, played by the same actor, also on that ship.

                          The first line spoken in Episode IV is "Did you hear that?" by C-3PO (Anthony Daniels), on the Tantive IV. An actor screams this line in every Star Wars movie. Luke's scream of "NOOO!" upon learning that Darth Vader is his father was also similarly lampooned and poorly received during its release in 1980. Vader's scream has been lampooned and criticized as campy and inappropriate.

                          In one of the final scenes, Darth Vader's screams "NOOO!!" when he learns of Padmé's death. This also is similar to Luke's situation in "The Empire Strikes Back" when Luke, after the duel with Darth Vader, falls down the massive circular shaft in Cloud City and hangs on to the weather vane below the city until he is rescued by the Millennium Falcon piloted by Leia Organa. Yoda, in the duel with Darth Sidious, falls down the massive circular Senate chamber and escapes through the bottom of the building into a waiting speeder piloted by Bail Organa. The lightsaber was subsequently broken, and then was re-returned to Obi-Wan's hut on Tatooine.

                          Luke lost that lightsaber in a duel with Vader in Empire Strikes Back. The blue-bladed lightsaber Anakin/Vader used in Revenge of the Sith is the same lightsaber Obi-Wan gave to Luke in A New Hope. Luke is then given a cybernetic hand to replace the one he lost in the duel with Vader. Leia senses Luke's danger through the force, and comes to rescue him in the Millennium Falcon.

                          A similar situation occurs in The Empire Strikes Back, when Luke sustains an injury from Vader in a lightsaber duel (his weapon hand is cut off), and after falling down a shaft, is left dangling from a weather vane on the underside of Cloud City. He is then given cybernetic limbs to replace those he lost in the duel. Sensing his danger through the Force, Emperor Palaptine rescues him. Defeated, he lies on the side of a lava bank, crawling his way up the embankment.

                          Vader sustains severe injuries from the lightsaber duel he has with his former master on Mustafar (his biological limbs are cut off). Finally, he says to Vader, "I know there is good in you.". He later says that to Leia on Endor. In a scene on Dabogah, Luke says to the spirit of Obi-Wan, "There is still good in him", also referring to Anakin.

                          Return of the Jedi contains variations of Padmé's last words. She says it to Obi-Wan on Polis Massa, momentarily after bearing Luke and Leia. I know, I know there is still...", referring to Anakin. Padmé's last words are, "There is good in him.

                          Vader says, "From my point of view, the Jedi are evil." In Return of the Jedi, Obi-Wan tells Luke, "You will find that many of the truths we cling to depend greatly on our own point of view.". Vader's offer to Padmé to join him and rule the Empire mirrors Vader's offer to Luke in Episode V. Luke realizes what this means and races home, despite Obi-Wan's warning that it is too dangerous, and he is dumbstruck to find that Owen and Beru Lars were reduced to burnt ashes by Imperial Stormtroopers. Luke at first suspects the Sandpeople, but Obi-Wan's closer inspection shows that Imperial Stormtroopers were actually responsible.

                          This is paralleled in Episode IV when Luke, Obi-Wan and the droids come upon the ruins of the Jawas' sandcrawler and find all of them slaughtered. Obi-Wan decides to look at the security holograms despite Yoda's warning that he will find it painful, and he is dumbstruck to find that Anakin led the massacre. When Obi-Wan and Yoda return to the Jedi Temple and discover the corpses of their fellow Jedi, Yoda's closer inspection of the bodies reveals that not all of them were killed by clone troopers, that a lightsaber was used as well, implicating one of the Jedi as a traitor. When Anakin and Obi-Wan are approaching the Senate after saving Palpatine, the Millennium Falcon is one of the ships which touch down on Coruscant.

                          In Return of the Jedi, Luke Skywalker cuts off Darth Vader's weapon hand, as Palpatine looks on, but refuses to join the Dark Side. Anakin cuts off Mace Windu's weapon hand, as Palpatine looks on, and joins the Dark Side. The scene where Mace has his blade at Palpatine's throat is similar to that when Vader has his blade at Luke's throat in The Empire Strikes Back, and when Luke had his blade at Vader's throat in Return of the Jedi. Anakin is conflicted to choose between Palpatine and a fellow Jedi, as in Return of the Jedi.

                          Palpatine closes his eyes and tells Anakin, "I can feel your anger." He gives the same line, directed at Luke, in Return of the Jedi. You know it to be true.". In convincing him that the Jedi are trying to oust him as Chancellor, Palpatine urges Anakin to "search your feelings...you know, don't you?" This mirrors Episode V, in which Vader convinces Luke that he is his father, urging the boy to "search your feelings. In the battle on the Wookiee planet Kashyyyk, a distinctive Tarzan yell can be heard, just as in Episode VI, when Chewbacca and two Ewoks swing toward an Imperial Scout Walker on Endor.

                          This mirrors the scenes in Return of the Jedi where Chewbacca rips out Imperial forces from their AT-STs. Wookiees from Kashyyyk rip out droids from vehicles during the Separatists' invasion. This was adapted for Episode VI as the Battle of Endor between Ewoks and Imperial Stormtroopers. In the original Star Wars script treatment, the climactic battle was between Wookiees and Imperial forces as in Revenge of the Sith.

                          This echoes the ultimate fate of the Tantive IV itself in the opening scenes of A New Hope. When Obi-Wan makes his rendezvous with the Tantive IV, the ship he is flying is swallowed up by the Tantive IV's underbelly. When Obi-Wan kills Grievous with a blaster and says "So uncivilized", echoing the line in Episode IV when he talks about the lightsaber being "an elegant weapon, for a more civilized age". This is the first line Obi-Wan says in Episode IV, to R2-D2.

                          When Obi-Wan jumps in the middle of the droid army in Utapau, he says "Hello there" to Grievous. In Return of the Jedi, Palpatine urges Luke to kill Vader, but Luke refuses, and avoids turning to the dark side. Palpatine urges Anakin to kill Count Dooku, and Anakin does and becomes Palpatine's apprentice. Palpatine watches as his current apprentice (Count Dooku) and his intended new apprentice (Anakin) duel to the death, while behind them can be seen a massive space fleet battle, as in Return of the Jedi.

                          The scene where the elevator falls and Anakin has to hold on to the ledge parallels the scene where Luke has to hold on when he falls out of a window in Episode V. Obi-Wan says the traditional "I have a bad feeling about this!" just before he and Anakin enter the hangar of General Grievous' battlecruiser. Han Solo says the identical line in A New Hope. In the beginning of the movie while flying a starfighter on the way to rescue Palpatine, Anakin says, "This is where the fun begins".

                          Many vehicles and technology in the film appear to be predecessors of their counterparts in the original trilogy. The title is a reprise of an early working title of Return of the Jedi, "Revenge of the Jedi", which was altered by Lucas with the rationale that Jedi do not take revenge. Previously held by The Matrix Reloaded with $37.5 million. Thursday gross.

                          Previously held by Shrek 2 with $44.8 million. Single day gross. Previously held by Spider-Man 2 with $40.4 million. Opening day gross.

                          Previously held by The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, which earned $8 million from 2,100 midnight screenings. Midnight screenings. Favorite Movie - Drama. Favorite Movie.

                          Worst Supporting Actor (Hayden Christensen). Achievement in Makeup.

10-01-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List