Japanese cuisine

One course of a multi course Kaiseki meal, showing a careful arrangement of the foods

There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II.

Food individual to the country

Barrels of sake, a traditional Japanese alcoholic drink

Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu.

Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea.

This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets.

Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine.

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock.

Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. Salamander is eaten as well in places.

Traditional Japanese table settings

The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century.

Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes.

Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き).

Dishes for special occasions

In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. Major such combinations include:

  • Osechi - New Year.
  • Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri.
  • botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.
  • Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival.
  • Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival.
  • Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general.
  • Soba - New Year's Eve. This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba").

In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi).

Japanese ingredients

  • Rice
    • Short or medium grain white rice
    • Mochi rice (glutinous rice)
  • Vegetables:
    • nira (Chinese chives),
    • spinach,
    • cucumber,
    • eggplant,
    • gobo (burdock),
    • daikon,
    • sweet potato,
    • renkon (lotus root),
    • takenoko (bamboo shoots),
    • negi (Welsh onion),
    • fuki (butterbur),
    • moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts)
    • Sansai (wild vegetables)
    • Konnyaku (shirataki)
  • Mushrooms:
    • shiitake,
    • matsutake,
    • enokitake,
    • nameko,
    • shimeji.
  • Tsukemono (pickled vegetables)
  • seaweed:
    • nori,
    • konbu,
    • wakame,
    • hijiki,
    • others; see Category:Sea vegetables
  • Processed seafood:
    • chikuwa,
    • niboshi,
    • dried cuttlefish,
    • kamaboko,
    • Satsuma-age.
  • Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen)
  • Eggs (chicken, quail)
  • Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat)
  • Beans (soy, adzuki)
  • Bean products:
    • Edamame,
    • Miso,
    • Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),
    • Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),
    • Yuba
  • Fruits:
    • persimmon,
    • chestnut,
    • nashi pear,
    • loquat
  • Citrus fruits:
    • daidai,
    • iyokan,
    • kabosu,
    • kumquat,
    • mikan,
    • natsumikan (amanatsu),
    • sudachi,
    • yuzu.
  • Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour
  • Fu (wheat gluten)

See also Category:Japanese ingredients.

Japanese flavorings

It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi.

  • Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake.
  • Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi.
  • Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion)
  • Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress.
  • Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba).

Famous Japanese foods and dishes

Deep-Fried dishes (Agemono)

  • Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings.
  • Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer.
  • Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat.
  • Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu).

Donburi

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings

  • Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon)
  • Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe
  • Gyūdon - seasoned beef
  • Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods

Grilled and pan-fried dishes (Yakimono)

  • Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables
  • Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone
  • Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs
  • Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants)
  • Omu-Raisu - i.e. "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette
  • Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling
  • Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside
  • Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce
  • Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel
  • Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles
  • Yakitori - chicken kebabs

Nabemono (one pot cooking)

  • Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake
  • Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating
  • Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base
  • Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea
  • Oden
  • Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew.

Noodles (men-rui)

Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets.

  • Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth
  • Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan
  • Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth
  • Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
  • Somen
  • Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork

Other

  • Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth
  • Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box
  • Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish
  • Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year
  • Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai
  • Shiokara - salty fermented viscera
  • Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard

Rice (gohanmono)

  • Mochi - soft rice cake
  • Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored
  • Onigiri - Japanese rice balls
  • Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans
  • Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
  • Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan
  • Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice"
  • Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo

Sashimi

Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken.

  • Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura
  • Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty
  • Rebasashi - usually liver of beef
  • Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan

Soups (suimono and shirumono)

  • Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
  • Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
  • Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc.
  • Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood

Sushi

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood.

  • Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
  • Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
  • Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside.
  • Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish.

Sweets

  • Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets
    • Amanatto
    • Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert
    • Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center
    • Dango - rice dumpling
    • Ginbou
    • Hanabiramochi
    • Higashi
    • Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit
    • Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
    • Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping.
    • Kompeito - crystal sugar candy
    • Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
    • Matsunoyuki
    • Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon
    • Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass
    • Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake
    • Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour
    • Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste
  • Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
    • Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
    • Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth
    • Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
    • Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors
  • Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy
    • Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
    • Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe
  • Other Snack
    • Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans
    • Hello Panda
    • Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream
    • Pocky

Chinmi

  • Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni
  • Karasumi
  • Konowata

Japanese influence on other cuisines

United States

Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii.

Imported and adapted foods

A Japanese children's book. The food and utensils depicted, however, are Western.

Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce.

Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:

  • Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan')
  • Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce)
  • Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor
  • Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria.

In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus.

Washoku and yōshoku

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Western cuisine. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. Chinese recipe.

A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. Western cuisine restaurants. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin.

Tempura

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. As such, it is considered washoku. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen.

Fusion foods

In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants.


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Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants. There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansion (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game.
A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan.

Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. With the “Expedition” expansion, they introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) are compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy video games, Nintendo took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen. Initially, it was published by Wizards of the Coast, the company most famous for Magic: The Gathering.

Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game based on Pokémon, first introduced to North America in 1999, and in Japan at an earlier date. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. Whilst Chronicles can be seen on YTV in Canada and in the United Kingdom on Toonami UK (as of May 2005), Pokémon Sunday can only be seen on TV Tokyo. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. Housoukyoku originally aired on TV Tokyo but has since ended its run. As such, it is considered washoku. In other countries the English language adaptations air on the following channels:.

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. The English adaptation can be seen on Kids WB in the United States. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin. Two series from Advanced Generation have been aired, with the third series currently airing in the United States and elsewhere. Western cuisine restaurants. In the English language release, the original series was split into four separate series spanning five seasons while Advanced Generation was split into separate series. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. There is also a television program in Japan titled Pokémon Sunday, a live action Pokémon-themed variety show hosted by the Pokémon Research Team.

Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. The English adaptation of this series, Pokémon Chronicles, combines the episodes from this series as well as various other made-for-TV specials (originally unrelated to Housoukyoku) that have not previously been released in English. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. A spin-off series, entitled Shu-kan Pokémon Ho-so-kyoku (also referred to as Pokémon Hoso) is a spinoff of the first, and tells the adventures within the continuity of Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation, starring many of the recurring characters in Pocket Monsters. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. This part of the series is loosely based upon Pokémon FireRed, LeafGreen, and Emerald. A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Misty meets with them through this part of the journey as they go to the Kanto contests and the Battle Frontier.

Chinese recipe. Afterward, Ash goes back to his home region of Kanto and visits new areas around there with the current team. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. This series is based on the third generation games. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. Western cuisine. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows massive amounts of handy information.

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a beginner Pokémon trainer in this series named May. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus. Ash catches a Snorunt, a Treecko, and a Tailow, all of which evolve: Snorunt into Glalie, Treecko into Grovyle and Tailow into Swellow. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. The saga continues into Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation (in Japan) where Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. These names, in turn, were taken from the two people who produced the franchise - Pokémon creator Satoshi Tajiri and gaming legend Shigeru Miyamoto, who helped Tajiri to launch the series.

The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria. The names of Ash and Gary were derived from the characters' Japanese names, Satoshi and Shigeru. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. Gary (whose grandfather was none other than Professor Oak, the man in charge of giving new trainers their first Pokémon) was well known and acompanied by a squad of cheerleaders. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. In the original series Ash's main rival was another trainer from Pallet Town, Gary Oak. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. Accompanying Ash on his journeys were Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader; Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leaders sisters from Cerulean City; and Tracey Sketchit, an artist and “Pokémon watcher”.

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. This series is based on the first and second generation games. Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:. The first, and the most familiar, is Pocket Monsters or simply Pokémon (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), which details the adventures of Ash Ketchum as he travels through Kanto, the Orange Islands, and Johto on a quest to become the greatest Pokémon Master of all time. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce. There are several Pokémon anime series based on the video games. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. The review of this demo is currently available at GameSpot as well as many other sites.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. However, Nintendo has produced a demo for the Nintendo Revolution (exclusive only to major game related companies such as GameSpot and IGN) known as the “Big Pokémon Hunter” game where the goal was to zoom with the controller and find different Pokémon. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese. A Pokémon game for the new Nintendo Revolution has currently not been announced by Nintendo. Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. Whilst the appearence of any Pokémon characters has not been explicitly confirmed, they are highly likely to be featured in the game (considering the abundance of Pokémon references in the first two games in the series). Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). Revolution/DX.

Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii. will appear on their forthcoming codenamed Nintendo Revolution console, tentatively titled Super Smash Bros. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. Nintendo has also stated that a version of Super Smash Bros. Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. Melee, the player can collect many different trophies of a variety of characters from numerous Nintendo games, including several Pokémon characters. United States. In Super Smash Bros.

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood. A randomly-chosen Pokémon is released from the Pokéball, using one of its attacks to affect other players. Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken. In both games, many different Pokémon can be used in a match by throwing the Pokéball item. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets. They kept their positions, Pikachu was still an initial character while Jigglypuff was still an unlockable character, but two new Pokémon also appeared (joining Jigglypuff as unlockable characters: Mewtwo and Pichu.). Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. Melee.

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings. The pair returned in the 2001 GameCube sequel, Super Smash Bros. It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi. Pikachu appeared as an initially available character while Jigglypuff was an unlockable one. See also Category:Japanese ingredients. Two of the most popular Pokémon, Pikachu and Jigglypuff, were picked to appear as two of the 12 characters in Nintendo's beat-'em-up game Super Smash Bros., which was released in 1999 for the Nintendo 64. In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi). They include:.

Major such combinations include:. A number of Pokémon games are currently in development. In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. It came out on October 3rd, 2005. Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き). The most recent game to be released was Pokémon XD for the GameCube. Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes. A handful of these spinoffs are remade in subsequent “generations”; for example, Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire is very similar to Pokémon Pinball but with newer Pokémon, and Pokémon Stadium 2 is largely identical to Pokémon Stadium but for the compatibility with Pokémon Gold and Silver.

Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). The series has also diversified into various spin-offs, such as pinball games, virtual pets, simulated photography, and racing. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. A third version of Ruby and Sapphire, called Pokémon Emerald, was released on May 1, 2005. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. The most recent full fledged game has been FireRed and LeafGreen which are remakes of Red and Blue. Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. The Game Boy Advance first saw the release of Ruby and Sapphire.

Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century. Gold and Silver were followed by the exclusively Game Boy Color version, Crystal. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Pokémon Red and Blue were followed by Pokémon Yellow (in Japan, Red and Green were followed by Blue which was subsequently followed by Yellow). The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Each generation of Pokémon games so far has followed a pattern of two complementing versions followed later by at least one other version with some extras. Salamander is eaten as well in places. This was done by collecting eight Gym Badges by beating the eight Gym Leaders and then defeating the Elite Four, plus the current League Champion.

In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. Another, perhaps easier, goal was to finish the game's storyline by becoming the Pokémon League Champion. Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. While battling monsters is nothing new to RPGs, many players found themselves nearly addicted to finding, fighting, and capturing every Pokémon in the game. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock. The ultimate goal of these games was to catch at least one member of all the different species of Pokémon (151, though the 151st could only be caught in-game in the Japanese version), and to do so, players had to trade for Pokémon not available in the version they had. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. These games were nearly identical, save for the fact that each version had a select group of Pokémon that the other version did not.

Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. The first games in the series were Pokémon Red and Blue' (Red and Green in Japan, followed by a Blue, and a special edition Yellow version). Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. [1]. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. This makes it the second biggest-selling games franchise ever (after Nintendo's Mario series). There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Accumulative sold units (including home console versions) reach 143 million copies.

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. These games have sold over 100 million copies to date. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine. These role-playing games (and their sequels, remakes and English language translations) are still considered the “main” Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term “Pokémon games.”. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. Popular Japanese magazine Coro Coro has stated that their mid-February issue will reveal a new Pokémon, most likely one that will be related to the new movie, Pokémon Ranger and the Prince of the Sea, as there has been debate over whether the “Prince of the Sea” is actually the only Pokémon (other than Pikachu) so far guaranteed to appear in the film, Kyogre.

There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets. Mime), and Munchlax (pre-evolution of Snorlax). Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. The known fourth generation Pokémon are: Manyula (evolution of Sneasel), Bonsly (pre-evolution of Sudowoodo), Lucario, Manene (pre-evolution of Mr. This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. In addition, the anime has also featured the capture of three out of the five currently known fourth generation Pokémon. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea. A handful of new Pokémon from this generation have made cameo appearances in the seventh and eighth Pokémon movies (Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys and Mew and the Wave Guiding Hero: Lucario, respectively), as well as Pokémon XD and Pokémon Mysterious Dungeon Blue & Red.

The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Slated to be introduced in Pokémon Ranger: the Road to Diamond and Pearl for the Nintendo DS. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. The first Pokémon RPGs for home consoles, these titles introduced the desert country of Orre, as well as corrupted shadow Pokémon, and “Snag”ging, the ability to steal/rescue them from their trainers and eventually “purify” them. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. All five GBA games are compatible the storage program Pokémon Box: Ruby & Sapphire for Nintendo GameCube, and also with Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness. This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. This generation was rounded out on handhelds by Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen for the GBA, enhanced remakes of the first two Pokémon games, including a playable female character (based on concept art for a playable female the original designers considered but were unable to implement), new items and regions, move tutors, and all the features of the 2nd and 3rd generations, excluding the day/night system and (except in Japan) e-reader compatibility.

The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). The Emerald version also shipped with the GBA wireless adapter for wireless battles. Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. These 3 versions all appeared on the Game Boy Advance. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu. Emerald version also saw a return of the Pokémon battle dance when encountering an enemy Pokémon. Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. The third game in this series was Pokémon Emerald, which updated the PokéNAV's Trainers Eyes feature for a return to the mobile phone system of the previous generation (but modified, allowing players to contact Pokémon Gym Leaders for rematches, but no longer allowing them to remove NPC trainers).

. These versions also introduced the ability to grow berries in certain places, each which had set lengths of time for their flowering, and the ability to make “Secret Bases” in trees or caves in which dolls, tables, chairs, plants, and other objects could be placed. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II. However, this generation saw the loss of the Night and Day system, although the time mechanic did exist to the extent that a clock appeared and that certain Pokémon would only evolve into certain Pokémon at specific times of the day or night. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Starting over by hearkening back to Red and Blue, Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire added another 135 Pokémon from the Hoenn region, as well as Pokémon natures (30 distinct Pokémon personality types), Pokémon Abilities (always-on special innate abilities), Pokéblocks and Pokémon Contests , and two-on-two Pokémon battles. There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. These games were compatible with Pokémon Stadium 2 (with the exception of Crystal).

Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth. However, the other two still had to be found in the normal way. Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor. Crystal version also featured a slight alteration of the encounter with the 3 Legendary Pokémon, in which the player would eventually encounter Suicune and be able to catch it. Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce). It was also the first to feature Pokémon who would do a battle dance when encountered, and signposts indicating the entering of a route, town and occasionally building or cave. Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan'). This generation of the games was completed by Pokémon Crystal, which was most notably the only GBC-exclusive Pokémon RPG and the first which allowed the player to choose the protagonist's sex.

Konowata. The game also featured the newly created Pokégear which consisted of. Karasumi. The games also introduced two new types of Pokémon, the Steel and Dark types. Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni. Beginning with Pokémon Gold and Silver, this generation introduced an additional one hundred Pokémon, the “Mystery Gift” function with the GBC's IR port, customization of the protagonist's bedroom, the ability to pick Berries with healing properties, and Apricorns which could then be given to a character who would fashion them into custom Poké Balls, as well as the concepts of equipping Pokémon with items, Pokémon genders, breeding Pokémon, baby Pokémon and wild (random placement) one-per-game Pokémon such as Suicune, Entei and Raikou (3 new Legendary Pokémon), which would appear randomly around the newly created land of Johto. Pocky. Remakes of the first two games, called Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen, were released in the 3rd “Advance” generation.

Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream. These games were compatible with the N64 game Pokémon Stadium. Hello Panda. This generation also introduced the idea of a rival trainer whom the player faced a number of times, as well as a team of evil Pokémon trainers; however, Pokémon Red and Blue focus on the entire mostly-faceless organization of Team Rocket, while besides the normal Team Rocket trainers, Jessie, James, and Meowth (also recurring characters from the anime) also appear only in Pokémon Yellow. Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans. These versions of the games revolved around the country of Kanto. Other Snack

    . This generation was completed by the game Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition, loosely based upon the anime, in which the player started with a Pikachu who refused to go into its Poké Ball.

    Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe. In Japan, the first generation included Pokémon Red, Green, and later Blue, while other regions started with Red and Blue, but never got a Green. Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake. The 1st generation introduced the original 151 Pokémon, as well as the basic concepts of trading and battling Pokémon. Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy

      . Started with Pokémon Red and Blue. Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors. Two-on-two battles appeared in the anime long before appearing in the games, and Pokémon Abilities are similar to Pokémon Powers, introduced long before in the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

      Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce. Some of the general concepts were introduced elsewhere, before being introduced in the games. Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; a handful of Pokémon from a subsequent generation appear in the anime, manga, or trading card game before the main Game Boy games which demarcate the generation are released, but the anime, manga, and even (of late) the card game divides itself into sagas or generations by the same scheme as the games. Also called Karumeyaki. Each generation introduces a slew of new Pokémon and a handful of new general concepts, usually without replacing any old Pokémon or concepts. Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. Each of these generations has been first introduced in a pair of Pokémon video games for the Game Boy or its successors (including the Nintendo DS), beginning with Pokémon Red and Blue.

      Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets

        . There have been four generations, defined by the Pokémon which appear therein. Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste. All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by the Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour. Some still use the catchphrase. Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake. The game's catchphrase in the English versions of the franchise used to be “Gotta catch 'em all!”, although it is now no longer officially used.

        Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass. This was a very touchy subject to Tajiri, as he didn't want to further fill the gaming world with pointlessly violent games. Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon. The Pokémon creatures never bleed or die, only faint. Matsunoyuki. The Pokémon games allowed players to catch, collect, and train hundreds of cute and monstrous pets, known as Pokémon (short for Pocket Monsters), with various abilities, and battle them against each other to build their strength and evolve them into more powerful Pokémon. Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center. First introduced in Japan as a pair of Game Boy games—Pocket Monster Red and Green—in 1996, the franchise arrived in the west in 1998 as Pokémon Red and Blue.

        Kompeito - crystal sugar candy. The concept of Pokémon evolved from insect collecting, a simple pastime many Japanese children (including Pokémon's creator, Satoshi Tajiri, as a child) had enjoyed in the past. Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping. . Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same. As of 2006, Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., will oversee all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia. Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit. These figures have grown from the 151 monsters - including #151 Mew - from the original Pokémon Red/Blue games.

        Higashi. The franchise has 386 unique monsters that lie at the heart of the Pokémon series (391 including currently known Pokémon from future games). Hanabiramochi. Pokémon is also the collective name for the fictional creatures within the Pokémon universe. Ginbou. The name Pokémon is a portmanteau of its Japanese name, “Pocket Monsters” (ポケットモンスター Poketto Monsutā). Dango - rice dumpling. It has been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, and much more.

        Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center. Pokémon (ポケモン Pokemon, pronounced /'poʊ.kɛ.mɑn/, although frequently, and even intentionally mispronounced /poʊ.ki.'mæn/), is a video game franchise, created by Satoshi Tajiri and published by Nintendo for several of their systems, most importantly the Game Boy. Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert.
        . Amanatto.
        . Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets

          . It was divided into four tanko-bon, each with four separate titles in North A.

          Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish. Pokémon (The Electric Tale of Pikachu a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a sho-nen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Channel Ten's Cheez TV and Cartoon Network/Toonami in Australia. Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces. Kids Central in Singapore. Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice. TF1 and Jetix in France.

          Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood. RTL 2 in Germany. Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc. RTÉ Two in Ireland. Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots. Toonami UK in the United Kingdom. Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients. YTV in Canada.

          Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan. Pokémon Trozei - Nintendo DS, 2006. Rebasashi - usually liver of beef. Pokémon Mysterious Dungeon Red Rescue Force and Blue Rescue Force, for GBA and DS respectively, 2005. Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. Pokémon Diamond and Pearl - Nintendo DS, 2006. Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura. This feature is also related to the appearance and evolution of Pokémon on specific days and times, and is part of a Day and Night system in which the sun shone from 6am to 6pm, but from 6pm to 6am the land became dark.

          Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo. A watch function including time and day of the week and the ability to change between Summer Time or Mean Time. Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice". There is also a station stating where certain Pokémon could be found. Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan. A radio, where the radio station chosen would influence the rate at which the player encountered wild Pokémon. Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot. A mobile phone to communicate with in-game trainers for conversation or the potential of a rematch.

          Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans. Onigiri - Japanese rice balls. Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored. Mochi - soft rice cake.

          Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard. Shiokara - salty fermented viscera. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai. Often eaten for breakfast.

          Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year. Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish. Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box.

          Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth. Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork. Somen. Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students.

          Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth. Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth. Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew.

          Oden. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea. Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base.

          Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating. Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake. Yakitori - chicken kebabs. Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles.

          Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel. Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce. Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling.

          "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette. Omu-Raisu - i.e. Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants). Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs.

          Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone. Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables. Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods. Gyūdon - seasoned beef.

          Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe. Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon). Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu). Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat.

          Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer. Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings. Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba). Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress.

          Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion). Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi. Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake. Fu (wheat gluten).

          Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour. yuzu. sudachi,. natsumikan (amanatsu),.

          mikan,. kumquat,. kabosu,. iyokan,.

          daidai,. Citrus fruits:

            . loquat. nashi pear,.

            chestnut,. persimmon,. Fruits:

              . Yuba.

              Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),. Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),. Miso,. Edamame,.

              Bean products:

                . Beans (soy, adzuki). Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat). Eggs (chicken, quail).

                Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen). Satsuma-age. kamaboko,. dried cuttlefish,.

                niboshi,. chikuwa,. Processed seafood:

                  . others; see Category:Sea vegetables.

                  hijiki,. wakame,. konbu,. nori,.

                  seaweed:

                    . Tsukemono (pickled vegetables). shimeji. nameko,.

                    enokitake,. matsutake,. shiitake,. Mushrooms:

                      .

                      Konnyaku (shirataki). Sansai (wild vegetables). moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts). fuki (butterbur),.

                      negi (Welsh onion),. takenoko (bamboo shoots),. renkon (lotus root),. sweet potato,.

                      daikon,. gobo (burdock),. eggplant,. cucumber,.

                      spinach,. nira (Chinese chives),. Vegetables:

                        . Mochi rice (glutinous rice).

                        Short or medium grain white rice. Rice

                          . This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba"). Soba - New Year's Eve.

                          Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general. Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival. Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival. botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.

                          Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri. Osechi - New Year.

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