Japanese cuisine

One course of a multi course Kaiseki meal, showing a careful arrangement of the foods

There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II.

Food individual to the country

Barrels of sake, a traditional Japanese alcoholic drink

Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu.

Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea.

This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets.

Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine.

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock.

Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. Salamander is eaten as well in places.

Traditional Japanese table settings

The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century.

Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes.

Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き).

Dishes for special occasions

In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. Major such combinations include:

  • Osechi - New Year.
  • Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri.
  • botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.
  • Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival.
  • Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival.
  • Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general.
  • Soba - New Year's Eve. This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba").

In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi).

Japanese ingredients

  • Rice
    • Short or medium grain white rice
    • Mochi rice (glutinous rice)
  • Vegetables:
    • nira (Chinese chives),
    • spinach,
    • cucumber,
    • eggplant,
    • gobo (burdock),
    • daikon,
    • sweet potato,
    • renkon (lotus root),
    • takenoko (bamboo shoots),
    • negi (Welsh onion),
    • fuki (butterbur),
    • moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts)
    • Sansai (wild vegetables)
    • Konnyaku (shirataki)
  • Mushrooms:
    • shiitake,
    • matsutake,
    • enokitake,
    • nameko,
    • shimeji.
  • Tsukemono (pickled vegetables)
  • seaweed:
    • nori,
    • konbu,
    • wakame,
    • hijiki,
    • others; see Category:Sea vegetables
  • Processed seafood:
    • chikuwa,
    • niboshi,
    • dried cuttlefish,
    • kamaboko,
    • Satsuma-age.
  • Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen)
  • Eggs (chicken, quail)
  • Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat)
  • Beans (soy, adzuki)
  • Bean products:
    • Edamame,
    • Miso,
    • Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),
    • Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),
    • Yuba
  • Fruits:
    • persimmon,
    • chestnut,
    • nashi pear,
    • loquat
  • Citrus fruits:
    • daidai,
    • iyokan,
    • kabosu,
    • kumquat,
    • mikan,
    • natsumikan (amanatsu),
    • sudachi,
    • yuzu.
  • Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour
  • Fu (wheat gluten)

See also Category:Japanese ingredients.

Japanese flavorings

It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi.

  • Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake.
  • Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi.
  • Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion)
  • Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress.
  • Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba).

Famous Japanese foods and dishes

Deep-Fried dishes (Agemono)

  • Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings.
  • Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer.
  • Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat.
  • Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu).

Donburi

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings

  • Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon)
  • Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe
  • Gyūdon - seasoned beef
  • Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods

Grilled and pan-fried dishes (Yakimono)

  • Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables
  • Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone
  • Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs
  • Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants)
  • Omu-Raisu - i.e. "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette
  • Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling
  • Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside
  • Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce
  • Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel
  • Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles
  • Yakitori - chicken kebabs

Nabemono (one pot cooking)

  • Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake
  • Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating
  • Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base
  • Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea
  • Oden
  • Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew.

Noodles (men-rui)

Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets.

  • Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth
  • Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan
  • Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth
  • Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
  • Somen
  • Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork

Other

  • Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth
  • Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box
  • Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish
  • Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year
  • Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai
  • Shiokara - salty fermented viscera
  • Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard

Rice (gohanmono)

  • Mochi - soft rice cake
  • Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored
  • Onigiri - Japanese rice balls
  • Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans
  • Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
  • Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan
  • Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice"
  • Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo

Sashimi

Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken.

  • Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura
  • Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty
  • Rebasashi - usually liver of beef
  • Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan

Soups (suimono and shirumono)

  • Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
  • Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
  • Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc.
  • Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood

Sushi

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood.

  • Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
  • Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
  • Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside.
  • Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish.

Sweets

  • Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets
    • Amanatto
    • Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert
    • Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center
    • Dango - rice dumpling
    • Ginbou
    • Hanabiramochi
    • Higashi
    • Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit
    • Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
    • Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping.
    • Kompeito - crystal sugar candy
    • Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
    • Matsunoyuki
    • Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon
    • Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass
    • Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake
    • Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour
    • Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste
  • Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
    • Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
    • Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth
    • Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
    • Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors
  • Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy
    • Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
    • Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe
  • Other Snack
    • Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans
    • Hello Panda
    • Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream
    • Pocky

Chinmi

  • Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni
  • Karasumi
  • Konowata

Japanese influence on other cuisines

United States

Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii.

Imported and adapted foods

A Japanese children's book. The food and utensils depicted, however, are Western.

Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce.

Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:

  • Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan')
  • Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce)
  • Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor
  • Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria.

In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus.

Washoku and yōshoku

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Western cuisine. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. Chinese recipe.

A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. Western cuisine restaurants. However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin.

Tempura

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. As such, it is considered washoku. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen.

Fusion foods

In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants.


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Anmitsu (あんみつ), a dish of cream, bean jam, ice cream, and fruits is often served as a dessert in restaurants. Upcoming Films:. Other recipes are so exotic by any standard that they remain a local cuisine. 2006. Curry is often eaten with pickled vegetables called Fukujinzuke or Rakkyo. 2005. It is wrapped in dough and deep fried, making "Kare Pan", curry bread. 2004.

Curry made with fish based dashi is poured over udon, making "Kare Udon". 2003. For example, "curry" from India, imported via the United Kingdom, has fused with varieties of foods to make new recipes. 2002. In a constant quest to adopt and expand Japanese cuisine, Japanese have made hundreds of recipes that are distinctly different from the original recipes but still retain the "air" (and basic taste) of their origins. 2001. Another food, like tempura, that is now considered washoku is sōmen. 2000.

Shrimp, eggplant, squash, and carrots are typical ingredients today. 1999. Since then, the Japanese have extended its ingredients to include almost every sort of seafood and vegetable. 1998. Tempura came to Japan from Portuguese sailors in the 16th century as a technique for cooking fish. 1997. As such, it is considered washoku. 1995.

One of the oldest imported dishes is tempura, although it has been so thoroughly adopted that its foreign roots are unknown to most people, including many Japanese. On a Hollywood television gossip show in 2004, an interviewer asked her, "How do you feel about your butt?" She answered "I can't believe you're asking me a question like that.". However, yōshoku basically refers to Japanese-style foreign cuisine of a vague origin. In a skit at the MTV Video Music Awards, Triumph, the Comic Insult Dog begged Lopez to let him sniff her rear end, claiming that it was the equivalent of scaling Mount Everest for a dog. Western cuisine restaurants. magazine Celebrity Bodies poll in 2001; and also First Place in FHM magazine's 2000 and 2001 polls of Sexiest Women, with all of the polls citing her shapely rear as a reason. Restaurants that serve these foods are called yōshokuya (洋食屋), lit. She won the title of Best Female Body in the U.K.

Another example is "Hamburg steak", which is a ground beef patty, usually mixed with breadcrumbs and fried chopped onions, served with a side of white rice and vegetables. The size of her backside was actually one of the components in helping her win the title role in the 1997 film Selena about real-life Texan singer Selena Quintanilla-Pérez, who also was noted for having a shapely posterior. Perhaps the best example is curry rice, which was imported in the 19th century by way of the United Kingdom, and vaguely resembles the original Indian dish. Lopez's buttocks, which are commonly described as attractively large and shapely, have frequently been the subject of comment and parody. Yet, these are still categorized as yōshoku as they were imported. Arianna starred in Lopez's music video for "Get Right". A number of foreign dishes have been adapted to a degree that they are now considered Japanese, and are an integral part of any Japanese family menu. Lopez has become a stepmother to Anthony's two sons, Cristian and Ryan, with Torres and also to his daughter, Arianna, from a previous relationship.

Chinese recipe. The couple has since confirmed their marriage, although Lopez refuses to elaborate publicly on her marriage to Anthony. Japanese cuisine and Chinese cuisine is called Chūkaryōri (中華料理), lit. Complicating the situation is Anthony's refusal to confirm his marriage to Lopez and the fact that his divorce took place in the Dominican Republic less than a week before his reported marriage to Lopez, making it potentially invalid in the United States. Japanese cuisine is called washoku (和食), lit. Claiming to be a devoted Roman Catholic, Lopez has said in the past that she would never have a baby without being married. Western cuisine. Almost immediately after the wedding, rumors began swirling that the wedding was of the "shotgun" variety and that Lopez was pregnant.

Imported cuisines and foods from America and Europe are called yōshoku (洋食), a shortened form of seiyōshoku (西洋食) lit. Years before they married (or even became a couple), she and Marc Anthony sang a song together called "No Me Ames" which appeared on her album "On the 6.". "Italian restaurants" also tend to only have pizza and pasta in their menus. All the guests were invited to a "afternoon party", and they were never told that they were going to a wedding. However, in most of the country, in many ways, the variety of imported food is limited; for example, it is rare to find pasta that is not of the spaghetti or macaroni varieties in supermarkets or restaurants; bread is very rarely of any variety but white; and varieties of imported cereal are also very limited, usually either frosted or chocolate flavored. Lopez married singer Marc Anthony in a secret wedding on June 5, 2004, less than a week after his divorce was finalized from former Miss Universe Dayanara Torres. In Tokyo, it is quite easy to find restaurants serving authentic foreign cuisine. This never came to be as she and Affleck broke off their engagement and split for good in January 2004.

The Japanese also alter American-style fast-food, serving such items as green-tea milkshakes and fried shrimp burgers at chains like Lotteria. She had stated in interviews during her engagement to Affleck that, once married, she would go by the name Jennifer Affleck both privately and professionally. Okinawa has a chain of A&W drive-in restaurants featuring the company's root beer. But the marriage planned for September 14, 2003 in Santa Barbara, California was called off a few days before the event. These include doughnut and ice cream shops. Lopez became engaged to Ben Affleck and confirmed this in October 2002, after Affleck gave her a reported $3.5 million ring. Other fast-food establishments are similarly popular. Their breakup was announced on February 14, 2001.

The Japanese often eat at hamburger chains such as McDonald's or Mos Burger, a popular competitor. He was eventually tried and acquitted. Other examples of changed imported cuisine include:. The charges against Lopez were dropped, but the charges against Combs stayed. Similarly, Japanese pizza may have toppings such as sliced boiled eggs, sweetcorn, shrimps, nori, and mayonnaise instead of tomato sauce. Police found them with a stolen gun. For example, the Korean pickle kimchi, usually fermented in Korea, in Japan is instead often simply pickled, without a key Korean ingredient, fermented shrimp. Both were arrested in connection with a nightclub shooting in December 1999.

Many imported foods are made suitable for the Japanese palate by reducing the amount of spice used or changing a part of a recipe. From 1999 to 2001, she dated singer and producer Puff Daddy [real name: Sean Combs], breaking up after a shooting incident in a New York night club. Historically, foods such as castella and bread were originally imported from Portugal, and the name pan for bread is a loanword from Portuguese. The marriage also ended in divorce in January 2003. Chinese, French, Italian and Spanish cuisine is of particular interest to Japanese people. The two were married on September 29, 2001 at a home in a Los Angeles suburb officiated by attorney Barry Hirsch. Japan has incorporated imported food from across the world (mostly from Asia, Europe and to a lesser extent the Americas). She met Judd while filming the music video for her single "Love Don't Cost A Thing".

Japanese food, which had been quite exotic in the West as late as the 1970s, is now quite at home in parts of the continental United States, and has become an integral part of food culture in Hawaii. Her second marriage was to Chris Judd, her former backup dancer. However thanks to some recent trends in American culture such as Iron Chef and Benihana, Japanese culinary culture is slowly fusing its way into American life. They divorced in January 1998. Teppanyaki is said to be an American invention, as is the California roll (not to mention the Philadelphia roll), and while the former has been well received in Japan the latter has not and has, at worst, been termed not sushi by Japanese people. He was later named the manager of Lopez's restaurant, Madre's. United States. Her first marriage, to waiter Ojani Noa, occured on February 22, 1997.

Sushi is vinegared rice topped or mixed with various fresh ingredients, usually fish or seafood. Lopez is notorious for her multiple relationships. Sashimi is raw, thinly sliced foods served with a dipping sauce and simple garnishes; usually fish or shellfish but can be almost anything including beef, horse and chicken. These three movies put together made more than $350 million at the box office worldwide. However, the Japanese appetite for rice is so strong that many restaurants even serve ramen-rice combination sets. The company produced the commercially-successful movies The Cell, The Wedding Planner and Maid in Manhattan. Noodles often take the place of rice in a meal. Currently, the company produces the television series South Beach for UPN.

A one-bowl dish of hot steamed rice with various savory toppings. This company was founded together with her former manager, Benny Medina, whom she filed a lawsuit against because of alleged fraud in July 2003. It is not generally thought possible to make authentic Japanese food without shō-yu (soy sauce), miso and dashi. Some of the projects for the company include Carmen, Dirty Girls Social Club (featuring Jeffrey Wilkinson as Dirty Girl # 4) and The Hector Lavoe Project. See also Category:Japanese ingredients. Lopez owns a production company, Nuyorican Productions, in which she is expected to produce some of her upcoming movies. In some regions every 1st and 15th day of the month people eat a mixture of rice and adzuki (azuki meshi). J.Lo has now said that she is going to start producing clothes for pets dogs, most of the customers will most likely be members of hollywood and their furry little friends.

Major such combinations include:. Other merchandise includes a clothing and cologne line for men due for release sometime in 2006. In Japanese tradition some dishes are strongly tied to a festival or event. She has also done a photoshoot to represent the Louis Vuitton Winter 2003 campaign, in which the pictures would be seen all over the world through TV commercials, billboards, ads, newspapers, magazines and more. Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick holder, or hashioki (箸置き). That has not discouraged her in the least bit from wearing and marketing clothing made from fur. Pickled vegetables are often served as well, and eaten at the end of the meal, but are not counted as part of three side dishes. For her part, Lopez told a radio DJ she was open to being educated on the topic-and the DJ promptly told her animals are routinely skinned alive to make trendy furs.

Behind these are three flat plates to hold the three side dishes, one to far back left (on which might be served a simmered dish), one at far back right (on which might be served a grilled dish), and one in the center of the tray (on which might be served boiled greens). More than one hundred protestors from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals held a demonstration at the Los Angeles premiere of Monster-in-Law. Nearest the diner are the rice bowl on the left and the soup bowl on the right. Lopez's frequent use of fur in her clothing lines and personal wardrobe has brought the scorn of people concerned with animal rights. Typically, five separate bowls and plates are set before the diner. During November of the same year, she launched a new clothing line called "Sweetface". Traditional table settings are based on the ichijū-sansai formula. In October 2003, Lopez introduced a perfume called "Still".

Larger low tables (chabudai, ちゃぶ台) that accommodated entire families were becoming popular by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century. She also has a perfume line out called "Glow", and she was in question before, because the name came from another patented perfume. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables (hakozen, 箱膳) or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Furthermore, she is planning to launch a jewelry line, hats, gloves and a scarves line. The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Her line is the most successful of any artists' in history and includes many different types of clothing for young women, including jeans, tees, coats, belts, purses, sexy lingere and many other products. Salamander is eaten as well in places. Lopez owns a clothing line called "JLO by Jennifer Lopez", whose brand has been licensed for a term by Warnaco Group [1].

In some regions, grasshoppers (inago) and bee larvae (hachinoko) are not uncommon dishes. In late 2006, Jennifer Lopez is to release her 6th studio album and first Spanish Album titled "Como Ama Una Mujer", and in the Fall she is to release her sixth studio album, an English album. Although most Japanese eschew eating insects, there are a couple of exceptions. The second single, "Hold You Down," which featured Fat Joe, only barely made it into the top 75 in the US, peaking at #64 but the track managed a peak of #6 in the UK. Ramen is served in a variety of soup stocks ranging from soy sauce/fish stock to butter/pork stock. Even so, "Get Right" was a huge hit in the UK, becoming her second #1 single there. A more recent import from China, dating to the early 19th century, is ramen (ラーメン; Chinese wheat noodles), which has become extremely popular. Despite this, the album has so-far spawned one hit in "Get Right", which reached the top twenty; however, it was greatly shunned by critics as an almost complete rip-off of Usher's unreleased song Ride.

Both are generally served in a soy-flavored fish broth with various vegetables. Debuting at #2 on the Billboard 200 to initially decent sales success, the album quickly fell off the charts and remains to be Lopez's biggest commercial (not to mention critical) failure/flop yet. Made from wheat flour, udon (うどん) is a thick, white noodle. After a considerable amount of time away from the music scene, Lopez finally released her fifth studio album, Rebirth, on March 1, 2005. Made from buckwheat flour, soba (蕎麦) is a thin, brown noodle. In 2004, Lopez once again participated in duets with Marc Anthony, this time on his albums Amar Sin Mentiras and Valio La Pena. There are two traditional types of noodle, soba and udon. Another song from the album was a cover of Carly Simon's "You Belong to Me.".

Noodles, originating from China, have become an essential part of Japanese cuisine. Another single, "I'm Glad", was also released, but only managed to go top forty, a rather low result considering Lopez's usual chart success. Beef and chicken are commonly eaten and have become part of everyday cuisine. Then, which reached #2 on the Billboard 200 and spawned two very popular singles; the top 5 "Jenny from the Block", (sampling the track from the song "Watch Out Now" by the Beatnuts, and including raps from Jadakiss and Styles P and the multi-week #1 "All I Have" duet with LL Cool J. Although not known as a meat eating country, very few Japanese consider themselves vegetarians. On November 26, 2002, Lopez released her fourth studio album, This Is Me.. Since Japan is an island nation, its people consume much seafood including fish, shellfish, octopus, squid, crabs, lobsters, shrimp and seaweed. The album also included rarer dance and hip-hop remixes of her past singles, and a new song, a ballad called "Alive", which was included in Lopez's movie Enough.

There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets. This time around, she got 50 Cent and Nas to write rhymes for two remixes of her next single, "I'm Gonna Be Alright", which ended up becoming another top ten hit. Chapters are organized according to cooking techniques: fried foods, steamed foods, and grilled foods, for example, and not according to particular ingredients (e.g., chicken or beef) as are western cookbooks. This album, too, debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200, marking the first remix album in history to debut (or even reach) #1 on the chart. This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of traditional Japanese cookbooks. Following the successes of the remix, Lopez decided to devote an entire album to the effort; the result, J to tha L-O: The Remixes, appeared on February 5, 2002. Ichijū-sansai often finishes with pickles such as umeboshi and green tea. Rumors suggest this was Tommy Motolla's doing, Carey's ex-husband.

The three side dishes are usually raw fish (sashimi), a grilled dish, and a simmered (sometimes called boiled in translations from Japanese) dish -- although steamed, deep fried, vinegared, or dressed dishes may replace the grilled or simmered dishes. The remix of "I'm Real" sparked controversy when it contained a sample originally used for Mariah Carey's single 'Loverboy'. The most common meal, however, is called ichijū-sansai (一汁三菜; "one soup, three sides"), or soup, rice, and three side dishes, each employing a different cooking technique. She re-released the CD on her 32nd birthday, July 24, 2001, including Ja Rule's remixed version of "I'm Real". A traditional Japanese breakfast, for example, usually consists of miso soup, rice, and a pickled vegetable. Lo street credibility and brought her music to a whole new group of fans. This means soup, rice, and one accompanying side dish--usually a pickled vegetable like daikon. The "I'm Real" and "Ain't It Funny" remixes were two of the biggest pop and rap hits in late 2001 and early 2002, respectively, and their more hip-hop sound gave J.

The simplest Japanese meal, for example, consists of ichijū-issai (一汁一菜; "one soup, one side" or "one dish meal"). to remix both songs, completely changing the lyrics and melodies and adding raps from Ja Rule in both songs, and from Caddillac Tah to "Ain't it Funny (Remix)". Traditional Japanese meals are named by the number of side dishes that accompany the rice and soup that are nearly always served. However, to capitalize on this, Lopez asked Murder Inc. Anything else served during a meal--fish, meat, vegetables, tsukemono (pickles)--is considered a side dish, known as okazu. The album's next two singles, "I'm Real" and "Ain't it Funny", ended up becoming her biggest ever hits, with both spending several weeks at #1. Traditional Japanese cuisine is dominated by white rice (hakumai, 白米), and few meals would be complete without it. The lead single, "Love Don't Cost a Thing" was her first UK number one single, and, along with its follow-up, "Play" (which was written by rising teen star, Christina Milian) it became a top five hit during the year the album was released.

. Lo, was released in January 2001 and debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200. Many Japanese think of the everyday food of the Japanese people--especially that existing before the end of the Meiji Era (1868 - 1912) or before World War II. Her sophomore effort, J. Many think of sushi or the elegant stylized formal kaiseki meals that originated as part of the Japanese tea ceremony. "Let's Get Loud" was also released as a single, and became a minor dance hit. There are many views of what is fundamental to Japanese cuisine. The album also spawned another international hit in "Feelin' So Good", a hip-hop track which contained guest raps by Big Pun and Fat Joe; it failed to make the top 50 of the Billboard Hot 100.

Korean Naengmyun with thicker noodles and a different broth. Despite this, the video received moderate airplay on the US music channels VH1 and The Box as a novelty. Korean barbecue that is unflavored and is dipped in sauce before eating for flavor. It also contained the Spanish language, Latin-flavored duet "No me Ames" with Marc Anthony, which was an international DAN hit, though the song was never released as a single in the US. Japanese-only "Chinese dishes" like Ebi Chili (shrimp in a tangy and slightly spicy sauce). The album featured the multi-week #1 lead single, "If You Had My Love", as well as the top ten hit "Waiting for Tonight". Spaghetti with creamy shrimp, lobster, crab, Alaska pollock roe or sea urchin sauce, or a non-creamy light sauce topped with seaweed, or made with tomato ketchup, weiners, sliced onion and green pepper (called 'neapolitan'). Lopez's debut album, On the 6, a reference to the subway line she used to take growing up in Castle Hill, was released on June 1, 1999 and reached the top ten of the Billboard 200.

Konowata. In 1998, the Golden Globes organization nominated her for the "Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy" for her role in Selena. Karasumi. After a nationwide search of tens of thousands of women, Jennifer was chosen to play the lead role in the film Selena. Uni - Specifically salt-pickled uni. She appeared in Francis Ford Coppola's 1996 comedy Jack, and the 1997 thriller Blood and Wine. Pocky. Lopez broke onto the big screen in 1995, in the drama My Family/Mi Familia and opposite Wesley Snipes in the action film Money Train.

Macha Ice (Green tea ice cream) - green tea flavored ice cream. She danced for Janet Jackson on tour and in Jackson's video for the popular song "That's the Way Loves Goes" in 1995. Hello Panda. She got more television acting parts in the made-for-TV movie Nurses on the Line: The Crash of Flight 7. Azuki Ice - vanilla flavored ice cream with sweet azuki beans. She later starred shortly in Second Chances and Hotel Malibu. Other Snack

    . She got her big break playing a small role in a short-lived television program South Central.

    Mirucurepu - "mille crepe" - layered crepe. Lopez's stability during that time parlayed into the earliest successes of her career. Kasutera - "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake. She then left the show after the second season due to confliction between she and another dancer. Yogashi - Western-style sweets, but in Japan typically very light or spongy

      . After month's and month's of auditioning for dance gig's, she got her first spot and started out in television as a video girl for rap artist MC Hammer, also a guest spot on the American Music Awards, and was then introduced to the world as a "fly girl" dancer on the television comedy program In Living Color in 1990 only after being rejected twice. Umaibou - Puffed corn food with various flavors. She moved out of the house in protest of her controlling parents and was able to shack up with her dance teacher and literally lived on the floor of the dance studio for many years until she could pay rent with occasional work as a dancer.

      Sosu Senbei - Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce. Though she did not, and still does not, drink alcohol, her parents disapproved of her working nights so far from home and feared she was associating with a potentially dangerous crowd. Ramune - Sweet candy that melts in your mouth. She split her time between her job at a law office, taking dance classes, and dancing in Manhattan clubs at night. Also called Karumeyaki. After she dropped out of high school, Lopez pursued her talent for dance. Karumetou - Brown sugar cake. Jennifer Lopez financed singing and dancing lessons from the age of 16.

      Dagashi - Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets

        . "That's the kind of person she is." She met the famous Jorge "Chicken Wings" Lopez from Jersey City. Taiyaki - a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an - red bean paste. "Basically, anything she wants to do, she'll be as successful as you can at it," sister Lynda Lopez told Rolling Stone. Uiro - a steamed cake made of rice flour. Her father feared that, new to the sport, she would be outclassed, but Lopez rose to the challenge and ended up competing nationally. Oshiruko - a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi - rice cake. She went out for the track team, though she had no experience.

        Mochi - steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid mass. She was a driven student and natural athlete in gymnastics, softball, and tennis. Melonpan - a large, round, sweet, crusty bread that looks and tastes somewhat like a melon. "It was crazy." She spent her entire academic career in Catholic school, and admits she still prays regularly. Matsunoyuki. Because her parents were strict, Lopez spent much of what she called "the boyfriend years" in Rolling Stone sneaking around to meet up with first-love David Cruz, whom she remained with from the time she was 16 until she was 25."I was always climbing out windows, jumping off roofs, and he was sneaking up," she said. Manju - sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center. Lopez's parents also stressed assimilation — the need to speak English, to fit into the mainstream, to succeed.

        Kompeito - crystal sugar candy. "Our parents had a strong work ethic — there wasn't really any other way," Lynda Lopez told Rolling Stone. Kakigori - shaved ice with syrup topping. They were strict with their girls and instilled a strong work ethic in them — no one in the family was allowed to miss a day of school, work, or church (the family was devoutly Roman Catholic). Imagawayaki - also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same. Though Lopez's parents were born in the same Puerto Rican town, they did not meet until they both had moved to Castle Hill. Hoshigaki - Dried persimmon fruit. She has two sisters, Lynda and Leslie.

        Higashi. Lopez was born in the Bronx, New York to Puerto Rican parents Guadalupe Rodriguez and David Lopez. Hanabiramochi. . Ginbou. She is also commonly known as J-Lo or J.Lo. Dango - rice dumpling. She is married to singer Marc Anthony.

        Anpan - bread with sweet bean paste in the center. Jennifer Lynn López (born July 24, 1969) is a well-known American actress, Latin Pop singer, fashion designer, and dancer. Anmitsu- a traditional Japanese dessert. Reggaeton (2007). Amanatto. Bridge & Tunnel (2007). Wagashi - Japanese-style sweets

          . El Cantante (2006).

          Chirashi - Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish. Bordertown (2006). Temaki - Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Fabolous),Most Fashionable Artist (Won), Most Fashionable Music Video ("Get Right"). Makizushi - Translated as "roll sushi," this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces. 2006 Groovevolt Fashion And Music Awards: 3 nominations for-Best Pop Song by a group or collaboration ("Get Right" -feat. Nigirizushi - This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice. 2005 World Music Awards :Nominated for World`s Best-Selling Pop Female Artist.

          Sumashijiru - a clear soup made with dashi and seafood. 2005 MTV Video Music Awards: 4 nominations for ("Get Right"), Best Editing in a Video, Best Direction in a Video, Best Dance Video, Best Choreography in a Video. Miso soup - soup made with miso, dashi and seasonal ingredients like fish, kamaboko, onions, clams, potato, etc. 2004 People's Choice Awards: nomination for Best Smile. Dangojiru - soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots. 2004 Golden Raspberry Awards: 2 nominations, Worst Screen Couple, Worst Supporting Actress for ("Jersey Girl"). Tonjiru - similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients. 2003 Latin Billboard Music Awards: win for Latin Dance Single Of The Year ("Alive"-remix).

          Shikasashi - sliced deer meat, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan. 2003 NRJ Radio Awards: win for Best RnB. Rebasashi - usually liver of beef. 2003 Teen Choice Awards: win for Female Fashion Icon , win for Best RnB/Hip-Hop Artist. Fugu - sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. LL Cool J,Most Fashionable Artist. Basashi - sliced horse meat, sometimes called Sakura. 2003 Groovevolt Fashion And Music Awards: 4 nominations for-Video Of The Year ("I'm Glad"),Best Album Female ("This is me...Then"),Best Collaboration for "All I Have"-feat.

          Om-rice (Omu-raisu オムライス) - omelette filled with fried rice, apparently originating from Tokyo. 2003 Mtv European Music Awards: nomination for Best RnB Act. Hayashi Rice - thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown, but may be "hashed rice". 2003 MTV Video Music Awards: 4 nominations for ("I'm Glad"), Best Female Video, Best Dance Video, Best Choreography in a Video, Best Art Direction in a Video. Kare Rice (see also curry) - Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, it became a staple food in Japan. 2003 American Music Award: win for Favorite Female Artist - Pop / Rock. Kamameshi - rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot. 2002 Teen Choice Awards: win for Best RnB/Hip-Hop/Rap Single ("Ain't It Funny-remix").

          Sekihan - red rice with adzuki beans. 2002 Showest Awards: win for Female Star Of The Year. Onigiri - Japanese rice balls. 2002 VH1/Vogue Fashion Awards: win for Most Influential Artist. Ochazuke - green tea poured over white rice, often flavored. 2002 Mtv European Music Awards: nomination for Best RnB Act, win for Best Female Act. Mochi - soft rice cake. 2002 Hastings Bad Cinema Society Stinkers Awards: nomination for Worst Actress ("Enough").

          Chawan mushi - meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables boiled in egg custard. 2002 NAACP Image Award: nomination for Outstanding Actress - Motion Picture ("Maid in Manhattan"). Shiokara - salty fermented viscera. 2002 MTV Video Music Awards: win for Best Hip-Hop Video ("I'm Real") - shared with Ja Rule. Typically popular in Kanto and less so in Kansai. 2002 American Music Award: nomination for Favorite Female Artist - Hip-Hop/R&B. Often eaten for breakfast. 2001 Teen Choice Awards: Female Hottie Of The Year; win for Best Dance Track ("Play").

          Natto - fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous amongst non-Japanese for its strong smell and slippery texture. 2001 Top Of The Pops: ARTIST ON TOP OF THE WORLD. Osechi - traditional food eaten at the New Year. 2001 Kid's Choice Awards: win for Favourite Female Movie Star. Hiyayakko - cold tofu dish. 2001 Grammy Award: nomination for Dance Recording Of The Year("Let's Get Loud"). Bento or Obento - combination meal served in a wooden box. 2001 Mtv European Music Awards: win for Best Female Act.

          Agedashi tofu - cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth. 2001 Alma Awards: 4 nominations, Outstanding Female Performer, Album of the Year ("J.Lo"), Outstanding Performance - Music, Variety or Comedy Special ("Jennifer Lopez in Concert: Let's Get Loud"), win for Outstanding Actress - Motion Picture ("Angel Eyes"). Okinawa soba - a wheat-flour noodle often served with sōki, steamed pork. 2001 Alma Awards: win for Outstanding Music Video - People's Choice Award ("Love Don't Cost A Thing"). Somen. 2001 Hastings Bad Cinema Society Stinkers Awards: nomination for Worst Actress, win for Most Annoying Fake Accent - Female ("Angel Eyes"). Champon - yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students. 2001 People's Choice Awards: 2 nominations, Favorite Actress, Favorite Female Musical Performer.

          Udon - thick wheat noodle served with various toppings or in a hot shoyu and dashi broth. 2001 MTV Video Music Awards: 2 nominations for ("Love Don't Cost A Thing"), Best Female Video, Best Dance Video. Ramen - thin light yellow noodle served in hot broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. 2001 American Music Award: nomination for Favorite Female Artist - Pop or Rock. Soba - thin brown buckwheat noodles served chilled with various toppings or in hot broth. 2000 Alma Awards: win for Outstanding Music Video Performer ("If you had my love"). Nikujaga, a Japanese version of beef stew. 2000 Bambi Awards: win for Best International Pop Performance.

          Oden. 2000 Kid's Choice Awards: win for Favourite New Music Artist. Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish, but it has also become very popular in Japan, particularly in the southern island of Kyushu, which is situated closest to South Korea. 2000 VH1/Vogue Fashion Awards: Versace Award. Kimuchinabe - similar to motsunabe, except with a kimuchi base and using thinly sliced pork. 2000 Mtv European Music Awards: nomination for Best Female Act,win for Best RnB Act. Motsunabe - cow intestine, hakusai (bok choi) and various vegetables are cooked in a light soup base. 2000 Saturn Awards: nomination for Best Actress ("The Cell").

          Shabu-shabu - noodles, vegetables and shrimp or thinly sliced beef boiled in a thin stock and dipped in a soy or sesame sauce before eating. 2000 Grammy Award: nomination for Best Dance Recording ("Waiting For Tonight"). Sukiyaki - mixture of noodles, thinly sliced beef, egg and vegetables boiled in a special sauce made of fish broth, soy sauce, sugar and sake. 2000 MTV Movie Awards: nomination for Best Female Performance ("The Cell"), win for Best Dressed in a Movie ("The Cell"). Yakitori - chicken kebabs. 2000 MTV Video Music Award: nomination for ("Waiting For Tonight"), Best Choreography, win for Dance Video of the Year ("Waiting For Tonight"). Yakisoba - Japanese style fried noodles. 1999 VH1/Vogue Fashion Awards: win for Most Fashionable Female Artist.

          Unagi, including kabayaki - grilled and flavored eel. 1999 Teen Choice Awards: win for Best Song Of The Summer ("If you had my love"). Teriyaki - grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce. 1999 Billboard Music Awards: win for Best Pop Clip ("If you had my love"). Takoyaki - a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. 1999 Ritmo Latino Awards: win for New Artist Of The Year. Omu-Soba - an omelette with yakisoba as its filling. 1999 Alma Awards: win for Outstanding Actress ("Out Of Sight").

          "omelette rice", a fried ketchup-flavored rice sandwiched with a thinly spread beaten egg or covered with a plain egg omelette. 1999 Mtv European Music Awards: nomination for Breakthrough Act. Omu-Raisu - i.e. 1999 Soul Train Award: nomination for Best R&B/Soul Album - Female ("On the 6"). Okonomiyaki - pan-fried batter cakes with various savory toppings (see also Okonomiyaki restaurants). 1999 American Music Awards: 2 nominations, Favorite Artist - Latin Music, Favorite New Artist - Pop / Rock. Kushiyaki - meat and vegetable kebabs. 1999 MTV Video Music Awards: 4 nominations for ("If You Had My Love"), Female Video of the Year, Dance Video of the Year, New Artist Video of the Year, Pop Video of the Year.

          Hamachi Kama - grilled yellow tail tuna jaw and cheek bone. 1998 Imagen Foundation Awards: Latin Image Award "Selena". Gyoza - Chinese dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables. 1998 Alma Awards: win for Outstanding Actress for "Selena". Tempuradon - battered, deep fried bite-sized foods. 1998 Empire Awards: nomination for Best Actress ("Out of Sight"). Gyūdon - seasoned beef. 1998 MTV Movie Awards: 2 nominations, Best Kiss - shared nomination with George Clooney ("Out Of Sight"), Best Female Performance ("Out of Sight").

          Oyakodon - (Parent and Child) Usually chicken and egg but sometimes salmon and salmon roe. 1998 Golden Globes: nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for "Selena". Katsudon - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chicken katsudon) or fish (e.g., magurodon). 1997 Saturn Awards: nomination for Best Actress ("Anaconda"). Tonkatsu - deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions called chicken katsu). 1995 Independent Spirit Awards: nomination for Best Supporting Actress ("My Family"). Tempura - battered and deep-fried vegetables, seafood, and meat. 2006: Como Ama Una Mujer (Release in May 2006).

          Kushiage - meat deep fried on a skewer. Fat Joe). Korokke (croquette) - breaded and deep-fried balls of mashed potato with creamy vegetable, seafood, or meat-flavored fillings. Hold You Down (Feat. Wasabi (and imitation wasabi from horseradish), mustard, red pepper, ginger, shiso (or beefsteak) leaves, sansho, citrus peel, and honeywort (called mitsuba). Get Right. Sesame seeds, sesame oil, sesame salt (gomashio), furikake, walnuts or peanuts to dress. 2005: Rebirth.

          Negi (welsh onion), onions, garlic, nira (garlic chives), rakkyo (a type of scallion). Baby I Love You (official release in UK). Kombu, katsuobushi, niboshi. I'm Glad. Shō-yu (Soy sauce), dashi, mirin, sugar, rice vinegar, miso, sake. LL Cool J). Fu (wheat gluten). All I Have (Feat.

          Katakuri flour, kudzu flour, rice powder, soba flour, wheat flour. Jadakiss, Lox & Styles). yuzu. Jenny From The Block (Feat. sudachi,. Then. natsumikan (amanatsu),. 2002: This Is Me..

          mikan,. Alive (from movie Enough). kumquat,. Nas and 50 Cent on the explicit version). kabosu,. I'm Gonna Be Alright (Feat. iyokan,. Ja Rule).

          daidai,. Ain't It Funny Remix (Feat. Citrus fruits:

            . Ja Rule). loquat. I'm Real Remix (Feat. nashi pear,. 2002: J To Tha L-O! The Remixes.

            chestnut,. I'm Real. persimmon,. Ain't It Funny. Fruits:

              . Play. Yuba. Love Don't Cost A Thing.

              Tofu (tofu, agedōfu),. 2001: J.Lo. Soy sauce (light, dark, tamari),. Let's Get Loud. Miso,. Feelin' So Good. Edamame,. Waiting For Tonight.

              Bean products:

                . No Me Ames. Beans (soy, adzuki). If You Had My Love. Meats (pork, beef, chicken, horse), sometimes as minchi (minced meat). 1999: On The 6. Eggs (chicken, quail). Main article: Jennifer Lopez discography.

                Noodles (udon, soba, somen, ramen). Lopez is one of the top 10 highest paid actresses in Hollywood. Satsuma-age. In 2004, the JLO Clothing and Perfume lines combined, brought in over $US 550,000,000. kamaboko,. and a combined 25 weeks at #1. dried cuttlefish,. Lopez has 5 #1 hits in the U.S.

                niboshi,. Lopez has sold nearly 40 million records worldwide. chikuwa,. Lopez made the highest debut of 2003 on the US charts with "All I Have" debuting at #25. Processed seafood:

                  . Her wealth is estimated at $255 million. others; see Category:Sea vegetables. Lopez made the 2004 Fortune list of the wealthiest entertainers under the age of 40.

                  hijiki,. Lopez is the only woman who has been #1 two years in a row in FHM magazine's list of the 100 Sexiest Females in the World. wakame,. Lopez's perfume "Glow" made history in 2001, by being the #1 perfume in more than nine countries in less than four months. konbu,. Lo) at #1 in the same week. nori,. Lopez is the first actress and singer to have a movie (The Wedding Planner) and an album (J.

                  seaweed:

                    . She still holds the record, earning $15,000,000 for her performance in Monster-in-Law (2005). Tsukemono (pickled vegetables). By 2003, Lopez had become the highest-paid Latina actress in Hollywood. shimeji. Jennifer Lopez became the first Latina actress to get paid $1 million or more for one film (for her role in Selena). nameko,.

                    enokitake,. matsutake,. shiitake,. Mushrooms:

                      .

                      Konnyaku (shirataki). Sansai (wild vegetables). moyashi (mung or soybean sprouts). fuki (butterbur),.

                      negi (Welsh onion),. takenoko (bamboo shoots),. renkon (lotus root),. sweet potato,.

                      daikon,. gobo (burdock),. eggplant,. cucumber,.

                      spinach,. nira (Chinese chives),. Vegetables:

                        . Mochi rice (glutinous rice).

                        Short or medium grain white rice. Rice

                          . This is called toshi koshi soba (年越しそば) (literally "year crossing soba"). Soba - New Year's Eve.

                          Sekihan, cooked rice with adzuki - celebration in general. Hamo (a kind of fish) and somen - Gion Festival. Chimaki (steamed sweet rice cake) - Tango no Sekku and Gion Festival. botamochi (sticky rice dumpling with sweet azuki paste) - Spring equinox.

                          Chirashizushi, clear soup of crumbs and amazake - Hinamatsuri. Osechi - New Year.

09-01-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.