Hiroshima

Main keep of Hiroshima Castle

The city of Hiroshima (広島市; -shi) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, the largest of Japan's islands. Geographical location 34°23′07″N, 132°27′19″E (City Hall). It is most known throughout the world as the first city in history subjected to nuclear warfare.

Hiroshima gained municipality status on April 1, 1889 and was designated on April 1, 1980 by government ordinance. As of 2004, the city's mayor is Tadatoshi Akiba.

History

Atomic Bomb Dome at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, a remnant of the city at ground zero of its nuclear bombardment

Hiroshima was founded in 1589, on the coast of the Seto Inland Sea, and became a major urban center during the Meiji period. The city is located on the broad, flat delta of the Ota River, which has 7 channel outlets dividing the city into six islands which project into Hiroshima Bay. The city is almost entirely flat and only slightly above sea level; to the northwest and northeast of the city, some hills rise to 700 feet.

Hiroshima was founded by Mori Motonari as his capital. About a half century later, after the Battle of Sekigahara, his grandson and the leader of the West Army Mori Terumoto was on the losing side. The winner Tokugawa Ieyasu deprived Mori Terumoto of most of his fiefs including Hiroshima and gave Aki province to another daimyo who had supported him.

Finally Asano was appointed the daimyo of this area and Hiroshima served as the capital of Hiroshima han during the Edo period. After the han was abolished the city became the capital of Hiroshima prefecture.

During the First Sino-Japanese War, Hiroshima emerged as a major supply and logistics base for the Japanese military. This role continued until World War II.

Atomic bombing

On August 6, 1945 the nuclear weapon Little Boy was dropped on Hiroshima by the Enola Gay, a U.S. Air Force B-29 bomber which was altered specifically to hold the bomb, killing an estimated 80,000 civilians and heavily damaging the city. It was the second such device to be detonated, and the first ever to be used in military action. The American atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are commonly believed to be the major factor leading to the surrender of the Japanese government six days after the latter attack.

After the nuclear attack, Hiroshima was rebuilt as a “peace memorial city”, and the closest surviving building to the location of the bomb's detonation was designated the "Atomic Bomb Dome," a part of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. The city government continues to advocate the abolition of nuclear weapons, and has advocated more broadly for world peace. They have written a letter of protest every time a nuclear weapon has been detonated anywhere in the world since 1968.

Hiroshima, following the atomic bombing

After the war

Hiroshima was rebuilt after the war, with new modern buildings rising all over the city. Several civic leaders and scholars were consulted about the rebuilding plan. In 1949, Hiroshima was proclaimed a City of Peace by the Japanese parliament, at the initiative of its mayor Shinzo Hamai (b. 1905-d. 1968). As a result, the city of Hiroshima was receiving more international attention as a desirable location for holding international conferences on peace as well as social issues. As part of that effort, the Hiroshima Interpreters' and Guide's Association (HIGA) was established in 1992 in order to facilitate translation services for conferences, and the Hiroshima Peace Institute was established in 1998 within the Hiroshima University. In 1994, the city of Hiroshima hosted the Asian Games.

Memorial cenotaph at Hiroshima Peace Park

Also, as a result of the atomic bombing, Hiroshima began to receive donations of streetcars from all over Japan. (After World War II, Japanese cities - like British ones - were anxious to get rid of their streetcar systems due to damage to the infrastructure, and so there were plenty of streetcars available to give away.) Hiroshima thus rebuilt its streetcar system along with the rest of the city, and thus Hiroshima is the only city in Japan with an extensive streetcar system (although other cities have streetcar lines). Some streetcars that survived the war - and the nuclear attack - were put back into service, and four of these are still running today. For the most part, however, Hiroshima has updated its streetcars over the years.

Folded paper cranes representing prayers for peace

Every year on August 6, the mayor of Hiroshima gives a speech called "The Peace Declaration" to commemorate the atomic bombing of the city. It has often been used as an occasion to criticize U.S. foreign policy and urge the president to visit Hiroshima. Tens of thousands of people marked the 60th anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city on August 6, 2005.

Attractions

A man prepares okonomiyaki in a restaurant in Hiroshima

Baseball fans immediately recognize the city as the home of the Hiroshima Toyo Carp. Six-time champions of Japan's Central League, the team has gone on to win the Japan Series three times.

Sanfrecce Hiroshima is the city's J. League football team.

Hiroshima's rebuilt castle (nicknamed Rijō, meaning Koi Castle) houses a museum of life in the Edo period.

Itsukushima ("Miyajima") Shrine is in the town of Miyajima, on the island of Itsukushima, across from Hiroshima. Its large red "floating" gate is one of the best known sights of Japan. Although it lies outside the city of Hiroshima, it is accessible by streetcar or railroad (and ferry) from the central train station.

Hiroshima is known for its version of okonomiyaki, called "Hiroshima-yaki" or "Hiroshima pancake." The Hiroshima version of okonomiyaki is unique for its inclusion of yakisoba noodles.

  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial
  • Hiroshima Castle
  • Shukkei Garden
  • Mitaki Temple

Wards

Hiroshima has 8 wards (ku):

  • Aki-ku
  • Asakita-ku
  • Asaminami-ku
  • Higashi-ku
  • Minami-ku
  • Naka-ku
  • Nishi-ku
  • Saeki-ku

Demographics

As of 2003, the city has an estimated population of 1,136,684 and the density of 1532.44 persons per km². The total area is 741.75 km².

Industry

Mazda Motor Company, now controlled by the Ford Motor Company, is by far Hiroshima's dominant company. Mazda makes many models in Hiroshima for worldwide export, including the popular MX-5/Miata and Mazda RX-8. The Mazda CX-7 is slated to be built here in early 2006. Other Mazda factories are in Hofu and Flat Rock, Michigan.

Sister cities

  • Chongqing, China
  • Daegu, South Korea
  • Hannover, Germany
  • Honolulu, United States
  • Montreal, Canada
  • Volgograd, Russia

Further reading

  • Pacific War Research Society, “Japan's Longest Day”, the internal Japanese account of the surrender and how it was almost thwarted by fanatic soldiers who attempted a coup against the Emperor.
  • Richard B. Frank, “Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire” (Penguin, 2001 ISBN 0141001461), a thorough analysis of all the available contemporaneous intel from the perspectives of the various participants during the last months of the war. Uses newly declassified US military intelligence records and other primary sources from many countries to make the case that bombing had a huge net saving of lives, Japanese and American, over an invasion. The author shows why the Japanese were preparing to continue the fight for an indefinite period and why they expected that a bloody defense of their main islands would lead to something less than unconditional surrender and a continuation of their existing government.
  • Robert Jungk, Children of the Ashes, 1st Eng. ed. 1961
  • Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb, ISBN 067976285X
  • John Hersey, Hiroshima, ISBN 0679721037

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Other Mazda factories are in Hofu and Flat Rock, Michigan. ^At the end of the 2005 NFL season, the Seahawks All-Time Record is 232-249-0 (including playoffs). The Mazda CX-7 is slated to be built here in early 2006. Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties. Mazda makes many models in Hiroshima for worldwide export, including the popular MX-5/Miata and Mazda RX-8. The team now alternates between the blue colored pants and white pants, although they usually wear all blue at home and all white when playing away. Mazda Motor Company, now controlled by the Ford Motor Company, is by far Hiroshima's dominant company. The helmets also were changed from silver to the darker blue color after a fan poll was conducted.

The total area is 741.75 km². The colors were modified to become a darker blue and a more neon green. As of 2003, the city has an estimated population of 1,136,684 and the density of 1532.44 persons per km². In 2002, both the logo and the uniforms were redesigned. Hiroshima has 8 wards (ku):. The helmet was metallic silver while the uniforms were dark blue with silver pants. Hiroshima is known for its version of okonomiyaki, called "Hiroshima-yaki" or "Hiroshima pancake." The Hiroshima version of okonomiyaki is unique for its inclusion of yakisoba noodles. When the Seahawks debuted in 1976, the team's logo was a stylized blue and green hawk's head based on Northwestern tribal art.

Although it lies outside the city of Hiroshima, it is accessible by streetcar or railroad (and ferry) from the central train station. Seattle fell short in its bid for its first NFL title, losing to the Pittsburgh Steelers at Super Bowl XL in Detroit on February 5, 2006 by a score of 21-10. Its large red "floating" gate is one of the best known sights of Japan. On January 22nd, 2006 Seattle clinched its first Super Bowl berth in franchise history as they beat the Carolina Panthers 34-14. Itsukushima ("Miyajima") Shrine is in the town of Miyajima, on the island of Itsukushima, across from Hiroshima. The win ended the franchise's 21-year playoff victory drought. Hiroshima's rebuilt castle (nicknamed Rijō, meaning Koi Castle) houses a museum of life in the Edo period. Shaun Alexander suffered a concussion in the first quarter, but the Seahawks managed to prevail by a final score of 20-10.

League football team. After having the first round bye in the playoffs, the Seahawks hosted the Washington Redskins in the Divisional Playoff Round. Sanfrecce Hiroshima is the city's J. C Robbie Tobeck and rookie MLB Lofa Tatupu were added to the Roster after injuries to Chicago's Brian Urlacher and Olin Kreutz. Six-time champions of Japan's Central League, the team has gone on to win the Japan Series three times. The players included MVP RB Shaun Alexander, QB Matt Hasselbeck, LT Walter Jones, LG Steve Hutchinson and FB Mack Strong. Baseball fans immediately recognize the city as the home of the Hiroshima Toyo Carp. Seven Seahawks players were selected for the 2006 Pro Bowl, tying a franchise record set in 1984.

Tens of thousands of people marked the 60th anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city on August 6, 2005. Four days later, he was named the 2005 NFL MVP. foreign policy and urge the president to visit Hiroshima. He also ended the season with the league's most rushing yards for the season with 1,880 yards. It has often been used as an occasion to criticize U.S. On January 1, 2006, despite losing to the Green Bay Packers 23-17, Shaun Alexander broke Priest Holmes's record for most rushing touchdowns in a single season, with his 28th touchdown coming in the 2nd quarter of the game. Every year on August 6, the mayor of Hiroshima gives a speech called "The Peace Declaration" to commemorate the atomic bombing of the city. In addition, the schedule makers set a record with the first regular season game where the teams combined for at least 25 victories.

For the most part, however, Hiroshima has updated its streetcars over the years. The game featured the highest scoring and winningest teams against each other, and each looking to set a franchise record for most wins in a season. Some streetcars that survived the war - and the nuclear attack - were put back into service, and four of these are still running today. Interestingly enough, the Colts-Seahawks game set records well before kickoff. (After World War II, Japanese cities - like British ones - were anxious to get rid of their streetcar systems due to damage to the infrastructure, and so there were plenty of streetcars available to give away.) Hiroshima thus rebuilt its streetcar system along with the rest of the city, and thus Hiroshima is the only city in Japan with an extensive streetcar system (although other cities have streetcar lines). The victory also clinched the top seed in the NFC playoffs for the Seahawks assuring them of a home playoff game during the weekend of January 14-15, 2006 against the lowest remaining NFC seed (which turned out to be the Washington Redskins). Also, as a result of the atomic bombing, Hiroshima began to receive donations of streetcars from all over Japan. Shaun Alexander scored three touchdowns in the game and tied Priest Holmes for the NFL record for touchdowns in a season with 27.

In 1994, the city of Hiroshima hosted the Asian Games. On Christmas Eve, the Seahawks beat the Colts 28-13 setting the franchise record for wins in season with 13. As part of that effort, the Hiroshima Interpreters' and Guide's Association (HIGA) was established in 1992 in order to facilitate translation services for conferences, and the Hiroshima Peace Institute was established in 1998 within the Hiroshima University. However, they wouldn't be denied as QB Matt Hasselbeck threw a game-winning 2-yard pass to WR Darrell Jackson, to end up with a 28-24 victory. As a result, the city of Hiroshima was receiving more international attention as a desirable location for holding international conferences on peace as well as social issues. After the third quarter, the Seahawks trailed 24-21. 1968). Coming into the second half, the score was tied at 14.

1905-d. After smashing the Niners, the Seahawks traveled to The Coliseum to face the Tennessee Titans. In 1949, Hiroshima was proclaimed a City of Peace by the Japanese parliament, at the initiative of its mayor Shinzo Hamai (b. At least four team records were set during this game, including the lowest yards ever allowed by a Seahawk defense at 113, the biggest two game margin of victory, the first time the team has posted three forty point wins in a season, and the franchise record for wins in a row at 9. Several civic leaders and scholars were consulted about the rebuilding plan. With some starters playing less than three quarters for the second game in a row, the victory put the Seahawks at 11-2 with three games remaining, just one win shy of their franchise record 12 wins (12-4 overall) in 1984. Hiroshima was rebuilt after the war, with new modern buildings rising all over the city. On December 11, 2005, the week after their Monday night rout of the Eagles, the Seahawks defeated the San Fransisco 49ers 41-3, making their margin of victory for the two-week period 80 points (team record), and marking the first time in team history that the Seahawks had recorded three forty point or better games in a season.

They have written a letter of protest every time a nuclear weapon has been detonated anywhere in the world since 1968. When the game had finished, the Seahawks had handed the Eagles their 3rd worst defeat in team history (Seattle also handed the Eagles their 5th worst defeat since 1998, the last time the Seahawks played in Philadelphia). The city government continues to advocate the abolition of nuclear weapons, and has advocated more broadly for world peace. A fourth interception return by Michael Boulware fell just short of tying another Seahawks NFL record of four defensive scores in a single game, set during a 45-0 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in 1984. After the nuclear attack, Hiroshima was rebuilt as a “peace memorial city”, and the closest surviving building to the location of the bomb's detonation was designated the "Atomic Bomb Dome," a part of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. On December 5, 2005, the Seahawks shut out the Philadelphia Eagles 42-0 with three defensive touchdowns (two interceptions, one fumble return) to tie the largest margin of victory mark in Monday Night Football history and set the mark for the greatest margin of victory in an MNF shutout, as well as setting the NFL record for scoring the most points with under 200 yards of offense. The American atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are commonly believed to be the major factor leading to the surrender of the Japanese government six days after the latter attack. Louis Rams lost on December 4, 2005, the Seahawks clinched their second straight NFC West title after playing only 11 games.

It was the second such device to be detonated, and the first ever to be used in military action. When the St. Air Force B-29 bomber which was altered specifically to hold the bomb, killing an estimated 80,000 civilians and heavily damaging the city. The Seahawks won on a 36-yard Josh Brown field goal and the final score was 24-21. On August 6, 1945 the nuclear weapon Little Boy was dropped on Hiroshima by the Enola Gay, a U.S. With the score 21-21, opposing kicker Jay Feely missed three chances for a winning field goal (one as time expired in regulation and two in OT). This role continued until World War II. A week later, the Seahawks went home and played a close game with the eventual NFC East champion New York Giants.

During the First Sino-Japanese War, Hiroshima emerged as a major supply and logistics base for the Japanese military. Fortunately for the Seahawks, the Niners couldn't tie on the two-point conversion and Seattle held on for the win (27-25). After the han was abolished the city became the capital of Hiroshima prefecture. The Niners started to rally, however, and in the final seconds, the 49ers got within two points with a 1-yard touchdown run by Maurice Hicks. Finally Asano was appointed the daimyo of this area and Hiroshima served as the capital of Hiroshima han during the Edo period. When the Seahawks flew to Candlestick Park to take on the division rival San Francisco 49ers, the Seahawks were leading 27-12 going into the fourth quarter. The winner Tokugawa Ieyasu deprived Mori Terumoto of most of his fiefs including Hiroshima and gave Aki province to another daimyo who had supported him. Afterwards, they went home and finished the sweep of their much-hated division rivals, the Rams, by the score of 31-16.

About a half century later, after the Battle of Sekigahara, his grandson and the leader of the West Army Mori Terumoto was on the losing side. After their Week 8 bye, they then traveled to Tempe, Arizona and finished the sweep of the Cardinals by a score of 33-19. Hiroshima was founded by Mori Motonari as his capital. The Seahawks won 13-10. The city is almost entirely flat and only slightly above sea level; to the northwest and northeast of the city, some hills rise to 700 feet. It wasn't settled until second-year DB Jordan Babineaux intercepted opposing QB Drew Bledsoe's pass for 25 yards, setting the stage for kicker Josh Brown's game-winning 50-yard field goal as time expired. The city is located on the broad, flat delta of the Ota River, which has 7 channel outlets dividing the city into six islands which project into Hiroshima Bay. When the Dallas Cowboys came to town the next week, the game came down to the wire.

Hiroshima was founded in 1589, on the coast of the Seto Inland Sea, and became a major urban center during the Meiji period. The Seahawks easily won on the power of RB Shaun Alexander by a score of 42-10. . Afterwards, they went home for a Sunday night game against the hapless Houston Texans. As of 2004, the city's mayor is Tadatoshi Akiba. Not only did the Seahawks win 37-31, but they also ended their four-game losing streak against them, which dated back to the late 2003 season. Hiroshima gained municipality status on April 1, 1889 and was designated on April 1, 1980 by government ordinance. Louis Rams.

It is most known throughout the world as the first city in history subjected to nuclear warfare. First, they went to the Edward Jones Dome to face their fierce division-rival, the St. Geographical location 34°23′07″N, 132°27′19″E (City Hall). The Seahawks rebounded, however, and went on an eleven-game win streak. The city of Hiroshima (広島市; -shi) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, the largest of Japan's islands. The game went into overtime and the Seahawks lost 20-17. John Hersey, Hiroshima, ISBN 0679721037. Kicker Josh Brown missed a game winning field goal attempt late in regulation.

Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb, ISBN 067976285X. The following week, they were on the road against the Washington Redskins. 1961. The following week at home, they dispatched the division rival Arizona 37-12. ed. In Week 2, their home-opener was against the same team that they beat on the last game of the 2004 regular season, the Atlanta Falcons (21-18). Robert Jungk, Children of the Ashes, 1st Eng. They lost their first game of the season on the road against the Jacksonville Jaguars 26-14.

The author shows why the Japanese were preparing to continue the fight for an indefinite period and why they expected that a bloody defense of their main islands would lead to something less than unconditional surrender and a continuation of their existing government. The Seahawks got off to a rocky start on their 2005 campaign but it would end with their first Super Bowl appearance. Uses newly declassified US military intelligence records and other primary sources from many countries to make the case that bombing had a huge net saving of lives, Japanese and American, over an invasion. Louis Rams. Frank, “Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire” (Penguin, 2001 ISBN 0141001461), a thorough analysis of all the available contemporaneous intel from the perspectives of the various participants during the last months of the war. They lost the first home playoff game at Qwest Field to the St. Richard B. The Seahawks also won their third division championship in 2004, when they claimed the NFC West title.

Pacific War Research Society, “Japan's Longest Day”, the internal Japanese account of the surrender and how it was almost thwarted by fanatic soldiers who attempted a coup against the Emperor. Some current players were either very young children or not even born when the last 49ers shutout occurred. Volgograd, Russia. The 49ers were in a position to score in the 4th quarter, but an interception and a fumble recovery sealed their fate. Montreal, Canada. This marked the end of the 49ers' league record 27 year streak without a shutout - the last such game being against Atlanta in 1977 (7-0). Honolulu, United States. On September 26, 2004 the Seahawks shutout the San Francisco 49ers 34-0.

Hannover, Germany. The playoff game would go into overtime, where quarterback Hasselback made the prediction "we want the ball, and we're going to score." Unfortunately for Seattle, an Al Harris interception returned for a TD sealed the Seahawks fate and they were out of the playoffs again. Daegu, South Korea. They went to the playoffs where they would face Holmgren's former team, the Green Bay Packers. Chongqing, China. The Seahawks responded by carrying over the momentum from 2002 by finishing with a 10-6 record and a perfect record at home of 8-0. Saeki-ku. Before the 2003 season, Holmgren decided to step down as general manager so that he could concentrate exclusively on improving the team.

Nishi-ku. But the team finished with a 7-9 record. Naka-ku. He would end the season on a 3 game winning streak and Shaun Alexander lead the NFC with 18 touchdowns. Minami-ku. The year would prove to be one of ups-and-downs as Dilfer was injured in Week 7 and Hasselbeck became the starting QB. Higashi-ku. This was because of the addition of the expansion team Houston Texans and to achieve parity among the divisions.

Asaminami-ku. When the Seahawks left Husky Stadium at the end of the 2001 season they were part of the AFC West but when they moved into Seahawks Stadium they were now part of the NFC West. Asakita-ku. Big changes were afoot in 2002. Aki-ku. QB Trent Dilfer was signed and won his first four games and the Seahawks finished the 2001 season with a 9-7 record but didn't make the playoffs. Mitaki Temple. But Hasselbeck struggled in the first half of the season compiling a 5-7 record.

Shukkei Garden. Holmgren then traded for Green Bay Packers backup QB Matt Hasselbeck and made him the starting QB. Hiroshima Castle. But QB Jon Kitna was let go after the 2000 season and a 6-10 record. Hiroshima Peace Memorial. The Seahawks drafted RB Shaun Alexander in 2000 draft as their RB of the future. For the 2000-2001 seasons the Seahawks moved back to Husky Stadium while their new stadium was being built.

But they lost 20-17 to Dan Marino and the Miami Dolphins after leading the game 17-13 in the fourth quarter. Holmgren would lead the Seahawks to a division title and to the playoffs in his first year there. With the addition of a new stadium, new head coach and general manager, Mike Holmgren, a new era began for the Seahawks. In 1999 the voters approved the ballot measure to allow the Seahawks to build a brand new stadium to replace the aging Kingdome.

Vinny Testaverde's "Phantom Touchdown" decided the game; a legendary officiating error that became a primary factor in the NFL's reinstatement of instant replay. Dennis Erickson was fired at the end of the 1998 season after losing to the New York Jets and missing the playoffs. As a result of the change in ownership and management, Tom Flores resigned in 1998 and was replaced by Bob Whitsitt. The other Kingdome tenants, the Seattle Mariners, were building a brand new stadium, and the Seahawks felt there was no good reason to remain in the decrepit Kingdome.

Allen bought the team in 1997 after funding a special election on stadium funding. This grassroots effort succeeded when Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen purchased an option to buy the team. Grassroots groups like Save Our Seahawks soon formed to pressure the NFL, Behring, and local officials to stop the move. In January 1996, Seahawks owner Ken Behring announced that he was moving the franchise to Los Angeles where the team would play at Anaheim Stadium.

He was replaced by University of Miami coach Dennis Erickson. Upon returning to the Kingdome, the team finished with a 6-10 record; Tom Flores resigned his coaching position and returned to his general manager duties. The Seahawks moved to nearby Husky Stadium on the campus of the University of Washington for 3 games after an acoustic tile fell inside the Kingdome in 1994. After struggling in Seattle for 3 seasons he was traded to the Chicago Bears after the 1996 season.

In 1993 the Seahawks drafted Rick Mirer, with the second pick in the draft, in hopes that he would be able to be the franchise's quarterback of the future. The only bright spot for the 1992 season was defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy being declared NFL Defensive Player of the Year. 1992 would also prove to be the Seahawks' worst year ever when they finished 2-14. Longtime quarterback Dave Krieg left in 1992 and was replaced by three different quarterbacks (first-round pick Dan McGwire, Stan Gelbaugh and Kelly Stouffer).

Team president/GM Tom Flores assumed the head coaching duties for the 1992 season. After finishing with a 7-9 record, he resigned to rejoin the Los Angeles Rams. 1991 would be Chuck Knox's last year as head coach of the Seahawks. These years would prove to be the most tumultuous of the franchise's history so far.

A year later he would name former Los Angeles Raiders head coach Tom Flores team president and general manager. In 1988, Ken Behring purchased the club from the original owners, the Nordstrom Family. Despite the 1983 season ending on a sour note, it was the first breakthrough season for the Seahawks, because Curt Warner was named AFC Rookie Of The Year and Chuck Knox was named AFC Coach Of The Year. The Seahawks' miracle season ended in the AFC Championship as they lost to the eventual Super Bowl XVIII champion Los Angeles Raiders 30-14.

The next week at the Miami Orange Bowl the Seahawks drove 66 yards in 5 plays that ended with a game-winning touchdown for the Seahawks' 27-20 victory over the Miami Dolphins and their rookie quarterback Dan Marino. In the wild-card playoffs the Seahawks shut down the Denver Broncos and their rookie quarterback John Elway 31-7. They would win 2 of the next 3 games to earn their first ever playoff berth. Then in week 13, the Seahawks beat the Kansas City Chiefs 51-48 at the Kingdome to start their winning ways.

In 1983 the Seahawks were battling for a playoff berth with a 6-6 record. After a disappointing 1982 season (which was shortened because of a players' strike), the Seahawks moved interim coach Mike McCormack back into the front office and hired Chuck Knox as their head coach. Interim coach Mike McCormack would finish out the rest of the season and the Seahawks compiled a 4-5 record. In the strike-shortened season of 1982, the Seahawks fired their first coach, Jack Patera, after losing their first two games.

In 1981, when the Seahawks lost five of their first six games on their way to a 6-10 record, Steve Largent had another stellar season with 1,224 receiving yards. However, the team rebounded from that embarrassment to finish the season with a 9-7 record. In 1979, the Seahawks set the NFL record for the lowest total offense in one game (minus 7 yards) in a 24-0 loss to the Los Angeles Rams at the Kingdome. In 1978, the Seahawks acheived their first winning season with a 9-7 record as WR Steve Largent finished second in the NFL with 1,168 receiving yards and Jack Patera was named NFL Coach of the Year.

The 1977 season highlight happened on October 30 when quarterback Jim Zorn came back from an injury to throw four touchdown passes in a 56-17 win over the Buffalo Bills at the Kingdome. On November 7 they won their first home game in a 30-13 victory over the Atlanta Falcons. The franchise's first win came on October 17 when they beat the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 13-10 at Tampa Bay. That drought was ended with a 20-10 victory over the Washington Redskins in the 2005 playoffs.

Before 2005, Seattle had the longest drought since its last playoff win of any NFL team, going back to the 1984 season. The team set two franchise records with an 11-game winning streak and 13 regular-season wins in 2005. Seattle has won four division titles in their franchise history: the 1988 and 1999 AFC West titles, and the 2004 and 2005 NFC West titles. The original AFC West teams (Broncos, Chargers, Chiefs and Raiders) were original AFL franchises and the realignment preserved those natural rivalries.

This realignment also allowed the NFL to restore the NFC East and the AFC West to their original post-merger rosters. In 2002, the Seahawks were returned to the NFC West as part of an NFL realignment plan that gave each conference four balanced divisions of four teams each. This realignment was dictated by the league as part of the 1976 expansion plan, so that both expansion teams could play each other twice and every other NFL franchise once during their first two seasons. After one season, Seattle switched conferences with Tampa Bay and joined the AFC West.

The franchise began play in 1976 in the NFC West division. The Seahawks are the only NFL team to switch conferences twice in the post-merger era. The Seahawks were defeated by the Los Angeles Raiders in the 1983 AFC championship game. Seattle is the only NFL team to play in both the AFC and NFC championship games.

. The Seahawks have one Super Bowl appearance. The team, along with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, joined the NFL in 1976 as expansion teams. They currently belong to the Western Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The Seattle Seahawks are a professional American football team based in Seattle, Washington. National Football League (1976-present). Paul Allen: 1997 - present. Ken Behring: 1988 - 96.

John Nordstrom: 1976 - 88. Mike Holmgren: 1999 - present. Dennis Erickson: 1995 - 98. Tom Flores: 1992 - 94.

Chuck Knox: 1983 - 91. Mike McCormack: 1982 (replaced Patera after two games). Jack Patera: 1976 - 82. Dan McGwire.

Fredd Young. Charle Young. Williams. John L.

Ricky Watters. Chris Warren. Shawn Springs. Eugene Robinson.

Jerry Rice. John Randle. Rufus Porter. Joe Nash.

Warren Moon. Cortez Kennedy. Franco Harris. Jacob Green.

Joey Galloway. Dan Doornink. Chad Brown. Brian Bosworth.

Brian Blades. Chuck Knox, Head Coach, 1983 - 91 (Inducted 2005). 17 Dave Krieg, QB, 1980 - 91 (Inducted 2004). 45 Kenny Easley, S, 1981 - 87 (Inducted 2002).

79 Jacob Green, DE, 1980 - 91 (Inducted 1995). 28 Curt Warner, RB, 1983 - 89 (Inducted 1993, not to be confused with later quarterback Kurt Warner). Pete Gross, the "original" voice of the Seahawks, 1976 - 92, passed away in December, 1992 due to cancer (Inducted November, 1992 just two days before his passing). 22 Dave Brown, CB, 1976 - 86 (Inducted 1992).

10 Jim Zorn, QB, 1976 - 84 (Inducted 1991). 80 Steve Largent, WR, 1976 - 89 (Inducted 1989). 80 Steve Largent (brought out of retirement for a portion of the 2004 season for Jerry Rice, who received Largent's blessing). 12 "The Fans", dedicated to Seahawks fans, the so-called "12th man".

Warren Moon. Steve Largent (also a former member of the United States House of Representatives). Franco Harris. Carl Eller.

Seahawks Stadium (2002-2003). a.k.a. Qwest Field (2002-present)

    . Husky Stadium (First half of the 1994 season due to repairs at The Kingdome; 2000-2001).

    Kingdome (1976-1993; Second half of the 1994 season-1999). NFC West: 2004, 2005. AFC West: 1988, 1999. NFC: 2005.

    Seattle Seahawks (1976-present). NFC West (1976, 2002-present). National Football Conference (1976, 2002-present)

      . AFC West (1977-2001).

      American Football Conference (1977-2001)

        .

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