Delphi

The theatre, seen from above

Delphi (Greek Δελφοί - Delphoi; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece. In ancient times it was the site of the Delphic Sibyl, dedicated to the god Apollo. Delphi was revered throughout the Greek world as the site of the ομφαλός (omphalos) stone, the centre of the universe. In the inner εστία (hestia), or hearth, of the Temple of Delphic Apollo (Απόλλων Δελφίνιος - Apollon Delphinios), an άσβεστος φλόγα (eternal flame) burned. After the battle of Plataea, the Greek cities extinguished their fires and brought new fire from the hearth of Greece, at Delphi; in the foundation stories of several Greek colonies, the founding colonists were first dedicated at Delphi (Burkert, 1985, pp. 61, 84).

Location

Delphi is located in a plateau on the side of Mt. Parnassus. This semicircular spur is known as Phaedriades; it overlooks the Pleistos Valley. Southwest of Delphi, about 15 km away, is the harbor-city of Kirrha on the Corinthian Gulf.

Apollo

The Temple of Apollo, seen from below View of the stadium of the Delphi sanctuary, used for the Pythian Games. The stone steps on the right were added under the Romans.

The name Delphoi is connected with δελφός delphus "womb" and may indicate archaic veneration of an Earth Goddess at the site. Apollo is connected with the site by his epithet Δελφίνιος Delphinios, "the Delphinian", i.e. either "the one of Delphi", or "the one of the womb". The epithet is connected with dolphins (the "womb-fish") in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo Εις Απόλλωνα Πύθιον, 400), telling how Apollo first came to Delphi in the shape of a dolphin, carrying Cretan priests on his back.

Another legend held that Apollo walked to Delphi from the north and stopped at Tempe, a city in Thessaly to pick laurel, a plant sacred to him. In commemoration of this legend, the winners at the Pythian Games received a laurel wreath picked in Tempe.

Delphi was the site of a major temple to Phoebus Apollo, as well as the Pythian Games and a famous oracle. Even in Roman times hundreds of votive statues remained, described by Pliny the Younger and seen by Pausanias.

When young, Apollo killed the chthonic serpent Python, which lived beside the Castalian Spring, according to some because Python had attempted to rape Leto while she was pregnant with Apollo and Artemis. This was the spring which emitted vapors that caused the Oracle at Delphi to give her prophesies. Apollo killed Python but had to be punished for it, since Python was a child of Gaia. The shrine dedicated to Apollo was probably originally dedicated to Gaia and then Poseidon. The oracle at that time predicted the future based on the lapping water and leaves rustling in the trees.

The Pythian Games comprised a chariot race, thus this magnificent statue, the Charioteer of Delphi.

Oracle

The first oracle at Delphi was commonly known as Sibyl or Pythia, though her name was Herophile. She sang her predictions, which she received from Gaia. Later, "Sibyl" became a title given to whichever priestess manned the oracle at the time. The Sibyl sat on the Sibylline Rock, breathing in vapors from the ground1 and gaining her often puzzling predictions from that. Pausanias claimed that the Sibyl was "born between man and goddess, daughter of sea monsters and an immortal nymph". Others said she was sister or daughter to Apollo. Still others claimed the Sibyl received her powers from Gaia originally, who passed the oracle to Themis, who passed it to Phoebe.

This oracle exerted considerable influence across the country, and was consulted before all major undertakings: wars, the founding of colonies, and so forth. She also was respected by the semi-Hellenic countries around the Greek world, such as Lydia, Caria, and even Egypt. Croesus of Lydia consulted Delphi before attacking Persia, and according to Herodotus received the answer "if you do, you will destroy a great empire." Croesus found the response favorable and attacked, and was utterly overthrown (resulting, of course, in the destruction of his own empire).

The oracle is also said to have proclaimed Socrates the wisest man in Greece, to which Socrates said that if so, this was because he alone was aware of his own ignorance. This claim is related to one of the most famous mottos of Delphi, which Socrates said he learned there, Gnothi Seauton (Γνώθι Σεαυτόν): "know thyself". Another famous motto of Delphi is Meden Agan (Μηδέν Άγαν): "nothing in excess".

In the 3rd century A.D., the oracle (perhaps bribed) declared that the god would no longer speak there.

The temple to Apollo at Delphi was built by Trophonius and Agamedes.

The Treasury of Athens, built to commemorate their victory at the Battle of Marathon

Footnote

1 After investigating the site, archeologists were convinced that these vapours are only a myth, as no evidence for them could be found, and — so the then standard opinion in geology — gaseous emissions from rock only occur in conjunction with volcanic activity. However, recent geological research indicates that the site of the oracle shows young geological faults, and it seems plausible that these emitted in ancient times light hydrocarbon gases, possibly ethylene, from bituminous limestone which do have an intoxicating effect. (de Boer et al., Geology 29 (2001) pp. 707; see e.g. here for a popular science coverage)

Other archaeologists believe that the oracle also inhaled fumes of burning bay leaves.

Treasuries

From the entrance of the site, continuing up the slope almost to the temple itself, is a large number of votive statues, and numerous treasuries. These were built by the various states – those overseas as well as those on the mainland – to commemorate victories and to thank the oracle for advice important to those victories. The most impressive is the now-restored Treasury of Athens, built to commemorate the Athenians' victory at the Battle of Marathon. The Athenians had previously been given the advice by the oracle to put their faith in their "wooden walls" – taking this advice to mean their navy, they won a famous battle at Salamis. Another impressive treasury that exists on the site was dedicated by the city of Siphnos, who had ammassed great wealth from their silver and gold mines and so they dedicated the Siphnian Treasury.

Tholos

The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia

The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia is a circular building that was constructed between 380 and 360 B.C. It consisted of 20 Doric columns arranged with an exterior diamater of 14.76 meters, with 10 Corinthian columns in the interior. The Tholos is located approximately a half-mile (800 m) from the main ruins at Delphi. Three of the Doric colums have been restored, making it the most popular site at Delphi for tourists to take photographs.

Modern Delphi

The modern Delphi or Delfi or Delfoi is situated west of the archaeological site. It is passed by a major highway linking Amfissa along with Itea and Arachova. The two main streets are each one-way and narrow. Delphi also has a school, a lyceum and a square (plateia). The communities include Chrysso which in ancient times was Crissa.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Delphi

General

  • Homepage of the modern municipality (in English or Greek)
  • Hellenic Ministry of Culture: Delphi
  • The Oracle of Delphi and Ancient Oracles, annotated guide edited by Tim Spalding
  • Delphi guide
  • Delphi (in Greek)
  • C. Osborne , "A Short detour to Delphi and the Sibyls"
  • Livius Picture Archive: Delphi
  • Eloise Hart, "The Delphic oracle"
  • "The Delphic oracle"

Geology of Delphi

  • John R. Hale, et al., "Questioning the Delphic Oracle: When science meets religion at this ancient Greek site, the two turn out to be on better terms than scholars had originally thought", in Scientific American August 2003
  • John Roach, "Delphic Oracle's Lips May Have Been Loosened by Gas Vapors" in National Geographic news, August 2001
  • Geology of Delphi
  • The New York Times, March 19, 2002: "Fumes and Visions Were Not a Myth for Oracle at Delphi"

Reference

  • Burkert, Walter, Greek Religion 1985.

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The communities include Chrysso which in ancient times was Crissa. Some UT traditions include:. Delphi also has a school, a lyceum and a square (plateia). Texas is a tradition-rich school, and many of those traditions are associated with athletics events, especially football. The two main streets are each one-way and narrow. In addition, the University of Texas has numerous practice, training, and intramural facilities. It is passed by a major highway linking Amfissa along with Itea and Arachova. Major sporting facilities and their main use include:.

The modern Delphi or Delfi or Delfoi is situated west of the archaeological site. Texas is also the biggest rival of the University of Arkansas which perhaps may be attributed to their long tenure as the two eponymous state schools of the former Southwest Conference, or to the 1969 game between the two, which decided the national championship in favor of the Longhorns. Three of the Doric colums have been restored, making it the most popular site at Delphi for tourists to take photographs. This list includes most other colleges in Texas, but especially Baylor (located just up Interstate 35 from UT), Texas Tech, and Houston. The Tholos is located approximately a half-mile (800 m) from the main ruins at Delphi. Perhaps due to the Longhorns' enduring athletic success, many other schools consider UT among their biggest rivals. It consisted of 20 Doric columns arranged with an exterior diamater of 14.76 meters, with 10 Corinthian columns in the interior. Aspects of the rivalry include:.

The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia is a circular building that was constructed between 380 and 360 B.C. The football game between University of Texas and Oklahoma is known as the "Red River Shootout" (the official name of the event was changed to "Red River Rivalry", most likely due to political correctness) and is held annually in Dallas, Texas at the Cotton Bowl. Another impressive treasury that exists on the site was dedicated by the city of Siphnos, who had ammassed great wealth from their silver and gold mines and so they dedicated the Siphnian Treasury. In recent years, this rivalry has taken on added significance, since both football programs have been highly ranked and compete in the same division of the Big 12 conference. The Athenians had previously been given the advice by the oracle to put their faith in their "wooden walls" – taking this advice to mean their navy, they won a famous battle at Salamis. There is also a long-standing rivalry with the University of Oklahoma. The most impressive is the now-restored Treasury of Athens, built to commemorate the Athenians' victory at the Battle of Marathon. Aspects of the rivalry include:.

These were built by the various states – those overseas as well as those on the mainland – to commemorate victories and to thank the oracle for advice important to those victories. At the end of the year, the school with the most points wins the series and will receive a trophy. From the entrance of the site, continuing up the slope almost to the temple itself, is a large number of votive statues, and numerous treasuries. Essentially, each time the two schools meet in a sport, the winner of the matchup gets a point. Other archaeologists believe that the oracle also inhaled fumes of burning bay leaves. In an attempt to generate more attention for the rivalry in sports other than football, in 2004 the two schools started the Lone Star Showdown, a trial two-year program. here for a popular science coverage). The annual football game with Texas A&M takes place the day after Thanksgiving each year.

707; see e.g. The Texas/Texas A&M rivalry has given rise to several stereotypes on both sides: Aggies are generally portrayed as ignorant and dumb farmers, while Longhorns are portrayed as highbrow and arrogant city-slickers. (de Boer et al., Geology 29 (2001) pp. Texas has other important rivalries as well. However, recent geological research indicates that the site of the oracle shows young geological faults, and it seems plausible that these emitted in ancient times light hydrocarbon gases, possibly ethylene, from bituminous limestone which do have an intoxicating effect. The University's biggest rival is Texas A&M University, although UT considers the Oklahoma Sooners to also be important rivals in football, especially in recent years due to the prominence of both programs. 1 After investigating the site, archeologists were convinced that these vapours are only a myth, as no evidence for them could be found, and — so the then standard opinion in geology — gaseous emissions from rock only occur in conjunction with volcanic activity. The women's volleyball club won National Championship honors at the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association Collegiate Volleyball Sport Club Championships April 14 - April 16, 2005 in Kansas City, Missouri.

The temple to Apollo at Delphi was built by Trophonius and Agamedes. Some of these teams compete with other university clubs. In the 3rd century A.D., the oracle (perhaps bribed) declared that the god would no longer speak there. UT offers a large number of intramural sports opportunities. Another famous motto of Delphi is Meden Agan (Μηδέν Άγαν): "nothing in excess". The table at right shows Longhorn medals won in the Summer Olympics. This claim is related to one of the most famous mottos of Delphi, which Socrates said he learned there, Gnothi Seauton (Γνώθι Σεαυτόν): "know thyself". Several Longhorn athletes have had success at the Olympics over the years.

The oracle is also said to have proclaimed Socrates the wisest man in Greece, to which Socrates said that if so, this was because he alone was aware of his own ignorance. Volleyball achieved titles in 1981 and 1988. Croesus of Lydia consulted Delphi before attacking Persia, and according to Herodotus received the answer "if you do, you will destroy a great empire." Croesus found the response favorable and attacked, and was utterly overthrown (resulting, of course, in the destruction of his own empire). Women's track and field achieved national indoor titles in 1986, 1988, 1990, 1998-99, and outdoor titles in 1982, 1986, 1998-99, 2005. She also was respected by the semi-Hellenic countries around the Greek world, such as Lydia, Caria, and even Egypt. Women's tennis claimed the title in 1993 and 1995. This oracle exerted considerable influence across the country, and was consulted before all major undertakings: wars, the founding of colonies, and so forth. Texas women's cross country won a National Title in 1986.

Still others claimed the Sibyl received her powers from Gaia originally, who passed the oracle to Themis, who passed it to Phoebe. In addition, Texas has won nine National Titles in men's swimming and diving (1981, 1988-1991, 1996, 2000-2002) and nine in Women's Swimming and Diving (1981-82, 1984-88, 1990-91). Others said she was sister or daughter to Apollo. Two longstanding traditions exist in which the fans interact with the team and each other; when Texas makes a stuff block, the players yell "Whose House?" and the fans respond with "Horns' House!" In addition, whenever a point is made by Texas, the announcer will say "Point Texas!" and the fans respond with "Point Texas!". Pausanias claimed that the Sibyl was "born between man and goddess, daughter of sea monsters and an immortal nymph". The team plays home games in Gregory Gymnasium. The Sibyl sat on the Sibylline Rock, breathing in vapors from the ground1 and gaining her often puzzling predictions from that. It also sent Demetria Sance to the 2000 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia.

Later, "Sibyl" became a title given to whichever priestess manned the oracle at the time. Texas won the national championship in 1981 and 1988 and was runner-up to Nebraska in 1995. She sang her predictions, which she received from Gaia. Texas has a strong women's volleyball tradition, with its teams finishing in the top 25 in the nation 19 out of the last 23 years, as well as two #2 finishes. The first oracle at Delphi was commonly known as Sibyl or Pythia, though her name was Herophile. The women's gymnastics team won a national title on April 16, 2005 at the Association of Intercollegiate Gymnastics Clubs competition, and the men's team finished second, missing out on the national title by seven-tenths of a point to Penn State. The oracle at that time predicted the future based on the lapping water and leaves rustling in the trees. However, the University is home to two club gymnastics teams.

The shrine dedicated to Apollo was probably originally dedicated to Gaia and then Poseidon. The University of Texas does not field a varsity gymnastics squad. Apollo killed Python but had to be punished for it, since Python was a child of Gaia. Legendary golf instructor Harvey Penick was a long-time Texas coach. This was the spring which emitted vapors that caused the Oracle at Delphi to give her prophesies. Several former Longhorn players have gone on to success on the PGA Tour including: Tom Kite, Ben Crenshaw, Phil Blackmar, Mark Brooks, Bob Estes, and Justin Leonard. When young, Apollo killed the chthonic serpent Python, which lived beside the Castalian Spring, according to some because Python had attempted to rape Leto while she was pregnant with Apollo and Artemis. Texas has a strong golf tradition, winning National Titles in 1971 and 1972 and finishing runner-up four other times.

Even in Roman times hundreds of votive statues remained, described by Pliny the Younger and seen by Pausanias. The team plays home games on Disch-Falk Field. Delphi was the site of a major temple to Phoebus Apollo, as well as the Pythian Games and a famous oracle. In January of 2006, Texas is listed at number 1 in both major pre-season polls. In commemoration of this legend, the winners at the Pythian Games received a laurel wreath picked in Tempe. Former Longhorns who went on to success in the pros include Roger Clemens, Calvin Schiraldi, Burt Hooton, Keith Moreland, Spike Owen, Greg Swindell, and many more. Another legend held that Apollo walked to Delphi from the north and stopped at Tempe, a city in Thessaly to pick laurel, a plant sacred to him. The team was runner-up 5 other times: 1953, 1984, 1985, 1989, and 2004.

The epithet is connected with dolphins (the "womb-fish") in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo Εις Απόλλωνα Πύθιον, 400), telling how Apollo first came to Delphi in the shape of a dolphin, carrying Cretan priests on his back. Texas has won the College World Series 6 times: 1949, 1950, 1970, 1983, 2002 and 2005. either "the one of Delphi", or "the one of the womb". Texas has also won more individual games in the CWS than any other school, though they do not have the most championships. Apollo is connected with the site by his epithet Δελφίνιος Delphinios, "the Delphinian", i.e. The University's baseball team is considered one of the best in the nation with more trips to the College World Series than any other school, extending their record in 2005 to 32 appearances. The name Delphoi is connected with δελφός delphus "womb" and may indicate archaic veneration of an Earth Goddess at the site. As of January 15th, Texas is 13-2 and ranked eighth after beating third-ranked Villanova.

Southwest of Delphi, about 15 km away, is the harbor-city of Kirrha on the Corinthian Gulf. This year (2005-2006) they went into the season ranked #2 in the nation until they were beat by the #1 Duke Blue Devils in East Rutherford, New Jersey and the Tennessee Volunteers. This semicircular spur is known as Phaedriades; it overlooks the Pleistos Valley. Both teams play home games in the Frank Erwin Special Events Center. Parnassus. The women's basketball team has long been a national power, especially during the late 1980s (winning a National Title in 1986) and through the 1990s. Delphi is located in a plateau on the side of Mt. In 2003, the basketball team advanced to the NCAA Tournament Final Four round, and in 2004 advanced to the Sweet Sixteen round.

. In recent years, the men's basketball team has gained prominence. 61, 84). * Rankings are from the Associated Press poll released prior to each game.
† First national championship since 1970 (BCS, AP). After the battle of Plataea, the Greek cities extinguished their fires and brought new fire from the hearth of Greece, at Delphi; in the foundation stories of several Greek colonies, the founding colonists were first dedicated at Delphi (Burkert, 1985, pp. Texas and USC ended up winning out their seasons and faced each other in the National Championship, which Texas won 41-38. In the inner εστία (hestia), or hearth, of the Temple of Delphic Apollo (Απόλλων Δελφίνιος - Apollon Delphinios), an άσβεστος φλόγα (eternal flame) burned. However, USC remained atop both human polls and was able to reclaim the top overall ranking.

Delphi was revered throughout the Greek world as the site of the ομφαλός (omphalos) stone, the centre of the universe. With the October 31st BCS rankings, Texas remained first in the computer rankings, with Virginia Tech actually pulling even with USC for number 2 in the computer rankings. In ancient times it was the site of the Delphic Sibyl, dedicated to the god Apollo. The stay at the top was short-lived. Delphi (Greek Δελφοί - Delphoi; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece. [3] The 0.0007 percent margin separating Texas from USC was the slimmest margin between the top two teams since the inception of BCS rankings.[4]. Burkert, Walter, Greek Religion 1985. The first place ranking was the first ever for UT in the BCS era, and the first top ranking in any major football poll since October 8th, 1984, when they were atop both the Associated Press and Coaches polls.

The New York Times, March 19, 2002: "Fumes and Visions Were Not a Myth for Oracle at Delphi". On October 24, Texas passed USC in the Bowl Championship Series rankings due to a strong showing in the computer rankings, which favored the Longhorns because of the overall strength of their opponents as well as the previous week's win over previously unbeaten Texas Tech. Geology of Delphi. They maintained those rankings throughout the entire 2005 - 2006 season. John Roach, "Delphic Oracle's Lips May Have Been Loosened by Gas Vapors" in National Geographic news, August 2001. Texas was given a pre-season #2 ranking (behind defending National Champions University of Southern California) by Sports Illustrated magazine, and was also ranked second in the AP and USA Today coaches pre-season polls. Hale, et al., "Questioning the Delphic Oracle: When science meets religion at this ancient Greek site, the two turn out to be on better terms than scholars had originally thought", in Scientific American August 2003. With the exception of Cedric Benson, Derrick Johnson, and Bo Scaife, Texas returned most of their key players from 2004 - 2005, including red-shirt Junior Quarterback Vince Young.

John R. Brown, who was often lauded for his recruiting while being criticized for failing to win championships, followed up a strong 2004 season on the field with an extremely successful 2005 recruiting season by securing the top-ranked recruiting class (the 2005 recruiting season is for players entering the University in Fall 2006). "The Delphic oracle". The Longhorns are currently coached by Mack Brown and led on the field by quarterback Vince Young. Eloise Hart, "The Delphic oracle". Three ex-Longhorns from the 2005 Rose Bowl team, Cedric Benson, Derrick Johnson, and Bo Scaife, were selected in the 2005 NFL Draft. Livius Picture Archive: Delphi. The Longhorns defeated the Wolverines 38-37 thanks to a successful field goal kick by Dusty Mangum as time expired off the clock.

Osborne , "A Short detour to Delphi and the Sibyls". The game was the first meeting between the two storied teams and the Longhorns' first trip to the Rose Bowl for a BCS game. C. Under the current bowl system, the Longhorns played their first Bowl Championship Series game in 2005 at the Rose Bowl against the University of Michigan. Delphi (in Greek). The improvements are scheduled to be completed before the 2006-2007 football season.[2]. Delphi guide. The stadium is undergoing renovations scheduled to start November 14, 2005, two days following UT's last home football game of the season.

The Oracle of Delphi and Ancient Oracles, annotated guide edited by Tim Spalding. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium which has a seating capacity of 80,082. Hellenic Ministry of Culture: Delphi. The team currently plays home games in Darrell K. Homepage of the modern municipality (in English or Greek). During the late 1980s and 1990s, the team was somewhat less successful, but has recently returned to prominence, finishing in the top ten in 2001, 2002, 2004, and 2005. Only two programs, Notre Dame and the University of Michigan, have won more games than Texas.

The Longhorns have a long tradition of winning football games. Other former Longhorn greats include: Scott Appleton, Tommy Nobis, Bobby Layne, Tom Landry, Jerry Sisemore, Brad Shearer, Kenneth Sims, Tony Degrate, Doug English, Jerry Gray, Eric Metcalf, Tony Brackens, Priest Holmes, and many more. Two Texas Longhorn running backs have won college football's highest honor, the Heisman Trophy: Earl Campbell (1977) and Ricky Williams (1998). The team experienced its greatest success when it was coached by Darrell Royal, under Royal winning three National Championships — 1963, 1969 and 1970.

From 1936 to 2004, the team finished the season in the top ten 23 times, or one-third of the time, according to the Associated Press. The University of Texas has traditionally been considered a college football powerhouse, with four national titles to their credit, including the 2005-2006 season. The mascot is a Texas longhorn named Bevo. The school's colors are burnt orange and white, and its alma mater is The Eyes of Texas.[1] At football games, students frequently sing Texas Fight, the University's fight song.

A charter member of the Southwest Conference until its dissolution in 1996, Texas now competes in the Big 12 Conference (South Division) of the NCAA's Division I-A. . Due to the breadth of sports offered and the quality of the programs, Texas was selected as "America's Best Sports College" in a 2002 analysis performed by Sports Illustrated. The University of Texas offers a wide variety of varsity and intramural sports programs.

The women's teams are sometimes called the Lady Longhorns, but generally both the men's and women's teams are referred to as the Longhorns. The University of Texas at Austin (often referred to as simply the University of Texas, Texas, or the abbreviation UT) is the flagship institution of the University of Texas System. These teams are referred to as the Texas Longhorns, taking their name from the Longhorn cattle that were an important part of the development of Texas. Texas Longhorn Athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of The University of Texas.

1 in BCS ahead of USC October 25, 2005 The San Diego Union-Tribune. ^  Harmonson, Todd Texas ascends to No. ^  Veyhl, Jake Longhorns Number 1 for First Time in BCS Rankings October 25, 2005 The Daily Texan. ^  Young, Meghan Regents approve stadium upgrades November 10, 2005 The Daily Texan.

"Eyes of Texas" Handbook of Texas Online. ^  Berry, Margaret C. Texas coach Darrell Royal replied, "We're ready." and the Longhorns went on to win the game. At the time, the prevailing custom was for the final polls to come out in advance of the bowl game, meaning Texas had already been crowned the National Champions.

Wayne Hardin, coach of the US Naval Academy, ranked #2 prior to the 1963 Cotton Bowl, hoping to pull off an upset of #1 Texas. "When the challenger meets the champion and the challenger wins, there is a new champion."

    . Kennedy, referring to the general skill gap between Texas and Rice University, from a speech given at Rice Stadium, September 12, 1962. John F.

    why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard ..."

      . ".. Read the rest - Students from Texas A&M University usually taunt Texas students by threatening to "saw off" the horns of Bevo, citing the Bible verse Psalm 75:10; "I shall cut off the horns of the wicked." As it turns out, that's not the entire verse however, and as a response, Texas students tell Aggies to "read the rest." The rest of the verse is "but the horns of the righteous shall be lifted up." This appears on shirts, usually with "Hook 'Em" written underneath. Lighting the UT Tower (also known as the Main Building) in different colors for various types of sporting victories.

      Cheerleading by the Texas cheerleaders and Pom squads. The University of Texas Longhorn Band, nicknamed The Showband of the Southwest. Smokey the Cannon - fired in celebration on game day at the moment of kickoff and after UT scores. Script Texas - half-time routine by the Longhorn Band.

      Texas - Fight! cheer - one side of the stadium yells "Texas!" and then the other side yells "Fight" - this is usually repeated several times. Texas Fight - the school fight song. Hook 'em Horns - the school hand signal. The Eyes of Texas - the school song.

      Big Bertha - the world's largest drum. Bevo - the school mascot, a live Texas longhorn steer present for football games and other special events. Texas Rowing Center — rowing. Penick-Allison Tennis Center — tennis.

      Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center — swimming and diving. Gregory Gymnasium — volleyball. Red and Charline McCombs Field — softball. Myers Stadium — soccer.

      Mike A. Disch-Falk Field — baseball. Frank Erwin Special Events Center — basketball. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium — football.

      Darrell K. The University of Texas holds its annual Torchlight Parade during the week of the Red River Shootout. Though more than 50 game balls are used during the game, the first balls used by each side is the ball that is ran from their stadiums. Prior to the game, a ball is run from the 50 yard line of each school's football field to the cotton bowl by members of each school's ROTC.

      Images of upside-down Longhorn logos and Hook 'em hand signals on the part of OU as well as various chants deriding each team. The Red River Shootout being played on neutral turf in a stadium split with each team having an equal number of supporters on each side of the 50 yard line. In the past, mischief has preceded the annual game, such as "kidnapping" each other's mascots. Texas has a unique lighting scheme for the UT Tower after wins over Texas A&M.

      Each school has elaborate pre-game preparations for the annual football clash, including the Aggie Bonfire and the Hex Rally. The last regular season football game is reserved for their matchup. Each school mentions the other in their fight song.

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