The Amityville Horror

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The Amityville Horror was a best-selling 1977 novel by Jay Anson. The novel is also the basis of two movies made in 1979 and 2005.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Synopsis

Both book and film revolve around the Lutz family, who move into the Dutch Colonial home in the village of Amityville, a New York City suburb on the south shore of Long Island, New York village. Thirteen months earlier the house on 112 Ocean Avenue was the scene of a brutal mass murder. The Lutz family, having lived in the house for only 28 days, fled their house with very few belongings, claiming to have been terrorized by paranormal phenomenon.

The murders

  • This section contains information that is a part of the public record separate from specific allegations of supernatural events which form the heart of the book and movies.

Main Article: Ronald DeFeo, Jr.

On November 13, 1974, police found that all but one of the members of the family residing at 112 Oceanside Ave., the DeFeo's, had been murdered in the middle of the night. Ronald DeFeo Jr., the only surviving member, claimed that they had been murdered by the mob until he confessed to the murders.

The popular story of ensuing events is that DeFeo’s original claims were that the murders were mob-connected had changed to “hearing voices,” demonic possession, and being handed the murder weapon, a .35 calibre Marlin hunting rifle, by a “pair of black hands”. DeFeo also claimed to have seen shadow figures moving about the house during the murders. He also claimed when killing his parents the weapon made no sound when firing it. However CourtTV's account of the murder case makes no mention of these claims, implying that DeFeo in fact did not contest his confession until the trial [1]. DeFeo's attorney pursued that line of questioning during the trial, only to have it backfire on him when DeFeo testified that he had not heard any voices the night of the murders [2]. He was convicted of second degree murder and is currently serving a life sentence.

Story

  • This section contains allegations of events that support the contention that the house was actually haunted. They are part of a work of literature alleging supernatural events and have not been independently verified by impartial research.
Left to right: 112 Ocean as owned by the DeFeo & Lutz familiy, 112 Ocean in 1978, House in Toms River, New Jersey remodeled to look like 112 Ocean (was used for filming first three Amityville Horror movies), 112 Ocean as remodeled in the 1990s - note the replacement of quarter-moon window as well as the alteration of porch balustrade and the removal of latticework around porch columns.

The house on 112 Ocean Avenue remained empty for 13 months until late 1975, when George and Kathleen Lutz purchased the 2 ½ floor house. George and Kathy were married in July and had their own houses, however they wanted to start a new life with a new home, for a new marriage. Kathy had three children from a previous marriage and a black Labrador named Harry. During their first inspection of the house the realtor told them about the DeFeo murders the previous November and asked if this changed their opinion on wanting to purchase the house. After family discussions, it was agreed that it was not an issue.

They moved in on December 18, 1975. When a friend of George’s learned of the house he insisted George have the house blessed. At the time George was a non-Catholic (at the time he was a non-practising Methodist) and had no experience with what a house blessing entailed. Kathy was a non-practising Catholic at the time and explained the process. George only knew of one Catholic priest, named Father Ray, who was also a close friend, who agreed to do the house blessing.

Being an ecclesiastical judge at the local Catholic establishment, Father Ray was not in the habit of doing house-blessings but since he and George were friends, he was doing it as a favour. Father Ray arrived to do the house blessing on the day the Lutz’s were moving in and as they busily unpacked outside he went in and performed the house blessing. Much later, after fleeing, George and Kathy learned from Father Ray that when blessing a particular room on the second-storey, which would be referred to as the “sewing room” (formerly Marc and John Matthew DeFeo’s bedroom), he discovered an unnatural coldness in this room, and heard an unearthly voice telling him to “Get Out!” Startled by this, Father Ray was subsequently slapped by an unseen force. When leaving the house, Father Ray did not mention this incident to either George or Kathy, more than likely because he did not wish to cause them unnecessary concern. Instead he told them he felt uncomfortable in that room and would prefer it if nobody spent too much time in that room. Because they planned to use the room as a “sewing room” nothing else was mentioned of it, until much later after George and Kathy had fled the house.

The sensations in the house experienced by the Lutz family did not happen at an accelerated pace instantly. Occurrences were subtle and escalated as time went by. The instances of paranormal activity were later described as being “in a three-ringed circus”. Each family member would experience different things as individuals which made such a profound psychological effect that it was difficult to explain them to even other family members that lived in the house, and it was like they “were each living in a different house”.

Some of the experiences in the house for the Lutz family are as follows:

  • George would wake up around 3.15am every morning and then would go out to check the boathouse. Later it would be learned that it was the estimated time of death with the DeFeo murders.
  • Kathy would have vivid nightmares about the murders, and discovered which order the murders occurred and who was shot where. These details were later confirmed when they met with Ronald DeFeo’s defence attorney.
  • Kathy would feel a sensation as if “being embraced” in a loving manner, by an unseen force.
  • Kathy discovered a small hidden crawl space behind shelving in the basement, the walls painted red. This did not show up on the blue prints of the house. The room was referred to as “the red room”. This room had a profound effect on their dog, Harry, who refused to go near it and cowered away as if sensing something negative there.
  • There were cold spots and strange odours of scented perfume and excrement in certain areas of the house where there were no wind drafts or any piping whatsoever to explain a source.
  • The Lutz’s youngest daughter, Missy, developed an imaginary friend named “Jody” who it was later discovered was not so imaginary and who it would be discovered could change form from a little boy to a demonic pig-like creature.
  • George would be awoken by the sound of the front door slamming when there was no door slamming. He would race downstairs to see the dog sleeping soundly at the front door. Nobody else heard these sounds even though it was loud enough to wake the house.
  • George would hear what was described as a “German marching band tuning up” or what also sounded like a clock radio playing not quite on frequency. When he got downstairs the noise would stop.
  • While checking the boathouse one night, George saw a pair of “red eyes” looking at him from Missy’s bedroom window. When he raced upstairs and to her room there was no sign of this mysterious entity. Later it was theorized that it could have been “Jody”.

When it was apparent to the Lutz’s that something was wrong with their house that they could not explain rationally, it was suggested by a friend of George’s, who had had similar experiences in his house, that he and Kathy do a blessing of their own and open all the windows in the rooms and tell whatever was there to leave in the name of Jesus Christ. When taking his advice and walking around the house doing the Lord’s prayer each of the rooms, George and Kathy would hear a chorus of voices telling them “Will you please stop!”

By mid-January of 1976, and after another attempt at a house blessing by George and Kathy, they experienced what would be their final night in the house. To this day, events of this night have not been disclosed fully by any of the Lutz family, as they have described it as too frightening.

After getting in touch with Father Ray, he managed to convince George and Kathy to take some belongings and stay at Kathy’s mother’s house in Deer Park, for the time being until they sorted out what problems were in the house. On January 14, 1976, George and Kathy Lutz, with their three children and their dog, Harry, fled the house on 112 Ocean Avenue, leaving most of their possessions behind.

Criticisms

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The book and the subsequent movies were promoted as being based on a true story, and for a time Anson's word that "There is simply too much independent corroboration of their narrative to support the speculation that [the Lutzes] either imagined or fabricated these events" held. The popular consensus today, however, among researchers of the incident is that "the facts depicted in the books (and the movies to follow) were written entirely as a profit making scheme" [3].

The story started to fall apart when the Lutz's filed suit against Paul Hoffman (a writer working on an account of the hauntings), William Weber (DeFeo's Lawyer), Bernard Burton, Frederick Mars (both clairvoyants who had examined the house), Good Housekeeping, New York Sunday News and the Hearst Corporation (who had published articles related to the hauntings), alleging invasion of privacy, misappropration of names for trade purposes, and mental distress. Hoffman, Weber, and Burton immediately filed a countersuit alleging fraud and breach of contract. Eventually, the claims against the news corporations were dropped for lack of evidence, and the remainder of the case was tried by Brooklyn U.S. District Court judge Jack B. Weinstein. Weinstein dismissed the Lutz's claims, saying "it appears to me that to a large extent the book is a work of fiction, relying in a large part upon the suggestions of Mr. Weber" [4]. Weber had admitted that much of the story was created over "many bottles of wine" with the Lutz's [5].

Numerous discrepencies have emerged over the years, though the Lutz's continued claims that the book was essentially true help keep the legend alive in the public eye.

A recent view of 112 Ocean.

See Also

  • The Amityville Horror (1979 film)
  • The Amityville Horror (2005 film)

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Numerous discrepencies have emerged over the years, though the Lutz's continued claims that the book was essentially true help keep the legend alive in the public eye. †Denotes wild-card team (since 1995).. Weber had admitted that much of the story was created over "many bottles of wine" with the Lutz's [5]. Prior to 1924, the pattern generally had been to alternate, or to make other arrangements convenient to both clubs. Weber" [4]. In 1925, Brooklyn owner Charles Ebbets convinced owners to adopt the current 2-3-2 system of scheduling World Series games (one team would host the first two games, the other team would host the next three, and the first team would host the last two if necessary; the leagues alternated which representative would host the first games), already used in the 1924 Series, as a permanent rule. Weinstein dismissed the Lutz's claims, saying "it appears to me that to a large extent the book is a work of fiction, relying in a large part upon the suggestions of Mr. The list of post-season rules evolved over time.

Weinstein. Most importantly, the now-official (and compulsory) World's Series match was to be operated strictly by the National Commission itself, not on the whims of individual teams. District Court judge Jack B. Receipts for later games were split among the two teams and the National Commission, the governing body for the sport, which was able to cover much of its annual operating expenses from World Series revenue. Eventually, the claims against the news corporations were dropped for lack of evidence, and the remainder of the case was tried by Brooklyn U.S. This was to discourage teams from throwing early games in order to prolong the series and make more money. Hoffman, Weber, and Burton immediately filed a countersuit alleging fraud and breach of contract. One rule was that player shares would come from gate receipts from the first four games only.

The story started to fall apart when the Lutz's filed suit against Paul Hoffman (a writer working on an account of the hauntings), William Weber (DeFeo's Lawyer), Bernard Burton, Frederick Mars (both clairvoyants who had examined the house), Good Housekeeping, New York Sunday News and the Hearst Corporation (who had published articles related to the hauntings), alleging invasion of privacy, misappropration of names for trade purposes, and mental distress. During the winter of 1904/05, however, feeling the sting of press criticism, Brush saw the light and proposed what came to be known as the "Brush Rules", under which the series would be played over subsequent years. The popular consensus today, however, among researchers of the incident is that "the facts depicted in the books (and the movies to follow) were written entirely as a profit making scheme" [3]. Brush also cited the lack of rules under which the games would be played and how the money would be split. The book and the subsequent movies were promoted as being based on a true story, and for a time Anson's word that "There is simply too much independent corroboration of their narrative to support the speculation that [the Lutzes] either imagined or fabricated these events" held. Boston won on the last day of the season, but Brush stuck to his original decision. On January 14, 1976, George and Kathy Lutz, with their three children and their dog, Harry, fled the house on 112 Ocean Avenue, leaving most of their possessions behind. At the time of the announcement, their new cross-town rivals, the Highlanders, were leading the AL.

After getting in touch with Father Ray, he managed to convince George and Kathy to take some belongings and stay at Kathy’s mother’s house in Deer Park, for the time being until they sorted out what problems were in the house. Brush, refused to allow his team to play, citing the "inferiority" of the upstart American League. To this day, events of this night have not been disclosed fully by any of the Lutz family, as they have described it as too frightening. The Giants' owner, John T. By mid-January of 1976, and after another attempt at a house blessing by George and Kathy, they experienced what would be their final night in the house. The 1904 Series would have been between the AL's Boston Americans and the NL's New York Giants. When taking his advice and walking around the house doing the Lord’s prayer each of the rooms, George and Kathy would hear a chorus of voices telling them “Will you please stop!”. It had been arranged well in advance by the owners of the respective teams, as both were league leaders by large margins.

When it was apparent to the Lutz’s that something was wrong with their house that they could not explain rationally, it was suggested by a friend of George’s, who had had similar experiences in his house, that he and Kathy do a blessing of their own and open all the windows in the rooms and tell whatever was there to leave in the name of Jesus Christ. One of these series at the end of 1903 was a meeting between the two pennant winners and is known as the 1903 World Series. Some of the experiences in the house for the Lutz family are as follows:. These series were arranged by the individual teams, not by the leagues directly, the same as the 1880s World's Series matches had been. Each family member would experience different things as individuals which made such a profound psychological effect that it was difficult to explain them to even other family members that lived in the house, and it was like they “were each living in a different house”. After two years of bitter competition and player raiding, the National and American Leagues made peace and, as part of the accord, several pairs of teams squared off for interleague exhibition games after the 1903 regular season. The instances of paranormal activity were later described as being “in a three-ringed circus”. National League - American League.

Occurrences were subtle and escalated as time went by. National League. The sensations in the house experienced by the Lutz family did not happen at an accelerated pace instantly. American Association. Because they planned to use the room as a “sewing room” nothing else was mentioned of it, until much later after George and Kathy had fled the house. National League vs. Instead he told them he felt uncomfortable in that room and would prefer it if nobody spent too much time in that room. National League.

When leaving the house, Father Ray did not mention this incident to either George or Kathy, more than likely because he did not wish to cause them unnecessary concern. National Association of Professional Baseball Players. Much later, after fleeing, George and Kathy learned from Father Ray that when blessing a particular room on the second-storey, which would be referred to as the “sewing room” (formerly Marc and John Matthew DeFeo’s bedroom), he discovered an unnatural coldness in this room, and heard an unearthly voice telling him to “Get Out!” Startled by this, Father Ray was subsequently slapped by an unseen force. National Association of Baseball Players (Amateur -> Professional). Father Ray arrived to do the house blessing on the day the Lutz’s were moving in and as they busily unpacked outside he went in and performed the house blessing. The following are teams that played an earlier version of the "World's Championship Series" or otherwise claimed the national championship "Pennant". Being an ecclesiastical judge at the local Catholic establishment, Father Ray was not in the habit of doing house-blessings but since he and George were friends, he was doing it as a favour. World Series Cricket was a short-lived but influential cricket competition.

George only knew of one Catholic priest, named Father Ray, who was also a close friend, who agreed to do the house blessing. The term World Series has since been appropriated by other championships, such as the College World Series, the Little League World Series, the World Series of Golf, the World Series of Poker, the World Series of Birding and the World Series of Martial Arts. Kathy was a non-practising Catholic at the time and explained the process. Commissioner Bud Selig, among others, has high hopes that this tournament could be as big as soccer's World Cup. At the time George was a non-Catholic (at the time he was a non-practising Methodist) and had no experience with what a house blessing entailed. Many of the major baseball playing nations have committed to participating (the United States, Dominican Republic, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, etc.). When a friend of George’s learned of the house he insisted George have the house blessed. Teams will be split into four groups of four and play a round robin schedule, with the top two teams from each group advancing to the next round.

They moved in on December 18, 1975. The tournament will be held in sites around North America, Central America, and Asia. After family discussions, it was agreed that it was not an issue. Many major leaguers have expressed interest in playing in such a competition, including Miguel Tejada of the Baltimore Orioles (Dominican Republic), Dontrelle Willis of the Florida Marlins (United States), Carlos Lee of the Milwaukee Brewers (Panama), and Andruw Jones of the Atlanta Braves (from the Dutch island of Curaçao). During their first inspection of the house the realtor told them about the DeFeo murders the previous November and asked if this changed their opinion on wanting to purchase the house. In light of the International Olympic Committee recently voting baseball out of the Summer Games as a medal sport, this competition hopes to prove to the IOC that baseball is truly an international game. Kathy had three children from a previous marriage and a black Labrador named Harry. It will be the first international baseball competition to feature Major League players.

George and Kathy were married in July and had their own houses, however they wanted to start a new life with a new home, for a new marriage. Recently, Major League Baseball officially revealed its plans for the World Baseball Classic, to be held in March 2006. The house on 112 Ocean Avenue remained empty for 13 months until late 1975, when George and Kathleen Lutz purchased the 2 ½ floor house. According to the IBAF chairman, such a move would do more for popularizing baseball around the world than any amount of money spent by the MLB for its current worldwide marketing. He was convicted of second degree murder and is currently serving a life sentence. The International Baseball Federation (IBAF) has lobbied MLB to suspend play during the Summer Olympics, so that MLB players could compete for their respective national teams, and has agreed to shorten the Olympic tournament if MLB agrees to freeing its players. DeFeo's attorney pursued that line of questioning during the trial, only to have it backfire on him when DeFeo testified that he had not heard any voices the night of the murders [2]. At the 2004 Summer Olympics the United States was not represented at all, since its team of minor league players did not survive the qualifying rounds.

However CourtTV's account of the murder case makes no mention of these claims, implying that DeFeo in fact did not contest his confession until the trial [1]. The United States sends a team of minor league players to the Summer Olympics, as it takes place during the regular Major League season. He also claimed when killing his parents the weapon made no sound when firing it. Baseball tournaments between international teams do occur, notably at the world championships and at the Olympic Games. DeFeo also claimed to have seen shadow figures moving about the house during the murders. In deference to any controversy, more and more the term "World Series Championship" is being used, the subtlety being that it is merely a title and not a political statement. The popular story of ensuing events is that DeFeo’s original claims were that the murders were mob-connected had changed to “hearing voices,” demonic possession, and being handed the murder weapon, a .35 calibre Marlin hunting rifle, by a “pair of black hands”. Pappas' web page on the subject.).

Ronald DeFeo Jr., the only surviving member, claimed that they had been murdered by the mob until he confessed to the murders. (For details, see Mr. On November 13, 1974, police found that all but one of the members of the family residing at 112 Oceanside Ave., the DeFeo's, had been murdered in the middle of the night. Furthermore, investigation of the New York World for the relevant years revealed no evidence of the supposed sponsorship. Main Article: Ronald DeFeo, Jr. Baseball researcher Doug Pappas refutes that claim, demonstrating a linear progression from the phrase "World's Championship Series" (used to describe the 1903 series as well as some of the 19th-century postseason series) to "World's Series" (a term first used in the 1880s and which persisted for decades) to "World Series". The Lutz family, having lived in the house for only 28 days, fled their house with very few belongings, claiming to have been terrorized by paranormal phenomenon. A persistent myth is that the "World" in "World Series" came about because the New York World newspaper sponsored it.

Thirteen months earlier the house on 112 Ocean Avenue was the scene of a brutal mass murder. Attempts to pit the North American champions against champions in the Japanese or Latin American leagues in a truly meaningful way have, so far, not succeeded. Both book and film revolve around the Lutz family, who move into the Dutch Colonial home in the village of Amityville, a New York City suburb on the south shore of Long Island, New York village. Sometimes the Japanese have gained the upper hand in those series; but since they are only exhibitions, their results cannot be regarded as conclusive. . The World Series winners have occasionally played winter exhibition series against the best players of other leagues around the world, such as Japan. The novel is also the basis of two movies made in 1979 and 2005. Moreover, virtually all of the best international players — from the Pacific Rim, Latin America, the Caribbean, and elsewhere — play on Major League rosters, with the notable exception of Cuban nationals.

The Amityville Horror was a best-selling 1977 novel by Jay Anson. While some would contend that there is no reason to believe that the World Series winner is a significantly better team than any club team outside Major League Baseball, no challenges have been made by other leagues. The Amityville Horror (2005 film). At the time the term was first used, baseball at the major league level was only played in the United States. The Amityville Horror (1979 film). The "World" appellation has stuck despite the fact that only teams in the two major leagues, which happen to cover only the United States and Canada, actually participate. Later it was theorized that it could have been “Jody”. That rule has been in place from the beginning, to keep the games "honest".

When he raced upstairs and to her room there was no sign of this mysterious entity. The shares for the actual participants are limited to the gate receipts of the minimum number of games necessary to play the series. While checking the boathouse one night, George saw a pair of “red eyes” looking at him from Missy’s bedroom window. Prior to 1969, teams finishing in the first division, or top half of the leagues' standings, received such shares; today, only the teams finishing in second place in their division but not earning a wild card receive them, because there are more divisions with each having fewer teams. When he got downstairs the noise would stop. A portion of the gate receipts from the World Series — and, from 1969 onward, the other rounds of postseason play preceding it — is used to fund a Players' Pool, from which descending shares are distributed to the World Series winner, the World Series loser, all the other teams qualifying for the playoffs which did not reach the World Series, and certain other teams which did not qualify for the playoffs, the criteria for the latter changing at various times. George would hear what was described as a “German marching band tuning up” or what also sounded like a clock radio playing not quite on frequency. The designated hitter was not used at all prior to the 1975 Series, although the DH rule had been adopted by the AL in 1973.

Nobody else heard these sounds even though it was loud enough to wake the house. From 1975 through 1985, the designated hitter was used for all games in even-numbered years, and was not used in any games in odd-numbered years. He would race downstairs to see the dog sleeping soundly at the front door. In a National League ballpark, both team's pitchers must hit. George would be awoken by the sound of the front door slamming when there was no door slamming. In an American League ballpark, both teams use a designated hitter to hit for the pitcher. The Lutz’s youngest daughter, Missy, developed an imaginary friend named “Jody” who it was later discovered was not so imaginary and who it would be discovered could change form from a little boy to a demonic pig-like creature. Since 1986, the designated hitter rule has been applied based on the rules normally in effect at the home ballpark.

There were cold spots and strange odours of scented perfume and excrement in certain areas of the house where there were no wind drafts or any piping whatsoever to explain a source. Starting with the 2003 World Series, the league that wins the mid-season All-Star Game has been awarded home-field advantage. This room had a profound effect on their dog, Harry, who refused to go near it and cowered away as if sensing something negative there. Until 2003, the team given the home-field advantage was switched every year between the American League and the National League. The room was referred to as “the red room”. That has been the pattern since 1924, with the exception of World War II, when travel restrictions were in place. This did not show up on the blue prints of the house. The first two games of the series are played in the home ballpark of the team awarded home-field advantage; the next three are in the other team's ballpark, and the final two, if necessary, are back in the first team's ballpark.

Kathy discovered a small hidden crawl space behind shelving in the basement, the walls painted red. . Kathy would feel a sensation as if “being embraced” in a loving manner, by an unseen force. The Chicago Cubs have gone the longest between titles, having last won the World Series in 1908. These details were later confirmed when they met with Ronald DeFeo’s defence attorney. Of those eight teams, only three have appeared in the Series: Milwaukee, San Diego, and Houston. Kathy would have vivid nightmares about the murders, and discovered which order the murders occurred and who was shot where. Eight teams, all established since 1961, have never won a World Series title: the Texas Rangers, Houston Astros, San Diego Padres, Washington Nationals, Milwaukee Brewers, Seattle Mariners, Colorado Rockies, and Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

Later it would be learned that it was the estimated time of death with the DeFeo murders. The New York Yankees have the most World Series titles, with 26 championships through the 2005 season. George would wake up around 3.15am every morning and then would go out to check the boathouse. The modern World Series has been an annual event since 1903, with the exceptions of 1904 and 1994. They are part of a work of literature alleging supernatural events and have not been independently verified by impartial research. Baseball has employed various championship formulas since the 1850s. This section contains allegations of events that support the contention that the house was actually haunted. The Series winner is determined through a best-of-seven playoff (except in 1903, 1919, 1920 and 1921 when the winner was determined through a best-of-nine playoff) and is awarded the World Series Trophy, as well as World Series rings.

This section contains information that is a part of the public record separate from specific allegations of supernatural events which form the heart of the book and movies. It is played between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. The World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, the culmination of the sport's postseason each October. Glory Fades Away: The Nineteenth Century World Series Rediscovered, Jerry Lansch, 1991. Baseball Almanac: World Series.

Sporting News: History of the World Series. World Series.com - official website. Darold Knowles is the only pitcher to appear in every game of a seven-game World Series (1973). Bobby Richardson is the only player from a losing team to win a Series MVP award (1960).

Reggie Jackson is the only other player to accomplish the feat (1977). Babe Ruth twice hit three home runs in one Series game (1926 and 1928). The 1976 World Series was the first Series to use the designated hitter rule. The 1971 World Series featured the first Series game scheduled under lights.

The 1970 World Series featured the first Series game on artificial turf. The 1949 World Series featured the first Series game finished under lights. The 1908 World Series holds the record for poorest attendance including the record-low 6,210 in the finale. Amazingly, that has not happened since.

The 1906 World Series featured two franchises that had never appeared in the World Series. At 82-79 (.503), the 1973 New York Mets had the lowest winning percentage of any World Series team. From 1978 to 1987, no franchise won the World Series twice, the longest such streak. From 1949 to 1966, every Series involved the Yankees, Dodgers and/or Giants.

From 1949 to 1956, every Series game was won by a team from New York City. The 1921-1922 Giants and 1975-1976 Reds are the only National League teams to win two straight World Series. The Oakland Athletics' three consecutive World Series victories from 1972 to 1974 are the most for any non-Yankees franchise. The New York Giants' four consecutive World Series appearances from 1921 to 1924 are the most for any non-Yankees franchise.

The New York Yankees have won two or more championships in seven different decades - 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1990s. 2005 - Chicago White Sox broke their curse winning for the first time since 1917. 2004 - Boston Red Sox broke their curse winning for the first time since 1918. 1994 - World Series cancelled due to strike.

1993 - Toronto Blue Jays won on a Game 6 walk-off home run by Joe Carter. 1989 - Series interrupted by the Loma Prieta earthquake. 1988 - Los Angeles Dodgers propelled to victory by Kirk Gibson's shocking Game 1 walk-off home run. 1986 - New York Mets' elimination averted in Game 6 with the assistance of Bill Buckner's infamous error.

1985 - Kansas City Royals' elimination averted in Game 6 with the assistance of an umpire's blown call. 1980 - Philadelphia Phillies won their first championship after nearly a century in existence. 1977 - New York Yankees won on Reggie Jackson's Game 6 heroics. 1976 - Cincinnati Reds swept entire postseason.

1975 - Boston Red Sox' Carlton Fisk's riveting Game 6 walk-off home run was not enough to break their curse. 1962 - New York Yankees won a Series decided by Willie McCovey's line drive. 1960 - Pittsburgh Pirates won on Bill Mazeroski's Game 7 walk-off home run (the only Game 7 walk-off home run). 1956 - New York Yankees' championship included Don Larsen pitching the only postseason perfect game.

1954 - New York Giants won championship after Willie Mays made The Catch. Louis Cardinals won on Enos Slaughter's mad dash in Game 7. 1946 - St. 1932 - New York Yankees dominated behind Babe Ruth's Called Shot.

1923 - New York Yankees won their first championship. 1920 - Cleveland Indians' victory was punctuated by Bill Wambsganss who turned the only postseason unassisted triple play. 1919 - Cincinnati Reds' championship was tainted by the Black Sox scandal. 1908 - Chicago Cubs won their last championship to date.

1905 - New York Giants' Christy Mathewson became the first World Series hero after pitching three complete game shutouts. 1902 Pittsburgh Pirates NL, Philadelphia Athletics AL - no Series. 1901 Pittsburgh Pirates NL, Chicago White Sox AL - no Series. 1900 Brooklyn Superbas win 4, Pittsburgh Pirates win 1 - Chronicle-Telegraph Cup Series.

1899 Brooklyn Superbas - no Series. 1898 Boston Beaneaters - no Series. 1897 Baltimore Orioles win 4, Boston Beaneaters win 1 - Temple Cup Series. 1896 Baltimore Orioles win 4, Cleveland Spiders win 0 - Temple Cup Series.

1895 Cleveland Spiders win 4, Baltimore Orioles win 1 - Temple Cup Series. 1894 New York Giants win 4, Baltimore Orioles win 0 - Temple Cup Series. 1893 Boston Beaneaters - no Series. 1892 Boston Beaneaters win 5, Cleveland Spiders win 0 - split-season championship.

1891 Boston Beaneaters NL, Boston Reds AA - NL instructs Beaneaters not to play Series as leagues discuss restructuring. 1890 Brooklyn Bridegrooms NL, Louisville Colonels AA - each win 3, no resolution. 1889 New York Giants NL win 6, Brooklyn Bridegrooms AA win 3. Louis Browns AA win 2.

1888 New York Giants NL win 6, St. Louis Browns AA win 5. 1887 Detroit Wolverines NL win 10, St. Louis Browns AA win 4, Chicago White Stockings NL win 2.

1886 St. Louis Browns AA - 6 game Series, ends in dispute. 1885 Chicago White Stockings NL, St. 1884 Providence Grays NL, Metropolitan [New York] AA - 3 game series, Providence wins all 3, 60-game winner Old Hoss Radbourn pitches every inning.

1883 Boston Beaneaters NL, Philadelphia AA - Philadelphia cancels scheduled Series after losing "City Series" to Phillies. 1882 Chicago White Stockings NL, Cincinnati Reds AA - 2 game Series, each club wins 1. 1881 Chicago White Stockings. 1880 Chicago White Stockings.

1879 Providence Grays. 1878 Boston Red Caps. 1877 Boston Red Caps. 1876 Chicago White Stockings.

1875 Boston Red Stockings. 1874 Boston Red Stockings. 1873 Boston Red Stockings. 1872 Boston Red Stockings.

1871 Philadelphia Athletics. 1870 Chicago White Stockings. 1869 Brooklyn Atlantics. 1868 New York Mutuals.

1867 Morrisania Unions. 1866 Brooklyn Atlantics. 1865 Brooklyn Atlantics. 1864 Brooklyn Atlantics.

1863 Brooklyn Eckfords. 1862 Brooklyn Eckfords. 1861 Brooklyn Atlantics. 1860 Brooklyn Atlantics.

1859 Brooklyn Atlantics. 1858 New York Mutuals. 1857 Brooklyn Atlantics.

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