The Amityville Horror

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The Amityville Horror was a best-selling 1977 novel by Jay Anson. The novel is also the basis of two movies made in 1979 and 2005.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Synopsis

Both book and film revolve around the Lutz family, who move into the Dutch Colonial home in the village of Amityville, a New York City suburb on the south shore of Long Island, New York village. Thirteen months earlier the house on 112 Ocean Avenue was the scene of a brutal mass murder. The Lutz family, having lived in the house for only 28 days, fled their house with very few belongings, claiming to have been terrorized by paranormal phenomenon.

The murders

  • This section contains information that is a part of the public record separate from specific allegations of supernatural events which form the heart of the book and movies.

Main Article: Ronald DeFeo, Jr.

On November 13, 1974, police found that all but one of the members of the family residing at 112 Oceanside Ave., the DeFeo's, had been murdered in the middle of the night. Ronald DeFeo Jr., the only surviving member, claimed that they had been murdered by the mob until he confessed to the murders.

The popular story of ensuing events is that DeFeo’s original claims were that the murders were mob-connected had changed to “hearing voices,” demonic possession, and being handed the murder weapon, a .35 calibre Marlin hunting rifle, by a “pair of black hands”. DeFeo also claimed to have seen shadow figures moving about the house during the murders. He also claimed when killing his parents the weapon made no sound when firing it. However CourtTV's account of the murder case makes no mention of these claims, implying that DeFeo in fact did not contest his confession until the trial [1]. DeFeo's attorney pursued that line of questioning during the trial, only to have it backfire on him when DeFeo testified that he had not heard any voices the night of the murders [2]. He was convicted of second degree murder and is currently serving a life sentence.

Story

  • This section contains allegations of events that support the contention that the house was actually haunted. They are part of a work of literature alleging supernatural events and have not been independently verified by impartial research.
Left to right: 112 Ocean as owned by the DeFeo & Lutz familiy, 112 Ocean in 1978, House in Toms River, New Jersey remodeled to look like 112 Ocean (was used for filming first three Amityville Horror movies), 112 Ocean as remodeled in the 1990s - note the replacement of quarter-moon window as well as the alteration of porch balustrade and the removal of latticework around porch columns.

The house on 112 Ocean Avenue remained empty for 13 months until late 1975, when George and Kathleen Lutz purchased the 2 ½ floor house. George and Kathy were married in July and had their own houses, however they wanted to start a new life with a new home, for a new marriage. Kathy had three children from a previous marriage and a black Labrador named Harry. During their first inspection of the house the realtor told them about the DeFeo murders the previous November and asked if this changed their opinion on wanting to purchase the house. After family discussions, it was agreed that it was not an issue.

They moved in on December 18, 1975. When a friend of George’s learned of the house he insisted George have the house blessed. At the time George was a non-Catholic (at the time he was a non-practising Methodist) and had no experience with what a house blessing entailed. Kathy was a non-practising Catholic at the time and explained the process. George only knew of one Catholic priest, named Father Ray, who was also a close friend, who agreed to do the house blessing.

Being an ecclesiastical judge at the local Catholic establishment, Father Ray was not in the habit of doing house-blessings but since he and George were friends, he was doing it as a favour. Father Ray arrived to do the house blessing on the day the Lutz’s were moving in and as they busily unpacked outside he went in and performed the house blessing. Much later, after fleeing, George and Kathy learned from Father Ray that when blessing a particular room on the second-storey, which would be referred to as the “sewing room” (formerly Marc and John Matthew DeFeo’s bedroom), he discovered an unnatural coldness in this room, and heard an unearthly voice telling him to “Get Out!” Startled by this, Father Ray was subsequently slapped by an unseen force. When leaving the house, Father Ray did not mention this incident to either George or Kathy, more than likely because he did not wish to cause them unnecessary concern. Instead he told them he felt uncomfortable in that room and would prefer it if nobody spent too much time in that room. Because they planned to use the room as a “sewing room” nothing else was mentioned of it, until much later after George and Kathy had fled the house.

The sensations in the house experienced by the Lutz family did not happen at an accelerated pace instantly. Occurrences were subtle and escalated as time went by. The instances of paranormal activity were later described as being “in a three-ringed circus”. Each family member would experience different things as individuals which made such a profound psychological effect that it was difficult to explain them to even other family members that lived in the house, and it was like they “were each living in a different house”.

Some of the experiences in the house for the Lutz family are as follows:

  • George would wake up around 3.15am every morning and then would go out to check the boathouse. Later it would be learned that it was the estimated time of death with the DeFeo murders.
  • Kathy would have vivid nightmares about the murders, and discovered which order the murders occurred and who was shot where. These details were later confirmed when they met with Ronald DeFeo’s defence attorney.
  • Kathy would feel a sensation as if “being embraced” in a loving manner, by an unseen force.
  • Kathy discovered a small hidden crawl space behind shelving in the basement, the walls painted red. This did not show up on the blue prints of the house. The room was referred to as “the red room”. This room had a profound effect on their dog, Harry, who refused to go near it and cowered away as if sensing something negative there.
  • There were cold spots and strange odours of scented perfume and excrement in certain areas of the house where there were no wind drafts or any piping whatsoever to explain a source.
  • The Lutz’s youngest daughter, Missy, developed an imaginary friend named “Jody” who it was later discovered was not so imaginary and who it would be discovered could change form from a little boy to a demonic pig-like creature.
  • George would be awoken by the sound of the front door slamming when there was no door slamming. He would race downstairs to see the dog sleeping soundly at the front door. Nobody else heard these sounds even though it was loud enough to wake the house.
  • George would hear what was described as a “German marching band tuning up” or what also sounded like a clock radio playing not quite on frequency. When he got downstairs the noise would stop.
  • While checking the boathouse one night, George saw a pair of “red eyes” looking at him from Missy’s bedroom window. When he raced upstairs and to her room there was no sign of this mysterious entity. Later it was theorized that it could have been “Jody”.

When it was apparent to the Lutz’s that something was wrong with their house that they could not explain rationally, it was suggested by a friend of George’s, who had had similar experiences in his house, that he and Kathy do a blessing of their own and open all the windows in the rooms and tell whatever was there to leave in the name of Jesus Christ. When taking his advice and walking around the house doing the Lord’s prayer each of the rooms, George and Kathy would hear a chorus of voices telling them “Will you please stop!”

By mid-January of 1976, and after another attempt at a house blessing by George and Kathy, they experienced what would be their final night in the house. To this day, events of this night have not been disclosed fully by any of the Lutz family, as they have described it as too frightening.

After getting in touch with Father Ray, he managed to convince George and Kathy to take some belongings and stay at Kathy’s mother’s house in Deer Park, for the time being until they sorted out what problems were in the house. On January 14, 1976, George and Kathy Lutz, with their three children and their dog, Harry, fled the house on 112 Ocean Avenue, leaving most of their possessions behind.

Criticisms

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The book and the subsequent movies were promoted as being based on a true story, and for a time Anson's word that "There is simply too much independent corroboration of their narrative to support the speculation that [the Lutzes] either imagined or fabricated these events" held. The popular consensus today, however, among researchers of the incident is that "the facts depicted in the books (and the movies to follow) were written entirely as a profit making scheme" [3].

The story started to fall apart when the Lutz's filed suit against Paul Hoffman (a writer working on an account of the hauntings), William Weber (DeFeo's Lawyer), Bernard Burton, Frederick Mars (both clairvoyants who had examined the house), Good Housekeeping, New York Sunday News and the Hearst Corporation (who had published articles related to the hauntings), alleging invasion of privacy, misappropration of names for trade purposes, and mental distress. Hoffman, Weber, and Burton immediately filed a countersuit alleging fraud and breach of contract. Eventually, the claims against the news corporations were dropped for lack of evidence, and the remainder of the case was tried by Brooklyn U.S. District Court judge Jack B. Weinstein. Weinstein dismissed the Lutz's claims, saying "it appears to me that to a large extent the book is a work of fiction, relying in a large part upon the suggestions of Mr. Weber" [4]. Weber had admitted that much of the story was created over "many bottles of wine" with the Lutz's [5].

Numerous discrepencies have emerged over the years, though the Lutz's continued claims that the book was essentially true help keep the legend alive in the public eye.

A recent view of 112 Ocean.

See Also

  • The Amityville Horror (1979 film)
  • The Amityville Horror (2005 film)

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Numerous discrepencies have emerged over the years, though the Lutz's continued claims that the book was essentially true help keep the legend alive in the public eye.
. Weber had admitted that much of the story was created over "many bottles of wine" with the Lutz's [5]. In the United Kingdom, satellite channel Bravo began reruns in August 2005. Weber" [4]. CMT America began airing the series in late February 2005. Weinstein dismissed the Lutz's claims, saying "it appears to me that to a large extent the book is a work of fiction, relying in a large part upon the suggestions of Mr. CMT Canada and Showcase Action airs The Dukes in Canada.

Weinstein. Viacom's country music-themed cable network CMT (the former daughter network to TNN) currently airs the show several times each weekday. District Court judge Jack B. Some months after the creation of "The New TNN" (shortly before its change to "Spike TV"), the program was absent from all television for quite some time. Eventually, the claims against the news corporations were dropped for lack of evidence, and the remainder of the case was tried by Brooklyn U.S. Until TNN was purchased by Viacom, it aired reruns of The Dukes of Hazzard. Hoffman, Weber, and Burton immediately filed a countersuit alleging fraud and breach of contract. A feature film remake of the series, The Dukes of Hazzard premiered on August 5, 2005.

The story started to fall apart when the Lutz's filed suit against Paul Hoffman (a writer working on an account of the hauntings), William Weber (DeFeo's Lawyer), Bernard Burton, Frederick Mars (both clairvoyants who had examined the house), Good Housekeeping, New York Sunday News and the Hearst Corporation (who had published articles related to the hauntings), alleging invasion of privacy, misappropration of names for trade purposes, and mental distress. There were two made-for-TV reunion movies, The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion! (1997) and The Dukes of Hazzard: Hazzard In Hollywood (2000). The popular consensus today, however, among researchers of the incident is that "the facts depicted in the books (and the movies to follow) were written entirely as a profit making scheme" [3]. A complete listing of "The Dukes of Hazzard" episodes, along with synopsis, can be found at List of The Dukes of Hazzard episodes. The book and the subsequent movies were promoted as being based on a true story, and for a time Anson's word that "There is simply too much independent corroboration of their narrative to support the speculation that [the Lutzes] either imagined or fabricated these events" held. He was also "The Balladeer" (as credited), and served as narrator of the show. On January 14, 1976, George and Kathy Lutz, with their three children and their dog, Harry, fled the house on 112 Ocean Avenue, leaving most of their possessions behind. The theme song "The Good Ol' Boys" was written and performed by the late Waylon Jennings.

After getting in touch with Father Ray, he managed to convince George and Kathy to take some belongings and stay at Kathy’s mother’s house in Deer Park, for the time being until they sorted out what problems were in the house. Original airdate: 21 December 1979) claiming to be a cousin by marriage, but turned out to be a con man impersonating their real 3rd cousin from London, England where he is a priest at a halfway-house.. To this day, events of this night have not been disclosed fully by any of the Lutz family, as they have described it as too frightening. NOTE: "Gaylord Duke" appeared in the episode "The Duke of Duke" (Episode 13, Season 2. By mid-January of 1976, and after another attempt at a house blessing by George and Kathy, they experienced what would be their final night in the house. As the term "cousin" has a wide range of familial applications, it isn't strictly necessary for all the various cousins depicted on the show to be first cousins. When taking his advice and walking around the house doing the Lord’s prayer each of the rooms, George and Kathy would hear a chorus of voices telling them “Will you please stop!”. Considering Jesse's advanced age, it is possible he may have been a great-uncle to Bo, Luke and Daisy, and thus the brother of their grandfather.

When it was apparent to the Lutz’s that something was wrong with their house that they could not explain rationally, it was suggested by a friend of George’s, who had had similar experiences in his house, that he and Kathy do a blessing of their own and open all the windows in the rooms and tell whatever was there to leave in the name of Jesus Christ. Many people have tried to decipher the Duke's family tree in an attempt to understand how it is that so many people could be cousins, all with the last name "Duke." The last unofficial word is that Jesse Duke would have had to have come from a family of seven boys, including himself, as he would have had to have six brothers to have produced offspring named "Duke.". Some of the experiences in the house for the Lutz family are as follows:. More than 25,000 fans attended the 2 day event in 2005. Each family member would experience different things as individuals which made such a profound psychological effect that it was difficult to explain them to even other family members that lived in the house, and it was like they “were each living in a different house”. There are still gatherings of Dukes of Hazzard fans, the largest of which is the Dukesfest organized by Ben Jones (Cooter Davenport) and his wife. The instances of paranormal activity were later described as being “in a three-ringed circus”. Members of the cast were frequent visitors to the town's annual Black Gold Festival.

Occurrences were subtle and escalated as time went by. Although Hazzard County, Georgia was a fictional location (the early episodes of the show were filmed in Covington, Georgia), the real-life town of Hazard, Kentucky was a beneficiary of the show's popularity. The sensations in the house experienced by the Lutz family did not happen at an accelerated pace instantly. While the return of Bo and Luke was welcomed by hardcore fans, the show never regained its former popularity, and by 1985, The Dukes of Hazzard quietly ended its run. Because they planned to use the room as a “sewing room” nothing else was mentioned of it, until much later after George and Kathy had fled the house. Some fans consider this period as "The Scabs of Hazzard". Instead he told them he felt uncomfortable in that room and would prefer it if nobody spent too much time in that room. The "faux Dukes" (one of the more polite ways viewers described the "long-lost nephews" of Uncle Jesse) were never popular with viewers, and were immediately written out the show when Schneider and Wopat reached a settlement and returned to the series in early 1983.

When leaving the house, Father Ray did not mention this incident to either George or Kathy, more than likely because he did not wish to cause them unnecessary concern. Two "replacement Dukes" were subsequently hired (Byron Cherry as Coy, Christopher Mayer as Vance), and the ratings immediately sank. Much later, after fleeing, George and Kathy learned from Father Ray that when blessing a particular room on the second-storey, which would be referred to as the “sewing room” (formerly Marc and John Matthew DeFeo’s bedroom), he discovered an unnatural coldness in this room, and heard an unearthly voice telling him to “Get Out!” Startled by this, Father Ray was subsequently slapped by an unseen force. Then, in the spring of 1982, series stars John Schneider and Tom Wopat walked off the set in a contract dispute over their salaries and merchandising royalties. Father Ray arrived to do the house blessing on the day the Lutz’s were moving in and as they busily unpacked outside he went in and performed the house blessing. The Dukes of Hazzard was consistently among the top-rated television series (at one point, ranking second only to Dallas, which immediately followed the show on CBS' Friday night schedule). Being an ecclesiastical judge at the local Catholic establishment, Father Ray was not in the habit of doing house-blessings but since he and George were friends, he was doing it as a favour. Each of the Hazzard County Sheriff's Department officers drove various Chrysler "B-body" patrol cars (1976 or 1977 Dodge Monaco, 1977 or 1978 Plymouth Fury).

George only knew of one Catholic priest, named Father Ray, who was also a close friend, who agreed to do the house blessing. Deputy Cletus Hogg (Boss Hogg's cousin) was also generally friendly and dim-witted, but he would gladly assist Boss and Rosco in their unprovoked pursuit of the Dukes. Kathy was a non-practising Catholic at the time and explained the process. Only after he returned from his stint in Los Angeles did he totally refuse to harass the Dukes without just cause.
. At the time George was a non-Catholic (at the time he was a non-practising Methodist) and had no experience with what a house blessing entailed. Deputy Enos Strate was generally a friend of the Dukes, but during the early years, he too was involved in car chases with Bo and Luke (since he was Rosco's underling). When a friend of George’s learned of the house he insisted George have the house blessed. He is a greedy, corrupt politician with visions of grandeur, a voracious appetite for fatty foods, and constantly orders his bumbling sheriff, Rosco, to "Git them Duke Boys!!" His vehicle was a white 1970 Cadillac Coupe de Ville convertible, with bull horns attached to the hood.
.

They moved in on December 18, 1975. (Jefferson Davis) Hogg, (better known as "Boss" Hogg), is the wealthiest man in Hazzard County, and owns most of its property and businesses — whether directly or by holding the mortgages over the land. After family discussions, it was agreed that it was not an issue. J.D. During their first inspection of the house the realtor told them about the DeFeo murders the previous November and asked if this changed their opinion on wanting to purchase the house. Rosco's loyal companion (pictured) is Flash.
. Kathy had three children from a previous marriage and a black Labrador named Harry. Rosco frequently initiates car chases with Bo and Luke Duke (Hogg's most frequent adversaries), but the Duke boys are often able to easily elude Rosco, who winds up crashing his patrol car in various ways (always escaping uninjured).

George and Kathy were married in July and had their own houses, however they wanted to start a new life with a new home, for a new marriage. Rosco Pervis Coltrane is the bumbling sheriff of Hazzard County and right-hand man of its corrupt county administrator, Jefferson Davis "J.D." Hogg ("Boss Hogg"). The house on 112 Ocean Avenue remained empty for 13 months until late 1975, when George and Kathleen Lutz purchased the 2 ½ floor house. Cooter drove a variety of trucks, usually late-1960s to early-1970s Ford or GMC models.
. He was convicted of second degree murder and is currently serving a life sentence. Cooter was also an "Honorary Duke", as he often assisted the Dukes in escaping Rosco's clutches, or helped them to foil Boss Hogg's schemes. DeFeo's attorney pursued that line of questioning during the trial, only to have it backfire on him when DeFeo testified that he had not heard any voices the night of the murders [2]. He owned "Cooter's Garage" in Hazzard County Square, directly across from the Police Department and the County Bank.

However CourtTV's account of the murder case makes no mention of these claims, implying that DeFeo in fact did not contest his confession until the trial [1].
Cooter Davenport (portrayed by actor Ben Jones) was the Hazzard County mechanic, also known as "Crazy" Cooter. He also claimed when killing his parents the weapon made no sound when firing it. Uncle Jesse drove a mid-1970s Ford F-100 pickup truck. DeFeo also claimed to have seen shadow figures moving about the house during the murders. Jesse educated his nephews against Hogg, and often provided the cousins with inspirational sage advice. The popular story of ensuing events is that DeFeo’s original claims were that the murders were mob-connected had changed to “hearing voices,” demonic possession, and being handed the murder weapon, a .35 calibre Marlin hunting rifle, by a “pair of black hands”. However, it should be noted that, while both Boss Hogg and Uncle Jesse would scowl at the mention of the other's name, the two enjoyed a lifelong "friendship" of sorts, with one helping the other when in desperate need.

Ronald DeFeo Jr., the only surviving member, claimed that they had been murdered by the mob until he confessed to the murders. Hogg, thus beginning the "feud" between the Dukes and the Hoggs. On November 13, 1974, police found that all but one of the members of the family residing at 112 Oceanside Ave., the DeFeo's, had been murdered in the middle of the night. Jesse Duke, in his youth, had been a Ridge-Runner in direct competition with J.D. Main Article: Ronald DeFeo, Jr. Jesse apparently had no children of his own, and happily provided for his nephews and niece in the unexplained absence of all of their parents (The creator of the show states on the DVDs that their parents were killed in a car wreck, but it was never mentioned in the show). The Lutz family, having lived in the house for only 28 days, fled their house with very few belongings, claiming to have been terrorized by paranormal phenomenon. Uncle Jesse (portrayed by actor Denver Pyle) was the patriarch of the Duke clan, and the father-figure to all Dukes who stayed with him on the dilapidated "Duke Farm".

Thirteen months earlier the house on 112 Ocean Avenue was the scene of a brutal mass murder. Daisy also has the distinction of having her trademark provocatively high-cut jean short shorts named after her: "Daisy Dukes".
. Both book and film revolve around the Lutz family, who move into the Dutch Colonial home in the village of Amityville, a New York City suburb on the south shore of Long Island, New York village. Daisy worked as a waitress at the Boar's Nest, the local bar owned by Boss Hogg. . Daisy Duke (portrayed by actress Catherine Bach) raced around Hazzard with her cousins, first in a yellow-and-black 1971 Plymouth Road Runner (Although the car was intended to be a Plymouth Roadrunner, some early episodes used a 1974 Charger with a matching "Roadrunner stripe" painted behind the rear window.), and then — after her car was lost over the side of a cliff (depicted in the second season episode The Runaway) — she received her trademark white 1980 Jeep CJ-7 "Golden Eagle", the "Dixie", with a Golden Eagle emblem on the hood. The novel is also the basis of two movies made in 1979 and 2005. In these common situations, Bo and Luke often had to rescue their local Hazzard adversaries before ultimately defeating the bad guys.
.

The Amityville Horror was a best-selling 1977 novel by Jay Anson. Sheriff Rosco also found himself in trouble more than once. The Amityville Horror (2005 film). Other times, criminals who were even more crooked and ruthless than Boss came to town. The Amityville Horror (1979 film). More than once, however, Boss was targeted by former associates who were either seeking revenge or turned against him after a scheme unraveled due to Boss' greedy nature or Rosco's bumbling. Later it was theorized that it could have been “Jody”. It was up to Bo and Luke to uncover the schemes and foil the criminals.

When he raced upstairs and to her room there was no sign of this mysterious entity. Other times, Boss hired known criminals to frame Bo and Luke for crimes such as bank robbery (thus, resulting in probation revocation and allowing Boss to easily acquire the Duke farm). While checking the boathouse one night, George saw a pair of “red eyes” looking at him from Missy’s bedroom window. Some of them were "get-rich schemes", though many others affected the financial security of the Duke farm (property which Boss long wanted to acquire for various reasons). When he got downstairs the noise would stop. Many episodes revolved around Boss trying to engage in an illegal scheme with criminal associates. George would hear what was described as a “German marching band tuning up” or what also sounded like a clock radio playing not quite on frequency. Bo and Luke had been sentenced to probation for illegal transportation of moonshine.

Nobody else heard these sounds even though it was loud enough to wake the house. Coltrane. He would race downstairs to see the dog sleeping soundly at the front door. The TV series, The Dukes of Hazzard, followed the adventures of two good ol' boys, Bo and Luke Duke, living in an unincorporated area of the fictional Hazzard County, Georgia racing around in their souped-up 1969 Dodge Charger, The General Lee, evading corrupt Boss Hogg and his inept county sheriff Rosco P. George would be awoken by the sound of the front door slamming when there was no door slamming. Many characters, including "Uncle Jesse", "Sheriff Cole" (in the series to become "Coltrane"), and "Cooter" are also featured in the film. The Lutz’s youngest daughter, Missy, developed an imaginary friend named “Jody” who it was later discovered was not so imaginary and who it would be discovered could change form from a little boy to a demonic pig-like creature. The last name of the protagonists in the film became the last name of the main antagonist in the TV series.

There were cold spots and strange odours of scented perfume and excrement in certain areas of the house where there were no wind drafts or any piping whatsoever to explain a source. Uncle Jesse prides himself on his old-fashioned moonshining and refuses to buckle to the 'big business moonshine' tactics of boss Jake, who controls the area for the New York mafia. This room had a profound effect on their dog, Harry, who refused to go near it and cowered away as if sensing something negative there. In Moonrunners, the "Good Ol' Boys", Grady and Bobby Lee Hagg (pronounced "hogg"), run moonshine for Uncle Jesse Hagg. The room was referred to as “the red room”. The show was loosely based on the movie "Moonrunners" (1975), based on the life and times of Jerry Rushing. This did not show up on the blue prints of the house. .

Kathy discovered a small hidden crawl space behind shelving in the basement, the walls painted red.
. Kathy would feel a sensation as if “being embraced” in a loving manner, by an unseen force. Starrett went on to direct Hill Street Blues (1981). These details were later confirmed when they met with Ronald DeFeo’s defence attorney. Among others, it was directed by Jack Starrett following his departure from Starsky and Hutch (1975). Kathy would have vivid nightmares about the murders, and discovered which order the murders occurred and who was shot where. The Dukes of Hazzard is an American television series that originally aired on the CBS television network from 1979 to 1985.

Later it would be learned that it was the estimated time of death with the DeFeo murders. "Weird Al" Yankovic: In his song "eBay" he mentions buying a Dukes of Hazzard ashtray. George would wake up around 3.15am every morning and then would go out to check the boathouse. Three Wishes: In the episode taped in Covington, Georgia, Amy Grant opened the show driving the General Lee. They are part of a work of literature alleging supernatural events and have not been independently verified by impartial research. A kid plays the machine and pulls out Peter's watch, and says, "What's the Dukes of Hazzard?" Peter tries to steal the watch back from the kid while the screen freezes while Waylon Jennings says a line in a Dukes of Hazzard-esque style. This section contains allegations of events that support the contention that the house was actually haunted. Also, in the episode, "Chitty Chitty Death Bang", Peter and Chris go to Cheesy Charlie's, and Peter has a watch with him while he tries to insert his hand into a prize grabber machine in order to cheat, and takes his arm out quickly when Chris appears.

This section contains information that is a part of the public record separate from specific allegations of supernatural events which form the heart of the book and movies. However, Brian knocks himself out cold as Peter has left the window closed. A particularly memmorable scene depicts Brian Griffin running to jump through the window. "The Duke Boys would be proud" as Peter and Brian convert their station wagon into The General Lee, and always drive the car off a ramp whenever they see one to recreate the Dukes of Hazzard. They relocate to one of the southern states and live in a run down house.

Family Guy: In the episode, "To Live and Die in Dixie", a thug is after Chris, and Peter's family has to move south from Rhode Island. In a final tip of the hat to The Dukes of Hazzard, Jonathan Kent takes the wheel of the Dodge Charger, Jake Jennings climbs into the passenger window (because the door is stuck), and the pair tear off the farm where thereafter a few shots of short car jumps over the camera, à la Dukes of Hazzard, ensue. Later in the episode, Lex Luthor refers to Jake Jennings as a "good ol' boy" in a conversation with Jonathan Kent. During the episode Jake tells a story of how Jonathan once outran the cops in Chickasaw County, which neighbors fictional Hazzard County in the Dukes of Hazzard.

Smallville (TV series): In episode 5-06, "Exposed," Jake Jennings (Tom Wopat), Jonathan Kent (John Schneider)'s oldest friend, rolls onto the Kent farm in a blue Dodge Charger with a General Lee roll bar and the signature General Lee 10-spoke vector wheels. Season 5 was released on Region 1 DVD on December 13, 2005. Season 4 was released on Region 1 DVD on August 2, 2005. Season 3 was released on Region 1 DVD on May 31, 2005, and will be released on Region 2 DVD on November 21, 2005.

Season 2 was released on Region 1 DVD on January 25, 2005, and on Region 2 DVD on September 26, 2005. Season 1 was released on Region 1 DVD in 2004, and on Region 2 DVD on August 15, 2005. Interspersed with recollections of Bo, Luke, and Daisy, the play takes a deep look at southern "Good Ole Boy" culture and its popularization through the lens of American mass media. The story centers on a young widowed mother and a visit she receives from a big city television producer.

In 2005, the Humana Festival of New American Plays premiered a full-length comedy-drama entitled Hazzard County by Allison Moore. The Dukes of Hazzard: Return of the General Lee (2004). The Dukes of Hazzard 2: Daisy Dukes It Out (2000). The Dukes of Hazzard: Racing for Home (1999).

The Dukes of Hazzard (unreleased Atari 2600 prototype). Four video games based on the show were created:

    . An animated version of the show called The Dukes aired in 1983. The character of Deputy Sheriff Enos Strate was spun off into his own short-lived detective show called Enos, which ran from 1980–81.

    Brother 7 - Jesse Duke. He rides into Hazzard on a motocross bike]. Original airdate: 13 February 1981). Brother 6 - Jeb Stuart's father [Jeb Stuart Duke appeared in the episode "Along Came a Duke" (Episode 17, Season 3.

    Brother 5 - Vance's father. Brother 4 - Coy's father. Brother 3 - Daisy's father. Brother 2 - Bo's father.

    He is the long lost younger brother of Luke Duke, thought killed in a hospital fire as an infant]. Original airdate: 14 October 1983). Brother 1 - Luke and Jud Kane's father [Jud Kane appeared the episode "Brotherly Love" (Episode 4, Season 6. He wore a black suit and drove a black Cadillac convertible in direct contrast of his brother, J.D., who always wore white and drove a white Cadillac convertible.

    Played by Sorrell Booke in a dual-role. Abraham Lincoln Hogg, Boss Hogg's identical twin (and good) brother. Mary Kaye. "Little Cousin", an alien from outer space, portrayed by actor Felix Silla.

    Hazel. Doc Appleby (Parley Baer), Hazzard County's most prolific physician. Emery Potter, an employee of the Hazzard County Bank who was a friend of the Dukes. Drove a white VW Beetle with bull horns on the "hood" similar to Boss Hogg's Caddy.

    Hughie Hogg (Jeff Altman) Boss Hogg's evil nephew. Sheriff Little was also constantly frustrated by the bumbling performance of Boss and Rosco, although he thought highly of Enos. The ill-tempered sheriff hated Bo and Luke immensely, and they were well aware that they were not allowed to enter his county. Sheriff "Big Ed" Little (Don Pedro Colley), the chief law enforcement officer for neighboring Chickasaw County who had a tendency to rip doors off of cars.

    Miz (Emma) Tisdale (Nedra Volz), the elderly postmistress of the Hazzard Post Office; she had a huge crush on Uncle Jesse. Lulu constantly challenged her husband for authority and rallied for equality for women in Hazzard. Lulu Coltrane Hogg (Peggy Rea), Boss Hogg's wife, and Rosco's "fat sister". Flash, the Basset Hound - dog and Rosco's loyal companion.

    Vance Duke (Christopher Mayer 1982 to 1983 Season). Coy Duke (Byron Cherry 1982 To 1983 Season). The upper left corner of the "1" in the "01" different, making for a continuity error.). Twenty still exist in various states of repair.

    (Through the history of the show, an estimated 229 General Lees were used. The windows were always open, as the doors were welded shut; and the car has the number "01" on both sides. Lee (During the Civil War, General Lee had a horse named Charger, another connection to the show's car). The name refers to the American Civil War Confederate General Robert E.

    It was orange with a Confederate battle flag painted on the roof, and the words "GENERAL LEE" over each door. The General Lee, a souped-up 1969 Dodge Charger. The Balladeer (Waylon Jennings). Cooter Davenport (Ben Jones).

    Hazzard County Deputy Sheriff Cletus Hogg (Rick Hurst 1980-1983 Seasons). Hazzard County Deputy Sheriff Enos Strate (Sonny Shroyer 1979 to 1980 & 1982 to 1985 Seasons). Coltrane (James Best). Hazzard County Sheriff Rosco P.

    Lulu Coltrane Hogg (Peggy Rea). Jefferson Davis 'Boss' Hogg (Sorrell Booke). Uncle Jesse Duke (Denver Pyle). Daisy Duke (Catherine Bach).

    Wopat's latest. Luke Duke (Tom Wopat 1979 to 1981 & 1983 to 1985 Seasons). Bo Duke (John Schneider 1979 to 1981 & 1983 to 1985 Seasons).

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