ALDI

Aldi Nord logo Aldi Süd logo

Aldi is an international hard discount supermarket chain based in Germany. It is actually two separate companies but is commonly referred to as one. The company's name stands for Albrecht-Discount, using the founders' last name. Historically, Aldi is said to have been Germany's first real discount supermarket. Its spartan stores with low prices on a limited range of goods can now be found in more than a dozen countries.

History

The company was founded in 1946 by the brothers Karl and Theo Paul Albrecht in Essen, Germany. Back then, it comprised only one small food shop. In the year 1961, the then-Aldi chain of supermarket stores split into two sister companies (each belonging to one of the brothers) over a dispute whether to sell cigarettes and other tobacco products at the checkout. Thus today, Aldi consists of Aldi Nord (Aldi North) (where tobacco sales were deemed to be acceptable) and Aldi Süd (Aldi South) (where they were not; however Aldi Süd began selling tobacco products in 2003). The chains initially covered the respective different regions of the then-West Germany. The companies have since expanded internationally, into other European, North American, and Australian markets. In principle, the two firms share nothing but the name and a similar corporate identity; however, they describe their relationship as a "friendly alliance" and there appear to be agreements between the two insofar that they do not compete directly with each other and (except for Germany) never both operate in the same countries.

Regions where Aldi operates

A map of the countries in Europe that Aldi operates, orange: "Aldi South", dark blue:"Aldi North"

Aldi Nord operates in

  • Northern Germany
  • Belgium
  • Denmark
  • France
  • Luxembourg
  • The Netherlands
  • Portugal (coming soon)
  • Spain


Aldi Süd operates in

  • Southern Germany
  • Australia
  • Austria (where it operates under the name Hofer)
  • Ireland
  • Slovenia (where it operates under the name Hofer)
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

What you may find in an Aldi store

Aldi specializes in staple items such as food, beverages, sanitary articles and other inexpensive household items. One reason for Aldi's success is that the number of brands is very limited, you usually don't find more than two different brands for one kind of product and often only one. This increases the numbers of sales for each article and also allows Aldi stores to be smaller than supermarkets which cover the same range of products but with more diversity. Also it allowed Aldi to avoid the use of price tags even before the introduction of barcode scanners (see below).

Additionally to the standard assortment Aldi also has weekly special offers, some of them on more expensive products such as electronics, appliances or computers, usually from Medion. Although not always available, but regulary put up for sale are clothing, toys, flowers, gifts. The specials are only available in strictly limited quantities and for a limited timeframe (one week). In the past some of Aldi's early computer offers, created some kind of hysteria in Germany, with all available items sold in only a few hours.

Aldi is the largest wine retailer in Germany. Aldi mainly sells exclusively produced, custom-branded products (often identical to and produced by major brands) with brand names including "Grandessa" and "Fit and Active". American Aldi stores also feature bargain-priced, gourmet foods imported from Germany. Although Aldi emphasizes low prices, reports from a German consumer watchdog suggest that this does not negatively impact the quality of Aldi products.

Low price philosophy

Aldi's "strictly no frills" approach is evident for instance in that typically Aldi stores do not decorate aisles — or even fill shelves for that matter: Pallets of the products on offer are commonly simply parked alongside the aisles, and customers picking up products will gradually empty them. When all items on a pallet have been sold, it is replaced. Long queues at the checkout counter are also relatively common, reflecting Aldi's minimal staffing levels, as well as the competitive situation in Aldi's native Germany, where long supermarket checkout lines are part of daily life. However, due to the efficient checkout system, a long queue does not necessarily translate into longer waiting times than in other supermarkets.

These and other cost-cutting strategies save Aldi money and arguably the general price level in Aldi stores — as compared to more "upmarket" supermarkets — appears to show that at least some or most of these savings are passed on to consumer. Aldi has successfully carved its own (actually rather large) niche with this approach: While shoppers may not normally like shopping in a bland or industrial-looking (and possibly congested) store, such utter lack of frills has become part of the accepted norm with Aldi, and consumers appear to be willing to accept it because of the "incredible value" they expect to get in exchange. ("Top quality at incredibly low prices" is an Aldi marketing slogan.)

Aldi also profited from the introduction of the euro in Germany and other countries. Consumers believed that many merchants had used the currency changeover as a cover to increase prices, often substantially; this was later confirmed by independent studies. In contrast to other supermarkets, Aldi prominently listed "before and after" prices on posters in stores for months after the introduction, and generally rounded its euro prices down. As a result, Aldi earned a great deal of customer goodwill.

Advertising policy

Aldi has a policy in Germany of not advertising, apart from a weekly list of special prices called Aldi informiert (Aldi informs) that is distributed in stores, by direct mail, and sometimes printed in local newspapers. It claims this is a cost savings that can be passed on to consumers. However, in the USA, Aldi advertises regularly via weekly newspaper inserts and Aldi television commercials have begun airing on the TBS network, and in the UK print and television ads appeared in mid-2005. Aldi do not have publicly listed telephones in stores to minimize the time checkouts are unutilised.

Checkout system

Aldi's checkout procedure is highly standardized, with checkout operators sitting down in swivel chairs, passing products through a two-sided barcode scanner. Products have very long barcodes covering several sides of the packaging to speed this procedure. Cashiers save additional time by preparing the most likely amount of change while the customer is still searching for money in his/her wallet.

Aldi was, however, a latecomer to barcode scanners, and many stores only added them in 2004; previously, cashier clerks would manually enter a three-digit code for each item from memory (Aldi Nord) or the price (Aldi Süd). An advantage of this was that the cashiers could already type in the prices of all the articles on the conveyer belt even if the customers were blocking the process by not putting the articles quickly enough back into their shopping cart.

Once products have been scanned, they are put directly in the shopping cart, which has a special dock on the counter for this purpose. This is why Aldi stores in Germany insist that customers use a cart; the customer is expected to bag groceries at a separate bench. Many, if not most customers, however, ignore this rule, not least because it would force them to join the queue to leave the store even if they hadn't purchased anything. Aldi generally does not offer hand baskets. However, in Australia select stores do have hand baskets available.

Reputation

In West Germany, before about 1990, Aldi shops were often ridiculed as being cheap shops selling poor-quality goods. Aldi's customers were alleged to be only poor people who couldn't afford to shop elsewhere. Loyal German soccer fans, ashamed of their favorite team's performance, were known to wear Aldi bags over their heads as a gag. Being held in such low esteem by many did not seem to dent Aldi's profits however. After German reunification, many German middle class families had to cut down their spending and Aldi's popularity and public acceptance grew. Many individual consumers "discovered" that the poor reputation of Aldi's products was apparently undeserved. This shift in public perception was boosted by a series of cookbooks that only used Aldi ingredients, which led to the emergence of a kind of Aldi fandom into the German mainstream.

In countries such as the UK, where the level of service and presentation of mainstream supermarkets is arguably lower than in Aldi's native Germany, Aldi's public reputation does not appear to have improved in the same way. Despite this, and the strong price competition between such British retailers on precisely the basic goods Aldi sells, the firm apparently remains profitable.

In the United Kingdom, Aldi (just like it's rival Lidl) is often the centre of jokes regarding the wealth of a person, particularly with the younger generation. Many consider it to be derogatory to shop at Aldi, and as a result a lot of students will not admit to shopping there if they do.

Business practices

Many Aldi practices are common in German supermarkets but largely unique to Aldi in markets such as the U.S. and Britain. These include the system of metal gates and turnstiles forcing customers to exit through the checkout, the practice of charging for shopping bags, and the fact that Aldi until recently accepted only cash (since 2004, German stores have begun to accept the Maestro debit card). Debit cards are also accepted in the USA. Like most German retailers, Aldi does not accept major credit cards. Aldi does accept MasterCard, Bankcard and Visa in Australia for an additional 1% surcharge.

Aldi stores worldwide are approximately the same size. The company's stores in Germany are similar in size to those of competing supermarkets, and they can often be found in shopping centres or elsewhere where retail units of this size are common. However in other countries, such as Britain, France, and the U.S., Aldi stores are far smaller than those countries' typical supermarkets or hypermarkets, and tend to be free-standing, purpose-built structures.

Aldi stores often have fairly limited opening hours, such as were restricted by law (until 18:30 weeknights and 14:00 Saturdays) in Germany until these laws were relaxed somewhat in 1996 and 2004. Some (but by no means all) of its German outlets, particularly those in shopping centres, now stay open until the revised legal closing time of 20:00. On the other hand, Aldi stores in the U.S. and U.K. close around 19:00 weeknights, earlier on Saturday, and most remain closed on Sunday, in contrast to the late or 24-hour opening times of many U.S. and British supermarkets. Aldi's U.S. stores are the only ones to offer customer toilets.

In Germany Aldi is occasionally jokingly called Feinkost Albrecht (approximate translation: Albrecht Deli).

Recently the similar Lidl chain has grown faster than Aldi; its major difference in business practice is that it stocks a few name brands.

Aldi Talk

On the 7th December 2005, based on their well known brand, Aldi (both Nord and Süd) in Germany introduced a pay-as-you-go mobile phone company Aldi Talk, piggybacking on the e-plus network. They offered rates of €0,05 (approx US$ 0.06) per minute/SMS to other Aldi Talk customers and €0,15 (approx US$ 0.18) to landlines and other mobile phones. This phone offer is available on either a “starter set”, which is a SIM card and €10 (US$ 12.01) worth of credit at €19,99 (US$ 24.02), or a Medion mobile phone [1] with a SIM card at €59,99 (US$ 72.11).

Previously, Aldi Süd in Austria did a pay-as-you-go service called “yesss!” [2] with Connect Austria's One.

Competitors

  • Lidl (5000 stores)
  • Netto (1200 stores)
  • Kwiksave (UK Only)

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Previously, Aldi Süd in Austria did a pay-as-you-go service called “yesss!” [2] with Connect Austria's One. Marseille was the birthplace of:. This phone offer is available on either a “starter set”, which is a SIM card and €10 (US$ 12.01) worth of credit at €19,99 (US$ 24.02), or a Medion mobile phone [1] with a SIM card at €59,99 (US$ 72.11). The city's main football club is Olympique de Marseille, UEFA Champions League winner in 1993 but tainted by the 1990s match fixing scandal by then-owner Bernard Tapie. They offered rates of €0,05 (approx US$ 0.06) per minute/SMS to other Aldi Talk customers and €0,15 (approx US$ 0.18) to landlines and other mobile phones. Marseille is served by the Aéroport de Marseille Provence, located in Marignane. On the 7th December 2005, based on their well known brand, Aldi (both Nord and Süd) in Germany introduced a pay-as-you-go mobile phone company Aldi Talk, piggybacking on the e-plus network. The metro is a rubber-tiredtrain.

Recently the similar Lidl chain has grown faster than Aldi; its major difference in business practice is that it stocks a few name brands. The Jewish community is also the third largest in Europe. In Germany Aldi is occasionally jokingly called Feinkost Albrecht (approximate translation: Albrecht Deli). Approximately 25 per cent of Marseille’s population is of North African origin, mostly Algerian, and Tunisian. stores are the only ones to offer customer toilets. Such as; Armenians, Spaniards, Italians, Greeks, Arabs, Jews, Russians and North Africans. Aldi's U.S. The vast majority of the Marsellaise are descendants of the waves of immigrants that arrived to the port in the early 19th century.

and British supermarkets.
. close around 19:00 weeknights, earlier on Saturday, and most remain closed on Sunday, in contrast to the late or 24-hour opening times of many U.S. The most widely circulated tarot deck comes from Marseille; it is called the Tarot de Marseille, and was used to play the local variant of tarocchi before it came to the notice of people who used it in cartomancy. and U.K. The French national anthem "La Marseillaise" is named for the Revolutionary troops from Marseille. On the other hand, Aldi stores in the U.S. Since the last election, these 25 cantons are held by the following councilors:.

Some (but by no means all) of its German outlets, particularly those in shopping centres, now stay open until the revised legal closing time of 20:00. Marseille holds 25 of the 58 seats at the general council of the Bouches-du-Rhône. Aldi stores often have fairly limited opening hours, such as were restricted by law (until 18:30 weeknights and 14:00 Saturdays) in Germany until these laws were relaxed somewhat in 1996 and 2004. The cantons of Marseille :. However in other countries, such as Britain, France, and the U.S., Aldi stores are far smaller than those countries' typical supermarkets or hypermarkets, and tend to be free-standing, purpose-built structures. The Sector Mayors :. The company's stores in Germany are similar in size to those of competing supermarkets, and they can often be found in shopping centres or elsewhere where retail units of this size are common. The last mayors of Marseille :.

Aldi stores worldwide are approximately the same size. Number of councilors elected by sector:. Aldi does accept MasterCard, Bankcard and Visa in Australia for an additional 1% surcharge. Each sector elects its councillors (303 in total), one third of which are municipal councillors. Like most German retailers, Aldi does not accept major credit cards. The municipal elections are carried out by sector. Debit cards are also accepted in the USA. The arrondissements are regrouped in pairs into sectors, and 8 sectors have a council and a town hall, like the arrondissements in Paris and in Lyon.

These include the system of metal gates and turnstiles forcing customers to exit through the checkout, the practice of charging for shopping bags, and the fact that Aldi until recently accepted only cash (since 2004, German stores have begun to accept the Maestro debit card). Marseille is divided into 16 municipal arrondissements, which are themselves divided into quartiers (111 in total). and Britain. Marseilles' harbor is the biggest of the country, and one of the most important of the Mediterranean Sea. Many Aldi practices are common in German supermarkets but largely unique to Aldi in markets such as the U.S. He was assassinated there by Vlada Georgieff who hated Alexander's refusal to recognise Croatia as a separate state. Many consider it to be derogatory to shop at Aldi, and as a result a lot of students will not admit to shopping there if they do. In 1934 Alexander I of Yugoslavia arrived at the port to meet with the French foreign minister Louis Barthou.

In the United Kingdom, Aldi (just like it's rival Lidl) is often the centre of jokes regarding the wealth of a person, particularly with the younger generation. During the Roman times, it was called Massilia. Despite this, and the strong price competition between such British retailers on precisely the basic goods Aldi sells, the firm apparently remains profitable. It was overrun by Celts and then conquered by the Romans. In countries such as the UK, where the level of service and presentation of mainstream supermarkets is arguably lower than in Aldi's native Germany, Aldi's public reputation does not appear to have improved in the same way. by Greeks from Phocaea as a trading port under the name Μασσαλία (Massalia; see also List of traditional Greek place names). This shift in public perception was boosted by a series of cookbooks that only used Aldi ingredients, which led to the emergence of a kind of Aldi fandom into the German mainstream. Marseille was founded in 600 B.C.E.

Many individual consumers "discovered" that the poor reputation of Aldi's products was apparently undeserved. . After German reunification, many German middle class families had to cut down their spending and Aldi's popularity and public acceptance grew. Marseille is the capital of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur région, as well as the préfecture (capital) of the Bouches-du-Rhône département. Being held in such low esteem by many did not seem to dent Aldi's profits however. Located in the former province of Provence and on the Mediterranean Sea, it is France's largest commercial port and the largest in the Mediterranean. Loyal German soccer fans, ashamed of their favorite team's performance, were known to wear Aldi bags over their heads as a gag. Marseille (English alternative spelling Marseilles) (pronounced /maʀsɛj/ in standard French, /mɑxˈsɛjɐ/ in local Marseilles accent) (Provençal: Marsiho or Marsilha, both pronounced /maɾˈsijɐ/) is the second largest city in France and the third metropolitan area, with 1,516,340 inhabitants at the 1999 census.

Aldi's customers were alleged to be only poor people who couldn't afford to shop elsewhere.
. In West Germany, before about 1990, Aldi shops were often ridiculed as being cheap shops selling poor-quality goods. Un, deux, trois, soleil (1993). However, in Australia select stores do have hand baskets available. Trois places pour le 26 (1988). Aldi generally does not offer hand baskets. Taxi 3 (2003).

Many, if not most customers, however, ignore this rule, not least because it would force them to join the queue to leave the store even if they hadn't purchased anything. Taxi 2 (2000). This is why Aldi stores in Germany insist that customers use a cart; the customer is expected to bag groceries at a separate bench. Taxi (1998). Once products have been scanned, they are put directly in the shopping cart, which has a special dock on the counter for this purpose. Roselyne et les lions (1989). An advantage of this was that the cashiers could already type in the prices of all the articles on the conveyer belt even if the customers were blocking the process by not putting the articles quickly enough back into their shopping cart. Pépé le Moko (1937).

Aldi was, however, a latecomer to barcode scanners, and many stores only added them in 2004; previously, cashier clerks would manually enter a three-digit code for each item from memory (Aldi Nord) or the price (Aldi Süd). Marius et Jeannette (1997). Cashiers save additional time by preparing the most likely amount of change while the customer is still searching for money in his/her wallet. Marius (1931). Products have very long barcodes covering several sides of the packaging to speed this procedure. La Lune dans le caniveau (1983). Aldi's checkout procedure is highly standardized, with checkout operators sitting down in swivel chairs, passing products through a two-sided barcode scanner. Gomez & Tavarès (2003).

Aldi do not have publicly listed telephones in stores to minimize the time checkouts are unutilised. The French Connection (1971) and its sequel (1975). However, in the USA, Aldi advertises regularly via weekly newspaper inserts and Aldi television commercials have begun airing on the TBS network, and in the UK print and television ads appeared in mid-2005. Comme un aimant (2000). It claims this is a cost savings that can be passed on to consumers. Bye-Bye (1995). Aldi has a policy in Germany of not advertising, apart from a weekly list of special prices called Aldi informiert (Aldi informs) that is distributed in stores, by direct mail, and sometimes printed in local newspapers. Baise-moi (2000).

As a result, Aldi earned a great deal of customer goodwill. 37°2 le matin (1986). In contrast to other supermarkets, Aldi prominently listed "before and after" prices on posters in stores for months after the introduction, and generally rounded its euro prices down. King Alexander I of Yugoslavia was assassinated on October 9, 1934 in Marseille along with French Foreign Minister Louis Barthou. Consumers believed that many merchants had used the currency changeover as a cover to increase prices, often substantially; this was later confirmed by independent studies. French poet Arthur Rimbaud died in Marseille on November 10, 1891. Aldi also profited from the introduction of the euro in Germany and other countries. Zinedine Zidane (born 1972), soccer player.

("Top quality at incredibly low prices" is an Aldi marketing slogan.). Jean-Claude Izzo (1945-2000), author. Aldi has successfully carved its own (actually rather large) niche with this approach: While shoppers may not normally like shopping in a bland or industrial-looking (and possibly congested) store, such utter lack of frills has become part of the accepted norm with Aldi, and consumers appear to be willing to accept it because of the "incredible value" they expect to get in exchange. Jean Pierre Rampal (1922-2000), flutist. These and other cost-cutting strategies save Aldi money and arguably the general price level in Aldi stores — as compared to more "upmarket" supermarkets — appears to show that at least some or most of these savings are passed on to consumer. Louis Jourdan (born 1919), actor. However, due to the efficient checkout system, a long queue does not necessarily translate into longer waiting times than in other supermarkets. Eliane Browne-Bartroli (1917-1944), French Resistance, Croix de Guerre.

Long queues at the checkout counter are also relatively common, reflecting Aldi's minimal staffing levels, as well as the competitive situation in Aldi's native Germany, where long supermarket checkout lines are part of daily life. Fernandel (1903-1971), actor. When all items on a pallet have been sold, it is replaced. Vincent Scotto (1876-1952), guitarist, songwriter. Aldi's "strictly no frills" approach is evident for instance in that typically Aldi stores do not decorate aisles — or even fill shelves for that matter: Pallets of the products on offer are commonly simply parked alongside the aisles, and customers picking up products will gradually empty them. Edmond Rostand (1868-1918), poet and dramatist. Although Aldi emphasizes low prices, reports from a German consumer watchdog suggest that this does not negatively impact the quality of Aldi products. "Le Pétomane" (1857-1945), entertainer.

American Aldi stores also feature bargain-priced, gourmet foods imported from Germany. Joseph Pujol, aka. Aldi mainly sells exclusively produced, custom-branded products (often identical to and produced by major brands) with brand names including "Grandessa" and "Fit and Active". Olivier Émile Ollivier (1825-1913), statesman. Aldi is the largest wine retailer in Germany. Joseph Autran (1813-1877), poet. In the past some of Aldi's early computer offers, created some kind of hysteria in Germany, with all available items sold in only a few hours. Honoré Daumier (1808-1879), caricaturist and painter.

The specials are only available in strictly limited quantities and for a limited timeframe (one week). Etienne Joseph Louis Garnier-Pages (1801-1841), politician. Although not always available, but regulary put up for sale are clothing, toys, flowers, gifts. Adolphe Thiers (1797-1877), first president of the Third Republic. Additionally to the standard assortment Aldi also has weekly special offers, some of them on more expensive products such as electronics, appliances or computers, usually from Medion. Désirée Clary (1777-1860), wife of King Carl XIV Johann of Sweden, and therefore Queen Desirée or Queen Desideria of Sweden. Also it allowed Aldi to avoid the use of price tags even before the introduction of barcode scanners (see below). "Dugazon" (1746-1809), actor.

This increases the numbers of sales for each article and also allows Aldi stores to be smaller than supermarkets which cover the same range of products but with more diversity. Jean-Henry Gourgaud, aka. One reason for Aldi's success is that the number of brands is very limited, you usually don't find more than two different brands for one kind of product and often only one. Maurice Béjart (born 1927), ballet choreographer. Aldi specializes in staple items such as food, beverages, sanitary articles and other inexpensive household items. Antonin Artaud (1897-1948), author.
Aldi Süd operates in. The calanques.

Aldi Nord operates in. Unité d'Habitation de Marseille, by the Swiss architect Le Corbusier. In principle, the two firms share nothing but the name and a similar corporate identity; however, they describe their relationship as a "friendly alliance" and there appear to be agreements between the two insofar that they do not compete directly with each other and (except for Germany) never both operate in the same countries. Château d'If, an ancient prison island, where The Count of Monte Cristo was jailed, in Alexandre Dumas' novel. The companies have since expanded internationally, into other European, North American, and Australian markets. Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde. The chains initially covered the respective different regions of the then-West Germany. The old harbor.

Thus today, Aldi consists of Aldi Nord (Aldi North) (where tobacco sales were deemed to be acceptable) and Aldi Süd (Aldi South) (where they were not; however Aldi Süd began selling tobacco products in 2003). Watcha Clan. In the year 1961, the then-Aldi chain of supermarket stores split into two sister companies (each belonging to one of the brothers) over a dispute whether to sell cigarettes and other tobacco products at the checkout. Massilia Sound System. Back then, it comprised only one small food shop. The French rap band IAM is from Marseille. The company was founded in 1946 by the brothers Karl and Theo Paul Albrecht in Essen, Germany. General Councilor: Henri Jibrayel PS.

. 35,752). Its spartan stores with low prices on a limited range of goods can now be found in more than a dozen countries. Marseille-Verduron (pop. Historically, Aldi is said to have been Germany's first real discount supermarket. 29,668); General Councilor: André Malrait UMP. The company's name stands for Albrecht-Discount, using the founders' last name. Marseille-Vauban (pop.

It is actually two separate companies but is commonly referred to as one. 25,324); General Councilor: Christophe Masse PS (Representative). Aldi is an international hard discount supermarket chain based in Germany. Marseille-Les,Trois,Lucs (pop. Kwiksave (UK Only). 40,392); General Councilor: Jeanine Porte PCF. Netto (1200 stores). Marseille-Saint-Mauront (pop.

Lidl (5000 stores). 29,981); General Councilor: Jean Bonat PS (Municipal councilor of Marseille). USA. Marseille-Saint-Marcel (pop. United Kingdom. 26,218); General Councilor: Robert Assante UMP (Adjoint au Maire de Marseille). Switzerland. Marseille-Saint-Lambert (pop.

Slovenia (where it operates under the name Hofer). 32,749); General Councilor: Michel Pezet PS (Municipal councilor of Marseille). Ireland. Marseille-Saint-Just (pop. Austria (where it operates under the name Hofer). 34,621); General Councilor: Martine Vassal UMP (Adjointe au Maire de Marseille). Australia. Marseille-Saint-Giniez (pop.

Southern Germany. 36,868); General Councilor: Didier Garnier UMP. Spain. Marseille-Sainte-Marguerite (pop. Portugal (coming soon). 37,629); General Councilor: Denis Rossi PS (Municipal councilor of Marseille). The Netherlands. Marseille-Saint-Barthélemy (pop.

Luxembourg. 33,206); General Councilor: Félix Weygand PS. France. Marseille-La,Rose (pop. Denmark. 38,701); General Councilor: René Olmeta PS (Municipal councilor of Marseille). Belgium. Marseille-La,Pomme (pop.

Northern Germany. 31,116); General Councilor: Richard Miron UMP. Marseille-La,Pointe-Rouge (pop. 27,052); General Councilor: Marius Masse PS. Marseille-Les,Olives (pop.

33,472); General Councilor: Joël Dutto PCF. Marseille-Notre-Dame-Limite (pop. 31,107); General Councilor: Jocelyn Zeitoun PS. Marseille-Notre-Dame-du-Mont (pop.

33,644); General Councilor: Maurice Rey UMP. Marseille-Montolivet (pop. 35,890); General Councilor: Didier Réault UMP. Marseille-Mazargues (pop.

29,060); General Councilor: Jean-Noël Guerini PS (Sénateur, Président du Conseil Général, Municipal councilor of Marseille). Marseille-Les,Grands-Carmes (pop. 29,846); General Councilor: Marie-Arlette Carlotti PS (Representative européenne). Marseille-Les,Cinq-Avenues (pop.

34,292); General Councilor: Janine Ecochard PS. Marseille-La,Capelette (pop. 27,506); General Councilor: Antoine Rouzaud PS (Municipal councilor of Marseille). Marseille-Le,Camas (pop.

30,168); General Councilor Maurice Di Nocera UDF. Marseille-La,Blancarde (pop. 27,992); General Councilor: Fortuné Sportiello PS. Marseille-Belsunce (pop.

25,878); General Councilor: Lisette Narducci PS (Mayor of the 2ème sector de Marseille). Marseille-La,Belle-de-Mai (pop. 8th sector (15th and 16th arrondissements): Frédéric Dutoit (representative) PCF. 7th sector (13th and 14th arrondissements): Garo Hovsepian PS.

6th sector (11th and 12th arrondissements): Roland Blum (representative) UMP. 5th sector (9th and 10th arrondissements): Guy Teissier (representative) UMP. 4th sector (6th and 8th arrondissements): Dominique Tian (representative) UMP. 3rd sector (4th and 5th arrondissements): Bruno Gilles (representative) UMP.

2nd sector (2nd and 3re arrondissements): Lisette Narducci (General Councilor) PS. 1st sector (1st and 7th arrondissements): Jean Roatta (Representative) UMP. 1995- : Jean-Claude Gaudin UMP (relected in 2001). 1986-1995 : Robert Vigouroux PS (reelected in 1989).

1953-1986 : Gaston Defferre (already mayor between 1944 and 1946, relected in 1959, 1965, 1971, 1977, 1983).

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