ALDI

Aldi Nord logo Aldi Süd logo

Aldi is an international hard discount supermarket chain based in Germany. It is actually two separate companies but is commonly referred to as one. The company's name stands for Albrecht-Discount, using the founders' last name. Historically, Aldi is said to have been Germany's first real discount supermarket. Its spartan stores with low prices on a limited range of goods can now be found in more than a dozen countries.

History

The company was founded in 1946 by the brothers Karl and Theo Paul Albrecht in Essen, Germany. Back then, it comprised only one small food shop. In the year 1961, the then-Aldi chain of supermarket stores split into two sister companies (each belonging to one of the brothers) over a dispute whether to sell cigarettes and other tobacco products at the checkout. Thus today, Aldi consists of Aldi Nord (Aldi North) (where tobacco sales were deemed to be acceptable) and Aldi Süd (Aldi South) (where they were not; however Aldi Süd began selling tobacco products in 2003). The chains initially covered the respective different regions of the then-West Germany. The companies have since expanded internationally, into other European, North American, and Australian markets. In principle, the two firms share nothing but the name and a similar corporate identity; however, they describe their relationship as a "friendly alliance" and there appear to be agreements between the two insofar that they do not compete directly with each other and (except for Germany) never both operate in the same countries.

Regions where Aldi operates

A map of the countries in Europe that Aldi operates, orange: "Aldi South", dark blue:"Aldi North"

Aldi Nord operates in

  • Northern Germany
  • Belgium
  • Denmark
  • France
  • Luxembourg
  • The Netherlands
  • Portugal (coming soon)
  • Spain


Aldi Süd operates in

  • Southern Germany
  • Australia
  • Austria (where it operates under the name Hofer)
  • Ireland
  • Slovenia (where it operates under the name Hofer)
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

What you may find in an Aldi store

Aldi specializes in staple items such as food, beverages, sanitary articles and other inexpensive household items. One reason for Aldi's success is that the number of brands is very limited, you usually don't find more than two different brands for one kind of product and often only one. This increases the numbers of sales for each article and also allows Aldi stores to be smaller than supermarkets which cover the same range of products but with more diversity. Also it allowed Aldi to avoid the use of price tags even before the introduction of barcode scanners (see below).

Additionally to the standard assortment Aldi also has weekly special offers, some of them on more expensive products such as electronics, appliances or computers, usually from Medion. Although not always available, but regulary put up for sale are clothing, toys, flowers, gifts. The specials are only available in strictly limited quantities and for a limited timeframe (one week). In the past some of Aldi's early computer offers, created some kind of hysteria in Germany, with all available items sold in only a few hours.

Aldi is the largest wine retailer in Germany. Aldi mainly sells exclusively produced, custom-branded products (often identical to and produced by major brands) with brand names including "Grandessa" and "Fit and Active". American Aldi stores also feature bargain-priced, gourmet foods imported from Germany. Although Aldi emphasizes low prices, reports from a German consumer watchdog suggest that this does not negatively impact the quality of Aldi products.

Low price philosophy

Aldi's "strictly no frills" approach is evident for instance in that typically Aldi stores do not decorate aisles — or even fill shelves for that matter: Pallets of the products on offer are commonly simply parked alongside the aisles, and customers picking up products will gradually empty them. When all items on a pallet have been sold, it is replaced. Long queues at the checkout counter are also relatively common, reflecting Aldi's minimal staffing levels, as well as the competitive situation in Aldi's native Germany, where long supermarket checkout lines are part of daily life. However, due to the efficient checkout system, a long queue does not necessarily translate into longer waiting times than in other supermarkets.

These and other cost-cutting strategies save Aldi money and arguably the general price level in Aldi stores — as compared to more "upmarket" supermarkets — appears to show that at least some or most of these savings are passed on to consumer. Aldi has successfully carved its own (actually rather large) niche with this approach: While shoppers may not normally like shopping in a bland or industrial-looking (and possibly congested) store, such utter lack of frills has become part of the accepted norm with Aldi, and consumers appear to be willing to accept it because of the "incredible value" they expect to get in exchange. ("Top quality at incredibly low prices" is an Aldi marketing slogan.)

Aldi also profited from the introduction of the euro in Germany and other countries. Consumers believed that many merchants had used the currency changeover as a cover to increase prices, often substantially; this was later confirmed by independent studies. In contrast to other supermarkets, Aldi prominently listed "before and after" prices on posters in stores for months after the introduction, and generally rounded its euro prices down. As a result, Aldi earned a great deal of customer goodwill.

Advertising policy

Aldi has a policy in Germany of not advertising, apart from a weekly list of special prices called Aldi informiert (Aldi informs) that is distributed in stores, by direct mail, and sometimes printed in local newspapers. It claims this is a cost savings that can be passed on to consumers. However, in the USA, Aldi advertises regularly via weekly newspaper inserts and Aldi television commercials have begun airing on the TBS network, and in the UK print and television ads appeared in mid-2005. Aldi do not have publicly listed telephones in stores to minimize the time checkouts are unutilised.

Checkout system

Aldi's checkout procedure is highly standardized, with checkout operators sitting down in swivel chairs, passing products through a two-sided barcode scanner. Products have very long barcodes covering several sides of the packaging to speed this procedure. Cashiers save additional time by preparing the most likely amount of change while the customer is still searching for money in his/her wallet.

Aldi was, however, a latecomer to barcode scanners, and many stores only added them in 2004; previously, cashier clerks would manually enter a three-digit code for each item from memory (Aldi Nord) or the price (Aldi Süd). An advantage of this was that the cashiers could already type in the prices of all the articles on the conveyer belt even if the customers were blocking the process by not putting the articles quickly enough back into their shopping cart.

Once products have been scanned, they are put directly in the shopping cart, which has a special dock on the counter for this purpose. This is why Aldi stores in Germany insist that customers use a cart; the customer is expected to bag groceries at a separate bench. Many, if not most customers, however, ignore this rule, not least because it would force them to join the queue to leave the store even if they hadn't purchased anything. Aldi generally does not offer hand baskets. However, in Australia select stores do have hand baskets available.

Reputation

In West Germany, before about 1990, Aldi shops were often ridiculed as being cheap shops selling poor-quality goods. Aldi's customers were alleged to be only poor people who couldn't afford to shop elsewhere. Loyal German soccer fans, ashamed of their favorite team's performance, were known to wear Aldi bags over their heads as a gag. Being held in such low esteem by many did not seem to dent Aldi's profits however. After German reunification, many German middle class families had to cut down their spending and Aldi's popularity and public acceptance grew. Many individual consumers "discovered" that the poor reputation of Aldi's products was apparently undeserved. This shift in public perception was boosted by a series of cookbooks that only used Aldi ingredients, which led to the emergence of a kind of Aldi fandom into the German mainstream.

In countries such as the UK, where the level of service and presentation of mainstream supermarkets is arguably lower than in Aldi's native Germany, Aldi's public reputation does not appear to have improved in the same way. Despite this, and the strong price competition between such British retailers on precisely the basic goods Aldi sells, the firm apparently remains profitable.

In the United Kingdom, Aldi (just like it's rival Lidl) is often the centre of jokes regarding the wealth of a person, particularly with the younger generation. Many consider it to be derogatory to shop at Aldi, and as a result a lot of students will not admit to shopping there if they do.

Business practices

Many Aldi practices are common in German supermarkets but largely unique to Aldi in markets such as the U.S. and Britain. These include the system of metal gates and turnstiles forcing customers to exit through the checkout, the practice of charging for shopping bags, and the fact that Aldi until recently accepted only cash (since 2004, German stores have begun to accept the Maestro debit card). Debit cards are also accepted in the USA. Like most German retailers, Aldi does not accept major credit cards. Aldi does accept MasterCard, Bankcard and Visa in Australia for an additional 1% surcharge.

Aldi stores worldwide are approximately the same size. The company's stores in Germany are similar in size to those of competing supermarkets, and they can often be found in shopping centres or elsewhere where retail units of this size are common. However in other countries, such as Britain, France, and the U.S., Aldi stores are far smaller than those countries' typical supermarkets or hypermarkets, and tend to be free-standing, purpose-built structures.

Aldi stores often have fairly limited opening hours, such as were restricted by law (until 18:30 weeknights and 14:00 Saturdays) in Germany until these laws were relaxed somewhat in 1996 and 2004. Some (but by no means all) of its German outlets, particularly those in shopping centres, now stay open until the revised legal closing time of 20:00. On the other hand, Aldi stores in the U.S. and U.K. close around 19:00 weeknights, earlier on Saturday, and most remain closed on Sunday, in contrast to the late or 24-hour opening times of many U.S. and British supermarkets. Aldi's U.S. stores are the only ones to offer customer toilets.

In Germany Aldi is occasionally jokingly called Feinkost Albrecht (approximate translation: Albrecht Deli).

Recently the similar Lidl chain has grown faster than Aldi; its major difference in business practice is that it stocks a few name brands.

Aldi Talk

On the 7th December 2005, based on their well known brand, Aldi (both Nord and Süd) in Germany introduced a pay-as-you-go mobile phone company Aldi Talk, piggybacking on the e-plus network. They offered rates of €0,05 (approx US$ 0.06) per minute/SMS to other Aldi Talk customers and €0,15 (approx US$ 0.18) to landlines and other mobile phones. This phone offer is available on either a “starter set”, which is a SIM card and €10 (US$ 12.01) worth of credit at €19,99 (US$ 24.02), or a Medion mobile phone [1] with a SIM card at €59,99 (US$ 72.11).

Previously, Aldi Süd in Austria did a pay-as-you-go service called “yesss!” [2] with Connect Austria's One.

Competitors

  • Lidl (5000 stores)
  • Netto (1200 stores)
  • Kwiksave (UK Only)

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Previously, Aldi Süd in Austria did a pay-as-you-go service called “yesss!” [2] with Connect Austria's One.
. This phone offer is available on either a “starter set”, which is a SIM card and €10 (US$ 12.01) worth of credit at €19,99 (US$ 24.02), or a Medion mobile phone [1] with a SIM card at €59,99 (US$ 72.11).
. They offered rates of €0,05 (approx US$ 0.06) per minute/SMS to other Aldi Talk customers and €0,15 (approx US$ 0.18) to landlines and other mobile phones. The theme is currently a remixed version of the one used between 1991 and 1995 and is composed by Tony Gibber. On the 7th December 2005, based on their well known brand, Aldi (both Nord and Süd) in Germany introduced a pay-as-you-go mobile phone company Aldi Talk, piggybacking on the e-plus network. This was replaced in 1986 with "The Wizard", a composition by Paul Hardcastle.

Recently the similar Lidl chain has grown faster than Aldi; its major difference in business practice is that it stocks a few name brands. In 1981 an original song 'Yellow Pearl' by Phil Lynott was commissioned as the new theme music. In Germany Aldi is occasionally jokingly called Feinkost Albrecht (approximate translation: Albrecht Deli). was used as the show's theme tune for most of the 1970s, and also in a remixed version between 1998 and 2003, although ironically the band never performed on the show. stores are the only ones to offer customer toilets. S. Aldi's U.S. C.

and British supermarkets. A version of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" by C. close around 19:00 weeknights, earlier on Saturday, and most remain closed on Sunday, in contrast to the late or 24-hour opening times of many U.S. Mainly this has been performers who disliked the mime format of the show, often as a more effective protest of this rather than just refusing to appear. and U.K. A number of performers have sent up the format in various ways. On the other hand, Aldi stores in the U.S. In addition, the creator of the show, Johnnie Stewart, died on April 29, 2005.

Some (but by no means all) of its German outlets, particularly those in shopping centres, now stay open until the revised legal closing time of 20:00. Although the original four presenters are still alive, five presenters of the show have passed away — Stuart Henry, Kenny Everett, occasional presenter Caron Keating, John Peel and Tommy Vance. Aldi stores often have fairly limited opening hours, such as were restricted by law (until 18:30 weeknights and 14:00 Saturdays) in Germany until these laws were relaxed somewhat in 1996 and 2004. An edited version of the UK show can be seen on BBC Prime, the weekend after UK transmission. However in other countries, such as Britain, France, and the U.S., Aldi stores are far smaller than those countries' typical supermarkets or hypermarkets, and tend to be free-standing, purpose-built structures. It is being planned for a possible Fall 2006 launch. The company's stores in Germany are similar in size to those of competing supermarkets, and they can often be found in shopping centres or elsewhere where retail units of this size are common. It is expected to be similar to the 1987 version, but it will also utilize the Billboard magazine music charts, most notably the Hot 100 chart.

Aldi stores worldwide are approximately the same size. On January 23, 2006, record producer Lou Pearlman made a deal to bring "Top of the Pops" back to the airwaves in the United States. Aldi does accept MasterCard, Bankcard and Visa in Australia for an additional 1% surcharge. Viewer interest was gone and the show was taken off BBC America's schedule. Like most German retailers, Aldi does not accept major credit cards. BBC America then tinkered with the show by cutting a few minutes out of each show and moving it to a weekday time slot. Debit cards are also accepted in the USA. The network would get the episodes one week after they were transmitted in the UK.

These include the system of metal gates and turnstiles forcing customers to exit through the checkout, the practice of charging for shopping bags, and the fact that Aldi until recently accepted only cash (since 2004, German stores have begun to accept the Maestro debit card). In 2002, BBC America presented the BBC version of Top of the Pops as part of their weekend schedule. and Britain. The show was presented on late Friday nights and lasted almost a year. Many Aldi practices are common in German supermarkets but largely unique to Aldi in markets such as the U.S. It was hosted by Nia Peeples and even showed performances from the BBC version of the programme. Many consider it to be derogatory to shop at Aldi, and as a result a lot of students will not admit to shopping there if they do. In 1987, the CBS television network decided to try an American version of the show.

In the United Kingdom, Aldi (just like it's rival Lidl) is often the centre of jokes regarding the wealth of a person, particularly with the younger generation. Top of the Pops had short-lived fame in the United States. Despite this, and the strong price competition between such British retailers on precisely the basic goods Aldi sells, the firm apparently remains profitable. This is aimed at a younger audience as is part of the CBBC Saturday Morning lineup. In countries such as the UK, where the level of service and presentation of mainstream supermarkets is arguably lower than in Aldi's native Germany, Aldi's public reputation does not appear to have improved in the same way. A more recent spin-off is Top of the Pops Reloaded (previously Top of the Pops Saturday), showing on Saturday mornings on BBC One. This shift in public perception was boosted by a series of cookbooks that only used Aldi ingredients, which led to the emergence of a kind of Aldi fandom into the German mainstream. It has been shown on BBC2 since September 1994, although the network's new controller Roly Keating announced in the summer of 2004 that it was being "rested" (repeats, however, continue on the digital channel UKTV G2).

Many individual consumers "discovered" that the poor reputation of Aldi's products was apparently undeserved. The BBC have also had a show called TOTP2 which shows archive footage from as early as the 1960s of musicians on earlier Top of the Pops shows. After German reunification, many German middle class families had to cut down their spending and Aldi's popularity and public acceptance grew. It now averages around 1.5 million viewers. Being held in such low esteem by many did not seem to dent Aldi's profits however. Since the move to Sundays, Cotton has continued to host with a different guest presenter each week, such as Rufus Hound or Richard Bacon. Loyal German soccer fans, ashamed of their favorite team's performance, were known to wear Aldi bags over their heads as a gag. The show was co-hosted by Reggie Yates and Fearne Cotton until 11th July 2005 every Friday night.

Aldi's customers were alleged to be only poor people who couldn't afford to shop elsewhere. It was not renewed due to his apparent lack of popularity with TV viewers. In West Germany, before about 1990, Aldi shops were often ridiculed as being cheap shops selling poor-quality goods. The new show was hosted by MTV presenter Tim Kash until his contract expired in August 2004. However, in Australia select stores do have hand baskets available. In a break with the previous format, the show is to play more up-and-coming tracks ahead of any chart success, and also to feature interviews with artists. Aldi generally does not offer hand baskets. In November 2003, the show was radically overhauled in what has been widely reported as a make-or-break attempt to revitalise the long-running series.

Many, if not most customers, however, ignore this rule, not least because it would force them to join the queue to leave the store even if they hadn't purchased anything. While this resulted in some of the show's best performances — notably Kurt Cobain's singing on "Smells Like Teen Spirit" — it also exposed a number of poor live singers, and was dropped as a general rule. This is why Aldi stores in Germany insist that customers use a cart; the customer is expected to bag groceries at a separate bench. For a few years from 1991 the show adopted a live vocal to pre-recorded backing track policy. Once products have been scanned, they are put directly in the shopping cart, which has a special dock on the counter for this purpose. Acts performing on the show have traditionally mimed to a pre-recorded track and this accounts for a number of performers who never appeared on the show due to a resistance to mime. An advantage of this was that the cashiers could already type in the prices of all the articles on the conveyer belt even if the customers were blocking the process by not putting the articles quickly enough back into their shopping cart. In its heyday during the glam rock era of the early 1970s, the show featured the tightly choreographed dance troupe Pan's People (later succeeded by Legs & Co.), something which has been widely imitated on similar shows ever since.

Aldi was, however, a latecomer to barcode scanners, and many stores only added them in 2004; previously, cashier clerks would manually enter a three-digit code for each item from memory (Aldi Nord) or the price (Aldi Süd). The show has historically been closely associated with the BBC radio station Radio 1, usually being presented by DJs from the station (although from October 1991 to January 1994 no Radio 1 DJs presented the show, and the association has not been as close as it once was). Cashiers save additional time by preparing the most likely amount of change while the customer is still searching for money in his/her wallet. It celebrated its 2000th show in 2002. Products have very long barcodes covering several sides of the packaging to speed this procedure. This chart show has seen many changes through the decades: in style, design, fashion and taste. Aldi's checkout procedure is highly standardized, with checkout operators sitting down in swivel chairs, passing products through a two-sided barcode scanner. The first edition on BBC Two was broadcast on 17 July 2005 at 7pm.

Aldi do not have publicly listed telephones in stores to minimize the time checkouts are unutilised. However, it was insisted that the move was in fact so that the show would air immediately after the official announcement of the new top 40 chart on Radio 1, as it was thought that by the following Friday, the chart seemed out-of-date. However, in the USA, Aldi advertises regularly via weekly newspaper inserts and Aldi television commercials have begun airing on the TBS network, and in the UK print and television ads appeared in mid-2005. This move has been widely reported as a final "sidelining" of the show, and perhaps a move towards cancelling it altogether. It claims this is a cost savings that can be passed on to consumers. By November 2004, viewing figures had plummeted to below three million, prompting announcement by the BBC that the show was going to move again to Sunday evenings on BBC Two, thus losing its prime-time slot on BBC One which it had maintained for forty years.[2]. Aldi has a policy in Germany of not advertising, apart from a weekly list of special prices called Aldi informiert (Aldi informs) that is distributed in stores, by direct mail, and sometimes printed in local newspapers. It was traditionally shown on a Thursday night, but was moved to a Friday in 1996, a change which caused some controversy.

As a result, Aldi earned a great deal of customer goodwill. During its heyday in the 1970s, it attracted 15 million viewers each week [1]. In contrast to other supermarkets, Aldi prominently listed "before and after" prices on posters in stores for months after the introduction, and generally rounded its euro prices down. It was originally intended to have only a few programmes but has been going for over 40 years. Consumers believed that many merchants had used the currency changeover as a cover to increase prices, often substantially; this was later confirmed by independent studies. Over 2000 episodes have been shown over the years; and the act that has appeared in the most episodes is the British rock band, Status Quo. Aldi also profited from the introduction of the euro in Germany and other countries. Savile rotated with three other presenters: Alan Freeman, Pete Murray and David Jacobs.

("Top quality at incredibly low prices" is an Aldi marketing slogan.). DJ Jimmy Savile presented the first show, which featured (in order) The Rolling Stones with "I Wanna Be Your Man'", Dusty Springfield with "I Only Want to be With You", the Dave Clark Five with "Glad All Over", The Hollies with "Stay", The Swinging Blue Jeans with "The Hippy Hippy Shake" and The Beatles with "I Want to Hold Your Hand", that week's number one. Aldi has successfully carved its own (actually rather large) niche with this approach: While shoppers may not normally like shopping in a bland or industrial-looking (and possibly congested) store, such utter lack of frills has become part of the accepted norm with Aldi, and consumers appear to be willing to accept it because of the "incredible value" they expect to get in exchange. Top of the Pops began on New Year's Day 1964 in a studio set in a disused church in Manchester. These and other cost-cutting strategies save Aldi money and arguably the general price level in Aldi stores — as compared to more "upmarket" supermarkets — appears to show that at least some or most of these savings are passed on to consumer. . However, due to the efficient checkout system, a long queue does not necessarily translate into longer waiting times than in other supermarkets. Each programme consists of half an hour of performances of some of that week's best-selling popular music.

Long queues at the checkout counter are also relatively common, reflecting Aldi's minimal staffing levels, as well as the competitive situation in Aldi's native Germany, where long supermarket checkout lines are part of daily life. Top of the Pops is a long-running British music chart television programme shown each week on BBC Two and now licensed for local versions around the world. When all items on a pallet have been sold, it is replaced. The New Jersey power pop band The Smithereens recorded a song entitled "Top of the Pops" on their album "Blow Up.". Aldi's "strictly no frills" approach is evident for instance in that typically Aldi stores do not decorate aisles — or even fill shelves for that matter: Pallets of the products on offer are commonly simply parked alongside the aisles, and customers picking up products will gradually empty them. Akira the Don's single, 'Living in the Future'. Although Aldi emphasizes low prices, reports from a German consumer watchdog suggest that this does not negatively impact the quality of Aldi products. The song "Formed a Band" by Art Brut includes in its lyrics, "We’re gonna write a song as universal as happy Birthday, that makes sure everybody knows that everything is going to be OK, we’re going to take that song and we’re going to play it 8 weeks in a row on Top of the Pops." In their song "Bad Weekend," the band also sings, "sometimes it's hard to stop when your heart is set on Top of the Pops, Top of the Pops." Art Brut Lyrics.

American Aldi stores also feature bargain-priced, gourmet foods imported from Germany. "Me Plus One" by Anne Lilia Berge Strand or more commonly Annie. Aldi mainly sells exclusively produced, custom-branded products (often identical to and produced by major brands) with brand names including "Grandessa" and "Fit and Active". Rat Trap by The Boomtown Rats. Aldi is the largest wine retailer in Germany. A song entitled "Top of the Pops" appeared on the Kinks album, Lola versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One. In the past some of Aldi's early computer offers, created some kind of hysteria in Germany, with all available items sold in only a few hours. "C-30 C-60 C-90 GO!", originally by Bow Wow Wow and covered by Seattle, WA band Pretty Girls Make Graves.

The specials are only available in strictly limited quantities and for a limited timeframe (one week). The Scottish punk band The Rezillos lampooned the show as a vehicle for vapid commercialism and for paying little or no attention to talented, unknown bands, in their song "Top of the Pops." Ironically the band actually ended up performing the song on the programme (twice) when it entered the charts — it would appear the producers misunderstood the song's lyrics and thought it was an affectionate tribute. Although not always available, but regulary put up for sale are clothing, toys, flowers, gifts. Possibly because of this, his next appearance as presenter wasn't until 1982. Additionally to the standard assortment Aldi also has weekly special offers, some of them on more expensive products such as electronics, appliances or computers, usually from Medion. When John Peel first presented the programme in 1968 he forgot the name of Amen Corner who were appearing that week. Also it allowed Aldi to avoid the use of price tags even before the introduction of barcode scanners (see below). When Elvis Costello performed "Radio Radio" on the show, he changed the lyrics to criticise Tony Blackburn who was the presenter that week.

This increases the numbers of sales for each article and also allows Aldi stores to be smaller than supermarkets which cover the same range of products but with more diversity. Because of the BBC's former policy of deleting old programmes, nearly all of the episodes from the first ten years of the programme's history have been lost, including all of The Beatles' appearances. One reason for Aldi's success is that the number of brands is very limited, you usually don't find more than two different brands for one kind of product and often only one. Super Furry Animals once got the whole audience to sit down during a live performance of theirs. Aldi specializes in staple items such as food, beverages, sanitary articles and other inexpensive household items. In 1980, the then fledgling heavy metal superstars Iron Maiden became the first band to play live on the show since The Who in 1972, when they refused to mime to their single "Running Free".
Aldi Süd operates in. It noticeably had Victoria Beckham promote her new song "This Groove", with a performance 7 times in the first 8 shows, including the (pre-recorded) Christmas special.

Aldi Nord operates in. The show's relaunch with Andi Peters as producer was widely considered the point where Top Of The Pops was Jumping The Shark. In principle, the two firms share nothing but the name and a similar corporate identity; however, they describe their relationship as a "friendly alliance" and there appear to be agreements between the two insofar that they do not compete directly with each other and (except for Germany) never both operate in the same countries. The most complaints the show recieved for a single episode was in 1994 when Manic Street Preachers performed their song "Faster" in a manner that was seen as intimidating and featured lead singer James Dean Bradfield wearing a balaclava such as would be worn by an IRA terrorist. The companies have since expanded internationally, into other European, North American, and Australian markets. Cliff Richard has performed the most on Top Of The Pops, recording over 150 performances. The chains initially covered the respective different regions of the then-West Germany. The shortest performance was Super Furry Animals with Do or Die clocking in at 95 seconds.

Thus today, Aldi consists of Aldi Nord (Aldi North) (where tobacco sales were deemed to be acceptable) and Aldi Süd (Aldi South) (where they were not; however Aldi Süd began selling tobacco products in 2003). As of November 2005, the longest performance was of Green Day's Jesus Of Suburbia lasting 9 minutes. In the year 1961, the then-Aldi chain of supermarket stores split into two sister companies (each belonging to one of the brothers) over a dispute whether to sell cigarettes and other tobacco products at the checkout. "I'm miming"!. Back then, it comprised only one small food shop. The lyric he did not mime to was .. The company was founded in 1946 by the brothers Karl and Theo Paul Albrecht in Essen, Germany. Fish, the face painted lead singer of early 1980s prog rockers Marillion, made sure that the cameras caught a close up of his firmly closed mouth during a particular section of their single Punch and Judy.

. Singer Les Gray of Mud went on stage to perform with a ventriloquist dummy during the performance of Lonely this Christmas and had the dummy lip-synch to the voice-over in the middle of the song. Its spartan stores with low prices on a limited range of goods can now be found in more than a dozen countries. This performance has been taken to heart by Nirvana fans, who affectionately refer to it as "Teen Gothic". Historically, Aldi is said to have been Germany's first real discount supermarket. For this performance Cobain was trusted to sing live vocals to a pre-recorded backing track: instead, he sang in a low, mournful wail; he was later to claim this was his attempt to sound like Morrissey. The company's name stands for Albrecht-Discount, using the founders' last name. In grunge band Nirvana's only performance on Top of the Pops, frontman Kurt Cobain "played" his guitar with his fingers inches away from the frets, drummer Dave Grohl danced around in his seat for most of the performance, and bassist Krist Novoselic waved his instrument around his head.

It is actually two separate companies but is commonly referred to as one. Faith No More lead singer Mike Patton also showed he was obviously miming a performance by sticking his tongue out of the side of his mouth during closeup shots. Aldi is an international hard discount supermarket chain based in Germany. In a 2005 performance of "Lyla", Liam Gallagher made no secret of the fact that he was miming his lyrics by walking away from the microphone and chewing gum when he was supposed to be singing. Kwiksave (UK Only). The performance of "Do They Know It's Christmas?" witnessed the unlikely scene of Paul Weller lip-syncing to Bono's vocals. Netto (1200 stores). For the 1984 Christmas Day edition all of the performers from Band Aid had been booked to appear apart from Bono.

Lidl (5000 stores). The set ended with the band erupting in laughter at the Gallagher's impressions of each other. USA. It also mocked the habit people had in Oasis' early years of confusing the brothers, not being able to tell them apart. United Kingdom. In 1995 Oasis played their single "Roll With It" featuring singer Liam Gallagher pretending to play guitar, while guitarist Noel Gallagher pretended to sing, just to show how fake the 'live' performance was. Switzerland. Despite this, to this day, many TV nostalgia shows and other sources still claim this was an error.

Slovenia (where it operates under the name Hofer). This was a deliberate joke by the band and the production staff, but many people (including, apparently, host David Jensen) didn't realise this and thought it was a genuine mistake. Ireland. While performing their 1982 hit "Jackie Wilson Said" the band Dexy's Midnight Runners were seen performing in front of a projection of the darts player Jocky Wilson. Austria (where it operates under the name Hofer). Australia.

Southern Germany. Spain. Portugal (coming soon). The Netherlands.

Luxembourg. France. Denmark. Belgium.

Northern Germany.

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