World Wrestling Entertainment

(Redirected from WWE)

World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, is a professional wrestling promotion, currently the largest in North America. The company was previously known as TitanSports, Inc. and has previously done business as the Capitol Wrestling Corporation, the World Wide Wrestling Federation, and the World Wrestling Federation (WWF).

World Wrestling Entertainment is a publicly-traded company, but the vast majority (70%) of voting shares are owned by Chairman Vince McMahon, his wife, CEO Linda McMahon, his son, Executive Vice President of Global Media Shane McMahon, and his daughter, Vice President of Creative Writing Stephanie McMahon-Levesque. As of 2005, the headquarters of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. are located in Stamford, Connecticut.

Early history

In 1915, Roderick James "Jess" McMahon, grandfather of current WWE Chairman Vince McMahon, co-promoted a boxing match between Jess Willard and Jack Johnson. In the fight, on April 5, 1915, Johnson lost his title to Willard in Havana. A decade later, in 1925, McMahon joined Tex Rickard in promoting boxing events from the old Madison Square Garden Arena, in New York, starting with the December 11, 1925, light-heavyweight championship match between Jack Delaney and Paul Berlenbach. Jess McMahon's enterprise focused on boxing and live concert/music promotion.

It was not until 1935, the same year Jim Crockett Promotions was formed, that the McMahon family moved into the wrestling business. His son, Vincent Jess McMahon, began to take an increasing role in the running of the business, especially on the wrestling side. However, the McMahon family was not able to promote wrestling matches at Madison Square Garden due to Rickard's dislike of the sport.

This "no wrestling at the Garden" policy ended in 1948, when Joseph Raymond Mondt (better known as Toots Mondt), backed by millionaire Bernarr McFadden, managed to promote a wrestling show at the famous arena. Mondt's doing so was facilitated, in part, by the elder McMahon. Ray Fabiani, who helped Mondt take control of the New York territory after the death of Jack Curley, was influential in drawing the younger McMahon into an alliance with Mondt.

Capitol Wrestling Corporation

In January 1953, Jesse's son Vincent J. McMahon and wrestling promoter Toots Mondt took control of the Northeastern United States wrestling circuit as part of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). The NWA is a broad group of wrestling companies that recognized an undisputed champion, who went from wrestling company to wrestling company in the alliance and defended the belt around the world.

McMahon's company was called Capitol Wrestling Corporation (CWC). While originally running shows from the 2,000-seat Turner's Arena, the CWC would eventually control the territories of New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. It was able to do this after signing an agreement with WTTG Channel 5, in 1956, to air live CWC wrestling shows. These shows were then syndicated. Capitol dominated professional wrestling in the Northeastern United States during the mid-20th century, when it was divided into strictly regional enterprises.

World Wide Wrestling Federation

In 1963, "Nature Boy" Buddy Rogers was the NWA champion and his bookings were controlled by Mondt. The rest of the NWA was upset with Mondt because he rarely let Rogers wrestle outside of the Northeast. It was decided that Mondt and CWC would part ways with the NWA, creating the World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF) in the process. Mondt and WWWF wanted Rogers to keep the NWA title, but Rogers didn't want to lose his $25,000 deposit on the belt; wrestling champions at the time had to pay a deposit to ensure they would honor whatever commitments that came along with their titles. Rogers lost the NWA title to Lou Thesz in Toronto, Ontario on January 24, 1963.

In mid-April, Rogers was then awarded the new WWWF title after the WWWF claimed he won a (fictitious) tournament in Rio de Janeiro. He lost the title to Bruno Sammartino a month later on May 17, 1963 after supposedly suffering a heart attack shortly before the match.

The WWWF rejoined the NWA in 1971 and their world title was dropped to the status of a regional title.

Mondt (born in 1886) died in 1976.

The WWWF became the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) in mid-1979. The name change was purely cosmetic; the ownership and front office personnel remained unchanged during this period.

World Wrestling Federation

WWF goes national

This "old school" logo was the primary mark of Titan Sports/The World Wrestling Federation from 1984-1997.

In 1979, Vincent K. McMahon founded Titan Sports, Inc., and in 1982 purchased the WWF from his father, Vincent J. McMahon. After discovering at age 12 that the wrestling promoter was his father, Vince became steadily involved in his father's wrestling business until the latter was ready to retire. The elder McMahon had already established the northeastern territory as one of the most vibrant members of the NWA by recognizing that pro wrestling was more about entertainment than sport. Against his father's wishes, McMahon began an expansion process that would fundamentally change the sport, and place both the WWF--and his own life--in jeopardy.

Leaving the NWA for a second time in itself was not that big of a step; the AWA had long ago ceased being an official NWA member, and just over a decade earlier the WWWF itself had rejoined the NWA. But in neither instance did the defecting member attempt to undermine, and destroy, the Territory system that had been the foundation of the industry.

Other promoters were furious when McMahon began syndicating WWF shows to stations across America. McMahon also began selling videotapes of WWF events outside the Northeast. He effectively broke the unwritten law of regionalism around which the entire industry had been based. To make matters worse, McMahon would use the income generated by advertising, television deals, and tape sales to poach talent from rival promoters. Wrestling promoters nationwide were now in direct competition with the WWF.

According to several reports, Vincent Sr. warned his son: "Vinny, what are you doing?! You'll wind up at the bottom of a river!" In spite of such warnings, the younger McMahon had an even bolder ambition: the WWF would tour nationally. However, such a venture required huge capital investment; one which placed the WWF on the verge of financial collapse.

The future of not just McMahon's experiment, but also the WWF, the NWA, and the whole industry came down to the success or failure of McMahon's groundbreaking sports entertainment concept, WrestleMania. WrestleMania was a pay-per-view extravaganza that McMahon marketed as being the Super Bowl of professional wrestling.

The concept of a wrestling supercard was nothing new in North America; the NWA had been running StarrCade a few years prior to Wrestlemania. However, McMahon wanted to take the WWF to the mainstream, targeting the general public who were not regular wrestling fans. He drew the interest of the mainstream media by inviting celebrities such as Mr. T and Cyndi Lauper to participate in the event. MTV, in particular, featured a great deal of WWF coverage and programming at this time, in what was termed the Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection.

The new formula of what McMahon deemed Sports Entertainment was a resounding financial success at the original WrestleMania. The WWF did incredible business on the shoulders of McMahon and his All-American babyface hero, Hulk Hogan, for the next several years, creating what some observers dubbed a second golden age for professional wrestling. However, by the 1990s the WWF's fortunes steadily declined as Hulk Hogan's act grew stale, hitting a low point in the wake of allegations of steroid abuse and distribution against McMahon and the WWF in 1994. McMahon was eventually exonerated, but it was a public-relations debacle for the WWF.

WWF The Next Generation

Monday Night Wars

Under Eric Bischoff, World Championship Wrestling (WCW), the new name for NWA superterritory Jim Crockett Promotions after its purchase by Ted Turner, began using its tremendous financial resources to lure established talent away from the WWF. Beginning in 1994, these acquisitions included Hulk Hogan, "Macho Man" Randy Savage, Lex Luger, Scott Hall, "Big Sexy" Kevin Nash, and many others. In 1995, Bischoff upped the ante, creating WCW Monday Nitro, a cable show on Turner's TNT network, to directly compete with the WWF's flagship show, WWF Monday Night RAW. Eventually, on the strength of its newly-acquired WWF talent and the groundbreaking nWo storyline, WCW overtook the WWF in television ratings and popularity.

McMahon responded by stating that he could create new superstars to regain the upper hand in the ratings war, and at the same time tightening contracts to make it harder for WCW to raid WWF talent. Despite this, the WWF was losing money at a rapid rate. WCW's reality-based storylines drew attention away from the WWF's outdated (and childish) rock and wrestling-era gimmicks.

The Montreal Screwjob

Main article: Montreal Screwjob

The WWF/WCW feud reached a new level in 1997, when McMahon decided to force then-WWF champion Bret "The Hitman" Hart out of the company. The previous year, Hart was offered a lucrative deal to jump to WCW. McMahon countered with an offer worth much less money, but for a 20-year term, and Hart agreed to stay. However, McMahon immediately regretted the deal. Claiming financial hardship, McMahon threatened to breach the contract and advised Bret to do his best to sign with WCW.

While Hart's departure was not a surprise, the WWF was concerned about the fact that the man about to leave was the WWF Champion. Earlier in the WWF/WCW feud, the WWF Women's Champion, Alundra Blayze, signed with WCW while in possession of the belt and threw it in a trash can on WCW Nitro (imitating a heavily-publicized act by heavyweight boxing champion Riddick Bowe). The WWF's worst nightmare was for Hart to appear on WCW Nitro while wearing the WWF belt. Bret promised that no such thing would ever happen and put an agreement in place that the announcement of his departure would be delayed until the belt could be transitioned to a new champion. However, McMahon was concerned that the word would get out and he sought a way to get the belt off of Hart before the deal could be announced on WCW Monday Nitro.

Hart used his contractual control over his booking in the last 30 days of his deal, which would end with that year's Survivor Series PPV in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He let it be known to WWF management that he would willingly drop the title, but not to rival "HBK" Shawn Michaels in Montreal. McMahon would deviate from the agreed finish of their match at Survivor Series to allow Shawn Michaels to win the title from Hart. This would set the stage for the turning point in the WWF/WCW feud.

McMahon used the backlash from the event to cast himself as the evil company owner "Mr. McMahon" in WWF programming, a dictatorial ruler who favored wrestlers who were "good for business" over "misfits" like Stone Cold Steve Austin. This led to the Austin vs. McMahon feud, which was the cornerstone of the new WWF Attitude concept.

WWF Attitude

This logo was phased in with the Attitude era. Included is the "Attitude" wordmark which disappeared after a few years. This is the earliest variation of the current WWE logo. It is rumored this logo was originally doodled during a meeting by a bored Shane McMahon.

Running with the momentum from the Montreal Screwjob, McMahon took the WWF in an edgier, reality-based direction he called WWF Attitude, and in the process created a new corporate logo. Borrowing many of the exciting wrestling and storyline styles from then-insurgent wrestling promotion ECW, the WWF Attitude Era was based largely on the growing popularity of the wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austin. Popular with the fans ever since winning the King of the Ring tournament as a heel in 1996, Austin's rough-and-redneck style won over enough fans that the WWF was forced to turn him into a fan favorite at Wrestlemania XIII in spring 1997 (in a rare double-switch in which the increasingly whiny Bret Hart turned heel after a legendary match between the two wrestlers). During the summer and fall of 1997, Austin enhanced his status as a rebel willing to challenge any authority by giving his Stone Cold Stunner finishing move to WWF announcer Jim Ross, then-Commisssioner Sgt. Slaughter, and eventually WWF owner Vince McMahon himself. Hints of the Austin-McMahon feud in WWF storylines began after Stone Cold won the 1998 Royal Rumble to become #1 Contender for the WWF Title at Wrestlemania. McMahon said in a pre-Wrestlemania press conference that it was not in the WWF's best interest to have Austin as champion. The relationship would deteriorate over the next few years of WWF programming.

The Attitude era kicked off in earnest at WrestleMania XIV, when professional boxer Mike Tyson appeared as a special guest referee for the WWF Title match between Shawn Michaels and Stone Cold Steve Austin. The highlight was the verbal confrontation between Austin and Tyson ending with Austin flicking off Tyson. Fans who purchased the pay-per-view were amazed by what they saw; this certainly was not the childish Rock and Wrestling era they still expected from the WWF. Many more fans who had not bought WrestleMania, including fans of WCW, tuned in to watch RAW the next day and in subsequent weeks. This was the start of the epic feud between "evil promoter" Mr. McMahon and Austin. For the first time in 18 months, the edgier WWF would beat the weekly WCW Monday Nitro in the ratings.

Over the coming year, the WWF would see new fan favorites. The Rock would become one of the most popular professional wrestlers in history. Where earlier WCW's edgy WCW vs. nWo angle managed to almost lead the WWF to financial ruin, it was now becoming stale, and fans turned back to the WWF.

This change was not without critics. Many family groups were outraged at the graphic violence employed by the WWF. They, along with feminist groups, found the regular use of scantily-clad women to attract viewers as offensive. One group, the Parents Television Council, waged a sustained boycott campaign against the WWF. However, the controversial new presentation made the WWF more appealing than ever to its core audience.

The death of Owen Hart

Tragedy struck on May 23, 1999, in Kansas City. Owen Hart, as his "Blue Blazer" superhero character, was scheduled to make a dramatic appearance on that night's Over the Edge pay-per-view telecast, "flying" into the ring by being lowered from a harness attached to the roof of the arena. As Hart was being lowered into position in preparation for this entrance, his harness suddenly disengaged, sending him plummeting almost 80 feet to the ring below.

Those watching the pay-per-view telecast at the time were spared the sight because the director cut away to a pretaped interview just before the accident occurred. Hart was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after arrival. A stunned Jim Ross made the solemn announcement to the pay-per-view audience once word had reached the arena. The fans in attendance at the Kemper Arena were not informed of Owen's death. The decision to continue the event was (and still is) a controversial one.

The following night, the WWF dedicated its entire two-hour RAW telecast to Owen's memory, as various WWF performers and employees broke character and shared memories of their fallen friend.

Business advances

On April 23, 1999, the WWF launched a special program known as SmackDown! on the fledgling UPN network. The show became a weekly series on August 24, 1999. It has remained UPN's most successful program overall ever since.

Off the back of the success of the Attitude era, on October 19, 1999 the WWF's parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, Inc., became a publicly traded company. WWF announced its desire to diversify into other businesses, including a nightclub in Times Square, film production and book publishing.

In 2000 the WWF, in collaboration with television network NBC, announced the creation of the XFL, a new professional football league, but the league had dismal television ratings and NBC pulled the plug after a year.

Acquisition of WCW

With the massive success of WWF Attitude, WCW's financial situation deteriorated significantly, and its newly-merged parent company AOL Time Warner looked to cut the division loose. In March 2001, WWF Entertainment, Inc. acquired WCW from AOL Time Warner for $7 million. During the final WCW Monday Nitro, Vince McMahon (as the character Mr. McMahon) took over the broadcast during the last half hour and Monday Night Raw was seen on TNT. Months later, McMahon and Bischoff reconciled their personal differences, and Bischoff signed with WWF to perform as the storyline General Manager of Raw.

Since WCW's peak in the late 1990s, wrestling fans had dreamed about a feud between the two promotions. The original plan was to have WCW "take over" RAW, turning it back into WCW Monday Nitro. However, many big-name WCW stars such as "Hollywood" Hulk Hogan, Lex Luger, Kevin Nash, Goldberg, and Sting were still contracted to WCW's former parent company (McMahon decided not to buy them out), and all chose to sit out the duration of their contracts rather than work for McMahon for less money. The lack of major WCW star power, combined with McMahon deciding that WWF wrestlers generally should not lose to WCW wrestlers, ended the "InVasion" storyline quickly. Even the inclusion of ECW wrestlers and trademarks did not save it.

Many people believe that the story would have gone much better if WWE and McMahon waited a couple of years, as many WCW and ECW superstars joined after the end of the WWF vs. WCW feud. The feud was a contributor to the company's decline in the ratings as well as in attendance and financially, athough the company to this day still has a profitable quarter.

Some people think the WWF Attitude era ended at the end of WrestleMania X-Seven (17) and others say November 2001 when WWF beat WCW. It is still a debate amongst wrestling fans.

World Wrestling Entertainment

This t-shirt was part of the promotional campaign to raise awareness about the WWF's name change to WWE.

Following a lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund (also WWF), the Federation changed its name to World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. Its parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, also chose to adopt this name. The lawsuit dealt with the wrestling company's breaching of an agreement with the Fund over use of the initials "WWF" in the United Kingdom. Rather than attempt a financial settlement with the Fund, McMahon changed the name of the company. The logo was altered, and a promotional campaign called "Get The F Out" was used to publicize this change. Also, all verbal and visual references to "WWF" and the World Wrestling Federation logo from the "Attitude" era were edited out from old broadcasts. Some observers saw the new name as further acknowledgement by the company on its emphasis towards the entertainment rather than athletic aspects of professional wrestling.

Without WCW as competition, the WWE decided to split the promotion into two "separate" brands based on its two largest television shows, RAW and SmackDown! Under this "split brands" arrangement, each brand maintains a separate and non-overlapping roster of wrestlers, has championships exclusive to that brand (example: the WWE Championship on SmackDown!, and the World Heavyweight Championship on RAW), and is run by a different onscreen general manager. The two brands will occasionally clash at a pay-per-view card.

Programming

RAW brand

  • RAW - WWE's flagship show, airs live on Monday nights at 9 PM EST on Spike TV in the United States, live in Canada on TSN, and live in the United Kingdom on Sky Sports.
  • Sunday Night Heat - Sister show to RAW, airs Sunday nights at 7 PM EST on Spike TV.
  • Bottom Line - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the RAW brand. The show is hosted by Marc Loyd.

The Spike TV deal will expire in September, 2005, and Viacom (owner of Spike TV) has announced they will not seek to extend it. [1] (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20050311/tv_nm/television_wwe_dc_1) On April 4, 2005, WWE announced a new 3-year agreement with NBC Universal to air RAW on the USA Network once again, a deal that also reportedly included occasional WWE programming on Telemundo and NBC. In addition, WWE will broadcast a twice-yearly 90-minute "special event" on Saturday nights on NBC. [2] (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7380373/)

SmackDown! brand

  • SmackDown! - WWE's secondary show, airs Thursday nights at 8 PM EST on UPN in the United States (moving to Friday nights in September 2005) and in Canada at 7 PM EST on The Score.
  • Velocity - Sister show to SmackDown!, airs on Saturday nights at 11 PM EST on Spike TV. It is usually taped the hour before SmackDown! tapes. The current play-by-play commentator is Steve Romero and the current color commentator is Josh Matthews. Matthews formerly did play-by-play comentary with color analyst Bill DeMott.
  • Afterburn - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the SmackDown! brand. The show is hosted by Josh Matthews.

Pay-per-view

WWE is currently one of the leaders in pay-per-view content for cable and satellite television. Pay-per-views account for approximately 25% of WWE revenues ($95.3 million in the 2004 fiscal year).

  • 15 live shows for the North American market.
  • 4 live shows for the European market.
  • 2 live shows for the Asian market.
  • 4 live shows for the Australian market

All pay-per-views can be purchased and viewed on WWE.com as well.

WWE online

World Wrestling Entertainment has had a large Web presence since 1996 and was nominated for a "Streaming Media Award" in 1999 for its online content.

Streaming media has been one of the most important roles of the WWE.com "New Media" department and the output of videos is immense. With over fourteen million played video streams a month, WWE.com is a major contributor of online media.

The WWE has a large media repository dating back to the late 1960s and their goal was to stream most of this content online using a subscription service. Unfortunately, the lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund has kept WWE.com from showing any content from the "Attitude Era" (1998-May 2002). Furthermore, WWE.com provides the same services for its online pay-per-view content.

Shane McMahon is Executive Vice President of Global Media within World Wrestling Entertainment and is in charge of WWE.com. The younger McMahon was once a major character in WWF/WWE storylines in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but has since become seldom seen on television to concentrate his time exclusively on the Global Media division.

Other

  • The WWE Experience - A show aimed at the younger audience that recaps the past week's events in WWE. Airs Sunday mornings at 11 AM EST on Spike TV. The hosts are Todd Grisham and Ivory, although Josh Matthews has also guest hosted with Ivory.
  • Tough Enough - WWE's version of a reality show. It followed groups of men and women who were competing to become a WWE wrestler. This resulted in many new wrestlers being added to both brands. It aired as a separate show on MTV for three seasons, but integrated itself into regular SmackDown! programming in its fourth iteration, with a $1 million-dollar (US) contract awarded to the winner over four years. Daniel Puder, a former cage fighter, won the $1,000,000 Tough Enough.
  • WWE Confidential - This was a "behind the scenes"-type show hosted by "Mean" Gene Okerlund and featured many exclusive stories on WWE wrestlers. The final episode of this show aired on April 24, 2004.
  • WWE 24/7 - In 2004, the WWE officially announced a new video on demand service for digital cable users, allowing subscribers to the service access to matches in the promotion's extensive video library.

WWE Films

Since 2003, WWE has produced its own movie productions. Instead of focusing on wrestling movies, WWE is planning to produce movies that are non-wrestling related (excluding the first movie under the WWE Films name, which was a short documentary on WrestleMania XIX included on the WrestleMania XX DVD).

WWE Films is located in Hollywood, California and their first feature is named The Marine, starring John Cena. WWE Films will also produce Goodnight with WWE wrestler Kane. Stone Cold Steve Austin recently signed a three-movie deal with WWE Films in January, 2005. His first movie will be titled, The Condemned.

WWE and Vince McMahon were credited for production of the films The Scorpion King 2002, The Rundown 2003 and Walking Tall 2004 all starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. This was due to the fact that, at the time, WWE owned the rights to the name "The Rock". Since then, Johnson has obtained dual ownership of "The Rock" name with WWE.

Current champions


This page about WWE includes information from a Wikipedia article.
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Since then, Johnson has obtained dual ownership of "The Rock" name with WWE. Slavery and Louisiana. This was due to the fact that, at the time, WWE owned the rights to the name "The Rock". There is now a Six Flags in New Orleans East. WWE and Vince McMahon were credited for production of the films The Scorpion King 2002, The Rundown 2003 and Walking Tall 2004 all starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. For almost 20 years there was only one amusement park in Louisiana, called Hamel's Amusement Park near Bossier City. His first movie will be titled, The Condemned. They still maintain contacts with the Canary Islands, and have an annual "Caldo" festival named for a native dish.

Stone Cold Steve Austin recently signed a three-movie deal with WWE Films in January, 2005. Many of their descendants remained insulated from the city, and continued to speak an archaic version of Spanish well into the 20th Century. WWE Films will also produce Goodnight with WWE wrestler Kane. Bernard Parish, in the river passes east of the city, along an old mouth of the Mississippi River which they named Terre Aux Bouefs (literally "Land of the Cows" for the cattle living there). WWE Films is located in Hollywood, California and their first feature is named The Marine, starring John Cena. They settled in what is modern-day St. Instead of focusing on wrestling movies, WWE is planning to produce movies that are non-wrestling related (excluding the first movie under the WWE Films name, which was a short documentary on WrestleMania XIX included on the WrestleMania XX DVD). There were intended to help guard the eastern approaches to New Orleans from invasion by the British.

Since 2003, WWE has produced its own movie productions. The Islenos are dirrect descendants of Canary Islanders forced to migrate by the Spanish King beginning in the mid-1770s. The younger McMahon was once a major character in WWF/WWE storylines in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but has since become seldom seen on television to concentrate his time exclusively on the Global Media division. There is also a distinct Spanish-descended group in Louisiana. Shane McMahon is Executive Vice President of Global Media within World Wrestling Entertainment and is in charge of WWE.com. Two separate historically Francophone communities exist in Louisiana. Furthermore, WWE.com provides the same services for its online pay-per-view content. For schools see List of school districts in Louisiana.

Unfortunately, the lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund has kept WWE.com from showing any content from the "Attitude Era" (1998-May 2002). Ranked by per capita income. The WWE has a large media repository dating back to the late 1960s and their goal was to stream most of this content online using a subscription service. See also: List of famous people from Louisiana; List of Louisiana musicians; Music of Louisiana. With over fourteen million played video streams a month, WWE.com is a major contributor of online media. Its industrial outputs include chemical products, petroleum and coal products, food processing, transportation equipment, paper products, and tourism. Streaming media has been one of the most important roles of the WWE.com "New Media" department and the output of videos is immense. The state's principal agricultural outputs include seafood, cotton, soybeans, cattle, sugarcane, poultry and eggs, dairy products, and rice.

World Wrestling Entertainment has had a large Web presence since 1996 and was nominated for a "Streaming Media Award" in 1999 for its online content. Its Per Capita Personal Income was $26,312, 43rd in the nation. All pay-per-views can be purchased and viewed on WWE.com as well. The total gross state product in 2003 for Louisiana was $140 billion. Pay-per-views account for approximately 25% of WWE revenues ($95.3 million in the 2004 fiscal year). Highway 90. WWE is currently one of the leaders in pay-per-view content for cable and satellite television. Also, Interstate 49 is slated to be expanded north into Arkansas and east along Interstate 10 to New Orleans, replacing part of U.S.

[2] (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7380373/). There are proposed plans to extend Interstate 69 to the Texas/Mexico border, which will go through north-eastern Louisiana. In addition, WWE will broadcast a twice-yearly 90-minute "special event" on Saturday nights on NBC. State and Federal government efforts to halt or reverse this phenomenon are under way; others are being sought. [1] (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20050311/tv_nm/television_wwe_dc_1) On April 4, 2005, WWE announced a new 3-year agreement with NBC Universal to air RAW on the USA Network once again, a deal that also reportedly included occasional WWE programming on Telemundo and NBC. Owing to the extensive flood control measures along the Mississippi river and to natural subsidence, Louisiana is now suffering the loss of coastal land area. The Spike TV deal will expire in September, 2005, and Viacom (owner of Spike TV) has announced they will not seek to extend it. Near the coast, there are many salt domes, where salt is mined and oil is often found.

The two brands will occasionally clash at a pay-per-view card. It was originally covered by an arm of the sea, and has been built up by the silt carried down the valley by the great river. Without WCW as competition, the WWE decided to split the promotion into two "separate" brands based on its two largest television shows, RAW and SmackDown! Under this "split brands" arrangement, each brand maintains a separate and non-overlapping roster of wrestlers, has championships exclusive to that brand (example: the WWE Championship on SmackDown!, and the World Heavyweight Championship on RAW), and is run by a different onscreen general manager. A large part of Louisiana is the creation and product of the Mississippi River. Some observers saw the new name as further acknowledgement by the company on its emphasis towards the entertainment rather than athletic aspects of professional wrestling. The underlying strata of the state are of Cretaceous age and are covered by alluvial deposits of Tertiary and post-Tertiary origin. Also, all verbal and visual references to "WWF" and the World Wrestling Federation logo from the "Attitude" era were edited out from old broadcasts. The state also has 1,060 square miles of land-locked bays, 1,700 square miles of inland lakes, and a river surface of over 500 square miles.

The logo was altered, and a promotional campaign called "Get The F Out" was used to publicize this change. Besides the navigable rivers already named (some of which are called bayous), there are the Sabine, forming the western boundary, and the Pearl, the eastern boundary, the Calcasieu, the Mermentau, the Vermilion, the Teche, the Atchafalaya, the Boeuf, the Lafourche, the Courtableau, the D'Arbonne, the Macon, the Tensas, the Amite, the Tchefuncta, the Tickfaw, the Matalbany, and a number of other streams of lesser note, constituting a natural system of navigable waterways, aggregating over 4,000 miles in length, which is unequalled in the United States and probably in the world. The lawsuit dealt with the wrestling company's breaching of an agreement with the Fund over use of the initials "WWF" in the United Kingdom. Rather than attempt a financial settlement with the Fund, McMahon changed the name of the company. The elevations above sea-level range from 10 feet at the coast and swamp lands to 50 and 60 feet at the prairie and alluvial lands. In the uplands and hills the elevations rise to Mount Driskoll, the highest point in the state at only 535 feet above sea level, located in northwest Louisiana. Its parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, also chose to adopt this name. The uplands and contiguous hill lands have an area of more than 25,000 square miles, and they consist of prairie and woodlands. Following a lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund (also WWF), the Federation changed its name to World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. With the maintenances of strong levees these alluvial lands would enjoy perpetual immunity from inundation.

It is still a debate amongst wrestling fans. These floods, however, do not occur annually, and they may be said to be exceptional. Some people think the WWF Attitude era ended at the end of WrestleMania X-Seven (17) and others say November 2001 when WWF beat WCW. These alluvial lands are never inundated save when breaks occur in the levees by which they are protected against the floods of the Mississippi and its tributaries. The feud was a contributor to the company's decline in the ratings as well as in attendance and financially, athough the company to this day still has a profitable quarter. The lands along other streams present very similar features. WCW feud. The Mississippi flows upon a ridge formed by its own deposits, from which the lands incline toward the low swamps beyond at an average fall of six feet per mile.

Many people believe that the story would have gone much better if WWE and McMahon waited a couple of years, as many WCW and ECW superstars joined after the end of the WWF vs. The breadth of the alluvial region along the Mississippi is from 10 to 60 miles, and along the other streams it averages about 10 miles. Even the inclusion of ECW wrestlers and trademarks did not save it. The surface of the state may properly be divided into two parts, the uplands, and the alluvial and coast and swamp regions. The alluvial regions, including the low swamps and coast lands, cover an area of about 20,000 square miles; they lie principally along the Mississippi River, which traverses the state from north to south for a distance of about 600 miles and ultimately emptying into the Gulf of Mexico, the Red River, the Ouachita River and its branches, and other minor streams. The lack of major WCW star power, combined with McMahon deciding that WWF wrestlers generally should not lose to WCW wrestlers, ended the "InVasion" storyline quickly. See: List of Louisiana parishes. However, many big-name WCW stars such as "Hollywood" Hulk Hogan, Lex Luger, Kevin Nash, Goldberg, and Sting were still contracted to WCW's former parent company (McMahon decided not to buy them out), and all chose to sit out the duration of their contracts rather than work for McMahon for less money. See: List of Louisiana Governors, Napoleon Bonaparte.

The original plan was to have WCW "take over" RAW, turning it back into WCW Monday Nitro. All other states use the First Past the Post electoral system to elect Senators, Representatives, and statewide officials. Since WCW's peak in the late 1990s, wrestling fans had dreamed about a feud between the two promotions. Therefore it is common for a Democrat to be in a runoff with a fellow Democrat or a Republican to be in a runoff with a fellow Republican. Months later, McMahon and Bischoff reconciled their personal differences, and Bischoff signed with WWF to perform as the storyline General Manager of Raw. This runoff does not take into account party identification. McMahon) took over the broadcast during the last half hour and Monday Night Raw was seen on TNT. If no candidate has more than 50% of the vote, the two candidates with the highest vote total compete in a runoff election approximately one month later.

acquired WCW from AOL Time Warner for $7 million. During the final WCW Monday Nitro, Vince McMahon (as the character Mr. All candidates run in an open primary on Election Day, in which multiple candidates from the same party may be on the ballot. In March 2001, WWF Entertainment, Inc. states in using a runoff in state, local, and congressional elections. With the massive success of WWF Attitude, WCW's financial situation deteriorated significantly, and its newly-merged parent company AOL Time Warner looked to cut the division loose. Louisiana is unique among U.S. In 2000 the WWF, in collaboration with television network NBC, announced the creation of the XFL, a new professional football league, but the league had dismal television ratings and NBC pulled the plug after a year. Property, contractual, and family law are still mostly based on traditional Roman legal thinking and have little in common with English law.

WWF announced its desire to diversify into other businesses, including a nightclub in Times Square, film production and book publishing. While most of the differences are now found in verbiage, it is important to note that the "Civilian" tradition is still deeply rooted in all aspects of Louisiana law. Off the back of the success of the Attitude era, on October 19, 1999 the WWF's parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, Inc., became a publicly traded company. Great differences still exist between Louisiana Civil Law and the Common Law found in her 49 sister states. The show became a weekly series on August 24, 1999. It has remained UPN's most successful program overall ever since. Louisiana was never governed by the Napoleonic Code. On April 23, 1999, the WWF launched a special program known as SmackDown! on the fledgling UPN network. It is important to note that the Louisiana Civil Code and the French Civil Code, often referred to as the Napoleonic Code, came into existence at roughly the same time.

The following night, the WWF dedicated its entire two-hour RAW telecast to Owen's memory, as various WWF performers and employees broke character and shared memories of their fallen friend. Technically, it is known as "Civil Law," or the "Civilian System." It is often incorrectly referred to as the "Code Napoleon" or The Napoleonic Code. The decision to continue the event was (and still is) a controversial one. Louisiana is the only state whose legal system is based on Roman, Spanish, and French civil law as opposed to English common law. The fans in attendance at the Kemper Arena were not informed of Owen's death. Louisiana has seven U.S. Congressmen, five of which are Republicans, two of which are Democrats. A stunned Jim Ross made the solemn announcement to the pay-per-view audience once word had reached the arena. senators are Mary Landrieu (Democrat) and David Vitter (Republican).

Hart was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after arrival. Its governor is Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (Democrat) and its two U.S. Those watching the pay-per-view telecast at the time were spared the sight because the director cut away to a pretaped interview just before the accident occurred. The capital of Louisiana is Baton Rouge. As Hart was being lowered into position in preparation for this entrance, his harness suddenly disengaged, sending him plummeting almost 80 feet to the ring below. throughout the rest of the war. Owen Hart, as his "Blue Blazer" superhero character, was scheduled to make a dramatic appearance on that night's Over the Edge pay-per-view telecast, "flying" into the ring by being lowered from a harness attached to the roof of the arena. New Orleans was captured by Federal troops on April 25, 1862. As significant portions of the population had Union sympathies, the Federal government took the unusual step of recognizing the areas of Louisiana under Federal control as a state within the Union with elected representatives who were sent to the congress in Washington, D.C.

Tragedy struck on May 23, 1999, in Kansas City. In the American Civil War Louisiana seceded from the Union on January 26, 1861. However, the controversial new presentation made the WWF more appealing than ever to its core audience. Donaldsonville, Opelousas, and Shreveport have also briefly served as the seat of governments of Louisiana. One group, the Parents Television Council, waged a sustained boycott campaign against the WWF. In 1849 the capital moved from New Orleans to Baton Rouge. They, along with feminist groups, found the regular use of scantily-clad women to attract viewers as offensive. There are still remnants of its former status as a possession of France, including: the use of a civil law legal system, based on the Louisiana Civil Code, which is similar to (and often confused with) the Napoleonic Code (like France, and unlike the rest of the United States, which uses a common law legal system derived from England), the term "parishes" being used to describe the state's sub-divisions as opposed to "counties", etc.

Many family groups were outraged at the graphic violence employed by the WWF. The western boundary of Louisiana with Spanish Texas remained in dispute until the Adams-OnÝs Treaty in 1819, with the Sabine Free State serving as a neutral buffer zone as well as a haven for criminals. This change was not without critics. The Florida Parishes were annexed from Spanish West Florida by proclamation of President James Madison in 1810. nWo angle managed to almost lead the WWF to financial ruin, it was now becoming stale, and fans turned back to the WWF. In 1803 the United States purchased the French province of Louisiana (see Louisiana Purchase) and divided it into two territories: the Orleans Territory (which became the state of Louisiana in 1812) and the District of Louisiana (which consisted of all the land not included in Orleans Territory). Where earlier WCW's edgy WCW vs. In 1800 France's Napoleon Bonaparte re-acquired Louisiana from Spain in the Treaty of San Ildefonso, although this was kept secret for some two years.

The Rock would become one of the most popular professional wrestlers in history. During the period of Spanish rule, several thousand French-speaking refugees from the region of Acadia made their way to Louisiana following British expulsion; settling largely in the southwestern bayous, they became known as the Cajuns. Over the coming year, the WWF would see new fan favorites. The rest of Louisiana became a colony of Spain by the Treaty of Fountainebleau of 1762. For the first time in 18 months, the edgier WWF would beat the weekly WCW Monday Nitro in the ratings. Most of the territory to the east of the Mississippi was lost to Great Britain in the French and Indian War, except for the area around New Orleans and the parishes around Lake Pontchartrain. McMahon and Austin. Initially Mobile, Alabama and Biloxi, Mississippi functioned as the capital of the colony; from 1722 on New Orleans fulfilled that role.

This was the start of the epic feud between "evil promoter" Mr. See also: French colonization of the Americas. Many more fans who had not bought WrestleMania, including fans of WCW, tuned in to watch RAW the next day and in subsequent weeks. Most of the settlement concentrated along the banks of the Mississippi and its major tributaries, with trading outposts and mission settlements in the Illinois Country, as far north as Peoria, Illinois and a number of settlements in the area around near present-day Saint Louis, Missouri. Fans who purchased the pay-per-view were amazed by what they saw; this certainly was not the childish Rock and Wrestling era they still expected from the WWF. The French colony of Louisiana originally claimed a great region of land on both sides of the Mississippi River and north to Canada. The highlight was the verbal confrontation between Austin and Tyson ending with Austin flicking off Tyson. The first permanent settlement was founded by Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville in 1699.

The Attitude era kicked off in earnest at WrestleMania XIV, when professional boxer Mike Tyson appeared as a special guest referee for the WWF Title match between Shawn Michaels and Stone Cold Steve Austin. Louisiana was named by the French explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle in honour of Louis XIV in 1682. The relationship would deteriorate over the next few years of WWF programming. Thereafter the region was long neglected by the Spanish authorities, and the next explorers were French. McMahon said in a pre-Wrestlemania press conference that it was not in the WWF's best interest to have Austin as champion. Some 13 years later Hernando de Soto's expedition crossed through the region. Hints of the Austin-McMahon feud in WWF storylines began after Stone Cold won the 1998 Royal Rumble to become #1 Contender for the WWF Title at Wrestlemania. The first European explorers to visit what is now Louisiana was a Spanish expedition in 1528 led by Panfilo de Narvßez which located the mouth of the Mississippi River.

During the summer and fall of 1997, Austin enhanced his status as a rebel willing to challenge any authority by giving his Stone Cold Stunner finishing move to WWF announcer Jim Ross, then-Commisssioner Sgt. Slaughter, and eventually WWF owner Vince McMahon himself. What follows is a partial list, using current parish boundaries as rough approximations of locations.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana#endnote_sturdevent-67). Popular with the fans ever since winning the King of the Ring tournament as a heel in 1996, Austin's rough-and-redneck style won over enough fans that the WWF was forced to turn him into a fan favorite at Wrestlemania XIII in spring 1997 (in a rare double-switch in which the increasingly whiny Bret Hart turned heel after a legendary match between the two wrestlers). The lasting mark of the Native Americans can be seen even today in the names used in Louisiana, such as Atchafalaya, Natchitouches (now spelled Natchitoches), Caddo, Houma, Tangipahoa, and Avoyel (Avoyelles Parish). Borrowing many of the exciting wrestling and storyline styles from then-insurgent wrestling promotion ECW, the WWF Attitude Era was based largely on the growing popularity of the wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austin. Louisiana was long inhabited by Native American tribes before the arrival of Europeans. Running with the momentum from the Montreal Screwjob, McMahon took the WWF in an edgier, reality-based direction he called WWF Attitude, and in the process created a new corporate logo. Today, English is by far the main language of everyday life, but traces of French survive in local dialects.

McMahon feud, which was the cornerstone of the new WWF Attitude concept. While the state has no declared "official language", its law recognizes both English and French. This led to the Austin vs. Among the states, Louisiana has a unique culture, owing to its French colonial heritage. McMahon" in WWF programming, a dictatorial ruler who favored wrestlers who were "good for business" over "misfits" like Stone Cold Steve Austin. The state is bordered to the west by the state of Texas, to the north by Arkansas, to the east by the state of Mississippi, and to the south by the Gulf of Mexico. McMahon used the backlash from the event to cast himself as the evil company owner "Mr. postal abbreviation LA.

This would set the stage for the turning point in the WWF/WCW feud. It uses the U.S. McMahon would deviate from the agreed finish of their match at Survivor Series to allow Shawn Michaels to win the title from Hart. Louisiana (pronounced /luːˌiːzɪˈŠnə/ or /ˌluːzɪˈŠnə/) (French: Louisiane, pronounced /lwizjan/) is a Southern state of the United States of America. He let it be known to WWF management that he would willingly drop the title, but not to rival "HBK" Shawn Michaels in Montreal. ^ Sturdevent, William C. (1967): Early Indian Tribes, Cultures, and Linguistic Stocks (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states/early_indian_east.jpg), Smithsonian Institution Map (Eastern United States). Hart used his contractual control over his booking in the last 30 days of his deal, which would end with that year's Survivor Series PPV in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Many of the freed slaves in Louisiana in turn purchased their own slaves, which led to the state having one of the largest numbers of slave owning blacks in America, if not the largest.

However, McMahon was concerned that the word would get out and he sought a way to get the belt off of Hart before the deal could be announced on WCW Monday Nitro. While one would think that this would lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of slavery in the state, this is not the case. Bret promised that no such thing would ever happen and put an agreement in place that the announcement of his departure would be delayed until the belt could be transitioned to a new champion. It did, however, have one of the largest free black populations in the United States. The WWF's worst nightmare was for Hart to appear on WCW Nitro while wearing the WWF belt. Louisiana was a slave state. Earlier in the WWF/WCW feud, the WWF Women's Champion, Alundra Blayze, signed with WCW while in possession of the belt and threw it in a trash can on WCW Nitro (imitating a heavily-publicized act by heavyweight boxing champion Riddick Bowe). Most Acadians declined and emigrated from Canada, most of them fleeing to the South Western portion of Louisiana, centered in the region around Lafayette.

While Hart's departure was not a surprise, the WWF was concerned about the fact that the man about to leave was the WWF Champion. When the British won the French and Indian War, the British forced all of the citizens to take a pledge of allegiance. Claiming financial hardship, McMahon threatened to breach the contract and advised Bret to do his best to sign with WCW. The ancestors of the Cajuns are the Acadians, a French-descended people of what are now New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. However, McMahon immediately regretted the deal. The ancestors of Creoles generally came to Louisiana directly from France or from the French colonies in the Caribbean and settled in New Orleans or in South Eastern Louisiana. McMahon countered with an offer worth much less money, but for a 20-year term, and Hart agreed to stay. State songs: You Are My Sunshine, Every Man a King, and Give Me Louisiana.

The previous year, Hart was offered a lucrative deal to jump to WCW. State food: Gumbo. The WWF/WCW feud reached a new level in 1997, when McMahon decided to force then-WWF champion Bret "The Hitman" Hart out of the company. State amphibian: Green Tree Frog. Despite this, the WWF was losing money at a rapid rate. WCW's reality-based storylines drew attention away from the WWF's outdated (and childish) rock and wrestling-era gimmicks. State crustacean : Crawfish. McMahon responded by stating that he could create new superstars to regain the upper hand in the ratings war, and at the same time tightening contracts to make it harder for WCW to raid WWF talent. State insect: Honeybee.

In 1995, Bischoff upped the ante, creating WCW Monday Nitro, a cable show on Turner's TNT network, to directly compete with the WWF's flagship show, WWF Monday Night RAW. Eventually, on the strength of its newly-acquired WWF talent and the groundbreaking nWo storyline, WCW overtook the WWF in television ratings and popularity. State reptile : American Alligator. Beginning in 1994, these acquisitions included Hulk Hogan, "Macho Man" Randy Savage, Lex Luger, Scott Hall, "Big Sexy" Kevin Nash, and many others. State wildflower : Louisiana Iris. Under Eric Bischoff, World Championship Wrestling (WCW), the new name for NWA superterritory Jim Crockett Promotions after its purchase by Ted Turner, began using its tremendous financial resources to lure established talent away from the WWF. State mammal : Louisiana Black Bear. McMahon was eventually exonerated, but it was a public-relations debacle for the WWF. State tree : Bald Cypress.

However, by the 1990s the WWF's fortunes steadily declined as Hulk Hogan's act grew stale, hitting a low point in the wake of allegations of steroid abuse and distribution against McMahon and the WWF in 1994. State fossil : Petrified palmwood. The WWF did incredible business on the shoulders of McMahon and his All-American babyface hero, Hulk Hogan, for the next several years, creating what some observers dubbed a second golden age for professional wrestling. State flower : Magnolia. The new formula of what McMahon deemed Sports Entertainment was a resounding financial success at the original WrestleMania. State bird : Eastern Brown Pelican. MTV, in particular, featured a great deal of WWF coverage and programming at this time, in what was termed the Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection. State dog : Catahoula Leopard Dog.

T and Cyndi Lauper to participate in the event. Bossier-Shreveport Mudbugs - CHL. He drew the interest of the mainstream media by inviting celebrities such as Mr. Louisiana IceGators - ECHL. However, McMahon wanted to take the WWF to the mainstream, targeting the general public who were not regular wrestling fans. New Orleans Brass (1997 - 2003) - ECHL. The concept of a wrestling supercard was nothing new in North America; the NWA had been running StarrCade a few years prior to Wrestlemania. Minor League Hockey

    .

    WrestleMania was a pay-per-view extravaganza that McMahon marketed as being the Super Bowl of professional wrestling. The Charlotte Hornets moved to New Orleans in 2002 - Now known as The New Orleans Hornets. The future of not just McMahon's experiment, but also the WWF, the NWA, and the whole industry came down to the success or failure of McMahon's groundbreaking sports entertainment concept, WrestleMania. New Orleans Jazz (1974) team moved to Salt Lake City and became the Utah Jazz in 1979. However, such a venture required huge capital investment; one which placed the WWF on the verge of financial collapse. National Basketball Association:

      . warned his son: "Vinny, what are you doing?! You'll wind up at the bottom of a river!" In spite of such warnings, the younger McMahon had an even bolder ambition: the WWF would tour nationally. New Orleans Creoles (Negro League) (dates?).

      According to several reports, Vincent Sr. New Orleans Pelicans (1887-1959). Wrestling promoters nationwide were now in direct competition with the WWF. Houma Hawks. To make matters worse, McMahon would use the income generated by advertising, television deals, and tape sales to poach talent from rival promoters. Baton Rouge River Bats. He effectively broke the unwritten law of regionalism around which the entire industry had been based. Alexandria Aces.

      McMahon also began selling videotapes of WWF events outside the Northeast. Shreveport Sports. Other promoters were furious when McMahon began syndicating WWF shows to stations across America. New Orleans Zephyrs. But in neither instance did the defecting member attempt to undermine, and destroy, the Territory system that had been the foundation of the industry. Minor League baseball teams

        . Leaving the NWA for a second time in itself was not that big of a step; the AWA had long ago ceased being an official NWA member, and just over a decade earlier the WWWF itself had rejoined the NWA. Slidell Steelsharks - SAFL.

        The elder McMahon had already established the northeastern territory as one of the most vibrant members of the NWA by recognizing that pro wrestling was more about entertainment than sport. Against his father's wishes, McMahon began an expansion process that would fundamentally change the sport, and place both the WWF--and his own life--in jeopardy. Central Louisiana Warriors - SAFL. After discovering at age 12 that the wrestling promoter was his father, Vince became steadily involved in his father's wrestling business until the latter was ready to retire. Louisiana (Houma) Blazing Bulldogs - SAFL. McMahon. Hammond Headhunters - SAFL. McMahon founded Titan Sports, Inc., and in 1982 purchased the WWF from his father, Vincent J. Greater New Orleans Gladiators - SAFL.

        In 1979, Vincent K. Shreveport Steamers - SAFL. The name change was purely cosmetic; the ownership and front office personnel remained unchanged during this period. Ruston Rage - SAFL. The WWWF became the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) in mid-1979. Lafayette Bayou Bulls - SAFL. Mondt (born in 1886) died in 1976. Minden RoughRiders - SAFL.

        The WWWF rejoined the NWA in 1971 and their world title was dropped to the status of a regional title. Lake Charles RiverKats - SAFL. He lost the title to Bruno Sammartino a month later on May 17, 1963 after supposedly suffering a heart attack shortly before the match. Baton Rouge Riverboat Bandits - SAFL. In mid-April, Rogers was then awarded the new WWWF title after the WWWF claimed he won a (fictitious) tournament in Rio de Janeiro. Semi-Pro football Teams

          . Rogers lost the NWA title to Lou Thesz in Toronto, Ontario on January 24, 1963. Bossier City Battle Wings - AF2.

          Mondt and WWWF wanted Rogers to keep the NWA title, but Rogers didn't want to lose his $25,000 deposit on the belt; wrestling champions at the time had to pay a deposit to ensure they would honor whatever commitments that came along with their titles. Southwest Louisiana (Lake Charles) Swashbucklers - IPFL. It was decided that Mondt and CWC would part ways with the NWA, creating the World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF) in the process. Louisiana Bayou Beast - IPFL. The rest of the NWA was upset with Mondt because he rarely let Rogers wrestle outside of the Northeast. Shreveport Bombers - IPFL. In 1963, "Nature Boy" Buddy Rogers was the NWA champion and his bookings were controlled by Mondt. New Orleans Spice - NWFL.

          Capitol dominated professional wrestling in the Northeastern United States during the mid-20th century, when it was divided into strictly regional enterprises. Other football leagues

            . These shows were then syndicated. New Orleans VooDoo. It was able to do this after signing an agreement with WTTG Channel 5, in 1956, to air live CWC wrestling shows. Arena Football League
              . While originally running shows from the 2,000-seat Turner's Arena, the CWC would eventually control the territories of New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. New Orleans Saints.

              McMahon's company was called Capitol Wrestling Corporation (CWC). National Football League

                . The NWA is a broad group of wrestling companies that recognized an undisputed champion, who went from wrestling company to wrestling company in the alliance and defended the belt around the world. Mandeville: $26,420. In January 1953, Jesse's son Vincent J. McMahon and wrestling promoter Toots Mondt took control of the Northeastern United States wrestling circuit as part of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). Prien: $26,537. Ray Fabiani, who helped Mondt take control of the New York territory after the death of Jack Curley, was influential in drawing the younger McMahon into an alliance with Mondt. River Ridge: $27,088.

                Mondt's doing so was facilitated, in part, by the elder McMahon. Westminster: $28,087. This "no wrestling at the Garden" policy ended in 1948, when Joseph Raymond Mondt (better known as Toots Mondt), backed by millionaire Bernarr McFadden, managed to promote a wrestling show at the famous arena. Shenandoah: $29,722. However, the McMahon family was not able to promote wrestling matches at Madison Square Garden due to Rickard's dislike of the sport. Gilliam: $30,264. His son, Vincent Jess McMahon, began to take an increasing role in the running of the business, especially on the wrestling side. Eden Isle: $31,798.

                It was not until 1935, the same year Jim Crockett Promotions was formed, that the McMahon family moved into the wrestling business. Elmwood: $34,329. Jess McMahon's enterprise focused on boxing and live concert/music promotion. Oak Hills Place: $34,944. A decade later, in 1925, McMahon joined Tex Rickard in promoting boxing events from the old Madison Square Garden Arena, in New York, starting with the December 11, 1925, light-heavyweight championship match between Jack Delaney and Paul Berlenbach. Mound: $92,200 (population 12, as of the 2000 census). In the fight, on April 5, 1915, Johnson lost his title to Willard in Havana. Interstate 59.

                In 1915, Roderick James "Jess" McMahon, grandfather of current WWE Chairman Vince McMahon, co-promoted a boxing match between Jess Willard and Jack Johnson. Interstate 55. are located in Stamford, Connecticut. Interstate 49. As of 2005, the headquarters of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. Interstate 20. World Wrestling Entertainment is a publicly-traded company, but the vast majority (70%) of voting shares are owned by Chairman Vince McMahon, his wife, CEO Linda McMahon, his son, Executive Vice President of Global Media Shane McMahon, and his daughter, Vice President of Creative Writing Stephanie McMahon-Levesque. Interstate 12.

                The company was previously known as TitanSports, Inc. and has previously done business as the Capitol Wrestling Corporation, the World Wide Wrestling Federation, and the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). Interstate 10. World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, is a professional wrestling promotion, currently the largest in North America. The remainder of current day central and north Louisiana was home to a substantial portion of the Caddo nation. WWE 24/7 - In 2004, the WWE officially announced a new video on demand service for digital cable users, allowing subscribers to the service access to matches in the promotion's extensive video library. The northeastern parishes of Tensas, Madison, and East and West Carroll were occupied by the Tunica tribe. The final episode of this show aired on April 24, 2004. Portions of Avoyelles and Concordia parishes along the Mississippi River were home to the Avoyel, part of the Natchez nation.

                WWE Confidential - This was a "behind the scenes"-type show hosted by "Mean" Gene Okerlund and featured many exclusive stories on WWE wrestlers. The Houma tribe, was found in East and West Feliciana, and Pointe Coupee parishes; Ironically about 100 miles north of current location of the town named after them. It aired as a separate show on MTV for three seasons, but integrated itself into regular SmackDown! programming in its fourth iteration, with a $1 million-dollar (US) contract awarded to the winner over four years. Daniel Puder, a former cage fighter, won the $1,000,000 Tough Enough. Tammany. This resulted in many new wrestlers being added to both brands. Helena, Tangipahoa, Washington, East and West Baton Rouge, Livingston, and St. It followed groups of men and women who were competing to become a WWE wrestler. The Bayougoula, part of the Choctaw nation, were found in points directly north of the Chitimachas, in the parishes of St.

                Tough Enough - WWE's version of a reality show. Bernard, and Plaquemines. The hosts are Todd Grisham and Ivory, although Josh Matthews has also guest hosted with Ivory. Charles, Jefferson, Orleans, St. Airs Sunday mornings at 11 AM EST on Spike TV. John the Baptist, St.Bo St. The WWE Experience - A show aimed at the younger audience that recaps the past week's events in WWE. James, St.

                4 live shows for the Australian market. Martin, Terrebone, LaFourche, St. 2 live shows for the Asian market. The Chitimachas occupied the southeastern parishes of Iberia, Assumption, St Mary, Lower St. 4 live shows for the European market. The Atakapa were found in southwestern Louisiana in the parishes of Vermilion, Cameron, Lafayette, Acadia, Jefferson Davis, and Calcasieu. 15 live shows for the North American market.

                The show is hosted by Josh Matthews. Afterburn - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the SmackDown! brand. Matthews formerly did play-by-play comentary with color analyst Bill DeMott. The current play-by-play commentator is Steve Romero and the current color commentator is Josh Matthews.

                It is usually taped the hour before SmackDown! tapes. Velocity - Sister show to SmackDown!, airs on Saturday nights at 11 PM EST on Spike TV. SmackDown! - WWE's secondary show, airs Thursday nights at 8 PM EST on UPN in the United States (moving to Friday nights in September 2005) and in Canada at 7 PM EST on The Score. The show is hosted by Marc Loyd.

                Bottom Line - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the RAW brand. Sunday Night Heat - Sister show to RAW, airs Sunday nights at 7 PM EST on Spike TV. RAW - WWE's flagship show, airs live on Monday nights at 9 PM EST on Spike TV in the United States, live in Canada on TSN, and live in the United Kingdom on Sky Sports.

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