World Wrestling Entertainment

(Redirected from WWE)

World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, is a professional wrestling promotion, currently the largest in North America. The company was previously known as TitanSports, Inc. and has previously done business as the Capitol Wrestling Corporation, the World Wide Wrestling Federation, and the World Wrestling Federation (WWF).

World Wrestling Entertainment is a publicly-traded company, but the vast majority (70%) of voting shares are owned by Chairman Vince McMahon, his wife, CEO Linda McMahon, his son, Executive Vice President of Global Media Shane McMahon, and his daughter, Vice President of Creative Writing Stephanie McMahon-Levesque. As of 2005, the headquarters of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. are located in Stamford, Connecticut.

Early history

In 1915, Roderick James "Jess" McMahon, grandfather of current WWE Chairman Vince McMahon, co-promoted a boxing match between Jess Willard and Jack Johnson. In the fight, on April 5, 1915, Johnson lost his title to Willard in Havana. A decade later, in 1925, McMahon joined Tex Rickard in promoting boxing events from the old Madison Square Garden Arena, in New York, starting with the December 11, 1925, light-heavyweight championship match between Jack Delaney and Paul Berlenbach. Jess McMahon's enterprise focused on boxing and live concert/music promotion.

It was not until 1935, the same year Jim Crockett Promotions was formed, that the McMahon family moved into the wrestling business. His son, Vincent Jess McMahon, began to take an increasing role in the running of the business, especially on the wrestling side. However, the McMahon family was not able to promote wrestling matches at Madison Square Garden due to Rickard's dislike of the sport.

This "no wrestling at the Garden" policy ended in 1948, when Joseph Raymond Mondt (better known as Toots Mondt), backed by millionaire Bernarr McFadden, managed to promote a wrestling show at the famous arena. Mondt's doing so was facilitated, in part, by the elder McMahon. Ray Fabiani, who helped Mondt take control of the New York territory after the death of Jack Curley, was influential in drawing the younger McMahon into an alliance with Mondt.

Capitol Wrestling Corporation

In January 1953, Jesse's son Vincent J. McMahon and wrestling promoter Toots Mondt took control of the Northeastern United States wrestling circuit as part of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). The NWA is a broad group of wrestling companies that recognized an undisputed champion, who went from wrestling company to wrestling company in the alliance and defended the belt around the world.

McMahon's company was called Capitol Wrestling Corporation (CWC). While originally running shows from the 2,000-seat Turner's Arena, the CWC would eventually control the territories of New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. It was able to do this after signing an agreement with WTTG Channel 5, in 1956, to air live CWC wrestling shows. These shows were then syndicated. Capitol dominated professional wrestling in the Northeastern United States during the mid-20th century, when it was divided into strictly regional enterprises.

World Wide Wrestling Federation

In 1963, "Nature Boy" Buddy Rogers was the NWA champion and his bookings were controlled by Mondt. The rest of the NWA was upset with Mondt because he rarely let Rogers wrestle outside of the Northeast. It was decided that Mondt and CWC would part ways with the NWA, creating the World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF) in the process. Mondt and WWWF wanted Rogers to keep the NWA title, but Rogers didn't want to lose his $25,000 deposit on the belt; wrestling champions at the time had to pay a deposit to ensure they would honor whatever commitments that came along with their titles. Rogers lost the NWA title to Lou Thesz in Toronto, Ontario on January 24, 1963.

In mid-April, Rogers was then awarded the new WWWF title after the WWWF claimed he won a (fictitious) tournament in Rio de Janeiro. He lost the title to Bruno Sammartino a month later on May 17, 1963 after supposedly suffering a heart attack shortly before the match.

The WWWF rejoined the NWA in 1971 and their world title was dropped to the status of a regional title.

Mondt (born in 1886) died in 1976.

The WWWF became the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) in mid-1979. The name change was purely cosmetic; the ownership and front office personnel remained unchanged during this period.

World Wrestling Federation

WWF goes national

This "old school" logo was the primary mark of Titan Sports/The World Wrestling Federation from 1984-1997.

In 1979, Vincent K. McMahon founded Titan Sports, Inc., and in 1982 purchased the WWF from his father, Vincent J. McMahon. After discovering at age 12 that the wrestling promoter was his father, Vince became steadily involved in his father's wrestling business until the latter was ready to retire. The elder McMahon had already established the northeastern territory as one of the most vibrant members of the NWA by recognizing that pro wrestling was more about entertainment than sport. Against his father's wishes, McMahon began an expansion process that would fundamentally change the sport, and place both the WWF--and his own life--in jeopardy.

Leaving the NWA for a second time in itself was not that big of a step; the AWA had long ago ceased being an official NWA member, and just over a decade earlier the WWWF itself had rejoined the NWA. But in neither instance did the defecting member attempt to undermine, and destroy, the Territory system that had been the foundation of the industry.

Other promoters were furious when McMahon began syndicating WWF shows to stations across America. McMahon also began selling videotapes of WWF events outside the Northeast. He effectively broke the unwritten law of regionalism around which the entire industry had been based. To make matters worse, McMahon would use the income generated by advertising, television deals, and tape sales to poach talent from rival promoters. Wrestling promoters nationwide were now in direct competition with the WWF.

According to several reports, Vincent Sr. warned his son: "Vinny, what are you doing?! You'll wind up at the bottom of a river!" In spite of such warnings, the younger McMahon had an even bolder ambition: the WWF would tour nationally. However, such a venture required huge capital investment; one which placed the WWF on the verge of financial collapse.

The future of not just McMahon's experiment, but also the WWF, the NWA, and the whole industry came down to the success or failure of McMahon's groundbreaking sports entertainment concept, WrestleMania. WrestleMania was a pay-per-view extravaganza that McMahon marketed as being the Super Bowl of professional wrestling.

The concept of a wrestling supercard was nothing new in North America; the NWA had been running StarrCade a few years prior to Wrestlemania. However, McMahon wanted to take the WWF to the mainstream, targeting the general public who were not regular wrestling fans. He drew the interest of the mainstream media by inviting celebrities such as Mr. T and Cyndi Lauper to participate in the event. MTV, in particular, featured a great deal of WWF coverage and programming at this time, in what was termed the Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection.

The new formula of what McMahon deemed Sports Entertainment was a resounding financial success at the original WrestleMania. The WWF did incredible business on the shoulders of McMahon and his All-American babyface hero, Hulk Hogan, for the next several years, creating what some observers dubbed a second golden age for professional wrestling. However, by the 1990s the WWF's fortunes steadily declined as Hulk Hogan's act grew stale, hitting a low point in the wake of allegations of steroid abuse and distribution against McMahon and the WWF in 1994. McMahon was eventually exonerated, but it was a public-relations debacle for the WWF.

WWF The Next Generation

Monday Night Wars

Under Eric Bischoff, World Championship Wrestling (WCW), the new name for NWA superterritory Jim Crockett Promotions after its purchase by Ted Turner, began using its tremendous financial resources to lure established talent away from the WWF. Beginning in 1994, these acquisitions included Hulk Hogan, "Macho Man" Randy Savage, Lex Luger, Scott Hall, "Big Sexy" Kevin Nash, and many others. In 1995, Bischoff upped the ante, creating WCW Monday Nitro, a cable show on Turner's TNT network, to directly compete with the WWF's flagship show, WWF Monday Night RAW. Eventually, on the strength of its newly-acquired WWF talent and the groundbreaking nWo storyline, WCW overtook the WWF in television ratings and popularity.

McMahon responded by stating that he could create new superstars to regain the upper hand in the ratings war, and at the same time tightening contracts to make it harder for WCW to raid WWF talent. Despite this, the WWF was losing money at a rapid rate. WCW's reality-based storylines drew attention away from the WWF's outdated (and childish) rock and wrestling-era gimmicks.

The Montreal Screwjob

Main article: Montreal Screwjob

The WWF/WCW feud reached a new level in 1997, when McMahon decided to force then-WWF champion Bret "The Hitman" Hart out of the company. The previous year, Hart was offered a lucrative deal to jump to WCW. McMahon countered with an offer worth much less money, but for a 20-year term, and Hart agreed to stay. However, McMahon immediately regretted the deal. Claiming financial hardship, McMahon threatened to breach the contract and advised Bret to do his best to sign with WCW.

While Hart's departure was not a surprise, the WWF was concerned about the fact that the man about to leave was the WWF Champion. Earlier in the WWF/WCW feud, the WWF Women's Champion, Alundra Blayze, signed with WCW while in possession of the belt and threw it in a trash can on WCW Nitro (imitating a heavily-publicized act by heavyweight boxing champion Riddick Bowe). The WWF's worst nightmare was for Hart to appear on WCW Nitro while wearing the WWF belt. Bret promised that no such thing would ever happen and put an agreement in place that the announcement of his departure would be delayed until the belt could be transitioned to a new champion. However, McMahon was concerned that the word would get out and he sought a way to get the belt off of Hart before the deal could be announced on WCW Monday Nitro.

Hart used his contractual control over his booking in the last 30 days of his deal, which would end with that year's Survivor Series PPV in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He let it be known to WWF management that he would willingly drop the title, but not to rival "HBK" Shawn Michaels in Montreal. McMahon would deviate from the agreed finish of their match at Survivor Series to allow Shawn Michaels to win the title from Hart. This would set the stage for the turning point in the WWF/WCW feud.

McMahon used the backlash from the event to cast himself as the evil company owner "Mr. McMahon" in WWF programming, a dictatorial ruler who favored wrestlers who were "good for business" over "misfits" like Stone Cold Steve Austin. This led to the Austin vs. McMahon feud, which was the cornerstone of the new WWF Attitude concept.

WWF Attitude

This logo was phased in with the Attitude era. Included is the "Attitude" wordmark which disappeared after a few years. This is the earliest variation of the current WWE logo. It is rumored this logo was originally doodled during a meeting by a bored Shane McMahon.

Running with the momentum from the Montreal Screwjob, McMahon took the WWF in an edgier, reality-based direction he called WWF Attitude, and in the process created a new corporate logo. Borrowing many of the exciting wrestling and storyline styles from then-insurgent wrestling promotion ECW, the WWF Attitude Era was based largely on the growing popularity of the wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austin. Popular with the fans ever since winning the King of the Ring tournament as a heel in 1996, Austin's rough-and-redneck style won over enough fans that the WWF was forced to turn him into a fan favorite at Wrestlemania XIII in spring 1997 (in a rare double-switch in which the increasingly whiny Bret Hart turned heel after a legendary match between the two wrestlers). During the summer and fall of 1997, Austin enhanced his status as a rebel willing to challenge any authority by giving his Stone Cold Stunner finishing move to WWF announcer Jim Ross, then-Commisssioner Sgt. Slaughter, and eventually WWF owner Vince McMahon himself. Hints of the Austin-McMahon feud in WWF storylines began after Stone Cold won the 1998 Royal Rumble to become #1 Contender for the WWF Title at Wrestlemania. McMahon said in a pre-Wrestlemania press conference that it was not in the WWF's best interest to have Austin as champion. The relationship would deteriorate over the next few years of WWF programming.

The Attitude era kicked off in earnest at WrestleMania XIV, when professional boxer Mike Tyson appeared as a special guest referee for the WWF Title match between Shawn Michaels and Stone Cold Steve Austin. The highlight was the verbal confrontation between Austin and Tyson ending with Austin flicking off Tyson. Fans who purchased the pay-per-view were amazed by what they saw; this certainly was not the childish Rock and Wrestling era they still expected from the WWF. Many more fans who had not bought WrestleMania, including fans of WCW, tuned in to watch RAW the next day and in subsequent weeks. This was the start of the epic feud between "evil promoter" Mr. McMahon and Austin. For the first time in 18 months, the edgier WWF would beat the weekly WCW Monday Nitro in the ratings.

Over the coming year, the WWF would see new fan favorites. The Rock would become one of the most popular professional wrestlers in history. Where earlier WCW's edgy WCW vs. nWo angle managed to almost lead the WWF to financial ruin, it was now becoming stale, and fans turned back to the WWF.

This change was not without critics. Many family groups were outraged at the graphic violence employed by the WWF. They, along with feminist groups, found the regular use of scantily-clad women to attract viewers as offensive. One group, the Parents Television Council, waged a sustained boycott campaign against the WWF. However, the controversial new presentation made the WWF more appealing than ever to its core audience.

The death of Owen Hart

Tragedy struck on May 23, 1999, in Kansas City. Owen Hart, as his "Blue Blazer" superhero character, was scheduled to make a dramatic appearance on that night's Over the Edge pay-per-view telecast, "flying" into the ring by being lowered from a harness attached to the roof of the arena. As Hart was being lowered into position in preparation for this entrance, his harness suddenly disengaged, sending him plummeting almost 80 feet to the ring below.

Those watching the pay-per-view telecast at the time were spared the sight because the director cut away to a pretaped interview just before the accident occurred. Hart was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after arrival. A stunned Jim Ross made the solemn announcement to the pay-per-view audience once word had reached the arena. The fans in attendance at the Kemper Arena were not informed of Owen's death. The decision to continue the event was (and still is) a controversial one.

The following night, the WWF dedicated its entire two-hour RAW telecast to Owen's memory, as various WWF performers and employees broke character and shared memories of their fallen friend.

Business advances

On April 23, 1999, the WWF launched a special program known as SmackDown! on the fledgling UPN network. The show became a weekly series on August 24, 1999. It has remained UPN's most successful program overall ever since.

Off the back of the success of the Attitude era, on October 19, 1999 the WWF's parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, Inc., became a publicly traded company. WWF announced its desire to diversify into other businesses, including a nightclub in Times Square, film production and book publishing.

In 2000 the WWF, in collaboration with television network NBC, announced the creation of the XFL, a new professional football league, but the league had dismal television ratings and NBC pulled the plug after a year.

Acquisition of WCW

With the massive success of WWF Attitude, WCW's financial situation deteriorated significantly, and its newly-merged parent company AOL Time Warner looked to cut the division loose. In March 2001, WWF Entertainment, Inc. acquired WCW from AOL Time Warner for $7 million. During the final WCW Monday Nitro, Vince McMahon (as the character Mr. McMahon) took over the broadcast during the last half hour and Monday Night Raw was seen on TNT. Months later, McMahon and Bischoff reconciled their personal differences, and Bischoff signed with WWF to perform as the storyline General Manager of Raw.

Since WCW's peak in the late 1990s, wrestling fans had dreamed about a feud between the two promotions. The original plan was to have WCW "take over" RAW, turning it back into WCW Monday Nitro. However, many big-name WCW stars such as "Hollywood" Hulk Hogan, Lex Luger, Kevin Nash, Goldberg, and Sting were still contracted to WCW's former parent company (McMahon decided not to buy them out), and all chose to sit out the duration of their contracts rather than work for McMahon for less money. The lack of major WCW star power, combined with McMahon deciding that WWF wrestlers generally should not lose to WCW wrestlers, ended the "InVasion" storyline quickly. Even the inclusion of ECW wrestlers and trademarks did not save it.

Many people believe that the story would have gone much better if WWE and McMahon waited a couple of years, as many WCW and ECW superstars joined after the end of the WWF vs. WCW feud. The feud was a contributor to the company's decline in the ratings as well as in attendance and financially, athough the company to this day still has a profitable quarter.

Some people think the WWF Attitude era ended at the end of WrestleMania X-Seven (17) and others say November 2001 when WWF beat WCW. It is still a debate amongst wrestling fans.

World Wrestling Entertainment

This t-shirt was part of the promotional campaign to raise awareness about the WWF's name change to WWE.

Following a lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund (also WWF), the Federation changed its name to World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. Its parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, also chose to adopt this name. The lawsuit dealt with the wrestling company's breaching of an agreement with the Fund over use of the initials "WWF" in the United Kingdom. Rather than attempt a financial settlement with the Fund, McMahon changed the name of the company. The logo was altered, and a promotional campaign called "Get The F Out" was used to publicize this change. Also, all verbal and visual references to "WWF" and the World Wrestling Federation logo from the "Attitude" era were edited out from old broadcasts. Some observers saw the new name as further acknowledgement by the company on its emphasis towards the entertainment rather than athletic aspects of professional wrestling.

Without WCW as competition, the WWE decided to split the promotion into two "separate" brands based on its two largest television shows, RAW and SmackDown! Under this "split brands" arrangement, each brand maintains a separate and non-overlapping roster of wrestlers, has championships exclusive to that brand (example: the WWE Championship on SmackDown!, and the World Heavyweight Championship on RAW), and is run by a different onscreen general manager. The two brands will occasionally clash at a pay-per-view card.

Programming

RAW brand

  • RAW - WWE's flagship show, airs live on Monday nights at 9 PM EST on Spike TV in the United States, live in Canada on TSN, and live in the United Kingdom on Sky Sports.
  • Sunday Night Heat - Sister show to RAW, airs Sunday nights at 7 PM EST on Spike TV.
  • Bottom Line - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the RAW brand. The show is hosted by Marc Loyd.

The Spike TV deal will expire in September, 2005, and Viacom (owner of Spike TV) has announced they will not seek to extend it. [1] (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20050311/tv_nm/television_wwe_dc_1) On April 4, 2005, WWE announced a new 3-year agreement with NBC Universal to air RAW on the USA Network once again, a deal that also reportedly included occasional WWE programming on Telemundo and NBC. In addition, WWE will broadcast a twice-yearly 90-minute "special event" on Saturday nights on NBC. [2] (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7380373/)

SmackDown! brand

  • SmackDown! - WWE's secondary show, airs Thursday nights at 8 PM EST on UPN in the United States (moving to Friday nights in September 2005) and in Canada at 7 PM EST on The Score.
  • Velocity - Sister show to SmackDown!, airs on Saturday nights at 11 PM EST on Spike TV. It is usually taped the hour before SmackDown! tapes. The current play-by-play commentator is Steve Romero and the current color commentator is Josh Matthews. Matthews formerly did play-by-play comentary with color analyst Bill DeMott.
  • Afterburn - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the SmackDown! brand. The show is hosted by Josh Matthews.

Pay-per-view

WWE is currently one of the leaders in pay-per-view content for cable and satellite television. Pay-per-views account for approximately 25% of WWE revenues ($95.3 million in the 2004 fiscal year).

  • 15 live shows for the North American market.
  • 4 live shows for the European market.
  • 2 live shows for the Asian market.
  • 4 live shows for the Australian market

All pay-per-views can be purchased and viewed on WWE.com as well.

WWE online

World Wrestling Entertainment has had a large Web presence since 1996 and was nominated for a "Streaming Media Award" in 1999 for its online content.

Streaming media has been one of the most important roles of the WWE.com "New Media" department and the output of videos is immense. With over fourteen million played video streams a month, WWE.com is a major contributor of online media.

The WWE has a large media repository dating back to the late 1960s and their goal was to stream most of this content online using a subscription service. Unfortunately, the lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund has kept WWE.com from showing any content from the "Attitude Era" (1998-May 2002). Furthermore, WWE.com provides the same services for its online pay-per-view content.

Shane McMahon is Executive Vice President of Global Media within World Wrestling Entertainment and is in charge of WWE.com. The younger McMahon was once a major character in WWF/WWE storylines in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but has since become seldom seen on television to concentrate his time exclusively on the Global Media division.

Other

  • The WWE Experience - A show aimed at the younger audience that recaps the past week's events in WWE. Airs Sunday mornings at 11 AM EST on Spike TV. The hosts are Todd Grisham and Ivory, although Josh Matthews has also guest hosted with Ivory.
  • Tough Enough - WWE's version of a reality show. It followed groups of men and women who were competing to become a WWE wrestler. This resulted in many new wrestlers being added to both brands. It aired as a separate show on MTV for three seasons, but integrated itself into regular SmackDown! programming in its fourth iteration, with a $1 million-dollar (US) contract awarded to the winner over four years. Daniel Puder, a former cage fighter, won the $1,000,000 Tough Enough.
  • WWE Confidential - This was a "behind the scenes"-type show hosted by "Mean" Gene Okerlund and featured many exclusive stories on WWE wrestlers. The final episode of this show aired on April 24, 2004.
  • WWE 24/7 - In 2004, the WWE officially announced a new video on demand service for digital cable users, allowing subscribers to the service access to matches in the promotion's extensive video library.

WWE Films

Since 2003, WWE has produced its own movie productions. Instead of focusing on wrestling movies, WWE is planning to produce movies that are non-wrestling related (excluding the first movie under the WWE Films name, which was a short documentary on WrestleMania XIX included on the WrestleMania XX DVD).

WWE Films is located in Hollywood, California and their first feature is named The Marine, starring John Cena. WWE Films will also produce Goodnight with WWE wrestler Kane. Stone Cold Steve Austin recently signed a three-movie deal with WWE Films in January, 2005. His first movie will be titled, The Condemned.

WWE and Vince McMahon were credited for production of the films The Scorpion King 2002, The Rundown 2003 and Walking Tall 2004 all starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. This was due to the fact that, at the time, WWE owned the rights to the name "The Rock". Since then, Johnson has obtained dual ownership of "The Rock" name with WWE.

Current champions


This page about WWE includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about WWE
News stories about WWE
External links for WWE
Videos for WWE
Wikis about WWE
Discussion Groups about WWE
Blogs about WWE
Images of WWE

Since then, Johnson has obtained dual ownership of "The Rock" name with WWE. The site is aimed at young people and due to that, users enjoy making new friends and having to play with other people. This was due to the fact that, at the time, WWE owned the rights to the name "The Rock". On the guilds screen users can enter things onto a calendar, post a message onto a message board, change ranks in a guild and lots more. WWE and Vince McMahon were credited for production of the films The Scorpion King 2002, The Rundown 2003 and Walking Tall 2004 all starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. Users with similar intrests can create/join guilds. His first movie will be titled, The Condemned. To keep this stopped neopets created the rule that no personal information is allowed to be given away unless users are over 18 or have got permission from their parents/legal guardian.

Stone Cold Steve Austin recently signed a three-movie deal with WWE Films in January, 2005. With the ability of being able to contact strangers a danger still lurks with the fact of abusing infomation given to people. WWE Films will also produce Goodnight with WWE wrestler Kane. Either by Neomail to send private messages or the popular chat boards in which people can meet new friends and post to the world. WWE Films is located in Hollywood, California and their first feature is named The Marine, starring John Cena. Neopets throughout it's past has always had a community in which user can chat and contact each other. Instead of focusing on wrestling movies, WWE is planning to produce movies that are non-wrestling related (excluding the first movie under the WWE Films name, which was a short documentary on WrestleMania XIX included on the WrestleMania XX DVD). The List of references in Neopets article contains an extensive list of such references.

Since 2003, WWE has produced its own movie productions. Aside from the fact that Neopets has its own vibrant user culture, there are many references in the site to movies, video games, and more. The younger McMahon was once a major character in WWF/WWE storylines in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but has since become seldom seen on television to concentrate his time exclusively on the Global Media division. Also, Neopets has an extensive merchandise catalog for users, complete with a printable wishlist and a list of your collected items, both of which you can edit. Shane McMahon is Executive Vice President of Global Media within World Wrestling Entertainment and is in charge of WWE.com. When informing the users of this, they also implied that there may be more then one Neopets film in the future (although, of course, this will depend entirely on the success of their first film). Furthermore, WWE.com provides the same services for its online pay-per-view content. In March 2005 it was confirmed that the Neopets team had also begun work on a Neopets film (which the creators of the site, Adam and Donna had kept secret from their own staff until it was confirmed).

Unfortunately, the lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund has kept WWE.com from showing any content from the "Attitude Era" (1998-May 2002). Together, they will travel through new lands, meet strange inhabitants, and have the opportunity to acquire 450 valuable items and discover a mystery unseen by Neopian eyes. The WWE has a large media repository dating back to the late 1960s and their goal was to stream most of this content online using a subscription service. Players enter the land of Neopia® and can take the role of Tormund the Lupe or Roberta the Acara (both with their own distinct personality) who are on a mission to rid Neopia of a shrewd and cunning enemy - the evil Darkest Faerie. With over fourteen million played video streams a month, WWE.com is a major contributor of online media. Neopets: The Darkest Faerie includes hundreds of different Neopets from the popular Web site. Streaming media has been one of the most important roles of the WWE.com "New Media" department and the output of videos is immense. Neopets.com is consistently ranked among the top 10 stickiest sites on the Internet by Nielsen Net Ratings, generating more than two billion page views per month.

World Wrestling Entertainment has had a large Web presence since 1996 and was nominated for a "Streaming Media Award" in 1999 for its online content. With more than 50 million registrations in the past three years, Neopets.com is the fastest growing youth community in the world. All pay-per-views can be purchased and viewed on WWE.com as well. and The Code Monkeys Ltd., Neopets: The Darkest Faerie is an action/adventure game that extends the online entertainment of Neopets.com and provides a fully interactive offline experience. Pay-per-views account for approximately 25% of WWE revenues ($95.3 million in the 2004 fiscal year). Developed and created by Sony Computer Entertainment America's Santa Monica studio, NeoPets, Inc. WWE is currently one of the leaders in pay-per-view content for cable and satellite television. However, on March 2005 they confirmed that they had already began remaking the game for the PS2.

[2] (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7380373/). announced the upcoming June 2004 release of Neopets: The Darkest Faerie™, available exclusively for the PS one™ and PlayStation® game consoles. In addition, WWE will broadcast a twice-yearly 90-minute "special event" on Saturday nights on NBC. In 2004 Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. [1] (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20050311/tv_nm/television_wwe_dc_1) On April 4, 2005, WWE announced a new 3-year agreement with NBC Universal to air RAW on the USA Network once again, a deal that also reportedly included occasional WWE programming on Telemundo and NBC. This is another controversial marketing move, which has at once managed to endear and estrange players from the site. The Spike TV deal will expire in September, 2005, and Viacom (owner of Spike TV) has announced they will not seek to extend it. Most of the card releases are associated with "plots," or stories, on the site (notably the most recent set, Curse of Maraqua).

The two brands will occasionally clash at a pay-per-view card. To date, there have been six individual "sets" of cards (a base set and five expansions), with the sixth set recently released. Without WCW as competition, the WWE decided to split the promotion into two "separate" brands based on its two largest television shows, RAW and SmackDown! Under this "split brands" arrangement, each brand maintains a separate and non-overlapping roster of wrestlers, has championships exclusive to that brand (example: the WWE Championship on SmackDown!, and the World Heavyweight Championship on RAW), and is run by a different onscreen general manager. In September 2003, Wizards of the Coast released the Neopets Trading Card Game—a collectible card game based on the online characters and setting. It is distributed by card shops, as well as Wal-Mart and Target. Some observers saw the new name as further acknowledgement by the company on its emphasis towards the entertainment rather than athletic aspects of professional wrestling. There are also exclusively online retailers involved, such as www.99dogs.com, which was the first outlet for Neopets merchandise. Also, all verbal and visual references to "WWF" and the World Wrestling Federation logo from the "Attitude" era were edited out from old broadcasts. The merchandise retails at many mainstream outlets such as Wal-Mart, Target, and Limited Too.

The logo was altered, and a promotional campaign called "Get The F Out" was used to publicize this change. Neopets has branched out, and in addition to the website, it now also produces a range of merchandise, such as plushies, stickers, and hand-held video games. The lawsuit dealt with the wrestling company's breaching of an agreement with the Fund over use of the initials "WWF" in the United Kingdom. Rather than attempt a financial settlement with the Fund, McMahon changed the name of the company. Mr. Hubbard's organizational concepts are always with me" (according to the Hubbard College of Administration (http://www.hubbardcollege.com/mgmtsystem/use_dougdohring.html). Its parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, also chose to adopt this name. The impact of his beliefs on Neopets.com itself is not apparent, though Dohring has been quoted as saying "Having used his technology in every business activity.. Following a lawsuit from the World Wildlife Fund (also WWF), the Federation changed its name to World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. It has also been rumoured that Neopets is closely affiliated with the controversial Church of Scientology through CEO Doug Dohring [2] (http://www.scientology-kills.org/dohring.htm).

It is still a debate amongst wrestling fans. These Anti-Neopian groups have bought domain names for their movement, talked about their movement on the Neopets forums, and have even reported Neopets for what they believe to be potential copyright violations. Some people think the WWF Attitude era ended at the end of WrestleMania X-Seven (17) and others say November 2001 when WWF beat WCW. Groups of people believing that Neopets treats users poorly and who are also against the immersive advertising have formed Anti-Neopets websites expressing their views. The feud was a contributor to the company's decline in the ratings as well as in attendance and financially, athough the company to this day still has a profitable quarter. The actual number of active accounts is around 11 million[1] (http://media.hasbro.com/pl/page.release/dn/default.cfm?release=259) and the number of individual users is almost certainly less than this. WCW feud. Such accounts are never deleted, and even accounts that have not been accessed since the creation of the site linger.

Many people believe that the story would have gone much better if WWE and McMahon waited a couple of years, as many WCW and ECW superstars joined after the end of the WWF vs. A large percentage of these users are multiple secondary accounts owned by one person, frozen accounts or accounts no longer in use. Even the inclusion of ECW wrestlers and trademarks did not save it. Some dispute Neopets' registered users count, which has reached over 94 million, a figure Neopets often cites in promotional campaigns. The lack of major WCW star power, combined with McMahon deciding that WWF wrestlers generally should not lose to WCW wrestlers, ended the "InVasion" storyline quickly. Many users voice the opinion that the Neopets staff freeze accounts too often and without good reason; data from Yamipoli.com, which rates virtual pet sites, shows the frozen user amount is 45%. However, many big-name WCW stars such as "Hollywood" Hulk Hogan, Lex Luger, Kevin Nash, Goldberg, and Sting were still contracted to WCW's former parent company (McMahon decided not to buy them out), and all chose to sit out the duration of their contracts rather than work for McMahon for less money. Still others believe that the users of Neopets are poorly treated and considered nothing more than mere statistics, that the site has lost its friendliness over the years, and that the level of customer service has degraded considerably.

The original plan was to have WCW "take over" RAW, turning it back into WCW Monday Nitro. Complaints quickly died down after users realized that by merely changing the country setting on their user preferences the temporary ban could be bypassed. Since WCW's peak in the late 1990s, wrestling fans had dreamed about a feud between the two promotions. When this happened, a flurry of complaints appeared on Neopets itself when even Australians able to legally gamble could not access any game of chance on the website. Months later, McMahon and Bischoff reconciled their personal differences, and Bischoff signed with WWF to perform as the storyline General Manager of Raw. This article sparked a nation-wide controversy as concerned parents voiced their complaints about the website, prompting McDonald's to pressure Neopets into temporarily blocking Australian accounts from accessing games of chance for the duration of the promotion, which ended on November 5th. McMahon) took over the broadcast during the last half hour and Monday Night Raw was seen on TNT. Neopets had prohibited users under the age of 13 to use most games that involve gambling.

acquired WCW from AOL Time Warner for $7 million. During the final WCW Monday Nitro, Vince McMahon (as the character Mr. While much of this is factually incorrect (gambling is not required, nor are pets automatically sent to an orphanage if they are not fed) it is true that the website has a rather extensive collection of games of chance that are directly based on real-life games like blackjack, poker, and even lottery scratchcards. In March 2001, WWF Entertainment, Inc. In October of 2004, while McDonald's was promoting Neopets plushies in their Happy Meals, a story on the Australian news show Today Tonight featured a nine-year-old boy claiming that the site requires one to gamble in order to receive enough Neopoints to feed one's Neopet, else it is sent to an orphanage. With the massive success of WWF Attitude, WCW's financial situation deteriorated significantly, and its newly-merged parent company AOL Time Warner looked to cut the division loose. The introduction of a premium service in which adverts are removed and special gifts given has also sparked controversy, and the introduction of a further advertisement on the bottom of the web pages has also sparked controversy, with users stating that Neopets.com has started "selling neopoints", something prohibited in their terms and conditions. In 2000 the WWF, in collaboration with television network NBC, announced the creation of the XFL, a new professional football league, but the league had dismal television ratings and NBC pulled the plug after a year. In addition, you will get no ads if it is your birthday.

WWF announced its desire to diversify into other businesses, including a nightclub in Times Square, film production and book publishing. Neopets has said these offers and sponsor ads are to only keep the site free. Off the back of the success of the Attitude era, on October 19, 1999 the WWF's parent company, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, Inc., became a publicly traded company. Others disagree, pointing to the fact that not only are many of the sponsors' offers now grouped on one page and are somewhat avoidable, but that no user is ever required to sign up for these offers. The show became a weekly series on August 24, 1999. It has remained UPN's most successful program overall ever since. While immersive advertising is doubtlessly effective, some believe this constitutes subliminal advertising and is therefore inherently immoral, particularly considering the target demographic. On April 23, 1999, the WWF launched a special program known as SmackDown! on the fledgling UPN network. Neopets also features many games for sponsors, such as "The Incredibles Split-Shot".

The following night, the WWF dedicated its entire two-hour RAW telecast to Owen's memory, as various WWF performers and employees broke character and shared memories of their fallen friend. Even so, their primary method of advertising is still through creating items based on sponsor products (such as "Baby Bottle Pops", a real candy found in many American stores) or offering rare items, Neopoints, or, in one case, a special "Ice Bori" in return for signing up for sponsors' services. The decision to continue the event was (and still is) a controversial one. The placement of these banners has caused heated debate among avid Neopians as to the increasing commercial content and the quality of the site. The fans in attendance at the Kemper Arena were not informed of Owen's death. These banners are displayed on many site pages in three places, one at the top of the page, one at the bottom, and the other on a sidebar, making avoidance of advertisements increasingly difficult. A stunned Jim Ross made the solemn announcement to the pay-per-view audience once word had reached the arena. However, in October 2004, a considerable number of banners that link to external websites such as eBay (instead of linking to various areas on the Neopets website itself as they normally do) were introduced, Although they still have some neopets related ones.

Hart was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after arrival. Indeed, much of the company's revenue is gained through promotion of sponsors and their products and they have long accomplished this without a single banner or pop-up advertisement. Those watching the pay-per-view telecast at the time were spared the sight because the director cut away to a pretaped interview just before the accident occurred. While some educators and parents preach the wholesomeness and value of Neopets as a place for children to learn the basics of things like supply and demand, economics, stocks, and even HTML, others criticise it for its liberal placement and promotion of their sponsors' products, a technique they have dubbed "Immersion Advertisement". As Hart was being lowered into position in preparation for this entrance, his harness suddenly disengaged, sending him plummeting almost 80 feet to the ring below. Although seemingly uninteresting to the casual observer, the neoboards may display a model of real-world sociology when observed more closely. Owen Hart, as his "Blue Blazer" superhero character, was scheduled to make a dramatic appearance on that night's Over the Edge pay-per-view telecast, "flying" into the ring by being lowered from a harness attached to the roof of the arena. However, rescently the TNT has announced they may make non-neopets roleplays against the rules.

Tragedy struck on May 23, 1999, in Kansas City. There are roleplays here about many things (Harry Potter, high schools, etc), but Neopets roleplayers are greatly shunned here. However, the controversial new presentation made the WWF more appealing than ever to its core audience. Roleplaying (RP): This board holds, as the name suggest, boards which users have created to roleplay on. One group, the Parents Television Council, waged a sustained boycott campaign against the WWF. This board is 'hidden', and requires a javascript code to post on. They, along with feminist groups, found the regular use of scantily-clad women to attract viewers as offensive. Jelly World Chat (JWC): Certainly the most unusual board yet remarked upon.

Many family groups were outraged at the graphic violence employed by the WWF. This board is similar to the Battledome, though with the obvious exception of the lack of talking about battles. This change was not without critics. Trading Post/Auction (TC): Often called TCer's (Trader/Chatters), mainly people who spend thier time trading for profits. Although the term is considered offensive to older players, it applies to the general group of people who trade and chat on this board. nWo angle managed to almost lead the WWF to financial ruin, it was now becoming stale, and fans turned back to the WWF. Help Chat/Newbie Chat (HC/NC): This board is closely related to Fan Clubs, with typing habits similar to the AC. Where earlier WCW's edgy WCW vs. The FC was onced used for roleplaying your neopets, but rescently the TNT has frozen anyone of doing so.

The Rock would become one of the most popular professional wrestlers in history. Some literate users often place their name in front of new topics to better be identified. Over the coming year, the WWF would see new fan favorites. Typing often includes the '^-^' face. For the first time in 18 months, the edgier WWF would beat the weekly WCW Monday Nitro in the ratings. Although the majority of topics may range anywhere from claiming to be celebrities to remarking on one's favorite Neopet, many literates do exist, though they tend to be younger. McMahon and Austin. Fan Clubs (FC): This board replaced General Chat upon its deletion in popularity.

This was the start of the epic feud between "evil promoter" Mr. Typing habits are similar to that of the FC, though due to a smaller population, a tighter hierarchy has developed. Many more fans who had not bought WrestleMania, including fans of WCW, tuned in to watch RAW the next day and in subsequent weeks. Evil Things and Monster Sightings (EMS): This board consists mostly of people claiming to be 'emo' or 'goth', the few literates have formed a small group. Fans who purchased the pay-per-view were amazed by what they saw; this certainly was not the childish Rock and Wrestling era they still expected from the WWF. A stereotype has developed (not un-founded) of users on this board being rude. The highlight was the verbal confrontation between Austin and Tyson ending with Austin flicking off Tyson. Sadly, their status has severely lowered recently, due to an influx of younger players (often using chatspeak) claiming to be elite.

The Attitude era kicked off in earnest at WrestleMania XIV, when professional boxer Mike Tyson appeared as a special guest referee for the WWF Title match between Shawn Michaels and Stone Cold Steve Austin. Battledome (BD): The Battledome is one of the most well-known boards on Neopets. The relationship would deteriorate over the next few years of WWF programming. The BCers, as the regulars on the board are called, don't usually use chat speak and you can find them monitoring the board, hunting out the n00bs (annoying spammers who don't stay on topic), vote traders ("vote for me and I'll vote for you"), and Art Thieves. McMahon said in a pre-Wrestlemania press conference that it was not in the WWF's best interest to have Austin as champion. Some people think that the BC has become a popularity contest, but there still are many that will only vote for art they like. Hints of the Austin-McMahon feud in WWF storylines began after Stone Cold won the 1998 Royal Rumble to become #1 Contender for the WWF Title at Wrestlemania. Beauty Contest (BC): This is the place to meet other artists and advertise your pet in the BC or Beauty Contest.

During the summer and fall of 1997, Austin enhanced his status as a rebel willing to challenge any authority by giving his Stone Cold Stunner finishing move to WWF announcer Jim Ross, then-Commisssioner Sgt. Slaughter, and eventually WWF owner Vince McMahon himself. Chatspeak is used about fairly often in such groups (and the board in general), but generally exhibits a higher level of literacy and grammar than that of 'noobs'. Popular with the fans ever since winning the King of the Ring tournament as a heel in 1996, Austin's rough-and-redneck style won over enough fans that the WWF was forced to turn him into a fan favorite at Wrestlemania XIII in spring 1997 (in a rare double-switch in which the increasingly whiny Bret Hart turned heel after a legendary match between the two wrestlers). 'Pwn' is also a commonly-used word in this forum. Borrowing many of the exciting wrestling and storyline styles from then-insurgent wrestling promotion ECW, the WWF Attitude Era was based largely on the growing popularity of the wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austin. Typing habits are similar to those of FCer's (discussed later), but often substitute 'j00' for you, as well as 'meh' for me and 'luff' for love. Running with the momentum from the Montreal Screwjob, McMahon took the WWF in an edgier, reality-based direction he called WWF Attitude, and in the process created a new corporate logo. Many 'chat groups' have also sprung up in this board, often exclusionary to new members.

McMahon feud, which was the cornerstone of the new WWF Attitude concept. Dicussions include the method of obtaining new avatars, help on obtaining avatars, scattered font discussion, avatar games, and general discussion not always pertaining to avatars. This led to the Austin vs. These are displayed by a user's name when they make a post on the Neoboards and appear alongside a user's name when a player searches for them via the search bar. McMahon" in WWF programming, a dictatorial ruler who favored wrestlers who were "good for business" over "misfits" like Stone Cold Steve Austin. Avatars/Neosignatures (AC): The primary focus of this board is the small graphics known as 'avatars'. McMahon used the backlash from the event to cast himself as the evil company owner "Mr. Below are a few common ones.

This would set the stage for the turning point in the WWF/WCW feud. Players often find a 'home board', or a neoboard in which they feel most comfortable. McMahon would deviate from the agreed finish of their match at Survivor Series to allow Shawn Michaels to win the title from Hart. Premade 'avatars', small graphics displayed next to each post, are earned, and 'neotitles', a blurb underneath the username, can also be chosen from a list. He let it be known to WWF management that he would willingly drop the title, but not to rival "HBK" Shawn Michaels in Montreal. These boards may be unseen by the common visitor. Hart used his contractual control over his booking in the last 30 days of his deal, which would end with that year's Survivor Series PPV in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Another aspect of Neopets is the society that has developed on the 24 neoboards, which are forums for users to chat on.

However, McMahon was concerned that the word would get out and he sought a way to get the belt off of Hart before the deal could be announced on WCW Monday Nitro. However, there is some doubt over the veracity of these statistics (see "Controversy and Criticism" below). Bret promised that no such thing would ever happen and put an agreement in place that the announcement of his departure would be delayed until the belt could be transitioned to a new champion. Updated statistics may be found on the Neopets 'Pet Central' Page (http://www.neopets.com/petcentral.phtml). The WWF's worst nightmare was for Hart to appear on WCW Nitro while wearing the WWF belt. As of October 2004, Neopets report over 94 million accounts, and over 134 million pets (note that one user can have multiple pets, and many users have several accounts). Earlier in the WWF/WCW feud, the WWF Women's Champion, Alundra Blayze, signed with WCW while in possession of the belt and threw it in a trash can on WCW Nitro (imitating a heavily-publicized act by heavyweight boxing champion Riddick Bowe). The ability to amass large amounts of Neopoints and rare items is a challenge for competitive players, and someone who keeps up with the latest news has a greater chance of being the first one to obtain a rare item (and sell it before it drops in value) or to earn a top score in new a game.

While Hart's departure was not a surprise, the WWF was concerned about the fact that the man about to leave was the WWF Champion. Part of the reason why Neopets is so popular is that it is continually changing: new items, games, plots (such as "Hannah and the Ice Caves" or "Curse of Maraqua", etc.) are introduced almost every day. Claiming financial hardship, McMahon threatened to breach the contract and advised Bret to do his best to sign with WCW. He has not been involved in affairs within Neopia, since the Neopets Staff opted for more Hannah plots (as seen in Hannah and the Pirate Caves) instead. However, McMahon immediately regretted the deal. His greatest achievements were the enslavement of the Grundos, an alien-like race and his creation of the Transmogrification Potions, which change the appearance or species of a Neopet into a mutant version. McMahon countered with an offer worth much less money, but for a 20-year term, and Hart agreed to stay. Usually the source of ridicule due to his similarity to a green chicken, he has been featured in the comics page of the Neopian Times numerous times.

The previous year, Hart was offered a lucrative deal to jump to WCW. Sloth is often prominently featured in several of these site-wide stories. The WWF/WCW feud reached a new level in 1997, when McMahon decided to force then-WWF champion Bret "The Hitman" Hart out of the company. The Neopian villain, Dr. Despite this, the WWF was losing money at a rapid rate. WCW's reality-based storylines drew attention away from the WWF's outdated (and childish) rock and wrestling-era gimmicks. There are also regular Neopets message boards, accessible to anyone, which are quite active as well as site-wide stories or plots which anyone can take part in. McMahon responded by stating that he could create new superstars to regain the upper hand in the ratings war, and at the same time tightening contracts to make it harder for WCW to raid WWF talent. These usually have a theme, such as the "Faerie Guild" or the "Nimmo Lovers Guild." There are message boards inside of the guilds, only accessible to members of that guild.

In 1995, Bischoff upped the ante, creating WCW Monday Nitro, a cable show on Turner's TNT network, to directly compete with the WWF's flagship show, WWF Monday Night RAW. Eventually, on the strength of its newly-acquired WWF talent and the groundbreaking nWo storyline, WCW overtook the WWF in television ratings and popularity. Any Neopian can join or create a guild, essentially a club for users. Beginning in 1994, these acquisitions included Hulk Hogan, "Macho Man" Randy Savage, Lex Luger, Scott Hall, "Big Sexy" Kevin Nash, and many others. Neohomes can be bought for a certain number of Neopoints for each room. Furniture may be placed in the Neohomes, and extensions (lights, insurance, etc.) can be purchased. Under Eric Bischoff, World Championship Wrestling (WCW), the new name for NWA superterritory Jim Crockett Promotions after its purchase by Ted Turner, began using its tremendous financial resources to lure established talent away from the WWF. Neodecks has virtual trading cards (there are also virtual stamps and coins which can be "collected"). McMahon was eventually exonerated, but it was a public-relations debacle for the WWF. These players are often given the name 'restockers'.

However, by the 1990s the WWF's fortunes steadily declined as Hulk Hogan's act grew stale, hitting a low point in the wake of allegations of steroid abuse and distribution against McMahon and the WWF in 1994. Other players often 'restock' in the marketplace shops, purchasing items cheaply, then reselling them for often thousands more. The WWF did incredible business on the shoulders of McMahon and his All-American babyface hero, Hulk Hogan, for the next several years, creating what some observers dubbed a second golden age for professional wrestling. Prices rise and fall rapidly (sometimes within a single day) depending on the availability and desirability of items—for this reason, some teachers have used Neopets shops to teach about supply and demand. The new formula of what McMahon deemed Sports Entertainment was a resounding financial success at the original WrestleMania. Some experienced players make more Neopoints through their shops than by playing games. MTV, in particular, featured a great deal of WWF coverage and programming at this time, in what was termed the Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection. You can also send items to other users.

T and Cyndi Lauper to participate in the event. Items to sell in stores can be bought from the official stores or from other players, "found" through random events, won in an auction, or traded for. He drew the interest of the mainstream media by inviting celebrities such as Mr. Players can buy items from other players' shops and sell them in their own shop. However, McMahon wanted to take the WWF to the mainstream, targeting the general public who were not regular wrestling fans. Every Neopian can have a shop, Neodeck, and Neohome. The concept of a wrestling supercard was nothing new in North America; the NWA had been running StarrCade a few years prior to Wrestlemania. Sometimes, you may get lucky, and recieve a petpet from one of the various quests you can do, and a couple of games, or get a random event in which you find petpets or petpetpets.

WrestleMania was a pay-per-view extravaganza that McMahon marketed as being the Super Bowl of professional wrestling. Any of these goals can cost an enormous amount of Neopoints, and dedicated users will devote months to their acquisition. The future of not just McMahon's experiment, but also the WWF, the NWA, and the whole industry came down to the success or failure of McMahon's groundbreaking sports entertainment concept, WrestleMania. There are even Petpetpets (http://www.soup-faerie.com/articles/petpetpet.shtm), which seem to be the game equivalent of your pet's pet having fleas (except these Petpetpets seem to be items many want). However, such a venture required huge capital investment; one which placed the WWF on the verge of financial collapse. and Petpets (pets for your pet, which are generally quite cute, and are also able to be entered in their own version of the battledome). warned his son: "Vinny, what are you doing?! You'll wind up at the bottom of a river!" In spite of such warnings, the younger McMahon had an even bolder ambition: the WWF would tour nationally. There also are potions you can feed to your pet to change them into mutants (distorted versions of the pet) and many other colours.

According to several reports, Vincent Sr. Popular goals include Paintbrushes (which can change a pet into another colour, such as orange or brown, or even a completely different style, such as "pirate", "faerie" or "baby" even. Wrestling promoters nationwide were now in direct competition with the WWF. Once Neopians become comfortable with the basics, they can begin spending their Neopoints on items beyond caring for their pets. To make matters worse, McMahon would use the income generated by advertising, television deals, and tape sales to poach talent from rival promoters. however, it is unknown whether this will continue in other plots to come. He effectively broke the unwritten law of regionalism around which the entire industry had been based. For every 500 neopoints you recieved in the game, your score went up a point.

McMahon also began selling videotapes of WWF events outside the Northeast. You then either gather the items you are asked for (most of which are expensive) or play a game from the selection they give you. Other promoters were furious when McMahon began syndicating WWF shows to stations across America. In the last plot, you were also given the chance to 'support' a side. But in neither instance did the defecting member attempt to undermine, and destroy, the Territory system that had been the foundation of the industry. In the end, these points can determine prizes only avaible from the war or the shops, and a trophy displaying your stand in the war, which is placed on your lookup. Leaving the NWA for a second time in itself was not that big of a step; the AWA had long ago ceased being an official NWA member, and just over a decade earlier the WWWF itself had rejoined the NWA. If you decide to fight, you are given a series of characters to defeat in the battledome, each giving you more points.

The elder McMahon had already established the northeastern territory as one of the most vibrant members of the NWA by recognizing that pro wrestling was more about entertainment than sport. Against his father's wishes, McMahon began an expansion process that would fundamentally change the sport, and place both the WWF--and his own life--in jeopardy. Once the plot has reached a certain pint, you are given the option to choose a side to fight in (you don't have to sign up). After discovering at age 12 that the wrestling promoter was his father, Vince became steadily involved in his father's wrestling business until the latter was ready to retire. Another feature plots curently have is a comic book style of showing the art and, when the mouse rolls over a frame, the dialog. McMahon. The Neopets Staff has confirmed that the next plot will revolve around the Lost Desert, and will include a war, as all of their plots do. McMahon founded Titan Sports, Inc., and in 1982 purchased the WWF from his father, Vincent J. Maraqua is now rebuilt as a result of the "Curse of Maraqua" plot.

In 1979, Vincent K. For example, Maraqua (underwater), was destroyed by the Krawk Island pirates, which led to the "discovery" of Krawk Island. The name change was purely cosmetic; the ownership and front office personnel remained unchanged during this period. These worlds are generally introduced through in-game plots. The WWWF became the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) in mid-1979. Each of these worlds (which are, in reality, more like regions or settings) has unique shops, games, and activities pertaining to its theme. Mondt (born in 1886) died in 1976. There are also mini worlds and sub-worlds, such as Roo Island and Kiko Lake.

The WWWF rejoined the NWA in 1971 and their world title was dropped to the status of a regional title. There are also different themed worlds: Tyrannia (prehistoric), Faerieland (faeries), Mystery Island (Polynesian), Haunted Woods (Halloween/spooky), Krawk Island (pirates), Lost Desert (Ancient Egyptian), Terror Mountain (winter/Christmas), mysterious Jelly World (jelly), Virtupets Space Station (Space station), Kreludor (moon), Meridell (medieval), and Brightvale (Medieval with an emphasis on knowledge and enlightenment, ŕ la the Renaissance). He lost the title to Bruno Sammartino a month later on May 17, 1963 after supposedly suffering a heart attack shortly before the match. The main world is Neopia Central, a city where the main stores are based. In mid-April, Rogers was then awarded the new WWWF title after the WWWF claimed he won a (fictitious) tournament in Rio de Janeiro. The entire game takes place on (or in orbit around) the fictional planet of Neopia. Rogers lost the NWA title to Lou Thesz in Toronto, Ontario on January 24, 1963. See also: List of Neopian worlds.

Mondt and WWWF wanted Rogers to keep the NWA title, but Rogers didn't want to lose his $25,000 deposit on the belt; wrestling champions at the time had to pay a deposit to ensure they would honor whatever commitments that came along with their titles. Neopets has announced a premium service, which gives a special avatar for use on the boards, the option of 'Stealth' (hides how long it has been since you were on), and several other things. It was decided that Mondt and CWC would part ways with the NWA, creating the World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF) in the process. Many people who do not know were to get programs heavily disagree with this. The rest of the NWA was upset with Mondt because he rarely let Rogers wrestle outside of the Northeast. Neopets recently announced that autobuyers, which is a program used to make people neopoints, is now going to be allowed on the website and you won't get frozen for it. In 1963, "Nature Boy" Buddy Rogers was the NWA champion and his bookings were controlled by Mondt. Unfortunately, the Neopets team does not always respond promptly, and may sometimes take up to a month or more to reply.

Capitol dominated professional wrestling in the Northeastern United States during the mid-20th century, when it was divided into strictly regional enterprises. If wrongfully accused, there is a response form to contact Neopets. These shows were then syndicated. Upon attempting to log in, they receive a message saying that they are frozen. It was able to do this after signing an agreement with WTTG Channel 5, in 1956, to air live CWC wrestling shows. They can not log in, play games, or access any of the features on Neopets. While originally running shows from the 2,000-seat Turner's Arena, the CWC would eventually control the territories of New England, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. If an account is frozen, it means that the account is not at all accessible by the user.

McMahon's company was called Capitol Wrestling Corporation (CWC). If a Neopian is caught breaking the rules as stated in the Neopets Terms and Conditions (http://www.neopets.com/terms.phtml), their account will be frozen. The NWA is a broad group of wrestling companies that recognized an undisputed champion, who went from wrestling company to wrestling company in the alliance and defended the belt around the world. Items are then purchased in either main shops, which are automatically restocked by the game, or in user-owned shops. In January 1953, Jesse's son Vincent J. McMahon and wrestling promoter Toots Mondt took control of the Northeastern United States wrestling circuit as part of the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). If a user is skilled at a game, they may earn a trophy. Ray Fabiani, who helped Mondt take control of the New York territory after the death of Jack Curley, was influential in drawing the younger McMahon into an alliance with Mondt. There are also numerous PHP games, such as "NeoQuest" and "Pyramids".

Mondt's doing so was facilitated, in part, by the elder McMahon. Among the more popular games are "Hannah and the Ice Caves" (the sequel to the equally popular "Hannah and the Pirate Caves"),"Turmac Roll" and "Petpetsitter". This "no wrestling at the Garden" policy ended in 1948, when Joseph Raymond Mondt (better known as Toots Mondt), backed by millionaire Bernarr McFadden, managed to promote a wrestling show at the famous arena. Driller. However, the McMahon family was not able to promote wrestling matches at Madison Square Garden due to Rickard's dislike of the sport. There is even a curious case of reproducing a version of the popular Namco puzzle game Mr. His son, Vincent Jess McMahon, began to take an increasing role in the running of the business, especially on the wrestling side. Many of the games are interactive Flash or Shockwave games similar to older games—"Meerca Chase II" is very similar to Snake while "Korbat's Lab" is like Arkanoid.

It was not until 1935, the same year Jim Crockett Promotions was formed, that the McMahon family moved into the wrestling business. Neopians gain the Neopoints to care for their pets and purchase items by playing games. Jess McMahon's enterprise focused on boxing and live concert/music promotion. And to paint a pet from the Fountain Faerie you need to complete a quest from her (a rare event) to paint your pet. A decade later, in 1925, McMahon joined Tex Rickard in promoting boxing events from the old Madison Square Garden Arena, in New York, starting with the December 11, 1925, light-heavyweight championship match between Jack Delaney and Paul Berlenbach. To access the lab, you need to collect all nine "lab map pieces". In the fight, on April 5, 1915, Johnson lost his title to Willard in Havana. Robot, for instance, can only be achieved by using the Secret Laboratory or Fountain Faerie.

In 1915, Roderick James "Jess" McMahon, grandfather of current WWE Chairman Vince McMahon, co-promoted a boxing match between Jess Willard and Jack Johnson. Some colours cannot be obtained from a paint brush, though. are located in Stamford, Connecticut. Paint brushes can also change pets into different styles such as Pirate and Royal. As of 2005, the headquarters of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. Neopians can give their pets a different colour past the basic choices, such as purple and grey, if they purchase a paint brush. World Wrestling Entertainment is a publicly-traded company, but the vast majority (70%) of voting shares are owned by Chairman Vince McMahon, his wife, CEO Linda McMahon, his son, Executive Vice President of Global Media Shane McMahon, and his daughter, Vice President of Creative Writing Stephanie McMahon-Levesque. They can also read books and battle each other in a Battledome in a style akin to popular role-playing games such as Pokémon. Neglecting your Neopet will result in their unhappiness, which when left unhelped for a long ammount of time turns your neopet blue.

The company was previously known as TitanSports, Inc. and has previously done business as the Capitol Wrestling Corporation, the World Wide Wrestling Federation, and the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). There are many stages of hunger, ranging from "bloated" to "dying" (although Neopets will never die, or starve to death). World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, is a professional wrestling promotion, currently the largest in North America. Users can customize their pets by selecting gender, colour, (choice of red, blue, yellow, or green) and name (provided another user hasn't already chosen the name). WWE 24/7 - In 2004, the WWE officially announced a new video on demand service for digital cable users, allowing subscribers to the service access to matches in the promotion's extensive video library. There are also Neopets versions of popular fantasy creatures, such as dragons (Draiks) unicorns (Unis) and the newest neopet, a winged serpent, the "Hissi". The final episode of this show aired on April 24, 2004. For example, the Nimmo is a stylized frog, the Blumaroo is kangaroo-like, the Pteri is one of two bird-like species, the Lupe is wolf-like and the Gelert is dog-like.

WWE Confidential - This was a "behind the scenes"-type show hosted by "Mean" Gene Okerlund and featured many exclusive stories on WWE wrestlers. As of May 2005, there are 50 different Neopet species currently available, with most being fictionalized versions of real animals. It aired as a separate show on MTV for three seasons, but integrated itself into regular SmackDown! programming in its fourth iteration, with a $1 million-dollar (US) contract awarded to the winner over four years. Daniel Puder, a former cage fighter, won the $1,000,000 Tough Enough. TNT, which also stands for The Neopets Team, recommend people making multiple accounts if you want to be able to have more pets, but you can't use those for all of the freebies you can recieve on the site. This resulted in many new wrestlers being added to both brands. After creating an account, Neopians can have up to four different pets per account. It followed groups of men and women who were competing to become a WWE wrestler. also operates an Asian branch, which is partially owned by Green Dot Capital, a subsidiary of the investment vehicle of the Government of Singapore, Temasek Holdings.

Tough Enough - WWE's version of a reality show. Neopets Inc. The hosts are Todd Grisham and Ivory, although Josh Matthews has also guest hosted with Ivory. In addition to English, as of August 2004 the site is available translated (with varying degrees of completeness) into nine other languages. Airs Sunday mornings at 11 AM EST on Spike TV. Although the company is based in the United States, its founders are British and the site retains British English spellings. The WWE Experience - A show aimed at the younger audience that recaps the past week's events in WWE. Neopoints may not be traded or sold for currency, and vice versa.

4 live shows for the Australian market. Users can also play games to earn Neopoints (NP), Neopian currency that can be used to purchase items that interact with their Neopets. 2 live shows for the Asian market. Users, called "Neopians", have to care for their Neopets by feeding and playing with them. 4 live shows for the European market. Neopets started out as a site for bored college students but quickly grew into a site for 'children' of all ages (many adults play this site, some with children of their own), and is currently one of the most popular mainstream sites on the web. 15 live shows for the North American market. The site was founded on November 15, 1999 by Adam Powell and Donna Williams, but the company was bought by Doug Dohring soon after being created.

The show is hosted by Josh Matthews. Neopets is a popular online virtual pet simulation game. Afterburn - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the SmackDown! brand. Matthews formerly did play-by-play comentary with color analyst Bill DeMott. The current play-by-play commentator is Steve Romero and the current color commentator is Josh Matthews.

It is usually taped the hour before SmackDown! tapes. Velocity - Sister show to SmackDown!, airs on Saturday nights at 11 PM EST on Spike TV. SmackDown! - WWE's secondary show, airs Thursday nights at 8 PM EST on UPN in the United States (moving to Friday nights in September 2005) and in Canada at 7 PM EST on The Score. The show is hosted by Marc Loyd.

Bottom Line - Syndicated show that recaps the past week's events on the RAW brand. Sunday Night Heat - Sister show to RAW, airs Sunday nights at 7 PM EST on Spike TV. RAW - WWE's flagship show, airs live on Monday nights at 9 PM EST on Spike TV in the United States, live in Canada on TSN, and live in the United Kingdom on Sky Sports.

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