Thomas Kinkade

Kinkade with copy of his painting "Coming Home" presented to USO in October 2005.

Thomas Kinkade (born 1958-01-19 in Sacramento, California) is an American painter most widely known for his mass-produced prints. He is marketed as the "Painter of Light", a phrase he has trademarked.

His prints and paintings are distinguished by their glowing, highlights and vibrant pastel colors. Rendered in a impressionist style cross-pollinated with American Scene Painting values, his works often portray bucolic, idyllic settings such as gardens, streams, stone cottages, and Main Streets. He has also depicted various Christian themes including the Holy Cross and churches.

Kinkade claims to be placing emphasis on the value of simple pleasures and that his intent is to communicate inspirational, life-affirming messages through his work. A self-described "devout Christian" (all of his children have the middle name "Christian" [1]), Kinkade has said he gains his inspiration from his religious beliefs and that his work is intended to contain a larger moral dimension. Many pictures contain specific chapter-and-verse allusions to certain [Bible] passages.

Kinkade is reportedly America's most-collected living artist [2]. Relatedly, he is often criticized for the extent to which he has commercialized his art (for example, selling his prints on the QVC home shopping network). Others have complained that his paintings are merely kitsch and are without substance.

There also has been a Thomas Kinkade themed community of homes, The Village at Hiddenbrooke.

Biography

Kinkade grew up in the small town of Placerville, California, graduated from high school in 1976, and attended the University of California, Berkeley and the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. On 1982-05-02, he married his childhood sweetheart, Nanette.

He spent a summer on a sketching tour with a college friend, producing a popular instructional book, The Artist's Guide to Sketching. The success of the book landed the two young artists at Ralph Bakshi Studios creating background art for the 1983 animated feature film Fire and Ice. While working on the film, Kinkade began to explore the depiction of light and of imagined worlds. After the film, Kinkade earned his living as a painter, selling his originals in galleries throughout California.

His works are sold by mail order and in dedicated retail outlets as high-quality prints, often using texturizing techniques on real canvas to make the surface of the finished prints mimic the raised surface of the original painting. Some of the prints also feature light effects that are painted onto the print surface by hand by "skilled craftsmen", touches which add to the illusion of light and the resemblance to an original work of art. Kincaid's images are also used extensively on other merchandise such as calendars and greeting cards.

Criticism

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Joan Didion echoes a popular complaint that Kinkade's houses seem to be burning internally:

She goes on to make more serious complaints, comparing the "Kinkade Glow" to the luminism of 19th-century painter Albert Bierstadt, who sentimentalized the infamous Donner Pass in his Donner Lake from the Summit. Didion worries that Kinkade's own treatment of the Sierra Nevada likewise mocks the tragedy of the Yosemite Miwok Indians in The Mountains Declare His Glory.

References

  • Didion, Joan (2003). Where I Was From. Westminster: Knopf.

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Didion worries that Kinkade's own treatment of the Sierra Nevada likewise mocks the tragedy of the Yosemite Miwok Indians in The Mountains Declare His Glory. Tiles have been used in construction for at least 4000 years, by the Romans, Greeks, Babylonians, Phoenicians and many other cultures. She goes on to make more serious complaints, comparing the "Kinkade Glow" to the luminism of 19th-century painter Albert Bierstadt, who sentimentalized the infamous Donner Pass in his Donner Lake from the Summit. Tiles were developed as a product of earthenware pottery, either as an alternative use for fragments of broken pottery (called potsherds) or as an independent invention. Joan Didion echoes a popular complaint that Kinkade's houses seem to be burning internally:. For detailed information on tilings see the tessellation page. Kincaid's images are also used extensively on other merchandise such as calendars and greeting cards. These shapes are said to tessellate (from the Latin tessera, 'tile').

Some of the prints also feature light effects that are painted onto the print surface by hand by "skilled craftsmen", touches which add to the illusion of light and the resemblance to an original work of art. Certain shapes of tiles, most obviously rectangles, can be replicated to cover a surface with no gaps. His works are sold by mail order and in dedicated retail outlets as high-quality prints, often using texturizing techniques on real canvas to make the surface of the finished prints mimic the raised surface of the original painting. As both the influence and the extent of Islam spread during the Middle Ages this artistic tradition was carried along, finding expression from the gardens and courtyards of Málaga in Moorish Spain to the mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. After the film, Kinkade earned his living as a painter, selling his originals in galleries throughout California. Palaces, public buildings, and mosques were heavily decorated with dense, often massive mosaics and friezes of astonishing complexity. While working on the film, Kinkade began to explore the depiction of light and of imagined worlds. Perhaps because of the tenets of Moslem law (sharia) which disavow religious icons and images in favor of more abstract and universal representations of the divine, many consider decorative tilework to have reached a pinnacle of expression and detail during the Islamic period.

The success of the book landed the two young artists at Ralph Bakshi Studios creating background art for the 1983 animated feature film Fire and Ice. Batchelder. He spent a summer on a sketching tour with a college friend, producing a popular instructional book, The Artist's Guide to Sketching. Prominent among art tile makers during this period was Ernest A. On 1982-05-02, he married his childhood sweetheart, Nanette. In the United States, decorative tiles were in vogue, especially in southern California, in the 1920s and 1930s. Kinkade grew up in the small town of Placerville, California, graduated from high school in 1976, and attended the University of California, Berkeley and the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. Some places, notably Portugal, have a tradition of tilework on buildings that continues today.

. Although decorative tilework was known and extensively practiced in the ancient world (as evidenced in the magnificent mosaics of Pompeii and Herculaneum), it perhaps reached its greatest expression during the Islamic period. There also has been a Thomas Kinkade themed community of homes, The Village at Hiddenbrooke. Decorative tilework typically takes the form of mosaic upon the walls, floor, or ceiling of a building. Others have complained that his paintings are merely kitsch and are without substance. Finally, a cloth is rubbed over the wall tile to remove any haze which may remain from residual grout. Relatedly, he is often criticized for the extent to which he has commercialized his art (for example, selling his prints on the QVC home shopping network). The sponging provides added moisture to strengthen the grout as it cures.

Kinkade is reportedly America's most-collected living artist [2]. The excess grout is scraped off with a hard rubber block called a float immediately after applying; further, the grout is wiped again with a moist sponge before it completely hardens. Many pictures contain specific chapter-and-verse allusions to certain [Bible] passages. The spaces between the tiles are filled with a fine cement called unsanded grout. A self-described "devout Christian" (all of his children have the middle name "Christian" [1]), Kinkade has said he gains his inspiration from his religious beliefs and that his work is intended to contain a larger moral dimension. Modern wall tiles are fixed to a wall using a synthetic bonding agent tile adhesive for dry areas, or a cement-based mortar for areas prone to moisture, such as bath or shower walls. Kinkade claims to be placing emphasis on the value of simple pleasures and that his intent is to communicate inspirational, life-affirming messages through his work. Pictorial tiles, consisting of many tiles that the installer assembles like a jigsaw puzzle to form a single large picture, are available.

He has also depicted various Christian themes including the Holy Cross and churches. Wall tiles are usually glazed, and are often patterned by painting or embossing. Rendered in a impressionist style cross-pollinated with American Scene Painting values, his works often portray bucolic, idyllic settings such as gardens, streams, stone cottages, and Main Streets. These are usually ceramic, but other materials such as mirrored glass or polished metal can be used. His prints and paintings are distinguished by their glowing, highlights and vibrant pastel colors. While ancient Roman building bricks were broader and thinner than modern ones and are therefore usually called tiles, the term wall tile is normally applied to finishing tiles. He is marketed as the "Painter of Light", a phrase he has trademarked. See Laying tile
.

Thomas Kinkade (born 1958-01-19 in Sacramento, California) is an American painter most widely known for his mass-produced prints. The spaces between the tiles are nowadays filled with sanded or unsanded floor grout, but traditionally mortar was used. Where I Was From. Westminster: Knopf. Floor tiles are typically set into mortar consisting of sand, cement and oftentimes a latex additive for extra strength. Didion, Joan (2003). Small mosaic tiles may be laid in various patterns. Clay tiles may be painted and glazed.

These are commonly made of ceramic, clay, porcelain or stone. They include ridge, hip and valley tiles. There are also roof tiles for special positions, particularly where the planes of the several pitches meet. The tiles are usually hung in parallel rows, with each row overlapping the row below it to exclude rainwater and to cover the nails that hold the row below.

Roof tiles are 'hung' from the framework of a roof by fixing them with nails. These include:. Because of their long history, a large number of shapes (or "profiles") of roof tiles have evolved. Some clay tiles have a waterproof glaze.

Modern materials such as concrete and plastic are also used. Roof tiles are designed mainly to keep out rain, and are traditionally made from locally available materials such as clay, slate, or wood (wooden tiles are called shingles). .
.

Tiles are most often made from ceramic, with a hard glaze finish, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, slate, and reformed ceramic slurry, which is cast in a mould and fired. Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Less precisely, the modern term can refer to any sort of construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of baked clay.

Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, and walls, or other objects such as tabletops. A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, clay, stone, porcelain or even glass. Mission or barrel tiles are semi-cylindrical tiles made by forming clay around a log and laid in alternating columns of convex and concave tiles. These result in a ridged pattern resembling a ploughed field.

Pantiles - with an S-shaped profile, allowing adjacent tiles to interlock. Roman tiles - flat in the middle, with a concave curve at one end at a convex curve at the other, to allow interlocking. This profile is suitable for stone and wooden tiles, and most recently, solar cells. Flat tiles - the simplest type, which are laid in regular overlapping rows.

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