The Yardbirds

The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock music's most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page.

Formed originally as the Metropolitan Blues Quartet in 1962–63 in London, the Yardbirds first achieved notice on the burgeoning British blues scene (or "rhythm and blues," as the British music press alluded to it) when they took over as the house band at the Crawdaddy Club in London—succeeding the Rolling Stones. With a repertoire drawn more from the Delta-soaked Chicago blues titans Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson II, and Elmore James than the more commercially-minded Chuck Berry and Jimmy Reed influences of the Rolling Stones, the Yardbirds began to build a following of their own in London before very long. Their inexperience and their less-than-stellar musicianship was obvious but their commitment was just as powerful, as they hammered away at versions of such blues classics as "Smokestack Lightning," "Got Love If You Want It," "Here 'Tis," "Baby What's Wrong," "Good Morning Little School Girl," "Boom Boom," "I Wish You Would," "Done Somebody Wrong," and "Rollin' and Tumblin'."

They made their first significant lineup addition when singer/harmonica player Keith Relf, rhythm guitarist Chris Dreja, bassist Paul Samwell-Smith, and drummer Jim McCarty, replaced original lead guitarist Anthony (Top) Topham with a very boyish-looking art student named Eric Clapton in late 1963. Clapton already knew what he was doing with his instrument; his solo turns, while far enough from the gripping little gems for which he became famous enough soon enough, already set him apart from most of his peers among the British blues clubbers. Between his sleek guitar playing and Keith Relf's improving harmonica style, the group could at least boast two attractive players that made listeners overlook their still-incomplete rhythmic attack. And, of critical importance, Crawdaddy Club impresario Giorgio Gomelsky—who had all but discovered the Rolling Stones but thought it beyond his range to become their manager—learned enough from his previous miss to become the Yardbirds' manager and, as it turned out, first producer.

Under Gomelsky's guidance, the Yardbirds got themselves signed to EMI's Columbia label in early 1964; they set a precedent of a sort when their first album turned out to be a live album, Five Live Yardbirds, recorded at the legendary Marquee Club in London. The group was well enough reputed that none other than blues legend Sonny Boy Williamson himself invited the group to tour England and Germany with him, a union that survives to this day on a live album memorable for Williamson's trouper-like adaptation of his deep troubador style of blues to the Yardbirds' raw, unpolished rock and roll version. ("Those English kids," Williamson said famously of the Yardbirds and other British blues groups like the Animals and the Stones, "want to play the blues so bad—and they play the blues so bad," though he had a personal affection for the Yardbirds' members and even thought of moving to England permanently, until the illness that resulted in his early 1965 death.)

The quintet went from there to cut several singles, including "I Wish You Would," but it was "For Your Love," a Graham Gouldman composition that was anything but the blues, which put the band to their highest chart position yet in England—and their first major hit in the United States, when it was released there in 1965. It also prompted Eric Clapton—at the time a no-holds-barred blues purist—to leave the group and join with John Mayall's Blues Breakers. The loss could have been devastating to the Yardbirds; Clapton had already shown the striking, stabbingly virtuosic style he would later expand and deepen with Mayall and unfurl as a full-fledged virtuoso statement with the improvisational Cream. Clapton recommended Jimmy Page, a studio guitarist he had known (and with whom he would soon cut a series of stirring blues guitar duets, including "Tribute to Elmore" and "Draggin' My Tail"), as his replacement, but Page—uncertain at the time about giving up his lucrative studio work—recommended in turn one Jeff Beck, whose fleet-fingered style and bent for experimentation pushed the Yardbirds to the direction from which they became widely credited for opening the door to "psychedelic" rock.

The Yardbirds in 1965 and 1966 issued a pair of albums in the U.S., slapped together somewhat haphazardly from their British recordings, For Your Love (which included a delightful early take of "Hang On, Sloopy"—they'd gotten hold of a demo of the song before the McCoys had their chartbusting crack at it a year later, and their patented doubletime "rave up" version is a treat) and Havin' A Rave Up With The Yardbirds, half of which came from Five Live Yardbirds.

Beck's tenure in the group, meanwhile, produced a number of memorable recordings, from single hits like "Heart Full of Soul," "I'm A Man," and "Shapes of Things" to the Yardbirds album (known more popularly as Roger the Engineer, and first issued in the U.S. in a bowdlerised version called Over Under Sideways Down), and established him as a top-rank guitarist whose experiments with fuzz tone, feedback, and distortion jolted British rock forward with a bold drop kick. In addition, the Yardbirds began serious experiments with things like adapting Gregorian chant ("Still I'm Sad," "Turn Into Earth," Hot House of Omagarashid," "Farewell," "Ever Since The World Began") and various European folk styles into their blues and rock rooted music, and this gained them a new reputation among the hipster underground even as their commercial appeal had begun already to wane.

It was prior to the sessions that produced Yardbirds that Paul Samwell-Smith decided to quit the group for touring purposes and move behind the boards to co-produce them with new manager, Simon Napier-Bell. Jimmy Page re-entered the picture here, playing bass until rhythm guitarist Chris Dreja could become comfortable with that instrument, and then teaming with Beck for tantalising twin-guitar attacks that proved short-enough lived: Beck either quit or was fired from the group in mid-1966, and the Yardbirds continued as a quartet for the remainder of their career. (Almost the only pronounced examples of what the Beck-Page tandem could have been came on a single, "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago," and their half-crazed version of "The Train Kept A-Rollin'," an even crazier rendition of which turned up in the Antonioni film Blow-Up as "Stroll On".) Page was just as bent toward experimentation as Beck, particularly his striking technique of scraping a violin or cello bow across his guitar strings to induce a round of odd and surreal sounds, and his dextrous use of a wah-wah pedal. He also proved an adept fingerstyle guitarist, the shimmering "White Summer," an Indian-influence instrumental composition, joining his full-out hard rock grinder, "I'm Confused" as curlicues to the Yardbirds' unexpectedly forthcoming transmutation.

Increasing chart indifference, record company pressure (their British home label pressed hitmaking producer Mickie Most upon them in a failed bid to re-ignite their commercial success), and drug-related problems meant that by 1967 the Yardbirds' days were numbered. Or were they? After the failure of their final album (the badly-produced Little Games) and their reduction to small venues for touring, the group agreed to split in early 1968.

But Jimmy Page, left with both the rights to the band's name and a touring commitment yet fulfilled in Europe, was compelled to put a new lineup together to make that commitment. Billed as the New Yardbirds, they made the tour, found themselves clicking together decently enough, and then repaired home to England to produce, in a very short time, a very new album by a somewhat different group, although much of the sound derived from Page's sonic experiments (and a baby brother composition to his earlier "White Summer" called "Black Mountain Side"—not to mention a polished rewrite of "I'm Confused," called "Dazed and Confused") with the last edition of the Yardbirds: Led Zeppelin.

The remaining Yardbirds didn't exactly go gently into that good grey night. Paul Samwell-Smith, who had gone on to fame as Cat Stevens' producer in 1970, helped vocalist Relf and drummer McCarty organise a new group devoted to experimentation between rock, folk, and classical forms—Renaissance.

Keith Relf resurfaced in the late 1970s with a new quartet, Armageddon, a hybrid of hard, thrusting rock and folk that included former Renaissance mate Louis Cenammo. They recorded one promising album before Relf was killed in an electrocution accident in his home. Meanwhile, Jim McCarty, Paul Samwell-Smith (who had remained Cat Stevens' producer to the day Stevens converted to Islam and withdrew from pop music entirely), and Chris Dreja offered a nucleus in the 1980s for a short-enough lived but fun-enough kind of Yardbirds semi-reunion called Box of Frogs, which occasionally included Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page plus various friends with whom they'd all recorded over the years.

The Yardbirds were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. All six living musicians who had been part of the group's heyday—including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page, who had never (contrary to numerous misidentifications over the years) played in the group together (the confusion may have stemmed from a 1971 Epic Records anthology, Yardbirds Featuring Performances By: Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, a set which fell out of print and became a very expensive collectors' item for many years)—appeared at the ceremony. "I suppose," Jeff Beck cracked at the ceremony, "I should say thank you, but they fired me—so fuck 'em!"

In 2003, a new album, Birdland, was released under the Yardbirds name by a lineup including Chris Dreja, Jim McCarty, and new members Gypie Mayo (lead guitar, backing vocals), John Idan (bass, lead vocals) and Alan Glen (harmonica, backing vocals). Jeff Beck reunites with his former bandmates on one track.


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Jeff Beck reunites with his former bandmates on one track. See [6] (http://www.glennsacks.com/in_defense_of_spiderman.htm). In 2003, a new album, Birdland, was released under the Yardbirds name by a lineup including Chris Dreja, Jim McCarty, and new members Gypie Mayo (lead guitar, backing vocals), John Idan (bass, lead vocals) and Alan Glen (harmonica, backing vocals). In the political sphere, David Chick used a spiderman outfit to obtain publicity for fathers' rights. "I suppose," Jeff Beck cracked at the ceremony, "I should say thank you, but they fired me—so fuck 'em!". children dressed up as Spider-Man, making it the year's most popular costume. All six living musicians who had been part of the group's heyday—including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page, who had never (contrary to numerous misidentifications over the years) played in the group together (the confusion may have stemmed from a 1971 Epic Records anthology, Yardbirds Featuring Performances By: Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, a set which fell out of print and became a very expensive collectors' item for many years)—appeared at the ceremony. On Halloween 2004, an estimated 2.15 million U.S.

The Yardbirds were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. It is unlikely that this song is about the comic book character, however. Meanwhile, Jim McCarty, Paul Samwell-Smith (who had remained Cat Stevens' producer to the day Stevens converted to Islam and withdrew from pop music entirely), and Chris Dreja offered a nucleus in the 1980s for a short-enough lived but fun-enough kind of Yardbirds semi-reunion called Box of Frogs, which occasionally included Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page plus various friends with whom they'd all recorded over the years. In addition, the 1994 Veruca Salt album American Thighs has a track entitled Spiderman '79. They recorded one promising album before Relf was killed in an electrocution accident in his home. The theme song to the 1960s cartoon rendition of Spider-Man (called "Spider-Man") has been covered by:. Keith Relf resurfaced in the late 1970s with a new quartet, Armageddon, a hybrid of hard, thrusting rock and folk that included former Renaissance mate Louis Cenammo. Spider-man imitators in real life include :.

Paul Samwell-Smith, who had gone on to fame as Cat Stevens' producer in 1970, helped vocalist Relf and drummer McCarty organise a new group devoted to experimentation between rock, folk, and classical forms—Renaissance. 2005 will see another version of Spider-Man 2, this time for Sony's new handheld, the PlayStation Portable; to debut in the first quarter of the year along with the system. The remaining Yardbirds didn't exactly go gently into that good grey night. Like the movie, it opened to critical and commercial success. Billed as the New Yardbirds, they made the tour, found themselves clicking together decently enough, and then repaired home to England to produce, in a very short time, a very new album by a somewhat different group, although much of the sound derived from Page's sonic experiments (and a baby brother composition to his earlier "White Summer" called "Black Mountain Side"—not to mention a polished rewrite of "I'm Confused," called "Dazed and Confused") with the last edition of the Yardbirds: Led Zeppelin. Most recently, the 2004 video game Spider-Man 2 by Activision was released along with the Spider-Man 2 movie, also for GameCube, Xbox and PlayStation 2, a version was made specifically for PC, plus a handheld versions for both Game Boy Advance and the N-Gage. But Jimmy Page, left with both the rights to the band's name and a touring commitment yet fulfilled in Europe, was compelled to put a new lineup together to make that commitment. In tandem with the 2002 release of Spider-Man the movie, Activision released Spider-Man, the first Spider-Man game for all the major video game console systems, including Nintendo GameCube, Xbox, PlayStation 2 and PC, as well as a portable version for the Game Boy Advance.

Or were they? After the failure of their final album (the badly-produced Little Games) and their reduction to small venues for touring, the group agreed to split in early 1968. Both games were successful. Increasing chart indifference, record company pressure (their British home label pressed hitmaking producer Mickie Most upon them in a failed bid to re-ignite their commercial success), and drug-related problems meant that by 1967 the Yardbirds' days were numbered. The first title also appeared on Sega Dreamcast, N64 and PC. He also proved an adept fingerstyle guitarist, the shimmering "White Summer," an Indian-influence instrumental composition, joining his full-out hard rock grinder, "I'm Confused" as curlicues to the Yardbirds' unexpectedly forthcoming transmutation. Two three-dimensional Spider-Man games (Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro) were developed for the PlayStation by Neversoft, using a similar engine to their Tony Hawk's Pro Skater games (Spider-Man was also a secret character in the second installation of THPS). (Almost the only pronounced examples of what the Beck-Page tandem could have been came on a single, "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago," and their half-crazed version of "The Train Kept A-Rollin'," an even crazier rendition of which turned up in the Antonioni film Blow-Up as "Stroll On".) Page was just as bent toward experimentation as Beck, particularly his striking technique of scraping a violin or cello bow across his guitar strings to induce a round of odd and surreal sounds, and his dextrous use of a wah-wah pedal. Capcom series.

Jimmy Page re-entered the picture here, playing bass until rhythm guitarist Chris Dreja could become comfortable with that instrument, and then teaming with Beck for tantalising twin-guitar attacks that proved short-enough lived: Beck either quit or was fired from the group in mid-1966, and the Yardbirds continued as a quartet for the remainder of their career. Spider-Man has also been featured as a character in several fighting games made by Capcom, beginning with Marvel Super-Heroes and continuing in the Marvel vs. It was prior to the sessions that produced Yardbirds that Paul Samwell-Smith decided to quit the group for touring purposes and move behind the boards to co-produce them with new manager, Simon Napier-Bell. [5] (http://www.spiderfan.org/software/console/1983_parker_brothers/index.html) Subsequently, Spider-Man games were created by Acclaim, Sega, Paragon Software Corporation, LJN, and Activision for various video game consoles over the years. In addition, the Yardbirds began serious experiments with things like adapting Gregorian chant ("Still I'm Sad," "Turn Into Earth," Hot House of Omagarashid," "Farewell," "Ever Since The World Began") and various European folk styles into their blues and rock rooted music, and this gained them a new reputation among the hipster underground even as their commercial appeal had begun already to wane. Spider-Man first appeared in video game form in 1982, in the Parker Brothers game Spider-Man for the Atari 2600. in a bowdlerised version called Over Under Sideways Down), and established him as a top-rank guitarist whose experiments with fuzz tone, feedback, and distortion jolted British rock forward with a bold drop kick. Main article: Spider-Man (games).

Beck's tenure in the group, meanwhile, produced a number of memorable recordings, from single hits like "Heart Full of Soul," "I'm A Man," and "Shapes of Things" to the Yardbirds album (known more popularly as Roger the Engineer, and first issued in the U.S. Spider-Man 2 will be the first motion picture released in the Sony UMD format for the PlayStation Portable, being included for free with the first one million PSP systems released in the United States. The Yardbirds in 1965 and 1966 issued a pair of albums in the U.S., slapped together somewhat haphazardly from their British recordings, For Your Love (which included a delightful early take of "Hang On, Sloopy"—they'd gotten hold of a demo of the song before the McCoys had their chartbusting crack at it a year later, and their patented doubletime "rave up" version is a treat) and Havin' A Rave Up With The Yardbirds, half of which came from Five Live Yardbirds. Spider-Man 2's three-day weekend (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) total failed to beat its predecessor's $114.8 million record, but its six-day $180.1 million total outpaced The Matrix Reloaded's $146.9 million mark. Clapton recommended Jimmy Page, a studio guitarist he had known (and with whom he would soon cut a series of stirring blues guitar duets, including "Tribute to Elmore" and "Draggin' My Tail"), as his replacement, but Page—uncertain at the time about giving up his lucrative studio work—recommended in turn one Jeff Beck, whose fleet-fingered style and bent for experimentation pushed the Yardbirds to the direction from which they became widely credited for opening the door to "psychedelic" rock. The first Spider-Man's opening-day record was set on Friday, a more traditional opening day; Shrek 2's record-breaking day was the Saturday after the Wednesday of its release. The loss could have been devastating to the Yardbirds; Clapton had already shown the striking, stabbingly virtuosic style he would later expand and deepen with Mayall and unfurl as a full-fledged virtuoso statement with the improvisational Cream. Spider-Man 2's opening-day gross was even more impressive for occurring on a Wednesday, usually a weak day of the week for movies.

It also prompted Eric Clapton—at the time a no-holds-barred blues purist—to leave the group and join with John Mayall's Blues Breakers. The only higher single-day movie gross was Shrek 2's $44.8 million in the first weekend of its May 2004 release, and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith's $50 million on the first day of its May 2005 release. The quintet went from there to cut several singles, including "I Wish You Would," but it was "For Your Love," a Graham Gouldman composition that was anything but the blues, which put the band to their highest chart position yet in England—and their first major hit in the United States, when it was released there in 1965. Its first-day gross ($40.5 million) surpassed its predecessor's $39.4 million record. ("Those English kids," Williamson said famously of the Yardbirds and other British blues groups like the Animals and the Stones, "want to play the blues so bad—and they play the blues so bad," though he had a personal affection for the Yardbirds' members and even thought of moving to England permanently, until the illness that resulted in his early 1965 death.). It premiered in more North American movie theaters than any previous movie. The group was well enough reputed that none other than blues legend Sonny Boy Williamson himself invited the group to tour England and Germany with him, a union that survives to this day on a live album memorable for Williamson's trouper-like adaptation of his deep troubador style of blues to the Yardbirds' raw, unpolished rock and roll version. Spider-Man 2 was 2004's third-most financially successful movie and 16th-most financially successful movie of all time.

Under Gomelsky's guidance, the Yardbirds got themselves signed to EMI's Columbia label in early 1964; they set a precedent of a sort when their first album turned out to be a live album, Five Live Yardbirds, recorded at the legendary Marquee Club in London. Adjusted for inflation, it is ranked 34th in North American movie history. And, of critical importance, Crawdaddy Club impresario Giorgio Gomelsky—who had all but discovered the Rolling Stones but thought it beyond his range to become their manager—learned enough from his previous miss to become the Yardbirds' manager and, as it turned out, first producer. Spider-Man went on to become the fifth highest-grossing film in North American history -- not adjusting for inflation -- and is ranked 11th worldwide with a total take of more than $820 million internationally. Between his sleek guitar playing and Keith Relf's improving harmonica style, the group could at least boast two attractive players that made listeners overlook their still-incomplete rhythmic attack. Spider-Man 2 was released on June 30, 2004; Spider-Man 3 will be released on May 4, 2007. They made their first significant lineup addition when singer/harmonica player Keith Relf, rhythm guitarist Chris Dreja, bassist Paul Samwell-Smith, and drummer Jim McCarty, replaced original lead guitarist Anthony (Top) Topham with a very boyish-looking art student named Eric Clapton in late 1963. Clapton already knew what he was doing with his instrument; his solo turns, while far enough from the gripping little gems for which he became famous enough soon enough, already set him apart from most of his peers among the British blues clubbers. box offices, it was the highest-grossing movie of the year, outperforming Star Wars: Attack of the Clones (the first Star Wars movie not to be the biggest box-office hit of the year).

Their inexperience and their less-than-stellar musicianship was obvious but their commitment was just as powerful, as they hammered away at versions of such blues classics as "Smokestack Lightning," "Got Love If You Want It," "Here 'Tis," "Baby What's Wrong," "Good Morning Little School Girl," "Boom Boom," "I Wish You Would," "Done Somebody Wrong," and "Rollin' and Tumblin'.". Earning more than $404 million at U.S. With a repertoire drawn more from the Delta-soaked Chicago blues titans Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson II, and Elmore James than the more commercially-minded Chuck Berry and Jimmy Reed influences of the Rolling Stones, the Yardbirds began to build a following of their own in London before very long. Though the film adaptation took a number of liberties with the character's history and powers, most notably giving him organic web-shooters rather than mechanical, it was essentially true to the character and was widely embraced by the viewing public. Formed originally as the Metropolitan Blues Quartet in 1962–63 in London, the Yardbirds first achieved notice on the burgeoning British blues scene (or "rhythm and blues," as the British music press alluded to it) when they took over as the house band at the Crawdaddy Club in London—succeeding the Rolling Stones. The film featured a number of impressive CGI effects to bring Spider-Man to life. The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock music's most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. It was directed by Sam Raimi and starred actor Tobey Maguire as Peter Parker.

On May 3, 2002, the film Spider-Man was released. Spider-Man has been adapted to television numerous times, through a short-lived live-action television series and several animated cartoon series. These include:. In the comics, others have used the Spider-Man identity.

He also has had a number of series that are since canceled or have been given new names:. Many followed, but currently these are his related titles:. After that he was given his own series. Spider-Man first appeared in Amazing Fantasy #15.

Among the most famous of his friends and acquaintances are:. Spider-Man also has one of the best-known supporting casts in comics. Among the most infamous supervillains he encounters regularly are:. Spider-Man has one of the best-known rogues galleries (list of enemies) in comics.

In addition, the Human Torch once helped Spider-Man build a car called the Spidermobile which had a paint job and modifications that follow his spider motif. Unfortunately, Spider-Man had never learned to drive and he crashed the car into the Hudson river soon after receiving it. He typically uses it not only for a light source, but as a way of unnerving opponents and to call attention. Finally, the belt contains a strong light called a Spider Signal that creates an image of his mask when activated. The camera also has an automatic shutter mechanism linked to an internal motion detector so it will take a picture whenever Spider-Man moves in front of the camera lens.

It also carries his camera, which has an extended rear metal plate that allows him to use his web to position it without interfering with its functions. Spider-Man keeps his regular field equipment in a specially designed utility belt that contains his web fluid cartridges and his tracers. However, he eventually learned that he could tune the tracer signal frequency to his own spider-sense for more convenient use, but the receiver is still used as a back-up and long-range measure. Spider-Man originally used a small receiver device to follow the tracers.

While he originally threw his tracers at a target in the hopes that at least one hits, he later developed a wrist launcher which ejects tracers above the wrist while the web is fired from below to allow for more precise and reliable applications of the tracers. The outer casing is shaped like a spider and is designed to cling to a target without attracting attention. Spider-Man has also developed small electronic "spider-tracers" which allow him to track objects or individuals. For now (until Marvel decides to change this), Spider-Man is able to produce webbing without the aid of his web-shooters.

The transformation, however, seemed to give Spider-Man organic web glands in his wrists. The end of the situation saw the Queen presumably dead and Spider-Man reverting back to human form. During this encounter, the Queen transformed Spider-Man into a human-sized spider. Lately, Spider-Man and Captain America crossed paths with a villain called the Queen.

In some versions of the character (such as the Spider-Man 2099 comic series and the popular Spider-Man movie series), the character generates webs organically from his own altered spider-like biology, instead of mechanical web shooters. The web-shooters can also be used to expel other liquids, using interchangeable cartridges, but are seldom used to do this. In addition, Parker can modify the fluid formulation to suit particular specialized needs when called for (this explains why the webbing sometimes conducts electricity, but can also be used as an insulator). The substance is formulated to dissolve after one hour which is generally sufficient time for Spider-Man's needs while ensuring the webs he makes do not cause undue litter.

However, the default meshed spray generally allows for sufficient strength while being more versatile in its use and easier to remove when desired. In addition, when Spider-Man desires it, he can fire the web fluid as a straight liquid when he needs to use the substance's maximum adhesive strength. He can also form crude objects with a heavy application. He can change the setting to a wide spray to ensnare criminals, and to form protective shields or nets.

Typical uses of his webs include creating long swing lines which he uses to travel through the cavernous chasms between the Manhattan high-rises. The substance dries almost immediately into a strong material that can support very heavy loads: into the one-ton range. The default setting has the adhesive threaded through a special mesh to take on a spider web like design. The trigger rests high in the palm and requires two taps to activate, so Peter can't accidently fire the shooter if he makes a fist or his hand hits the trigger.

They are wrist mounted devices that fire a fibrous adhesive very similar to material spiders use to construct webs. Spider-Man's web-shooters are one of the character's most distinguishing traits. Although he is usually of limited financial means, Spider-Man has developed personal equipment that plays an important role in his superhero career. He did, however, wear a non-living version of the black costume until the new occupant of the living costume, Venom, frightened Mary Jane so badly that she could no longer stand to see Peter in the non-living black costume.

Spider-Man rejected the symbiote after finding out it was alive. The costume turned out to be a living symbiotic creature, capable of generating its own webbing and improving most of Spider-Man's abilities. He appeared in an almost all-black costume, with a large white spider emblem on the chest and back, and with built-in webshooters on the back of his hands. The most significant alteration to Spider-Man's costume came about in the mid-1980s, after his return from the Secret Wars.

The gloves had web-shooters on the outside, and the web design on the boots and gloves was partially replaced with dark blue. Instead of a large red spider on his back, the web pattern and spider emblem were repeated there. He placed more emphasis on the spider on the chest, making it large enough to cover the entire torso. Several alterations occurred when Ben Reilly replaced Peter Parker in the role.

He is sometimes depicted with "under-arm webbing" connecting his arms to his torso. The mask has large white eyes rimmed with black, that allow him to see but hide his eyes. There is a large red spider outline on his back, and a smaller black spider emblem on his chest. From the waist up the fabric is the red-and-black web pattern, except for his back, sides, and insides of his upper arms, which are dark blue.

From the waist down it is dark blue, except for mid-calf boots with a black web pattern on a red background. The standard costume is a form-fitting fabric covering his entire body. Although the details and proportions have changed somewhat over the years, with a few notable exceptions, Spider-Man's costume has remained fairly consistent. Curt Connors, in Spider-Man 2.

He is described as "brilliant but lazy" by one of his physics professors, Dr. In the recent films, he maintains his superb intellect with a mastery of physics and a degree from Columbia University. In the comics, he is an expert in chemistry and physics, but later pursues a graduate degree in biochemistry from Empire State University. Quite apart from his physical abilities, Peter has always been brilliant with prodigious aptitude in the physical sciences.

Spider-Man can jump the width of a city block, or almost five stories straight up. Because of his strength, he can leap to great heights. However, his strength is not as advanced as that of the Thing or the Hulk who have vast superhuman strength. In addition to his other amazing powers, Spider-Man has superhuman strength, and can lift 10 tons or more if he is under great stress or pressure.

The phrase "My spider-sense is tingling" has since become an oft parodied ironic catch phrase in American pop culture. This gives the supervillains an edge that Spider-Man often has trouble countering. Additionally, the alien symbiotes Venom and Carnage are not recognized by the spider-sense. For instance, the Green Goblin once secretly attacked him with a gas that temporarily suppressed this perceptive ability, allowing the supervillain to shadow him and learn his secret identity.

Although his spider-sense has saved his life innumerable times, Spider-Man has learned the hard way that it can be beaten. Extremely skilled martial artists taking Spider-Man on hand to hand often have better luck wounding him, although he is formidable in close quarters as well. When combined with his superhuman reflexes and agility, this makes him an extremely difficult target who is almost impossible to shoot in combat. Spider-Man also uses the spider-sense as a means to time his evasive maneuvers to the point where he can avoid multiple gunshots or machine gun fire.

The spider-sense not only alerts Spider-Man to threats to his physical safety, but it also warns him to threats to his privacy such as being observed while changing identities. On the other hand, if there is an immediate lethal physical danger to Parker such as a sniper is taking aim and about to fire for a kill shot, the spider-sense's tingling would take on an almost painful intensity to indicate a need to take extreme evasive action without hesitation. For instance, if an enemy passes by Spider-Man with no intention of interacting with him, the spider-sense would give a low signal indicating that he should be alert for a possible danger. While it cannot tell him of the exact nature of the threat, Spider-Man can judge the severity of it by the intensity of the tingling.

A form of clairvoyance or sixth sense, it unconsciously activates and alerts him to any threat to himself, manifesting as a tingling at the back of his skull. Spider-Man's most subtle power is his spider-sense. Few characters in the Marvel Universe can match Spider-Man's agility, with some exceptions such as Nightcrawler of the X-Men. His agility is such that he can perform gymnastic feats no Olympic gymnast could dream of duplicating.

His reflexes are instantaneous, allowing him to dodge single bullets provided they are fired at a reasonable distance from a low caliber gun that is not automatic. Spider-Man's agility and reflexes are far beyond a range attainable by human beings. However, the superhero has had trouble keeping his grip on heavily lubricated surfaces. In the live-action movies, Peter is shown to have barbed hairs or bristles, similar to those of real spiders, that extend or retract through his skin.

Another idea is that this ability is similar to static electricity. It has been theorized that his body can consciously attract the basic molecules of a solid object when pressed against it. For instance, if he wanted to catch a ball, all he would really need is one fingertip to make contact. He can also grip any solid object with any part of his body as long as it can accommodate the mass of the object.

Spider-Man also gained the ability to adhere to any smooth surface, allowing to him to support more than his own weight while on a vertical surface or upside down. In addition, his vision also lost its myopia. His recovery time from injury is less than that of an ordinary human, but it is far inferior to that of the X-Man, Wolverine. His bodily tissues are substantially more durable and resistant to impact or trauma than an ordinary human, making it difficult to injure him (although he is not bullet proof).

He has superhuman physical strength, agility, and reflexes. The irradiated spider's bite caused a variety of physiological mutations in Peter Parker's body that mirror the characteristics of a spider. Thanks to Spider-Man's membership in the latest incarnation of the Marvel Universe superhero team the Avengers, he, Mary Jane and Aunt May were able to move into Tony Stark's Avengers Tower. Recently, an altercation with former classmate turned superhuman Charlie Weiderman led to the arson of both his apartment and his aunt May's house.

Currently, Parker works again as a photographer for the Daily Bugle. Later, the stresses of Parker's dual identity, combined with Mary Jane's tempestuous career, the apparent loss of their daughter, May, and capricious editorial mandates led to a separation, but they later reconciled. After a lengthy on-again off-again relationship with semi-criminal Black Cat, Parker eventually wed long-time friend, Mary Jane Watson, an occasional fashion model and actress. He enrolled in the fictional Empire State University where he befriended Harry Osborn, who was in fact the son of his arch-enemy the Green Goblin, and Gwen Stacy, with whom he would have a lengthy romance before she was killed by the original Green Goblin.

He continued working as a freelance photographer for the Daily Bugle and living with his elderly and somewhat fragile Aunt May until he graduated from high school. However, as with many characters spanning a lengthy publishing history and handled by multiple creators, Spider-Man's history is somewhat convoluted. As originally conceived by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Peter Parker was something of an everyman character. Ironically, Parker works as a freelance photographer for Jameson, selling photographs of himself as Spider-Man.

Jonah Jameson, publisher of the daily newspaper the Daily Bugle. He is often considered little more than a lawbreaker himself, thanks largely to a smear campaign by J. Spider-Man consistently tries to do the right thing, but is viewed with suspicion by many authority figures. Realizing that stopping the thug when he had been given the chance would have prevented his uncle's murder, Spider-Man devoted himself to fighting injustice, driven by the realization that "with great power there must also come great responsibility".

One night, after a show, Spider-Man refused to help stop a thief that ran past him in the hallway, insisting that he was only going to look out for "number one." But his beloved Uncle Ben was later killed by the same thug he had allowed to escape. Debuting as a wrestler, Spider-Man quickly hired an agent and began making lucrative television appearances. Upon the discovery of his powers, Parker designed a costume and adopted the identity of Spider-Man in order to win money as an entertainer. In current Spider-Man continuity, he produces his webs from spinnerets in his wrists and no longer requires the mechanical web shooters.

In addition to his physical powers, Spider-Man used mechanical web shooters of his own design to spin webs in a variety of ways. A lesser effect was the improvement of his eyesight. Originally near-sighted and bespectacled, he now has perfect vision. The spider bite gave Parker an array of spider-like powers. When he was 16 years old, Parker attended a science exhibit where he was bitten by a spider which had been irradiated.

He was often the target of jokes by more popular fellow students like Flash Thompson, the high-school's star athlete. The exceptionally bright Peter showed more interest in his studies, especially science, than in any kind of social life. Over time he grew to be a lonely, timid teenager. After his parents' death the infant Peter Parker was left in the care of his Uncle Ben and Aunt May (Richard's older brother Benjamin Parker and his wife May Reilly-Parker), who were both in the Forest Hills neighborhood of Queens, New York City. Though Peter was always loved by the aging couple, he was unpopular among those of his own age.

Albert found out about their plans and arranged a plane-crash that resulted in their deaths. Their last assignment was the infiltration as double-agents of the organization of Albert Malik, who had taken on the name of Red Skull in the absence of the original. (a fictional secret agency). Peter Benjamin Parker was born to Richard Parker and his wife Mary Fitzpatrick-Parker, both of whom were agents of the CIA and later of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Goodman called for a regular series for the character to capitalize on this success. The story was released in issue #15, and months later, the sales figures indicated that the cover story was unexpectedly popular. When Martin Goodman was presented with the concept, he was resistant to the unorthodox ideas of a teenage hero with troubled personal life, but allowed the character to be used as a cover story for a dying anthology title, Amazing Fantasy, since content mattered little for a title slated to be cancelled. Kirby stated in an interview in Will Eisner's Spirit Magazine that Lee had minimal involvement in the creation of the character.

They say that Lee got the original Simon sketches from Kirby and presented them to Ditko, who recognized Simon's work and used it as the basis for Spider-Man (Comic Book Artist/Alter Ego, Winter, 1999). Another version comes from Joe Simon and Steve Ditko, who say that the creation of Spider-Man was based on Simon's Silver Spider (http://www.simoncomics.com/jsmag.htm). Lee turned to artist Steve Ditko, who found the concept particularly appealing and developed a visual motif that Lee found satisfactory. Originally, Lee assigned Jack Kirby to illustrate the story, but after seeing his designs, decided that Jack's style was "too 'larger than life'" for what he wanted.

In the Spider-Man movie DVD extras, 90's cartoon soapbox and Stan Lee's Mutants, Monsters and Marvels, Lee said he was inspired by seeing a fly climb up a wall. One of the influences for the character came from the pulp magazine, The Spider, and perhaps from an earlier minor spider-themed character, the Tarantula from DC Comics. In the 1980s, Stan Lee said that the idea for the series sprang out of the apparent increased teenage interest in the new Marvel comics characters, so he decided to create a character that could cater to them specifically. Various accounts of the character's creation have been given.

The character has grown from shy high school kid to troubled college student to married man, but the core of the character remains the same. Meanwhile, Marvel has published several comic book series featuring the character (most notably Amazing Spider-Man). Through the years, he has appeared in a handful of animated series, a weekly comic strip and, recently, two very successful films. Spider-Man is tremendously popular and is perhaps the most recognizable superhero alongside Superman and Batman.

The character expanded the dramatic potential of the fantasy subgenre by proving that a series with a strong focus on a more human character and his personal struggles was a viable basis for a successful series. Despite these complications, Spider-Man continues to fight crime and help those in need because he believes that "with great power there must come great responsibility", a sentiment that serves as the theme of the Spider-Man story. Spider-Man is the quintessential Marvel character--his gift of superpowers does not solve his emotional and personal problems; if anything, his powers seriously complicate his career and personal relationships. He has since become one of the world's most popular superheroes.

Spider-Man, the alter ego of Peter Benjamin Parker, is a Marvel Comics superhero created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko who first appeared in Amazing Fantasy #15 in 1962. The punk band The Distillers have also recorded their own unique version for the Spider-Man 2 console game. Apollo 440 for the original Spider-Man game created for PlayStation, Sega Dreamcast, N64 and PC by Neversoft. Somewhat unfaithfully by Tenacious D at concerts.

Remixed by Norwegian group Ugress on their 2002 album Resound. The Hyannis Sound on their Aged 10 Years album. Michael Buble for the soundtrack of the 2004 sequel. Aerosmith for the soundtrack of the 2002 feature film.

The Ramones as a hidden track in the vinyl version of their 1994 album Adios Amigos. Moxy Früvous in the 1993 album Bargainville. In May 2003, he was paid approximately $18,000 to climb the 312-foot, Lloyd's of London, to promote the premiere of the movie Spider-Man on the British television channel, Sky Movies. He sometimes wears a Spider-Man suit during his climbs.

Alain Robert nicknamed Spiderman, rock and urban climber who has scaled more than 70 tall buildings using his hands and feet, without using additional devices. "Spider Dan" Goodwin, who in 1981, climbed the glass of the Sears Tower and the John Hancock Center in Chicago using suction cups. Spider-Man was voiced by Neil Patrick Harris. In 2003, another television series adaptation, Spider-Man: The New Animated Series this time using computer animation was produced by Mainframe Entertainment and broadcast on MTV; it featured characters and continuity from the 2002 Spider-Man film, as well as the character Kingpin as depicted in the Daredevil movie.

[4] (http://www.spiderfan.org/shows/tv_unlimited/index.html). Here Spidey was voiced by Rino Romano. In 1999, an animated series named Spider-Man Unlimited was developed for Fox (intended to be an Expanded Universe final season of the 1994 show) in which Spider-Man is transported to an animated Counter-Earth. As a result each of the individual 65 episodes (starting with season 2) were called "chapters." [3] (http://www.spiderfan.org/shows/tv_90s/index.html).

This series had a bigger budget and used a novel system of one large story arc per season developed by John Semper. In 1994, Spider-Man: The Animated Series was made for the Fox Network, (to accompany their X-Men series) with Christopher Daniel Barnes providing the webslinger's voice. This series also featured a number of Marvel guest stars, and shared many of its character designs with the solo Spider-Man show produced just before it. Actor Dan Gilvezan gave voice to this incarnation of the wall-crawler.

Towards this end the cartoon series Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends was created for NBC featuring Spider-Man, Iceman of the X-Men, and a new character, Firestar. The strategy worked, and NBC became interested in having their own Spider-Man cartoon. To garner the attention of the major networks, Marvel first created a new syndicated Spider-Man cartoon that was partially based on the old 60s show. In 1980, with the creation of the animation studio Marvel Productions Ltd., Marvel endeavored to translate more of their comic characters to television.

It also had little-to-nothing to do with the Manga Spider-Man from around the same time. In 1978, a Spider-Man tokusatsu series was produced for Japanese television by Toei Doga (now Toei Animation), but apart from Spider-Man's costume it was not based on the original source. It also suffered from a sporadic broadcast schedule. The CBS Television Network cancelled it, along with Wonder Woman, to avoid being called "the superhero network.". Although the series earned good ratings, fans complained about its low-budget production values and its writing, which neither followed the comics' spirit nor provided adventures that were distinctively appropriate for the character.

In 1977, a short-lived live action television series was produced called The Amazing Spider-Man, starring Nicholas Hammond in the title role. [2] (http://www.spiderfan.org/shows/tv_electric_co/index.html). In addition, in the educational spirit of the series, Spider-Man communicates only in word balloons for the viewer to read. Spider-Man was also an occasional character in the children's educational show The Electric Company which presented brief tales using a combination of animation and live action called the Spidey Super Stories.

[1] (http://www.spiderfan.org/shows/tv_60s/index.html). Spider-Man was voiced by Paul Soles. The series may be best remembered for its theme song. One episode reused complete background animation, characters, and storyline from an episode of Rocket Robin Hood.

Bakshi's episodes, which suffered from extremely low budgets, were stylized and featured dark ominous settings and pervasive background music. In 1968, animator Ralph Bakshi took over. The first starring television adaptation was titled simply, Spider-Man, was produced in 1967 by Grantray-Lawrence Animation, which soon went bankrupt. Oddly to save money, the series feature images reproducing from the comic book by photocopying them.

The first, animated series was titled, Marvel Super-Heros and only featured Spider-Man. Note: with the exception of Ben Reilly, these characters all exist in alternate versions of the Marvel Universe.. Pavitr Prabhakar in the Indian adaptation of Spider-Man, Spider-Man: India. Peter Parquagh in the 1602 miniseries.

Yu Komori (小森ユウ Komori Yū) in Spider-Man: The Manga. Miguel O'Hara, the Spider-Man of Marvel 2099. Spider-Girl, the daughter of Peter Parker, set in an alternate reality. May "Mayday" Parker a.k.a.

Ben Reilly, a clone of Parker, who also fought crime as the Scarlet Spider. Sensational Spider-Man, cancelled with issue #33 in 1998, at the same time Spectacular Spider-Man was cancelled and Amazing Spider-Man and Peter Parker: Spider-Man were relaunched. Untold Tales of Spider-Man, a retcon series intended to enrich Spider-man's early super-hero career, cancelled in 1997. Relaunched with issue #98 (1998) and cancelled with volume 2 #58 in 2002.

Spider-Man, a series created in 1991 specifically for creator Todd McFarlane, later renamed Peter Parker: Spider-Man at the end of the Clone Saga. Web of Spider-Man, created in 1985 and cancelled in 1995 with issue #129 to make way for Sensational Spider-Man. A 2003 relaunch of the title, written primarily by Paul Jenkins, was cancelled at issue #27 (2005). Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, this one was renamed Spectacular Spider-Man in 1988 with issue #134 and cancelled with issue #263 (1998).

The current version of this title features Spider-Man heavily, but not in every issue. Marvel Team-Up, a series that featured Spider-Man paired with another different Marvel Comics super-hero on a monthly basis. Ultimate Spider-Man, currently written by Brian Michael Bendis, set in the Ultimate Marvel Universe. Spider-Man Unlimited, showcasing Spider-Man in stories by new writing talent.

Spider-Girl, currently written by Tom DeFalco, starring the daughter of Spider-Man in the MC2 Universe. Marvel Knights Spider-Man, currently written by Reginald Hudlin. Marvel Adventures Spider-Man, currently written by Sean McKeever, set during Spider-Man's high school years. Michael Straczynski, creator of the television series Babylon 5.

The Amazing Spider-Man, currently written by J. Frederick Foswell. Ned Leeds. Betty Brant.

Ben Reilly. Felicia Hardy. John Jameson. Liz Allan.

Curt Connors. Joseph "Robbie" Robertson. Norman Osborn. Harry Osborn.

Flash Thompson. Gwen Stacy. Uncle Ben. Jonah Jameson.

J. Aunt May. Mary Jane Watson. Kaine.

Shriek. Doppelganger. Spider-Slayers. Toxin.

Carnage. Venom. Hobgoblin. Hydro-Man.

Kingpin. Shocker. Rhino. Scorpion.

Kraven the Hunter. Mysterio. Electro. Lizard.

Sandman. Vulture. Chameleon. Doctor Octopus.

Green Goblin.

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