The 4400

The 4400 is a science fiction program on the USA Network, Space: The Imagination Station and Sky One. It began as a miniseries of five episodes, which aired weekly from July 11 to August 8, 2004; a second season of twelve episodes began airing on June 5, 2005 and concluded on August 28, 2005. Production on thirteen new episodes for a third season has begun for a summer 2006 premiere. It was created and written by Scott Peters and René Echevarria. It stars Joel Gretsch and Jacqueline McKenzie. The theme song of the show is "A Place in Time" written by Robert Phillips & Tim Paruskewitz, performed by Amanda Abizaid. The 4400 is produced by Paramount Network Television in Association with Sky Television for Sky One, Renegade 83 and American Zoetrope for USA Network.

The series is filmed in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

In the pilot episode, what is originally thought to be a comet deposits a group of exactly four thousand, four hundred people in the Seattle, Washington region. All of the 4,400 had disappeared at various points starting from 1941 in a beam of white light. After their return, none have aged, all are disoriented, and they remember nothing between the time of their disappearance and their return.

National Threat Assessment Command

NTAC (National Threat Assessment Command), a division of the Department of Homeland Security, is formed in response to the return of the 4400. There are a multitude of agents assigned to the case. The series mainly follows two of them, as well as their immediate superior:

  • Tom Baldwin: Baldwin's nephew is Shawn Farrell; Shawn was with Baldwin's son Kyle Baldwin during the abduction. Kyle was in a coma for three years, and after being awoken is troubled by blackouts.
  • Diana Skouris: Tom's partner. The eight-year old pre-cog Maia asks to move in with her at some point in season 1. In the first episode of season 2, Diana adopts Maia Rutledge.
  • Dennis Ryland: Baldwin's and Skouris's supervisor and director of the Seattle bureau of NTAC during season one.
  • Ryland is succeeded by Nina Jarvis in season two, but he takes his role back as a guest star on the 11th and 12th (season finale) episodes of season two.

(A real-life NTAC now exists as well; however, it is specifically part of the Secret Service division of the Department of Homeland Security, and the "C" stands for "Center" instead of "Command".)

The Returnees (The 4400)

Most have trouble trying to get their lives back on track after being separated from their world for years. More significantly, a small number of the returnees begin to manifest paranormal abilities, such as telekinesis, telepathy, precognition, and much stranger ones. In addition, one of the 4400 had become pregnant between her disapperance and return.

At the end of the first season, we learn that the 4400 were abducted, not by aliens, but by someone in Earth's future, and that they were returned in order to prevent some sort of catastrophe.

At the end of the second season, it was revealed that all 4400 had a new neurotransmitter called "promicin" in their brains; it was this which gave some of them their powers. The government, afraid of what this large group would do with such power, secretly dosed all 4400 with a promicin inhibitor. (It worked on the majority of the group, but not those who were later seen with powers.) The inhibitor caused a potentially fatal immune system condition in the returnees, forcing the government to inject all surviving returnees with replacement promicin; it is hinted that all of them will now exhibit powers.

The series follows the lives and stories of a select few of the 4400. The main characters are:

  1. Richard Tyler, disappeared May 11, 1951, at age 29, while in South Korea during the Korean War. Originally from St. Louis, MO. At the time, in a relationship with Lily Moore's grandmother, Lily Bonham. Father of Lily Moore's second daughter, Isabelle. Paranormal abilities: apparent telekinesis
  2. Lily Moore, disappeared in 1993, at age 26, from St. Louis, MO. At time of abduction, married to Brian Moore, mother to Heidi Moore. Returned pregnant, but not by Brian, rather by Richard Tyler. Paranormal abilities: None Known.
  3. Shawn Farrell, disappeared April 22, 2001, at age 17, from Highland Beach, WA. Paranormal abilities: Healer and life taker.
  4. Maia Rutledge, disappeared March 3, 1946, at age 8, from Crescent City, CA. Paranormal abilities: precognition.
  5. Jordan Collier, disappeared April 10, 2002, from Seattle, WA area, a former real estate mogul. Paranormal abilities: unknown. Possibly enhanced power of suggestion over other people, but this could just be a personality trait. Also, after being assassinated, he disappears and reappears alive at the very end of the second season finale.
  6. Isabelle Tyler-Moore, born post-return, daughter of Richard Tyler and Lily Moore. Technically not one of "The 4400" returned (she was still in the womb at the time of the count). As the only 4400 not affected by the ability-inhibitor, she provides blood used to heal Shawn Farrell and consequently all 4400s, activating their abilities. At the end of the season finale she ages considerably and shows up in Shawn's office, naked. Paranormal abilities: Telepathic communication (with Lily Moore, Richard Tyler, and Jordan Collier), mind control, materialization projection, alteration (Jordan Collier's injury, Lily Moore's first daughter's spleen) and/or acceleration of biological growth (the growth of berries in one episode and herself in the Season 2 finale), precognition (warned Lily of a bomb before it exploded), telekinesis (the bending trees in the final scene of Season 1). Note that many of these powers duplicate those from among the 4400.

Several other members of the 4400 feature in specific storylines:

  1. Carl Morrisey, disappeared February 16, 2003, from Seattle, WA. A supermarket employee (Deceased). Paranormal abilities: Enhanced reflexes and strength.
  2. Oliver Knox, disappeared August 22, 1983, from Friday Harbor, WA, a suspected serial killer. Captured and imprisoned in soundproof cell. Paranormal abilities: Mind control/suggestion via speech.
  3. Tess Doerner, disappeared April 3, 1955. A mental patient. Paranormal abilities: Ability to compel others to help her build a device, the plans for which have been planted in her head.
  4. Gary Navarro,disappeared January 5, 1973. A baseball player. Paranormal abilities: Is able to hear the thoughts of others.
  5. Trent Appelbaum, disappeared May 18, 1989. A telemarketer. Paranormal abilities: Saliva contains an agent that rapidly accelerates the metabolism of others.
  6. Orson Bailey, disappeared June 11, 1979, from Tacoma, WA. Insurance Salesman and partner in Kensington & Bailey. Paranormal abilities: Telekinesis of a magnitude to cause tremors in immediate vicinity and shatter objects (e.g. glass, bones). The ability does cause Orson to suffer nosebleeds, and he has shown an inability to control this power. He was shot during apprehension, but lived.
  7. Alana Mareva, disappeared September 5, 2001. Artist (and debatably museum director). Paranormal abilities: Ability to create an alternate reality. Given to her by the future so she can develop a relationship with Tom Baldwin to sustain him through the "coming troubles."
  8. Mary Deneville, disappeared August 4, 1999. (Deceased) Paranormal abilities: Could revive dead plants.
  9. Eric Papequash, disappeared August 5, 1955.
  10. Heather Tobey, school teacher, disappeared March 2, 1974. Paranormal abilities: Unlocked artistic potential in certain students in her classes.
  11. Jean DeLynn Baker, disappeared October 27, 1999. (Deceased) Paranormal abilities: sores on hands released plague-like disease (airborne, disappears in about half an hour, goes through biohazard gear).
  12. Edwin Mayuya, aka Edwin Musinga, doctor, disappeared February 24, 1996. Paranormal abilities: Could heal fetuses in utero (but causes progressive damage to self).
  13. Roger Wolcott, disappeared March 6, 1987. (Deceased)
  14. Sara James, disappeared November 5, 1971.
  15. Laurel Bryce, disappeared January 7, 1982.
  16. T.J. Kim, disappeared February 2, 1998. Paranormal abilities: Increases the levels of adrenaline or other hormones (causing elevated levels of rage) in males within a certain radius through sonic means.
  17. Rose Woodard, disappeared December 1,1991
  18. Matthew Lombard, disappeared May 30,1977
  19. Werner Loecher, disappeared April 19,1973
  20. Nate McCullough, disappeared September 8, 2000.

Promicin

The abilities of the 4400 derive from activating dormant neural pathways. Apparently the body produces four main neurotransmitters that control and regulate everything. Every 4400 produces a fifth neurotransmitter called Promicin that enables him or her to use parts of the cerebellum no human has ever had access to. Promicin's behavior and effect are unpredictable, potentially giving any ability.

This plot element uses the "Ten Percent Myth", which modern science has disproven.

The promicin-inhibitor would piggyback on glucose. It entered the brain through facilitated diffusion. It's a binding protein. A serum was created that contained pure promicin. This serum neutralized the charge so the inhibitor isn't able to cross membranes and can be flushed out of the body.

Episode List

Season One

Season Two

Season Three

Production of a third season is scheduled to begin in Vancouver in early 2006, and will be premiering in the summer.

Allusions to Scientology

The 4400 Center run by Jordan Collier seems intended to resemble the real-world Church of Scientology. The 4400 Center promises supernatural abilities to those who follow its training through for-pay courses, much as the Church of Scientology promises, though Scientology is not as forthcoming about its promises of supernatural powers. At least one 4400 Center attendee has had his psychological medication confiscated, much as the Church of Scientology is opposed to psychology and its medications. The 4400 Center includes technological devices strapped onto its members during courses, similar to Scientology's E-Meters. The 4400 Center targets celebrities for inclusion and promotes them through the program faster than non-celebrity members; the Church of Scientology definitely intentionally draws celebrities with its "Celebrity Centers". One former member of the 4400 Center accused it of making him take endless for-pay classes until he was bankrupted, at which point he was ejected from the program; Scientology has had similar accusations pointed at it.

Allusions to Judaeo-Christian Texts

The name of the show itself might be an allusion to the belief held by Jehovah's Witnesses that only 144,000 people will be allowed into heaven. The 4400 people who disappear do so in a rapture like fashion. The show's content has subtle Christian undertones, although not in a way that one would take it to be proselytizing. The baby Isabelle, believed by some to be the future savior of mankind, has no qualms about violently killing people who get in her way. While Isabelle might sometimes seem like a Christ-like figure, she is certainly not. In the same vein, Jordan Collier (note his initials JC), whose intentions and methods are also grey, is killed by a sniper, and after his funeral, his body miraculously disappears. He is then reborn (albeit in a currently unknown fashion).

Trivia

  • Vehicles from DaimlerChrysler's Chrysler Group, such as the Dodge Durango and Chrysler 300, appear frequently in the show being driven by members of NTAC.
  • In Australia and New Zealand the first series was shown as a miniseries of 3 episodes. The second season was aired weekly but taken off air halfway through the season, but continued to air in New Zealand.
  • Early marketing for the series included stencilled graffiti in public places across San Francisco, Houston, and Boston raising ire among residents. [1]

Broadcasters

  • Canada: Space
  • Switzerland: TSR
  • Australia: Network Ten
  • France: M6
  • Germany: ProSieben
  • United Kingdom: Sky One
  • United States: USA Network
  • The Netherlands: Talpa
  • Norway: TV3
  • Brazil: NBC's Universal Channel.
  • Turkey: CNBC-e
  • New Zealand: TV3 (New Zealand)

DVD release


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He is then reborn (albeit in a currently unknown fashion). At least one version of corporate history claims that the twenty-year-old Irving Thalberg rose so quickly because he told subordinates that he alone spoke for Carl Laemmle in making production decisions, while the others were more concerned with battling among themselves. In the same vein, Jordan Collier (note his initials JC), whose intentions and methods are also grey, is killed by a sniper, and after his funeral, his body miraculously disappears. For several years some of these junior partners carried considerable weight within Universal; inevitably factions and rivalries were the rule. While Isabelle might sometimes seem like a Christ-like figure, she is certainly not. Among those early film-production studios (and their proprietors) were:. The baby Isabelle, believed by some to be the future savior of mankind, has no qualms about violently killing people who get in her way. In the early years of Universal, the company absorbed a number of small firms.

The show's content has subtle Christian undertones, although not in a way that one would take it to be proselytizing. Movie Not Listed. The 4400 people who disappear do so in a rapture like fashion. For example, for Waterworld in 1995, the sea level on earth rises, covering the land as the Universal title moves into place. The name of the show itself might be an allusion to the belief held by Jehovah's Witnesses that only 144,000 people will be allowed into heaven. There have been occasional modifications to the logo to match the picture. One former member of the 4400 Center accused it of making him take endless for-pay classes until he was bankrupted, at which point he was ejected from the program; Scientology has had similar accusations pointed at it. Added to this was a dramatic, swelling theme by Jerry Goldsmith.

The 4400 Center targets celebrities for inclusion and promotes them through the program faster than non-celebrity members; the Church of Scientology definitely intentionally draws celebrities with its "Celebrity Centers". This was tweaked a bit in 1997 to add lights on earth and highlights on the rotating letter-wrap. The 4400 Center includes technological devices strapped onto its members during courses, similar to Scientology's E-Meters. Using CGI, the new introduction simulates a satellite-eye view of earth; as the point-of-view pulls back, a classically-styled "UNIVERSAL" moves into place like a belt. At least one 4400 Center attendee has had his psychological medication confiscated, much as the Church of Scientology is opposed to psychology and its medications. To celebrate the company's seventy-fifth anniversary, the logo got a digital makeover in 1990. The 4400 Center promises supernatural abilities to those who follow its training through for-pay courses, much as the Church of Scientology promises, though Scientology is not as forthcoming about its promises of supernatural powers. Added at the bottom of the screen was the sub-head, "AN MCA COMPANY." Earlier on this was used for widescreen where the logo is slower and UNIVERSAL blurs in then A & Pictures are sandwiched on it.

The 4400 Center run by Jordan Collier seems intended to resemble the real-world Church of Scientology. When the "International" portion of the name was dropped in 1963, the logo was updated to a more stylized revolving globe inside a whirling Van Allen Belt, with the name "UNIVERSAL" centered over it. Production of a third season is scheduled to begin in Vancouver in early 2006, and will be premiering in the summer. Following the 1946 merger with International Pictures, a new, more conventional logo was introduced, with a realistic representation of earth shown underneath the new name "Universal-International" in a dignified type font. This serum neutralized the charge so the inhibitor isn't able to cross membranes and can be flushed out of the body. With new management in the mid-1930s came a completely new logo; introduced in 1937, a highly stylized glass globe, surrounded by twinkling stars, rotated to display the name "UNIVERSAL PICTURES." This logo quickly conveyed a message of "new management" while tapping into the modern movement in design. A serum was created that contained pure promicin. At the end of the movie The End is on the globe then it read " It's A UNIVERSAL PICTURE".

It's a binding protein. An updated logo was introduced in 1929, as a biplane circling the globe "wiped" into place the words "A UNIVERSAL PICTURE". It entered the brain through facilitated diffusion. Universal has used an image of planet Earth as their logo since the early 1920s. The promicin-inhibitor would piggyback on glucose. As presently structured, GE owns 80% of NBC Universal, with Vivendi holding the remaining 20%, with an option to sell its share in 2006. This plot element uses the "Ten Percent Myth", which modern science has disproven.. The reorganized "Universal" film conglomerate has enjoyed several financially successful years.

Promicin's behavior and effect are unpredictable, potentially giving any ability. remained the name of the production subsidiary; and while some expressed doubts that regimented, profit-minded GE and high-living Hollywood could coexist, so far the mix seems to be working. Every 4400 produces a fifth neurotransmitter called Promicin that enables him or her to use parts of the cerebellum no human has ever had access to. The resulting media super-conglomerate was re-named NBC Universal, while Universal Studios Inc. Apparently the body produces four main neurotransmitters that control and regulate everything. Subsequently burdened with debt, Vivendi sold its majority share in Universal (including the studio and theme parks) to GE in 2004, parent of NBC. The abilities of the 4400 derive from activating dormant neural pathways. (These same properties would be bought back later at greatly inflated prices.) Seeing a way out, in June 2000, Seagram sold itself to French water-utility and media company Vivendi and the media conglomerate became Vivendi/Universal, while the music-related subsidiaries of MCA were sold to Geffen Music, thus effectively ending the existence of MCA.

Several other members of the 4400 feature in specific storylines:. sold Universal's television holdings (including cable network USA) to Barry Diller. The main characters are:. To raise money, Seagram head Edgar Bronfman, Jr. The series follows the lives and stories of a select few of the 4400. to enter the lucrative videotape sales industry; but the up-and-down profit in Hollywood was no substitute for a secure cash-cow like whiskey. (It worked on the majority of the group, but not those who were later seen with powers.) The inhibitor caused a potentially fatal immune system condition in the returnees, forcing the government to inject all surviving returnees with replacement promicin; it is hinted that all of them will now exhibit powers. Hoping to build a media empire around Universal, Seagram bought Polygram and other entertainment properties, and created MCA/Universal Home Video Inc.

The government, afraid of what this large group would do with such power, secretly dosed all 4400 with a promicin inhibitor. This provided a cash infusion, but the clash of cultures was too great to overcome, and, in frustration, five years later Matsushita sold control MCA/Universal to the Canadian liquor-distributor Seagram. At the end of the second season, it was revealed that all 4400 had a new neurotransmitter called "promicin" in their brains; it was this which gave some of them their powers. At this time, the production subsidiary was renamed Universal Studios Inc. At the end of the first season, we learn that the 4400 were abducted, not by aliens, but by someone in Earth's future, and that they were returned in order to prevent some sort of catastrophe. Anxious to expand its broadcast and cable presence, in 1990 Lew Wasserman, now head of MCA, sought a rich partner, of MCA/Universal to Matsushita Electric, the Japanese electronics manufacturer. In addition, one of the 4400 had become pregnant between her disapperance and return. There would be other film hits like E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial, Back to the Future, and Jurassic Park, but overall the film business was still hit-and-miss.

More significantly, a small number of the returnees begin to manifest paranormal abilities, such as telekinesis, telepathy, precognition, and much stranger ones. Weekly series production was the workhorse of the company. Most have trouble trying to get their lives back on track after being separated from their world for years. Though Universal's film unit did produce occasional hits, among them Airport, The Sting, American Graffiti, and a blockbuster that restored the company's fortunes, Jaws, Universal in the 1970s was primarily a television studio. (A real-life NTAC now exists as well; however, it is specifically part of the Secret Service division of the Department of Homeland Security, and the "C" stands for "Center" instead of "Command".). An innovation of which Universal was especially proud was the creation in this period of the ninety-minute, made-for-television movie. The series mainly follows two of them, as well as their immediate superior:. Television now carried the load, as Revue-MCA dominated the American networks, particularly NBC (which later merged with Universal to form NBC Universal-see below), where for several seasons it provided up to half of all prime time shows.

There are a multitude of agents assigned to the case. But it was too late, since the audience was no longer there, and by 1968, the film-production unit began to downsize. NTAC (National Threat Assessment Command), a division of the Department of Homeland Security, is formed in response to the return of the 4400. And so, with MCA in charge, for a few years in the 1960s Universal became what it had never been: a full-blown, first-class movie studio, with leading actors and directors under contract; offering slick, commercial films; and a studio tour subsidiary (launched in 1964). . As a last gesture before getting out of the talent agency business, virtually every MCA client was signed to a Universal contract. After their return, none have aged, all are disoriented, and they remember nothing between the time of their disappearance and their return. remained a subsidiary only engaged in export/international release of Universal product.

All of the 4,400 had disappeared at various points starting from 1941 in a beam of white light. Universal-International Pictures Inc. In the pilot episode, what is originally thought to be a comet deposits a group of exactly four thousand, four hundred people in the Seattle, Washington region. The actual, long-awaited takeover of Universal Pictures by MCA finally took place in mid-1962, and the production subsidiary reverted in name to Universal Pictures, while the parent company became MCA/Universal Pictures Inc. The series is filmed in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The studio lot was upgraded and modernized, while MCA clients like Doris Day, Lana Turner, and Cary Grant were signed to Universal Pictures contracts. The 4400 is produced by Paramount Network Television in Association with Sky Television for Sky One, Renegade 83 and American Zoetrope for USA Network. Although MCA owned the studio lot, but not Universal Pictures, it was increasingly influential on Universal's product.

The theme song of the show is "A Place in Time" written by Robert Phillips & Tim Paruskewitz, performed by Amanda Abizaid. After a period of complete shutdown, a moribund Universal agreed to sell its (by now) 360-acre (1.5 km²) studio lot to MCA in 1958, for $11 million. It stars Joel Gretsch and Jacqueline McKenzie. Talent agent MCA had also become a powerful television producer, renting space at Republic Studios for its Revue Productions subsidiary. It was created and written by Scott Peters and René Echevarria. The combination of the studio/theater-chain break-up and the rise of television saw the mass audience drift away, probably forever. Production on thirteen new episodes for a third season has begun for a summer 2006 premiere. By the late 1950s, the motion picture business was in trouble.

It began as a miniseries of five episodes, which aired weekly from July 11 to August 8, 2004; a second season of twelve episodes began airing on June 5, 2005 and concluded on August 28, 2005. This kind of arrangement would become the rule for many future productions at Universal, and eventually at other studios as well. The 4400 is a science fiction program on the USA Network, Space: The Imagination Station and Sky One. When one of those films, Winchester '73 proved to be a hit, Stewart became a rich man. New Zealand: TV3 (New Zealand). Wasserman's deal gave Stewart a share in the profits of three pictures in lieu of a large salary. Turkey: CNBC-e. Leading actors were increasingly free to work where and when they chose, and in 1950 MCA agent Lew Wasserman made a deal with Universal for his client James Stewart that would change the rules of the business.

Brazil: NBC's Universal Channel. case. Norway: TV3. Paramount Pictures, et al. The Netherlands: Talpa. vs. United States: USA Network. Though Decca would continue to keep picture-budgets lean, they were favored by changing circumstances in the film business, as other studios let their contract-actors go in the wake of the 1948 U.S.

United Kingdom: Sky One. At this point Rank lost interest and sold his shares to the investor Milton Rackmil, whose Decca Records would take full control of Universal in 1952. Germany: ProSieben. By the late 1940s, Goetz was out, and the studio reverted once more to the low-budget fare it knew best. France: M6. While there were to be a few hits like The Egg & I, The Killers, and Naked City, the studio still struggled. Australia: Network Ten. William Goetz, a founder of International, was made head of production at the re-named (as Universal-International Pictures Inc.) production arm of the Universal Pictures complex (distribution and copyright control remained under the name of Universal Pictures Company Inc.; Universal-International Pictures additionally served Universal as an import-export subsidiary, and copyright holder for the production arm's films), and he set out an ambitious schedule.

Switzerland: TSR. While trying to improve the quality of the studio's output, he instigated a merger in 1946 with a struggling American independent production company, International Pictures. Canada: Space. Arthur Rank bought a one-fourth interest in Universal in 1945. [1]. After the War, looking to expand his American presence, the British entrepreneur J. Early marketing for the series included stencilled graffiti in public places across San Francisco, Houston, and Boston raising ire among residents. During the war years Universal did have a co-production arrangement with producer Walter Wanger and his partner, director Fritz Lang, but their pictures were a small bit of quality in a schedule dominated by the likes of Cobra Woman and Frontier Gal.

The second season was aired weekly but taken off air halfway through the season, but continued to air in New Zealand. Fields, and Marlene Dietrich. In Australia and New Zealand the first series was shown as a miniseries of 3 episodes. Low and medium budget fare dominated through the years of World War II, when the studio's most popular stars were the many cast-off Paramount players like Mae West, W.C. Vehicles from DaimlerChrysler's Chrysler Group, such as the Dodge Durango and Chrysler 300, appear frequently in the show being driven by members of NTAC. Only the films of young singer Deanna Durbin were given reasonably high budgets, under the control of Joe Pasternak upon his emigration from Europe; if any one star can be said to have kept Universal in business during the early 1940s, it was Durbin, despite her often being woefully miscast as a young teenager when she was, clearly, a fully adult woman. Nate McCullough, disappeared September 8, 2000. By the start of World War II, the company was concentrating on small-budget production of the fare that had once been Universal's sidelines: westerns, melodramas, serials and sequels to the studio's horror classics.

Werner Loecher, disappeared April 19,1973. Gone were the big ambitions, and though Universal had few big names under contract, those it had been cultivating, like William Wyler and Margaret Sullavan, now left. Matthew Lombard, disappeared May 30,1977. The Laemmles were unceremoniously removed from all association with the company, and the new owners instituted severe cuts in production budgets. Rose Woodard, disappeared December 1,1991. When production dragged on, a cash-strapped studio could not repay the loan, and the bank foreclosed, claiming the pledged collateral, the Laemmle family's stock in (and therefore control of) Universal Pictures Company Inc. Paranormal abilities: Increases the levels of adrenaline or other hormones (causing elevated levels of rage) in males within a certain radius through sonic means. Throughout its twenty-plus years' existence, Universal had never borrowed money; to complete production on "Show Boat" the studio turned to the Standard Chartered Bank for a $750,000 production loan.

Kim, disappeared February 2, 1998. His intentions to upgrade production resulted in, in 1935, a lavish, all-star remake of Show Boat. This would prove to be a costly production for the studio, and for the Laemmle family. T.J. held fast to distribution, studio and production operations. Laurel Bryce, disappeared January 7, 1982. The theater chain was scrapped, but Laemmle Jr. Sara James, disappeared November 5, 1971. Taking on the task of modernizing and upgrading a film conglomerate in the depths of the depression was risky, and for a time Universal slipped into receivership.

(Deceased). Other Laemmle productions of this period include Imitation of Life and My Man Godfrey. Roger Wolcott, disappeared March 6, 1987. also created a successful niche for the studio, beginning a long-running series of horror classics, among them Frankenstein, Dracula, and The Mummy. Paranormal abilities: Could heal fetuses in utero (but causes progressive damage to self). Laemmle, Jr. Edwin Mayuya, aka Edwin Musinga, doctor, disappeared February 24, 1996. His early efforts included the 1929 version of Show Boat, the first color musical; King of Jazz; and All Quiet on the Western Front, winner of the "Best Picture" award for 1930.

(Deceased) Paranormal abilities: sores on hands released plague-like disease (airborne, disappears in about half an hour, goes through biohazard gear). saw what his father could not, and acted at once to bring Universal up to date, by buying and building theaters, converting the studio to sound production, and upgrading the quality of production. Jean DeLynn Baker, disappeared October 27, 1999. To his credit, Laemmle, Jr. Paranormal abilities: Unlocked artistic potential in certain students in her classes. benefitted from one of the greatest acts of nepotism in Hollywood history when his father handed him the keys to — and control of — Universal City as a twenty-first birthday gift in 1928. Heather Tobey, school teacher, disappeared March 2, 1974. Carl Laemmle, Jr.

Eric Papequash, disappeared August 5, 1955. Nazi persecution and a change in ownership for the parent Universal Pictures organization resulted in the dissolution of this subsidiary. (Deceased) Paranormal abilities: Could revive dead plants. In the USA, Universal Pictures did not distribute any of this subsidiary's films, but at least some of them were exhibited through other, independent, foreign-language film distributors based in New York, without benefit of English subtitles. Mary Deneville, disappeared August 4, 1999. With the advent of sound, these productions were made in the German language or, occasionally, Hungarian or Polish. Given to her by the future so she can develop a relationship with Tom Baldwin to sustain him through the "coming troubles.". This unit produced 3-4 films per year until 1936, migrating to Hungary and then Austria in the face of Hitler's increasing domination of central Europe.

Paranormal abilities: Ability to create an alternate reality. In 1926, Universal also opened a production unit in Germany, Deutsche Universal-Film AG, under production direction of Joe Pasternak. Artist (and debatably museum director). Mayer company. Alana Mareva, disappeared September 5, 2001. For a few years in the early twenties the young producer Irving Thalberg tried to improve the quality of Universal's output, but he left in 1923 for a better opportunity with the Louis B. He was shot during apprehension, but lived. Content with a market in small towns, its product was primarily melodramas, cheap westerns, and serials.

The ability does cause Orson to suffer nosebleeds, and he has shown an inability to control this power. By the early 1920s, as the other studios soared, Universal was decidedly in the second rank. glass, bones). He also financed all of his own films, refusing to take on debt. Paranormal abilities: Telekinesis of a magnitude to cause tremors in immediate vicinity and shatter objects (e.g. Unlike rivals Adolph Zukor, William Fox and Marcus Loew, Laemmle chose not to develop a theater chain. Insurance Salesman and partner in Kensington & Bailey. Despite Laemmle's role as an innovator, as a studio head he was extremely cautious, and within a few years the rapidly expanding film business had passed him by.

Orson Bailey, disappeared June 11, 1979, from Tacoma, WA. Studio management now became the third facet of Universal's operations, with the studio incorporated as a distinct subsidiary organization. Paranormal abilities: Saliva contains an agent that rapidly accelerates the metabolism of others. Following the westward trend of the industry, in 1915, Laemmle opened the world's largest motion-picture production facility, Universal City Studios, on a 230-acre (0.9 km²) converted farm just over the Cahuenga Pass from Hollywood. A telemarketer. By naming the stars of films, he was able to attract many of the leading players of the time, and created the star-system which helps sell films today. Trent Appelbaum, disappeared May 18, 1989. Though dodging the Edison trust, the new Universal company was an immediate success, in part because Laemmle broke with Edison's custom of refusing credit to actors.

Paranormal abilities: Is able to hear the thoughts of others. Film production and distribution were the Universal company's activities. A baseball player. Eventually all would be bought out by Laemmle. Gary Navarro,disappeared January 5, 1973. While Laemmle was the primary figure in Universal, by absorbing several smaller firms he acquired a number of partners, among them Mark Dintinfass, Charles Baumann and Adam Kessel, and Pat Powers. Paranormal abilities: Ability to compel others to help her build a device, the plans for which have been planted in her head. That company quickly evolved into the "Independent Moving Picture Company", or IMP; and a further reorganization in 1911 saw IMP reincorporate as the "Universal Film Manufacturing Co.," on June 8, 1912, introducing the word "universal" into the organization's name.

A mental patient. Soon Laemmle and other disgruntled nickelodeon owners saw that a way to avoid paying Edison was to produce their own pictures, and in June 1909, Laemmle and partners started the Yankee Film Company. Tess Doerner, disappeared April 3, 1955. Using Edison's patent on the electric motor used in cameras and projectors, the trust collected fees on all aspects of movie production and exhibition, and also held a monopoly on distribution. Paranormal abilities: Mind control/suggestion via speech. For Laemmle and other such entrepreneurs, the creation in 1908 of the Edison-backed Motion Picture Trust meant that exhibitors were expected to pay fees for any trust-produced film they showed. Captured and imprisoned in soundproof cell. Within weeks of his Chicago trip, he gave up dry-goods to buy the first of several nickelodeons.

Oliver Knox, disappeared August 22, 1983, from Friday Harbor, WA, a suspected serial killer. One story has Laemmle watching a box office for hours, counting patrons and calculating the take for the day. Paranormal abilities: Enhanced reflexes and strength. On a 1905 buying trip to Chicago, he was struck by the popularity of nickelodeons. A supermarket employee (Deceased). Carl Laemmle partnered with Abe Stern and Julius Stern to create Universal Pictures. Carl Morrisey, disappeared February 16, 2003, from Seattle, WA. The founder of Universal, Carl Laemmle, was an German Jewish immigrant who had settled in Wisconsin, where he managed a clothing store.

Note that many of these powers duplicate those from among the 4400. The longest-lived Hollywood film production company, Universal Pictures can trace its origins back to the creation in 1909 of a predecessor, the Yankee Film Company. Paranormal abilities: Telepathic communication (with Lily Moore, Richard Tyler, and Jordan Collier), mind control, materialization projection, alteration (Jordan Collier's injury, Lily Moore's first daughter's spleen) and/or acceleration of biological growth (the growth of berries in one episode and herself in the Season 2 finale), precognition (warned Lily of a bomb before it exploded), telekinesis (the bending trees in the final scene of Season 1). . At the end of the season finale she ages considerably and shows up in Shawn's office, naked. Distribution and other corporate, administrative offices are based in New York City. As the only 4400 not affected by the ability-inhibitor, she provides blood used to heal Shawn Farrell and consequently all 4400s, activating their abilities. Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal, has production studios and offices located at 100 Universal City Plaza Drive in Universal City, California, an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County between Los Angeles and Burbank.

Technically not one of "The 4400" returned (she was still in the womb at the time of the count). Los Angeles Library Photo Collection "Nestor Studios" . Isabelle Tyler-Moore, born post-return, daughter of Richard Tyler and Lily Moore. Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills - map Providencial and Water Development. Also, after being assassinated, he disappears and reappears alive at the very end of the second season finale. Los Angeles Library Photo Collection "Bird-Eye View of Universal City" 1911. Possibly enhanced power of suggestion over other people, but this could just be a personality trait. Putnam's Sons, 1931, illustrated.

Paranormal abilities: unknown. G.P. Jordan Collier, disappeared April 10, 2002, from Seattle, WA area, a former real estate mogul. The Life and Adventures of Carl Laemmle. Paranormal abilities: precognition. Drinkwater, John. Maia Rutledge, disappeared March 3, 1946, at age 8, from Crescent City, CA. New York: Vintage, 1994.

Paranormal abilities: Healer and life taker. Movie-Made America. Shawn Farrell, disappeared April 22, 2001, at age 17, from Highland Beach, WA. Skalr, Robert. Paranormal abilities: None Known. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998. Returned pregnant, but not by Brian, rather by Richard Tyler. When Hollywood Had a King.

At time of abduction, married to Brian Moore, mother to Heidi Moore. Bruck, Connie. Louis, MO. New York: Crown Publishers, 1998. Lily Moore, disappeared in 1993, at age 26, from St. The Last Mogul: Lew Wasserman, MCA and the Hidden History of Hollywood. Paranormal abilities: apparent telekinesis. McDougal, Dennis.

Father of Lily Moore's second daughter, Isabelle. New York: Fireside, 1989. At the time, in a relationship with Lily Moore's grandmother, Lily Bonham. The Hollywood Studios. Louis, MO. Mordden, Ethan. Originally from St. New York: Pantheon Books, 1989.

Richard Tyler, disappeared May 11, 1951, at age 29, while in South Korea during the Korean War. The Genius of the System. Ryland is succeeded by Nina Jarvis in season two, but he takes his role back as a guest star on the 11th and 12th (season finale) episodes of season two. Schatz, Thomas. Dennis Ryland: Baldwin's and Skouris's supervisor and director of the Seattle bureau of NTAC during season one. Rex Motion Picture Co., William Swanson. In the first episode of season 2, Diana adopts Maia Rutledge. Powers Motion Picture Co., Pat Powers, president.

The eight-year old pre-cog Maia asks to move in with her at some point in season 1. The New York Motion Picture Company, Charles Baumann and Adam Kessel, proprietors. Diana Skouris: Tom's partner. Nestor Motion Picture Company, David Horsley. Kyle was in a coma for three years, and after being awoken is troubled by blackouts. Champion Motion Picture Co., Mark Dintinfass, president. Tom Baldwin: Baldwin's nephew is Shawn Farrell; Shawn was with Baldwin's son Kyle Baldwin during the abduction. Miami Vice (2006).

Nanny McPhee (2006). Curious George (2006). Two for the Money (2005). The Skeleton Key (2005).

Serenity (2005). The Producers (2005). Prime (2005). The Perfect Man (2005).

Munich (2005). King Kong (2005). Kicking & Screaming (2005). Jarhead (2005).

Cinderella Man (2005). The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005). Van Helsing (2004). Ray (2004, distribution).

Meet the Fockers (2004). In Good Company (2004). Friday Night Lights (2004). The Chronicles of Riddick (2004).

Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004). The Bourne Supremacy (2004). Seabiscuit (2003). The Rundown (2003).

Peter Pan (2003). Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003). Love Actually (2003). Hulk (2003).

Honey (2003). The Cat in the Hat (2003). Bruce Almighty (2003). American Wedding (2003).

2 Fast 2 Furious (2003). 8 Mile (2002). The Bourne Identity (2002). Jurassic Park III (2001).

American Pie 2 (2001). The Mummy Returns (2001). A Beautiful Mind (2001, distribution). Erin Brockovich (2000, distribution).

End of Days (1999). American Pie (1999). The Mummy (1999). The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997).

Daylight (1996). Casino (Film) (1995). Balto (1995). Apollo 13 (1995).

Junior (1994). We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story (1993, distribution). Schindler's List (1993). Jurassic Park (1993).

Carlitos Way (1993). Scent of a Woman (1992). Child's Play 3 (1991). Kindergarten Cop (1990).

Child's Play 2 (1990). Back to the Future Part III (1990). An American Tail: Fievel Goes West (1990). Back to the Future Part II (1989).

The Land Before Time (1988 plus sequels). Jaws: The Revenge (1987). An American Tail (1986). The Breakfast Club (1985).

Back to the Future (1985). Sixteen Candles (1984). Scarface (1983). Jaws 3-D (1983).

The Thing (1982). Sophie's Choice (1982). Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982). the Extra-Terrestrial (1982).

E.T. Conan the Barbarian (1982). On Golden Pond (1981). The Blues Brothers (1980 plus sequel 2000).

National Lampoon's Animal House (1978). Jaws 2 (1978). The Deer Hunter (1978). Slap Shot (1977).

Jaws (1975). The Sting (1973). American Graffiti (1973). Silent Running (1971).

The Andromeda Strain (1971). Airport (1970) and its sequels (released 1974, 1977 and 1979). Marnie (1964). The Birds (1963).

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). That Touch of Mink (1962, distribution). Lover Come Back (1961, distribution). Spartacus (1960).

Pillow Talk (1959). Written on the Wind (1956). Magnificent Obsession (1954). Winchester '73 (1950).

Hamlet (1948). Naked City (1947). The Killers (1946). The Egg & I (1946).

The Bank Dick (1940). My Little Chickadee (1939). One Hundred Men and a Girl (1937). Three Smart Girls (1936).

My Man Godfrey (1936). Show Boat (1936). Magnificent Obsession (1935). The Bride of Frankenstein (1935).

Imitation of Life (1934). The Invisible Man (1933). Counsellor at Law (1933). Back Street (1932).

Frankenstein (1931). Dracula (1931). The King of Jazz (1930). All Quiet on the Western Front (1930).

Show Boat (1929). The Phantom of the Opera (1925). The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923). Foolish Wives (1921).

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