Tacoma, Washington

Tacoma, with Mount Rainier in background
Nickname: "The City of Destiny"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.cityoftacoma.org/
Location


Location of Tacoma in
Pierce County and Washington State

Government
County Pierce
Mayor Bill Baarsma (NP)
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 162.2 km²
Land 129.7 km²
Water 32.5 km²
Population
Total (2005) 196,957 (city proper)
Metro area {{{population_metro}}}
Density 1518.6/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude 47°14'29" N
Longitude 122°27'34" W
Coordinates {{{latd}}}°{{{latm}}}′0″ {{{latNS}}}
{{{longd}}}°{{{longm}}}′0″ {{{longEW}}}
Elevation m
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)

Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is the county seat of Pierce CountyGR6, Washington, USA, situated on Puget Sound's Commencement Bay, Tacoma Narrows, and the estuary of the Puyallup River. The 2000 census reported Tacoma's population as 193,556; the city's population on Apr. 1, 2004, was estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau to be 196,800, and a metropolitan area of 750,000 (Trends, No. D3 [Sept. 2004]).

Tacoma is the home of such international companies as Labor Ready, Inc. and the Russell Investment Group, as well as institutions of higher learning, including Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, and the University of Washington's Tacoma campus. Tacoma is a major international deep-water container port.

The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. It includes a functional glassblowing studio. Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003).

One of the largest urban parks in the U.S, Point Defiance Park, which includes the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Fort Nisqually, is located in Tacoma. Another park in Tacoma is Titlow Beach, which is a popular scuba diving area. Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts. It contains Wright Park Arboretum.

Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for its malodorousness, called the "Aroma of Tacoma" -- a distinctive, acrid odor produced by local paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. In the late 1990s, however, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%, largely eliminating the problem, but a strong smell is occasionally still detectable.

A number of noteworthy individuals have come from Tacoma, among them bowling legend Earl Anthony, singer Bing Crosby, authors Richard Brautigan and Frank Herbert, cartoonist Gary Larson, serial killer Ted Bundy, serial sniper John Allen Muhammad, actress Dyan Cannon, conspiracy gadfly Fred Crisman, Andrew and Thea Foss, first owners and operators of Foss Launch and Tug Company, Puyallup Indian rights activist Robert Satiacum, auto racer Pat Austin, prize fighter Sugar Ray Seales, NFL receiver Ahmad Rashad, Major League baseball player Ron Cey, glass artist Dale Chihuly, and musicians the Wailers, Jerry Miller (Moby Grape), Jerry Cantrell and Neko Case. Chef-author Jeff Smith learned to cook and began his career in Tacoma at the Chaplain's Pantry, later known as the Gourmet Pantry (now closed), on Tacoma Avenue.

History

The SR-509 Bridge leading into downtown.

Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by Native American people, predominantly the Puyallup people. It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks.

The town was originally settled by pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad. (A replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site.)

Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. Its early hopes to live to be the "City of Destiny" were frustrated in the late 19th century, when the discovery of gold in the Klondike turned Seattle into a boom town, eclipsing Tacoma's early lead.

George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish point.

What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city. To quote from the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project: On the morning of Nov. 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview, and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground."

Downtown looking west from the Tacoma Sheraton

Tacoma was named after Mount Rainier, whose original name was Tahoma, which derived from the Puyallup tacobet, or "mother of waters."

On April 26, 2003 Tacoma's Chief of Police, David Brame, shot and killed his wife and himself in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Utilities

Electrical power is furnished by Tacoma Power, a division of Tacoma Public Utilities, which owns hydroelectric plants on the North Fork of the Skokomish River. Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a cable television and internet service, one of the first public utilities to provide such a service. Tacoma Power is, along with Tacoma Water and Tacoma Rail, a part of Tacoma Public Utilities.

In addition, Comcast also offers digital cable and internet services in the area.

Geography

Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 162.2 km² (62.6 mi²). 129.7 km² (50.1 mi²) of it is land and 32.5 km² (12.5 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 20.01% water.

Education

Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. The school district contains 36 elementary schools and 11 middle schools. The district also has 5 high schools, one alternative high school, and one School of the Arts. One of the district's high schools, Henry Foss High School, operates an acclaimed International Baccalaureate program. Also, one of the elementary schools, Sheridan Elementary, operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese).

Newspapers

The city's only daily newspaper is The News Tribune, since 1986 a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers. The paper's circulation is about 128,000 (Sundays 144,000), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883; in the period from 1907 to 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune.

Demographics

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. Four years later, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. D3 [Sept. 2004]).

In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.08% White, 11.24% African American, 1.96% Native American, 7.57% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 2.94% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. 6.85% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10.

In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Transportation and urban form

Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to Pacific Avenue and 6th Avenue, both beginning in Downtown Tacoma. Numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with 6th Avenue or Division Street. North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to 6th Avenue. This can lead to confusion, as Union Avenue intersects both North and South 11th Streets. Many first-time visitors have encountered difficulty with this. Most streets east of Pacific Avenue are labeled "East." This system of numbering extends beyond city limits to much of the western portion of Pierce County.

In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace.

The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5. I-5 links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies about 22 miles to the north in the city of SeaTac.

Public Transport

Light Rail in Tacoma

Tacoma has a wide array of alternative transportation services available including busses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on busses powered by natural gas and diesel. Bus service operates at 15 or 30 minute frequencies on weekdays. Several primary routes of note are:


Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service during the week. Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 1.6-mile electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. This line is presently under consideration for extension. Tacoma is also served by Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, providing ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. Tacoma also has Greyhound and Amtrak service, accessible via Tacoma Dome Station.

Sports

Tacoma, in addition to the professional sports teams of Seattle, has one minor league baseball franchise, the Tacoma Rainiers, a Triple-A team playing in the Pacific Coast League as a farm team of the Seattle Mariners. The Rainiers play inside Cheney Stadium, named after local businessman and baseball enthusiast Ben Cheney.

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise, having lost the Tacoma Rockets of the WHL to relocation and having the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League go defunct due to financial woes. The Tacoma Dome does still host traveling sports and pseudo-sports events such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was gutted and renovated into Key Arena, the team's current home.

Tacoma in pop culture

Museum_of_Glass

Neko Case's song "Thrice All American", featured on her album Furnace Room Lullaby, is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. The album also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way."

Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma."

Tacoma is also prominently mentioned in the 1977 Steve Miller Band song "Rock 'N Me" (I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A.).

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington."

Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the flatiron building downtown. Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. Other films featuring a Tacoma location include Get Carter (2000). In addition, significant parts of The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) were shot in a North Tacoma home. The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. Sources: ([[2]]) ([[3]]) ([[4]]}

Toyota has named a popular line of pickup trucks the "Toyota Tacoma" after the city.

Tacoma is mentioned in the Sir Mix-a-Lot song "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned (Sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn").

Tacoma is also mentioned at the end of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song "Jump On It" ("Tacoma, jump on it...")

Tacoma is mentioned in the song "He's a Grungewhore" from the norwegian punk rock band Turbonegros 1994 album Never Is Forever. [5]

Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine. [6]

Neighborhoods

Downtown Tacoma

Sister cities

Tacoma has ten sister cities: Ålesund (Norway), Davao (Philippines), Fuzhou (China), George (South Africa), Qiryat Motzkin (Israel), Kitakyushu (Japan), Gunsan (South Korea), Cienfuegos (Cuba), Vladivostok (Russia), and Taichung City (Taiwan).


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Tacoma has ten sister cities: Ålesund (Norway), Davao (Philippines), Fuzhou (China), George (South Africa), Qiryat Motzkin (Israel), Kitakyushu (Japan), Gunsan (South Korea), Cienfuegos (Cuba), Vladivostok (Russia), and Taichung City (Taiwan). The movie stars the following actors (listed in (Disney) English version/(Streamline) English version/Japanese version format):. [6]. Kusakabe's hospital room, carved with the inscription "To Mommy," as the girls and the Totoros watch from a nearby tree, happy that mother seems to be feeling better. Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine. Kusakabe discover Mei's ear of corn on the windowsill of Mrs. [5]. In the movie's final scene, Professor and Mrs.

Tacoma is mentioned in the song "He's a Grungewhore" from the norwegian punk rock band Turbonegros 1994 album Never Is Forever. When the cat bus finally leaves them it fades into the evening shadows, in the manner of Lewis Carroll's Cheshire cat. Tacoma is also mentioned at the end of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song "Jump On It" ("Tacoma, jump on it..."). The movie features the Catbus, a grinning feline bus summoned by Totoro which rescues Mei and whisks her and Satsuki over the countryside to see their mother in hospital. Tacoma is mentioned in the Sir Mix-a-Lot song "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned (Sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn"). He is delighted to be of assistance, and with his help Mei is quickly found. Toyota has named a popular line of pickup trucks the "Toyota Tacoma" after the city. Satsuki finally seeks Totoro's help.

Sources: ([[2]]) ([[3]]) ([[4]]}. Satsuki and the villagers get a major scare when a girl's sandal is found in a pond and they begin to fear that Mei has drowned, but Satsuki confirms that the sandal is not Mei's. The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. Then, Mei gets lost while trying to bring an ear of healthy corn to her mother at the hospital, and a frantic Satsuki runs everywhere searching for her. In addition, significant parts of The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) were shot in a North Tacoma home. Satsuki understands why the visit was cancelled, but Mei does not, and a frustrated Satsuki yells at Mei and the girls end up not speaking to each other for several hours. Other films featuring a Tacoma location include Get Carter (2000). Later, Mei and Satsuki are disappointed to learn that their mother's planned homecoming visit that upcoming weekend has been postponed because mother's condition has worsened.

Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. This begins a series of encounters as the spirits allow the children to partake in their nightly activities. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the flatiron building downtown. When Satsuki gives him her umbrella, he's delighted at both the shelter and the sounds it makes as water hits it. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. One rainy night, while the girls are waiting for their father's bus which is running late, they encounter the giant Totoro who is looking rather forlorn with only a leaf for protection against the rain. Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. Mei is enchanted with them and determined to find the King of the Forest.

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington.". Not everyone can see the spirits of the forest, only the pure of heart. Tacoma is also prominently mentioned in the 1977 Steve Miller Band song "Rock 'N Me" (I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A.). Her father tells her that this is the "King of the Forest". Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma.". Mei names it Totoro. The album also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way.". Mei discovers a small Totoro, which leads her to find a large forest spirit living in a hollow under a Camphor Laurel by a small jinja.

Neko Case's song "Thrice All American", featured on her album Furnace Room Lullaby, is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. His daughters discover "soot sprites", which their father rationalizes as makkurokurosuke — an optical illusion seen when moving from light to dark places (glossed as dust bunnies in the 1993 English dub; in the Disney version they are called "Soot Gremlins".). For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was gutted and renovated into Key Arena, the team's current home. A university professor from the city and his two daughters move into an old house near a forest, while his wife recovers from tuberculosis in a nearby convalescence home. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. It is set during a summer of the 1950s. The Tacoma Dome does still host traveling sports and pseudo-sports events such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. The movie is a slow-moving yet fascinating portrayal of Japanese rural life.

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise, having lost the Tacoma Rockets of the WHL to relocation and having the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League go defunct due to financial woes. . The Rainiers play inside Cheney Stadium, named after local businessman and baseball enthusiast Ben Cheney. The DVD release will be the first version of the film in the United States to include both Japanese and English language tracks, as Fox did not have the rights to the Japanese audio track for their version. Tacoma, in addition to the professional sports teams of Seattle, has one minor league baseball franchise, the Tacoma Rainiers, a Triple-A team playing in the Pacific Coast League as a farm team of the Seattle Mariners. It features a new dub cast. Tacoma also has Greyhound and Amtrak service, accessible via Tacoma Dome Station. The film will be re-released by Disney on March 7, 2006.

Tacoma is also served by Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, providing ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. An ani-manga version of My Neighbor Totoro was published in English by Viz Communications starting on November 10, 2004. This line is presently under consideration for extension. Troma and Fox's rights to this version expired in 2004. Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 1.6-mile electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. It was released on VHS and DVD by Fox Home Video.
Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service during the week. Troma Films produced a 1993 dub of the film co-produced by Jerry Beck.

Several primary routes of note are:. My Neighbor Totoro (となりのトトロ - Tonari no Totoro) is a 1988 Japanese animated movie directed by Hayao Miyazaki and produced by Studio Ghibli. Bus service operates at 15 or 30 minute frequencies on weekdays. Frank Welker/Hitoshi Takagi/Hitoshi Takagi: Totoro. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on busses powered by natural gas and diesel. Pat Carroll/Natalie Core/Tanie Kitabayashi: Nanny. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. Kusakabe.

Tacoma has a wide array of alternative transportation services available including busses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Lea Salonga/Alexandra Kenworthy/Sumi Shimamoto: Mrs. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies about 22 miles to the north in the city of SeaTac. Timothy Daly/Steve Kramer/Shigesato Itoi: Professor Kusakabe. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. Elle Fanning/Cheryl Chase/Chika Sakamoto: Mei Kusakabe. I-5 links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. Dakota Fanning/the late Lisa Michelson/Noriko Hidaka: Satsuki Kusakabe.

The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5. The 2005 World Expo in Japan featured a "Totoro" house which was a recreation of the house in which Satsuki and Mei lived in the movie. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace. (TCM aired the dub as well as the original Japanese with English subtitles.). The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. The Turner Classic Movies cable television network held the television premiere of Disney's new English dub on January 19, 2006, as part of the network's January salute to Hayao Miyazaki. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. The world premiere for the Disney version was on October 23, 2005 after the premiere of Kiss, Kiss, Bang, Bang.

In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. The Disney version is slated for DVD release on March 7, 2006, but it appeared in the 2005 Hollywood Film Festival and on television prior to this. Most streets east of Pacific Avenue are labeled "East." This system of numbering extends beyond city limits to much of the western portion of Pierce County. Fox and Troma's rights to the film expired in 2004. Many first-time visitors have encountered difficulty with this. In 1993, Fox released the first english version of "My Neighbor Totoro", produced by John Daly and Derek Gibson (the producers of The Terminator) with co-producer Jerry Beck. This can lead to confusion, as Union Avenue intersects both North and South 11th Streets. It is believed Hayoa Miyazaki made the film because he was tired of good-and-evil conflicts, and decided it was time just to have fun.

North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to 6th Avenue. In the Disney dub, they are referred to as "Soot Gremlins". Numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with 6th Avenue or Division Street. In the word "makkurokurosuke" (used when calling the 'Soot spirits' in the Fox dub), makkurokuro would mean "pitch black black" and "suke" is a common element in boys names. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to Pacific Avenue and 6th Avenue, both beginning in Downtown Tacoma. In limited stores (in North America and Japan), collectable "My Neighbor Totoro" toys are on sale. Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. In fact, he asserted that the girls would never see the Totoros again (chiefly because he believed that if the girls retreated into the world of the Totoros, they would never return to their own world), but that the Totoros would always be around and watching over them. Pavilion reproduction of Satsuki & Mei’s House in Japan. .

Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. During the closing credits, Miyazaki purposely inserted art of Satsuki and Mei playing with other human children and not with the Totoros. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. In fact, Gainax reportedly invited the animator who did the original key animation for Totoro to work on that scene, although they never revealed the animator's name. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. The character of Totoro made a cameo appearance in one episode of the Gainax TV series Kareshi Kanojo no Jijo (His and Her Circumstances), which was likely director Hideaki Anno's way of paying tribute to Miyazaki (Anno worked as a key animator on Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind in 1984 and considers Miyazaki a mentor). Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. In the Japanese version, their father's position in his university is not explicitly given by Satsuki as in the English dub.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. Satsuki is the old Japanese name for the month of May, and Mei's name comes from the English name. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males. Satsuki and Mei were both born in the month of May. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. Ken Jennings, the winner of the most games in the history of the TV game show Jeopardy!, carries a small plush "Totoro" figure in his pocket for good luck. The median age was 34. Satsuki and Mei's mother's implied suffering from spinal tuberculosis (also known as Pott's disease) is somewhat autobiographical, as Hayao Miyazaki's mother suffered from the same illness.

In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. Bake neko are mentioned in several Ghibli films. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10. The Cat Bus is a bake neko that saw a bus and decided to become one. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. The Cat Bus originates from the Japanese belief that if a cat grows old enough it gains magical shape-changing powers and is called a bake neko. There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. Incidentally, the late Yoshifumi Kondo provided character designs for both films.

6.85% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Another theory is that "Grave of the Fireflies" (directed by Miyazaki's longtime colleague Isao Takahata) was believed to be too depressing for audiences as a stand-alone product, and thus needed a lighter animation to accompany it. The racial makeup of the city was 69.08% White, 11.24% African American, 1.96% Native American, 7.57% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 2.94% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. My Neighbor Totoro was released as a double feature with Grave of the Fireflies. There are two theories for this: one was that Totoro would not be successful. There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). The main Totoro has become a mascot for Studio Ghibli, gracing the studio's logo at the start of their films. In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). The name Totoro is Mei's mispronunciation of "tororu", Japanese for troll, which she saw in a story book (Three Billy Goats Gruff) and decided was the same kind of creature.

2004]). Catbus or Nekobasu - a cat that has become a bus. D3 [Sept. "Nanny" - Kanta's grandmother, who sometimes takes care of the girls. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. Kanta - A preteen boy of their village, ambivalent towards Satsuki. Four years later, the U.S. Small Totoro (Chibi Totoro) - The white, smallest (about 20 centimeters tall) one, with the power of invisibility.

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. Looks very similar to King Totoro. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883; in the period from 1907 to 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune. Medium Totoro (Chū Totoro) - The blue, medium-size (about 60 centimeters tall) one. The paper's circulation is about 128,000 (Sundays 144,000), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. Ō in that case means "large" but the English dub calls that Totoro "King Totoro". The city's only daily newspaper is The News Tribune, since 1986 a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers. She tried to say "tororu", the Japanese word for troll.

Also, one of the elementary schools, Sheridan Elementary, operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese). Mei has a habit of mispronouncing things. One of the district's high schools, Henry Foss High School, operates an acclaimed International Baccalaureate program. King Totoro (Ō Totoro) - The grey, friendly forest spirit who is the largest of the three (at least 3 meters tall); when someone says "totoro", they are usually referring to him. The district also has 5 high schools, one alternative high school, and one School of the Arts. Totoro - 3 Totoro appear in the film:

    . The school district contains 36 elementary schools and 11 middle schools. Professor Kusakabe - The girls' father.

    Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. Mei Kusakabe - Satsuki's younger sister, pre-school age (4 years old). The total area is 20.01% water. Satsuki Kusakabe - An 11-year-old girl. 129.7 km² (50.1 mi²) of it is land and 32.5 km² (12.5 mi²) of it is water. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 162.2 km² (62.6 mi²).

    Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet). Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. In addition, Comcast also offers digital cable and internet services in the area. Tacoma Power is, along with Tacoma Water and Tacoma Rail, a part of Tacoma Public Utilities.

    Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a cable television and internet service, one of the first public utilities to provide such a service. Electrical power is furnished by Tacoma Power, a division of Tacoma Public Utilities, which owns hydroelectric plants on the North Fork of the Skokomish River. On April 26, 2003 Tacoma's Chief of Police, David Brame, shot and killed his wife and himself in Gig Harbor, Washington. Tacoma was named after Mount Rainier, whose original name was Tahoma, which derived from the Puyallup tacobet, or "mother of waters.".

    The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground.". 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview, and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. To quote from the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project: On the morning of Nov. What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city.

    A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish point. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. Its early hopes to live to be the "City of Destiny" were frustrated in the late 19th century, when the discovery of gold in the Klondike turned Seattle into a boom town, eclipsing Tacoma's early lead.

    Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. (A replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site.). The town was originally settled by pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad. It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks.

    Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by Native American people, predominantly the Puyallup people. . Chef-author Jeff Smith learned to cook and began his career in Tacoma at the Chaplain's Pantry, later known as the Gourmet Pantry (now closed), on Tacoma Avenue. A number of noteworthy individuals have come from Tacoma, among them bowling legend Earl Anthony, singer Bing Crosby, authors Richard Brautigan and Frank Herbert, cartoonist Gary Larson, serial killer Ted Bundy, serial sniper John Allen Muhammad, actress Dyan Cannon, conspiracy gadfly Fred Crisman, Andrew and Thea Foss, first owners and operators of Foss Launch and Tug Company, Puyallup Indian rights activist Robert Satiacum, auto racer Pat Austin, prize fighter Sugar Ray Seales, NFL receiver Ahmad Rashad, Major League baseball player Ron Cey, glass artist Dale Chihuly, and musicians the Wailers, Jerry Miller (Moby Grape), Jerry Cantrell and Neko Case.

    In the late 1990s, however, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%, largely eliminating the problem, but a strong smell is occasionally still detectable. Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for its malodorousness, called the "Aroma of Tacoma" -- a distinctive, acrid odor produced by local paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. It contains Wright Park Arboretum. Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts.

    Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. Another park in Tacoma is Titlow Beach, which is a popular scuba diving area. One of the largest urban parks in the U.S, Point Defiance Park, which includes the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Fort Nisqually, is located in Tacoma. Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003).

    It includes a functional glassblowing studio. The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. Tacoma is a major international deep-water container port. and the Russell Investment Group, as well as institutions of higher learning, including Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, and the University of Washington's Tacoma campus.

    Tacoma is the home of such international companies as Labor Ready, Inc. 2004]). D3 [Sept. Census Bureau to be 196,800, and a metropolitan area of 750,000 (Trends, No.

    1, 2004, was estimated by the U.S. The 2000 census reported Tacoma's population as 193,556; the city's population on Apr. Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is the county seat of Pierce CountyGR6, Washington, USA, situated on Puget Sound's Commencement Bay, Tacoma Narrows, and the estuary of the Puyallup River.
    Location of Tacoma in
    Pierce County and Washington State.

    West End. South Tacoma. South End. Northeast Tacoma.

    Dome District. Stadium District. North End. McKinley Hill.

    Hilltop. Eastside. Central. Old Town.

    Route 3, "Downtown Tacoma – Lakewood via Tacoma Mall". Route 2, "South 19th – Bridgeport Way via Tacoma Community College", and. Route 1, "Pacific Avenue – 6th Avenue".

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