Tacoma, Washington

Tacoma, with Mount Rainier in background
Nickname: "The City of Destiny"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.cityoftacoma.org/
Location


Location of Tacoma in
Pierce County and Washington State

Government
County Pierce
Mayor Bill Baarsma (NP)
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 162.2 km²
Land 129.7 km²
Water 32.5 km²
Population
Total (2005) 196,957 (city proper)
Metro area {{{population_metro}}}
Density 1518.6/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude 47°14'29" N
Longitude 122°27'34" W
Coordinates {{{latd}}}°{{{latm}}}′0″ {{{latNS}}}
{{{longd}}}°{{{longm}}}′0″ {{{longEW}}}
Elevation m
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)

Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is the county seat of Pierce CountyGR6, Washington, USA, situated on Puget Sound's Commencement Bay, Tacoma Narrows, and the estuary of the Puyallup River. The 2000 census reported Tacoma's population as 193,556; the city's population on Apr. 1, 2004, was estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau to be 196,800, and a metropolitan area of 750,000 (Trends, No. D3 [Sept. 2004]).

Tacoma is the home of such international companies as Labor Ready, Inc. and the Russell Investment Group, as well as institutions of higher learning, including Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, and the University of Washington's Tacoma campus. Tacoma is a major international deep-water container port.

The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. It includes a functional glassblowing studio. Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003).

One of the largest urban parks in the U.S, Point Defiance Park, which includes the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Fort Nisqually, is located in Tacoma. Another park in Tacoma is Titlow Beach, which is a popular scuba diving area. Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts. It contains Wright Park Arboretum.

Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for its malodorousness, called the "Aroma of Tacoma" -- a distinctive, acrid odor produced by local paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. In the late 1990s, however, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%, largely eliminating the problem, but a strong smell is occasionally still detectable.

A number of noteworthy individuals have come from Tacoma, among them bowling legend Earl Anthony, singer Bing Crosby, authors Richard Brautigan and Frank Herbert, cartoonist Gary Larson, serial killer Ted Bundy, serial sniper John Allen Muhammad, actress Dyan Cannon, conspiracy gadfly Fred Crisman, Andrew and Thea Foss, first owners and operators of Foss Launch and Tug Company, Puyallup Indian rights activist Robert Satiacum, auto racer Pat Austin, prize fighter Sugar Ray Seales, NFL receiver Ahmad Rashad, Major League baseball player Ron Cey, glass artist Dale Chihuly, and musicians the Wailers, Jerry Miller (Moby Grape), Jerry Cantrell and Neko Case. Chef-author Jeff Smith learned to cook and began his career in Tacoma at the Chaplain's Pantry, later known as the Gourmet Pantry (now closed), on Tacoma Avenue.

History

The SR-509 Bridge leading into downtown.

Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by Native American people, predominantly the Puyallup people. It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks.

The town was originally settled by pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad. (A replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site.)

Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. Its early hopes to live to be the "City of Destiny" were frustrated in the late 19th century, when the discovery of gold in the Klondike turned Seattle into a boom town, eclipsing Tacoma's early lead.

George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish point.

What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city. To quote from the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project: On the morning of Nov. 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview, and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground."

Downtown looking west from the Tacoma Sheraton

Tacoma was named after Mount Rainier, whose original name was Tahoma, which derived from the Puyallup tacobet, or "mother of waters."

On April 26, 2003 Tacoma's Chief of Police, David Brame, shot and killed his wife and himself in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Utilities

Electrical power is furnished by Tacoma Power, a division of Tacoma Public Utilities, which owns hydroelectric plants on the North Fork of the Skokomish River. Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a cable television and internet service, one of the first public utilities to provide such a service. Tacoma Power is, along with Tacoma Water and Tacoma Rail, a part of Tacoma Public Utilities.

In addition, Comcast also offers digital cable and internet services in the area.

Geography

Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 162.2 km² (62.6 mi²). 129.7 km² (50.1 mi²) of it is land and 32.5 km² (12.5 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 20.01% water.

Education

Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. The school district contains 36 elementary schools and 11 middle schools. The district also has 5 high schools, one alternative high school, and one School of the Arts. One of the district's high schools, Henry Foss High School, operates an acclaimed International Baccalaureate program. Also, one of the elementary schools, Sheridan Elementary, operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese).

Newspapers

The city's only daily newspaper is The News Tribune, since 1986 a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers. The paper's circulation is about 128,000 (Sundays 144,000), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883; in the period from 1907 to 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune.

Demographics

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. Four years later, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. D3 [Sept. 2004]).

In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.08% White, 11.24% African American, 1.96% Native American, 7.57% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 2.94% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. 6.85% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10.

In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Transportation and urban form

Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to Pacific Avenue and 6th Avenue, both beginning in Downtown Tacoma. Numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with 6th Avenue or Division Street. North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to 6th Avenue. This can lead to confusion, as Union Avenue intersects both North and South 11th Streets. Many first-time visitors have encountered difficulty with this. Most streets east of Pacific Avenue are labeled "East." This system of numbering extends beyond city limits to much of the western portion of Pierce County.

In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace.

The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5. I-5 links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies about 22 miles to the north in the city of SeaTac.

Public Transport

Light Rail in Tacoma

Tacoma has a wide array of alternative transportation services available including busses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on busses powered by natural gas and diesel. Bus service operates at 15 or 30 minute frequencies on weekdays. Several primary routes of note are:


Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service during the week. Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 1.6-mile electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. This line is presently under consideration for extension. Tacoma is also served by Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, providing ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. Tacoma also has Greyhound and Amtrak service, accessible via Tacoma Dome Station.

Sports

Tacoma, in addition to the professional sports teams of Seattle, has one minor league baseball franchise, the Tacoma Rainiers, a Triple-A team playing in the Pacific Coast League as a farm team of the Seattle Mariners. The Rainiers play inside Cheney Stadium, named after local businessman and baseball enthusiast Ben Cheney.

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise, having lost the Tacoma Rockets of the WHL to relocation and having the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League go defunct due to financial woes. The Tacoma Dome does still host traveling sports and pseudo-sports events such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was gutted and renovated into Key Arena, the team's current home.

Tacoma in pop culture

Museum_of_Glass

Neko Case's song "Thrice All American", featured on her album Furnace Room Lullaby, is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. The album also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way."

Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma."

Tacoma is also prominently mentioned in the 1977 Steve Miller Band song "Rock 'N Me" (I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A.).

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington."

Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the flatiron building downtown. Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. Other films featuring a Tacoma location include Get Carter (2000). In addition, significant parts of The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) were shot in a North Tacoma home. The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. Sources: ([[2]]) ([[3]]) ([[4]]}

Toyota has named a popular line of pickup trucks the "Toyota Tacoma" after the city.

Tacoma is mentioned in the Sir Mix-a-Lot song "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned (Sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn").

Tacoma is also mentioned at the end of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song "Jump On It" ("Tacoma, jump on it...")

Tacoma is mentioned in the song "He's a Grungewhore" from the norwegian punk rock band Turbonegros 1994 album Never Is Forever. [5]

Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine. [6]

Neighborhoods

Downtown Tacoma

Sister cities

Tacoma has ten sister cities: Ålesund (Norway), Davao (Philippines), Fuzhou (China), George (South Africa), Qiryat Motzkin (Israel), Kitakyushu (Japan), Gunsan (South Korea), Cienfuegos (Cuba), Vladivostok (Russia), and Taichung City (Taiwan).


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Tacoma has ten sister cities: Ålesund (Norway), Davao (Philippines), Fuzhou (China), George (South Africa), Qiryat Motzkin (Israel), Kitakyushu (Japan), Gunsan (South Korea), Cienfuegos (Cuba), Vladivostok (Russia), and Taichung City (Taiwan). In addition to his 3 wins in the Indy Racing League, Stewart has also won 2 International Race of Champions events. [6]. During the 2005 season, Stewart won a total of $13,578,168, including $6,173,633 for winning the championshiop, making this the largest season total in NASCAR history. Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine. He was also praised by fellow competitors, notably NASCAR veteran Mark Martin who proclaimed Stewart as the greatest NASCAR driver of this generation. [5]. After winning his second championship, Stewart because only the third active driver in NASCAR to win multiple championships, along with Jeff Gordon and Terry Labonte.

Tacoma is mentioned in the song "He's a Grungewhore" from the norwegian punk rock band Turbonegros 1994 album Never Is Forever. He is also one of the youngest drivers to win multiple championships. Tacoma is also mentioned at the end of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song "Jump On It" ("Tacoma, jump on it..."). On November 20, Stewart won his second NASCAR Nextel Cup Championship, joining Jeff Gordon as the only active drivers to have won multiple championships. Tacoma is mentioned in the Sir Mix-a-Lot song "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned (Sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn"). He mentioned in a press release from his sponsor, "I plan to keep winning races and helping to drive down the cost of home improvement for The Home Depot customers.". Toyota has named a popular line of pickup trucks the "Toyota Tacoma" after the city. After his Allstate victory, Home Depot presented fans who presented the advertisement of his Allstate 400 win with a discount on purchasing bricks.

Sources: ([[2]]) ([[3]]) ([[4]]}. After his second full climb of the fence in Loudon, NH, they ran a discount on ladders and fencing at the stores with a campaign named, "Hey Tony, we've got ladders," where anyone who presented the advertisement in national newspapers in their stores earned the discount. The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. It also led to sponsor Home Depot cashing on Stewart's success with some promotions reminiscent of Stewart's Eldora Speedway drivers. In addition, significant parts of The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) were shot in a North Tacoma home. Tony was quoted as saying "I'm too fat for this," and recently purchased $17,000 worth of exercise equipment to remedy the problem. Other films featuring a Tacoma location include Get Carter (2000). Stewart has, following his second win of the season, begun a tradition of climbing the fence separating the fans from the racetrack after each victory, a practice adopted from two-time Indy 500 winner Hélio Castroneves .

Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. In an apparently unrelated incident, Kyle Busch was also fined $10,000 and placed on identical probation for ramming Anthony Lazzaro's car after the Sirius Satellite Radio race, also at Watkins Glen. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the flatiron building downtown. Stewart was also placed on probation until December 31st. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. Stewart was driving a Busch series car owned by Kevin Harvick at the time. Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. On August 16th Stewart was fined $5000 for hitting the car of another driver, Brian Vickers, after the completion of the Busch Series Zippo 200 at Watkins Glen International.

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington.". He won five races, including the Allstate 400 at The Brickyard, a race that Stewart said he would give up his championship to win, and took with it the #1 seed headed towards NASCAR's Chase for the Nextel Cup 10-race playoff. Tacoma is also prominently mentioned in the 1977 Steve Miller Band song "Rock 'N Me" (I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A.). 2005 was one of Stewart's most successful years in the Nextel Cup. Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma.". In addition to placing fourth, the trio placed third in the Daytona Prototype class. The album also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way.". With 15 minutes left in the race, and with Stewart at the wheel, one of the rear wheels came off, finally ending their run.

Neko Case's song "Thrice All American", featured on her album Furnace Room Lullaby, is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. The result does not show the trio's performance, however: they had dominated the race until the last two hours, when the suspension cracked. For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was gutted and renovated into Key Arena, the team's current home. in a Boss Motorsports Chevrolet to take fourth place in the 24 Hours of Daytona sports car race. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. In 2004, Stewart teamed with Englishman Andy Wallace and Dale Earnhardt, Jr. The Tacoma Dome does still host traveling sports and pseudo-sports events such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. He also still makes the occasional cameo on dirt tracks, appearing regularly at an ARCA race on dirt and at many prominent midget car events, USAC's Turkey Night Grand Prix, and the indoor Chili Bowl Midget Nationals.

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise, having lost the Tacoma Rockets of the WHL to relocation and having the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League go defunct due to financial woes. Located in Rossburg, Ohio, Eldora is a half-mile dirt track known to many as "Auto Racing's Showcase Since 1954." Stewart began racing there in 1991 and continues racing in special events alongside other Nextel Cup drivers and dirt track legends. The Rainiers play inside Cheney Stadium, named after local businessman and baseball enthusiast Ben Cheney. In November of 2004, Stewart became the owner of one of the most legendary short-tracks in America, Eldora Speedway. Tacoma, in addition to the professional sports teams of Seattle, has one minor league baseball franchise, the Tacoma Rainiers, a Triple-A team playing in the Pacific Coast League as a farm team of the Seattle Mariners. His current driver lineup in USAC consists of Josh Wise in the midget, sprint, and Silver Crown cars and Jay Drake in the sprint car and Silver Crown Series. Tacoma also has Greyhound and Amtrak service, accessible via Tacoma Dome Station. Yeley in 2003 and Jay Drake in 2004.

Tacoma is also served by Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, providing ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. He also collected owner titles in USAC's National Sprint Car Series with J.J. This line is presently under consideration for extension. Yeley, and in 2004 with Dave Steele. Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 1.6-mile electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. Stewart has won USAC car owner titles in the Silver Crown division in 2002 and 2003 with J.J.
Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service during the week. In addition to his Nextel Cup gig, Stewart, nicknamed "The Columbus Comet" (for his present hometown of Columbus, Indiana), "The Rushville Rocket" and "Smoke", is also the owner of a World of Outlaws sprint car driven by Danny "The Dude" Lasoski.

Several primary routes of note are:. He only won twice that season, but led more laps than he'd done the previous year and was highly competitive in the final races of the year. Bus service operates at 15 or 30 minute frequencies on weekdays. Driving a Chevrolet instead of his previous Pontiac ride (Gibbs switched), Tony actually had his worst Cup season, but it was still good enough for a 7th place finish in points. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on busses powered by natural gas and diesel. As defending champion, Stewart managed to have a relatively incident-free 2003. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. At the end of the year, Stewart held off a charging Mark Martin to win his first Winston Cup championship.

Tacoma has a wide array of alternative transportation services available including busses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Stewart went on to win the race immediately after being disciplined, and went on a tear in the final races, finishing consistently in the top five. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies about 22 miles to the north in the city of SeaTac. NASCAR put Stewart on probation for the rest of the season. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. The second half of his season was plagued by an altercation he had with a photographer after the Brickyard 400. I-5 links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. He won twice early in the season though, but was only 7th at the halfway point of the season.

The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5. Tony started 2002 even more inauspiciously than he'd started his previous season, as his Daytona 500 lasted just two laps due to a blown engine. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace. Tony, understandably, earned a reputation for being NASCAR's bad boy. The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. Stewart was not allowed to practice until wearing one, and only managed to practice after his crew chief intervened. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. He confronted the same official at the race in Talladega after refusing to wear a mandated head and neck restraint.

In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. This resulted in another fine and longer probation. Most streets east of Pacific Avenue are labeled "East." This system of numbering extends beyond city limits to much of the western portion of Pierce County. At the same race, he also got into an incident with a reporter, kicking away a tape recorder. Many first-time visitors have encountered difficulty with this. He got into further trouble at Daytona, when he confronted a Winston Cup official after ignoring a black flag. This can lead to confusion, as Union Avenue intersects both North and South 11th Streets. Stewart was fined and placed on probation by NASCAR.

North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to 6th Avenue. Gordon pulled a "bump and run" on Stewart to gain a better finishing position in a race in Bristol, and it resulted in Stewart retaliating in a post-race incident by spinning Gordon out on pit road. Numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with 6th Avenue or Division Street. The season was not without controversy though. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to Pacific Avenue and 6th Avenue, both beginning in Downtown Tacoma. Statistically, he had a worse season than 2000, but he was the runner up to Jeff Gordon for the Cup championship. Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. He recovered to win three more races, and as he'd done before, ran near the front most of the season.

Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. Amazingly, he walked away nearly unscathed. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. Tony's 2001 got off to a frightening start, as he was involved in a nasty crash in the Daytona 500 where his car violently flipped over several times. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. The two are still heated rivals to this day, with Gordon always seeming to outlast his competetitor. Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. Stewart made his displeasure towards Gordon known in an obscenity-laden tirade.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. The most well known of these came at Watkins Glen, when he and Jeff Gordon tangled and crashed into each other. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males. Tony also began to get some bad press for his on-track incidents. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. However, he "slipped" to 6th place in the standings because of a handful of DNFs, and an increase in the number of competitive drivers, among them his teammate Labonte, who won the Cup championship. The median age was 34. Stewart showed no signs of a sophomore slump in Winston Cup in 2000, as he won six races.

In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. His attempt at "The Double" was mildly successful, as he finished in the top 10 at both races, but he fell 10 miles short of completing all of the miles. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10. Tony also attempted to race 1,100 miles on Memorial Day, as he attempted to race the Indy 500 during the day and the Coca-Cola 600 in Charlotte at night. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. Not surprisingly, he ran away with the Winston Cup Rookie of the Year award. There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. He finished his first year an unprecedented 4th in points, the highest points finish by a rookie in the modern era (since 1972), and only bested by James Hylton, who finished 2nd as a first-timer in 1966.

6.85% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. He won a pair of pole positions at short tracks, and tied a rookie record with three victories. The racial makeup of the city was 69.08% White, 11.24% African American, 1.96% Native American, 7.57% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 2.94% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. He only failed to finish a race once, and even then he finished 9th. There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). Stewart spent most of his rookie season wowing people, as his car was often in the top 10. In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). In the 500 itself, Stewart ran near the front until problems with the car relegated him to a midpack finish.

2004]). The Intimidator came out on top, but Tony had nonetheless impressed quite a few people with his performance. D3 [Sept. He showed courage in one of the Gatorade Twin 125 races, when involved in a great battle with Dale Earnhardt for the win. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. Stewart started his Winston Cup career with a bang, as he qualified his No 20 Home Depot Pontiac in second place in his first Cup race, the Daytona 500. Four years later, the U.S. With that move, Stewart ended his three year career as a full time IRL driver.

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. Gibbs had enough confidence in Tony that he was moved into Cup for the 1999 season. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883; in the period from 1907 to 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune. Stewart finished a solid 2nd place in 2 (of 31) starts, ahead of six drivers with more starts, and had an average finish that was comparable to some of the series' top 10 finishers. The paper's circulation is about 128,000 (Sundays 144,000), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. He came extremely close to winning his first Busch Series race in Rockingham, but was beaten on a last lap pass by Matt Kenseth. The city's only daily newspaper is The News Tribune, since 1986 a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers. On the Busch side, he finished in the top-five five times in 22 starts.

Also, one of the elementary schools, Sheridan Elementary, operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese). His season was something of a disappointment, especially as he finished last in the Indy 500 because of an engine failure. One of the district's high schools, Henry Foss High School, operates an acclaimed International Baccalaureate program. In the IRL, he won twice and finished 3rd in the championship. The district also has 5 high schools, one alternative high school, and one School of the Arts. The double duty did not affect his performance in either series. The school district contains 36 elementary schools and 11 middle schools. Stewart so impressed Gibbs that he was signed to drive the majority of the Busch schedule in 1998 to go along with a full-time IRL schedule.

Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. When Stewart was able to finish, he was in the top 10, and had a 3rd place in Charlotte. The total area is 20.01% water. This time, he was racing for Joe Gibbs, the former (and current as of 2004) coach of the Washington Redskins who was having a lot of success with driver Bobby Labonte in Winston Cup. 129.7 km² (50.1 mi²) of it is land and 32.5 km² (12.5 mi²) of it is water. As he had done the previous year, he raced a handful of Busch Series races. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 162.2 km² (62.6 mi²). Despite an average end to his season, finishing 7th, 14th, and 11th, and five DNFs, Stewart did just enough to beat Hamilton for the IRL title.

Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet). He became the leading contender for the series' championship after a bad slump knocked points leader Davey Hamilton out of first place. Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. Tony finally got his first career win at Pikes Peak, where he led all but seven laps of a 200 lap race. In addition, Comcast also offers digital cable and internet services in the area. At that year's Indy 500, Stewart had a good enough car to win his first IRL race, as he led 64 laps, but tailed off near the end of the race and settled for 5th. Tacoma Power is, along with Tacoma Water and Tacoma Rail, a part of Tacoma Public Utilities. He failed to finish the first three races of a ten race schedule, but recovered to finish second in Phoenix.

Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a cable television and internet service, one of the first public utilities to provide such a service. Tony was poised to improve his IRL standing in 1997, but struggled with finishing at times. Electrical power is furnished by Tacoma Power, a division of Tacoma Public Utilities, which owns hydroelectric plants on the North Fork of the Skokomish River. He had more success in a one-time ride in the Craftsman Truck Series, where he finished 10th. On April 26, 2003 Tacoma's Chief of Police, David Brame, shot and killed his wife and himself in Gig Harbor, Washington. In nine races, however, he had only a best finish of 16th place. Tacoma was named after Mount Rainier, whose original name was Tahoma, which derived from the Puyallup tacobet, or "mother of waters.". Tony also made a handful of starts in NASCAR's Busch Series that year.

The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground.". When he wasn't racing Indy Cars, he raced stock cars. 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview, and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. In 1995, Stewart became the first driver to win USAC's version of the Triple Crown, earning championships in all three of USAC's major divisions, National Midget, Sprint, and Silver Crown. To quote from the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project: On the morning of Nov. Stewart was the USAC rookie of the year in 1991, and was the National Midget series champion in 1994. What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city. He raced three-quarter midgets for a handful of years before moving up to the USAC series.

A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish point. Born in Columbus, Indiana, Stewart grew up racing go karts, highly successfully, winning the world karting championship in 1987. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. . George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. Anthony Wayne "Tony" Stewart (born May 20, 1971), is an auto racing driver who has won championships in sprint cars, Indy cars, and stock cars. Its early hopes to live to be the "City of Destiny" were frustrated in the late 19th century, when the discovery of gold in the Klondike turned Seattle into a boom town, eclipsing Tacoma's early lead. 2002 and 2003 Virginia is for Lovers 200 (Richmond).

Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. 2005 Hershey's Take 5 300 (Daytona). (A replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site.). 1999 Exide NASCAR Select Batteries 400 (Richmond), Checker Auto Parts/Dura Lube 500 (Phoenix), Pennzoil 400 presented by Kmart (Homestead). The town was originally settled by pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad. 2000 MBNA Platinum 400 (Dover), Kmart 400 (Michigan), thatlook.com 300 (Loudon), MBNA.com 400 (Dover), NAPA AutoCare 500 (Martinsville), Pennzoil 400 presented by Discount Auto Parts (Homestead). It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks. 2001 Pontiac Excitement 400(Richmond), Dodge/Save Mart 350 (Sonoma), Sharpie 500 (Bristol).

Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by Native American people, predominantly the Puyallup people. 2002 MBNA America 500 (Atlanta), Chevy American Revolution 400 (Richmond), Sirius Satellite Radio at The Glen (Watkins Glen), also won Winston Cup Championship. . 2003 Pocono 500 (Pocono), UAW-GM Quality 500 (Charlotte). Chef-author Jeff Smith learned to cook and began his career in Tacoma at the Chaplain's Pantry, later known as the Gourmet Pantry (now closed), on Tacoma Avenue. 2004 Tropicana 400 presented by Meijer (Chicago), Sirius at The Glen (Watkins Glen). A number of noteworthy individuals have come from Tacoma, among them bowling legend Earl Anthony, singer Bing Crosby, authors Richard Brautigan and Frank Herbert, cartoonist Gary Larson, serial killer Ted Bundy, serial sniper John Allen Muhammad, actress Dyan Cannon, conspiracy gadfly Fred Crisman, Andrew and Thea Foss, first owners and operators of Foss Launch and Tug Company, Puyallup Indian rights activist Robert Satiacum, auto racer Pat Austin, prize fighter Sugar Ray Seales, NFL receiver Ahmad Rashad, Major League baseball player Ron Cey, glass artist Dale Chihuly, and musicians the Wailers, Jerry Miller (Moby Grape), Jerry Cantrell and Neko Case. 2005 Dodge/Save Mart 350 (Sonoma), Pepsi 400 (Daytona), New England 300 (Loudon), Allstate 400 at The Brickyard (Indianapolis), Sirius at The Glen (Watkins Glen), also won Nextel Cup Championship.

In the late 1990s, however, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%, largely eliminating the problem, but a strong smell is occasionally still detectable. Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for its malodorousness, called the "Aroma of Tacoma" -- a distinctive, acrid odor produced by local paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. It contains Wright Park Arboretum. Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts.

Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. Another park in Tacoma is Titlow Beach, which is a popular scuba diving area. One of the largest urban parks in the U.S, Point Defiance Park, which includes the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Fort Nisqually, is located in Tacoma. Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003).

It includes a functional glassblowing studio. The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. Tacoma is a major international deep-water container port. and the Russell Investment Group, as well as institutions of higher learning, including Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, and the University of Washington's Tacoma campus.

Tacoma is the home of such international companies as Labor Ready, Inc. 2004]). D3 [Sept. Census Bureau to be 196,800, and a metropolitan area of 750,000 (Trends, No.

1, 2004, was estimated by the U.S. The 2000 census reported Tacoma's population as 193,556; the city's population on Apr. Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is the county seat of Pierce CountyGR6, Washington, USA, situated on Puget Sound's Commencement Bay, Tacoma Narrows, and the estuary of the Puyallup River.
Location of Tacoma in
Pierce County and Washington State.

West End. South Tacoma. South End. Northeast Tacoma.

Dome District. Stadium District. North End. McKinley Hill.

Hilltop. Eastside. Central. Old Town.

Route 3, "Downtown Tacoma – Lakewood via Tacoma Mall". Route 2, "South 19th – Bridgeport Way via Tacoma Community College", and. Route 1, "Pacific Avenue – 6th Avenue".

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