Tacoma, Washington

Tacoma, with Mount Rainier in background
Nickname: "The City of Destiny"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.cityoftacoma.org/
Location


Location of Tacoma in
Pierce County and Washington State

Government
County Pierce
Mayor Bill Baarsma (NP)
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 162.2 km²
Land 129.7 km²
Water 32.5 km²
Population
Total (2005) 196,957 (city proper)
Metro area {{{population_metro}}}
Density 1518.6/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude 47°14'29" N
Longitude 122°27'34" W
Coordinates {{{latd}}}°{{{latm}}}′0″ {{{latNS}}}
{{{longd}}}°{{{longm}}}′0″ {{{longEW}}}
Elevation m
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)

Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is the county seat of Pierce CountyGR6, Washington, USA, situated on Puget Sound's Commencement Bay, Tacoma Narrows, and the estuary of the Puyallup River. The 2000 census reported Tacoma's population as 193,556; the city's population on Apr. 1, 2004, was estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau to be 196,800, and a metropolitan area of 750,000 (Trends, No. D3 [Sept. 2004]).

Tacoma is the home of such international companies as Labor Ready, Inc. and the Russell Investment Group, as well as institutions of higher learning, including Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, and the University of Washington's Tacoma campus. Tacoma is a major international deep-water container port.

The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. It includes a functional glassblowing studio. Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003).

One of the largest urban parks in the U.S, Point Defiance Park, which includes the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Fort Nisqually, is located in Tacoma. Another park in Tacoma is Titlow Beach, which is a popular scuba diving area. Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts. It contains Wright Park Arboretum.

Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for its malodorousness, called the "Aroma of Tacoma" -- a distinctive, acrid odor produced by local paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. In the late 1990s, however, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%, largely eliminating the problem, but a strong smell is occasionally still detectable.

A number of noteworthy individuals have come from Tacoma, among them bowling legend Earl Anthony, singer Bing Crosby, authors Richard Brautigan and Frank Herbert, cartoonist Gary Larson, serial killer Ted Bundy, serial sniper John Allen Muhammad, actress Dyan Cannon, conspiracy gadfly Fred Crisman, Andrew and Thea Foss, first owners and operators of Foss Launch and Tug Company, Puyallup Indian rights activist Robert Satiacum, auto racer Pat Austin, prize fighter Sugar Ray Seales, NFL receiver Ahmad Rashad, Major League baseball player Ron Cey, glass artist Dale Chihuly, and musicians the Wailers, Jerry Miller (Moby Grape), Jerry Cantrell and Neko Case. Chef-author Jeff Smith learned to cook and began his career in Tacoma at the Chaplain's Pantry, later known as the Gourmet Pantry (now closed), on Tacoma Avenue.

History

The SR-509 Bridge leading into downtown.

Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by Native American people, predominantly the Puyallup people. It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks.

The town was originally settled by pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad. (A replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site.)

Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. Its early hopes to live to be the "City of Destiny" were frustrated in the late 19th century, when the discovery of gold in the Klondike turned Seattle into a boom town, eclipsing Tacoma's early lead.

George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish point.

What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city. To quote from the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project: On the morning of Nov. 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview, and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground."

Downtown looking west from the Tacoma Sheraton

Tacoma was named after Mount Rainier, whose original name was Tahoma, which derived from the Puyallup tacobet, or "mother of waters."

On April 26, 2003 Tacoma's Chief of Police, David Brame, shot and killed his wife and himself in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Utilities

Electrical power is furnished by Tacoma Power, a division of Tacoma Public Utilities, which owns hydroelectric plants on the North Fork of the Skokomish River. Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a cable television and internet service, one of the first public utilities to provide such a service. Tacoma Power is, along with Tacoma Water and Tacoma Rail, a part of Tacoma Public Utilities.

In addition, Comcast also offers digital cable and internet services in the area.

Geography

Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 162.2 km² (62.6 mi²). 129.7 km² (50.1 mi²) of it is land and 32.5 km² (12.5 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 20.01% water.

Education

Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. The school district contains 36 elementary schools and 11 middle schools. The district also has 5 high schools, one alternative high school, and one School of the Arts. One of the district's high schools, Henry Foss High School, operates an acclaimed International Baccalaureate program. Also, one of the elementary schools, Sheridan Elementary, operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese).

Newspapers

The city's only daily newspaper is The News Tribune, since 1986 a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers. The paper's circulation is about 128,000 (Sundays 144,000), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883; in the period from 1907 to 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune.

Demographics

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. Four years later, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. D3 [Sept. 2004]).

In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.08% White, 11.24% African American, 1.96% Native American, 7.57% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 2.94% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. 6.85% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10.

In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Transportation and urban form

Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to Pacific Avenue and 6th Avenue, both beginning in Downtown Tacoma. Numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with 6th Avenue or Division Street. North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to 6th Avenue. This can lead to confusion, as Union Avenue intersects both North and South 11th Streets. Many first-time visitors have encountered difficulty with this. Most streets east of Pacific Avenue are labeled "East." This system of numbering extends beyond city limits to much of the western portion of Pierce County.

In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace.

The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5. I-5 links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies about 22 miles to the north in the city of SeaTac.

Public Transport

Light Rail in Tacoma

Tacoma has a wide array of alternative transportation services available including busses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on busses powered by natural gas and diesel. Bus service operates at 15 or 30 minute frequencies on weekdays. Several primary routes of note are:


Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service during the week. Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 1.6-mile electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. This line is presently under consideration for extension. Tacoma is also served by Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, providing ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. Tacoma also has Greyhound and Amtrak service, accessible via Tacoma Dome Station.

Sports

Tacoma, in addition to the professional sports teams of Seattle, has one minor league baseball franchise, the Tacoma Rainiers, a Triple-A team playing in the Pacific Coast League as a farm team of the Seattle Mariners. The Rainiers play inside Cheney Stadium, named after local businessman and baseball enthusiast Ben Cheney.

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise, having lost the Tacoma Rockets of the WHL to relocation and having the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League go defunct due to financial woes. The Tacoma Dome does still host traveling sports and pseudo-sports events such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was gutted and renovated into Key Arena, the team's current home.

Tacoma in pop culture

Museum_of_Glass

Neko Case's song "Thrice All American", featured on her album Furnace Room Lullaby, is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. The album also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way."

Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma."

Tacoma is also prominently mentioned in the 1977 Steve Miller Band song "Rock 'N Me" (I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A.).

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington."

Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the flatiron building downtown. Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. Other films featuring a Tacoma location include Get Carter (2000). In addition, significant parts of The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) were shot in a North Tacoma home. The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. Sources: ([[2]]) ([[3]]) ([[4]]}

Toyota has named a popular line of pickup trucks the "Toyota Tacoma" after the city.

Tacoma is mentioned in the Sir Mix-a-Lot song "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned (Sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn").

Tacoma is also mentioned at the end of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song "Jump On It" ("Tacoma, jump on it...")

Tacoma is mentioned in the song "He's a Grungewhore" from the norwegian punk rock band Turbonegros 1994 album Never Is Forever. [5]

Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine. [6]

Neighborhoods

Downtown Tacoma

Sister cities

Tacoma has ten sister cities: Ålesund (Norway), Davao (Philippines), Fuzhou (China), George (South Africa), Qiryat Motzkin (Israel), Kitakyushu (Japan), Gunsan (South Korea), Cienfuegos (Cuba), Vladivostok (Russia), and Taichung City (Taiwan).


This page about Tacoma includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Tacoma
News stories about Tacoma
External links for Tacoma
Videos for Tacoma
Wikis about Tacoma
Discussion Groups about Tacoma
Blogs about Tacoma
Images of Tacoma

Tacoma has ten sister cities: Ålesund (Norway), Davao (Philippines), Fuzhou (China), George (South Africa), Qiryat Motzkin (Israel), Kitakyushu (Japan), Gunsan (South Korea), Cienfuegos (Cuba), Vladivostok (Russia), and Taichung City (Taiwan). For 2008, Toyota will create a hybrid gasoline–electric Corolla. [6]. The Altis range of the Corolla is manufactured in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and Taiwan. Tacoma was named America's most stressed city in 2004 by Best Places Magazine. Two versions of engine are available, the 108 bhp 1.6 and the 134 bhp 1.8. [5]. In Asia (excluding Hong Kong Japan & India), the Toyota Corolla is branded as the Toyota Corolla Altis and is similar to the US-spec Corolla.

Tacoma is mentioned in the song "He's a Grungewhore" from the norwegian punk rock band Turbonegros 1994 album Never Is Forever. The Vibe, in turn, is sold with a different grille in Japan and is called the Toyota Voltz. Tacoma is also mentioned at the end of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song "Jump On It" ("Tacoma, jump on it..."). The Corolla has also spawned another multi-purpose vehicle, the Matrix, sold in Canada and the United States, and forms the basis of the Pontiac Vibe. Tacoma is mentioned in the Sir Mix-a-Lot song "My Hooptie" ("Rollin' in Tacoma, I could get burned (Sound of automatic gunfire) Betta make a u-turn"). The Corolla Spacio (Verso in Europe) moved on to the new platform. Toyota has named a popular line of pickup trucks the "Toyota Tacoma" after the city. The station wagon model is called the Toyota Corolla Fielder in Japan, and the five-door the Toyota Corolla Runx and Toyota Allex, launching in 2001.

Sources: ([[2]]) ([[3]]) ([[4]]}. The sporty XRS model, introduced for 2004, features the high-revving 170 hp (127 kW) 127 ft·lbf (172 N·m) 2ZZ-GE engine and 6 speed manual from the Toyota Celica GT-S and Lotus Elise. The long-running series of Tugboat Annie radio dramas, television shows and films (one of which starred a young actor named Ronald Reagan) was based on Tacoma tugboat operator Annie Foss. The torsion bar suspension and drum brakes in the rear are anachronisms, however. In addition, significant parts of The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) were shot in a North Tacoma home. This model made it to the United States in 2002. Other films featuring a Tacoma location include Get Carter (2000). Like the Vista, the Corolla's width is limited to 67 in (1700 mm), to avoid being in a higher tax bracket in Japan, although most of its European rivals are now wider.

Also featured was the 1927-vintage Java Jive, a Tacoma tavern shaped like a giant coffee pot. It is built on a shortened Toyota Vista platform—the Vista being a mid-sized, rather than compact, car. Kevin Kline's pizzeria was located in the flatiron building downtown. The ninth-generation Corolla (AE120/ZZE120) appeared in August 2000 with edgier styling and a longer 102.4 in (2600 mm) wheelbase. I Love You to Death (1990) was filmed in downtown and central Tacoma. In 1997, the Corolla Spacio, with its body panels stamped at long-time Toyota supplier Kanto Autoworks, was introduced as a two-box minivan version and sold as the Corolla Verso in Europe and the Toyota Spacio in New Zealand. Parts of the movie 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), whose plot is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, were filmed at Stadium High School and in the nearby North End neighborhood, although most other exterior scenes were filmed in Seattle. As a result, a sporting model with a six-speed gearbox was offered.

A running gag in the 1985 Tom Hanks film Volunteers is the repeated references to Tacoma by John Candy's character, "Tom Tuttle from Tacoma, Washington.". A European range had different front and rear ends (this was sold in Australia and New Zealand, too), to appeal to customers there. Tacoma is also prominently mentioned in the 1977 Steve Miller Band song "Rock 'N Me" (I went from Phoenix, Arizona, all the way to Tacoma, Philadelphia, Atlanta, L.A.). Europe (1996-2001). Richard Brautigan wrote of his Tacoma childhood in his autobiographical short stories "Corporal," "The Armoured Car," "The Auction," and "The Ghost Children of Tacoma.". The US-market 2001 Toyota Corolla has a maximum legal carrying capacity of 850lbs. The album also includes a song called "South Tacoma Way.". VVT-i variable valve timing was added to the engine for 2000.

Neko Case's song "Thrice All American", featured on her album Furnace Room Lullaby, is an ode to Tacoma, which she considers her hometown. In the US market, only sedans were offered. For the 1994-1995 season, the Seattle SuperSonics played in the Tacoma Dome while the Seattle Center Coliseum was gutted and renovated into Key Arena, the team's current home. A new all-aluminum engine powered all Corollas, making every car lighter than its predecessor. At one point, the Tacoma Dome was home to a professional indoor soccer team, the Tacoma Stars. All North American Corollas were now built in California (by NUMMI) or Canada (by TMMC). The Tacoma Dome does still host traveling sports and pseudo-sports events such as pro wrestling, figure skating tours, and the Harlem Globetrotters. USA (1998-2002).

The city has struggled to keep a minor league hockey franchise, having lost the Tacoma Rockets of the WHL to relocation and having the Tacoma Sabercats of the former West Coast Hockey League go defunct due to financial woes. JPN-market chassis:. The Rainiers play inside Cheney Stadium, named after local businessman and baseball enthusiast Ben Cheney. The Sprinter Trueno coupé range was carried over with a facelift, while the Wagon was identical to the Corolla. Tacoma, in addition to the professional sports teams of Seattle, has one minor league baseball franchise, the Tacoma Rainiers, a Triple-A team playing in the Pacific Coast League as a farm team of the Seattle Mariners. This marked the beginning of the end of the Sprinter. Tacoma also has Greyhound and Amtrak service, accessible via Tacoma Dome Station. The Japanese has a version called the "Corolla GT" which is a 4-door, 165hp, 6-speed sedan.

Tacoma is also served by Washington State Ferries system, which has a dock at Point Defiance, providing ferry access to Tahlequah at the southern tip of Vashon Island, typically on the ferry M/V Rhododendron. Due to recession, Toyota ordered that Corolla development chief Takayasu Honda cuts costs, hence the carryover engineering. This line is presently under consideration for extension. The eighth generation (AE110/ZZE110), which shared its platform (and doors, on some models) with its predecessor, was introduced in May 1995, 1998 in Europe and North America. Sound Transit has also established Tacoma Link light rail, a 1.6-mile electric streetcar line linking Tacoma Dome Station with the University of Washington, Tacoma, Tacoma's Museum District, and the Theater District. Japan (1995-1999).
Sound Transit, the regional transit authority, provides daily Sounder Commuter Rail service and express bus service during the week. This model was not as successful due to a rising yen and home-market recession, blunting demand.

Several primary routes of note are:. The three and five-door Corolla FX was also sold in Europe just as the Corolla, and was available mostly in normal (non-sports) specs unlike the FX range avaliable in Japan which were available in two models the SJ a 16 valve 1.6-litre 115bhp (4A-FE) and the GT a 20 Valve 1.6-litre 160bhp (Silvertop 4A-GE). Bus service operates at 15 or 30 minute frequencies on weekdays. The five-door Sprinter was sold as the Corolla Sprinter in Europe, confusingly. Pierce Transit operates a total of 55 bus routes on busses powered by natural gas and diesel. The US-market Geo Prizm was sold as a four-door sedan. Public bus service is provided by Pierce Transit, which serves Tacoma and Pierce County. The Corolla Levin and Sprinter Trueno were sold as two-door coupés.

Tacoma has a wide array of alternative transportation services available including busses, commuter rail, light rail, and ferries. Sprinters were available as a four-door sedan or five-door liftback, including a four-door hardtop called the Sprinter Marino (only for this generation). Seattle-Tacoma International Airport lies about 22 miles to the north in the city of SeaTac. It was available as a four-door sedan, three- and five-door hatchback and a five-door station wagon. Washington State Route 16 runs along a concrete viaduct through Tacoma's Nalley Valley connecting Interstate 5 with West Tacoma, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and the Kitsap Peninsula. This model appeared in 1992 in Japan, 1993 in Europe and 1994 in North America. I-5 links Tacoma with Seattle to the north and Portland, Oregon, to the south. With its 97 in (2465 mm) wheelbase, the Corolla had moved into the compact size class once occupied by the Toyota Corona and Camry.

The dominant intercity transportation link between Tacoma and other parts of the Puget Sound is Interstate 5. The next Corolla (AE10X) was larger, heavier, and more expensive, with development chief Dr Akihiko Saito wanting to develop a 'mini-Lexus', after success with that range's flagship. In newer portions of the city to the west and south, residential cul-de-sacs, four-lane collector roads and indoor shopping centers are more commonplace. They generated 152 ft·lbf at 4,400rpm as opposed to the N/a 4A-GE's 100 ft·lbf at 4,800 rpm. The Proctor, Old Town, Dome, Sixth Avenue, and Lincoln Business Districts are some of the more prominent and popular of these and coordinate their efforts to redevelop urban villages through the Cross District Association of Tacoma. They used the SC12 roots type supercharger and a top mounted intercooler that was fed cool air via a scoop on the bonnet. Twelve such districts have active, city-recognized business associations and hold "small town"-style parades and other festivals. In Japan the AE92 Levin/Trueno was also fitted with a supercharged engine and designated GT-Z.

In portions of the city dating back to the Tacoma Streetcar Period (1888-1938), denser mixed use business districts exist alongside single family homes. European-market chassis:. Most streets east of Pacific Avenue are labeled "East." This system of numbering extends beyond city limits to much of the western portion of Pierce County. US-market chassis:. Many first-time visitors have encountered difficulty with this. These two plants made 279,000 units, making a total of 4.5 million of this generation (AE90) made. This can lead to confusion, as Union Avenue intersects both North and South 11th Streets. American production of the sedan took place at NUMMI and Cambridge, Ontario.

North- and south-running streets are given a name or a letter, and are also labeled "North" or "South" in relation to 6th Avenue. These generations were also favored by tuners. Numbered streets run east to west and are labeled "North" or "South" according to their relationship with 6th Avenue or Division Street. The three-door is sold as a panel van model there, called the Toyota Carri. The majority of the city has a system of gridded streets oriented in relation to Pacific Avenue and 6th Avenue, both beginning in Downtown Tacoma. The sixth-generation five-door hatchback is still made in South Africa as an entry-level model called the Toyota Tazz. Tacoma's system of transportation is based primarily on the automobile. The Sprinter five-door liftback was re-badged as the Corolla in Europe, though for a period in Ireland (and possibly elsewhere) it was badged the "Sprinter GLS", unusually in cheap-looking decals instead of the metallic-coated plastic badges found on all other Toyotas of the time.

Out of the total population, 20.6% of those under the age of 18 and 10.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. It was called the All-Trac in the US and sold with the Tercel or Corolla name in some countries. 15.9% of the population and 11.4% of families were below the poverty line. It was sold from 1988 to 1994 and had different bodywork to other Corollas. The per capita income for the city was $19,130. The all wheel drive Sprinter Carib wagon used a solid axle rear suspension with coil springs, while the rest used struts all around. Males had a median income of $35,820, versus $27,697 for females. The Geo Prizm shared a slightly different body with the Japan-market Sprinter.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,879, and the median income for a family was $45,567. All Corollas were front-drive for 1987, with production beginning in May 1987. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males. Australian-market chassis: Similarity with the Holden Nova. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. US-market chassis: Also marketed by GM from 1985–1988 as Chevy Nova before becoming Geo Prizm. The median age was 34. It was available with either SOHC or DOHC engines, the latter marketed as the FX-16.

In 2000, the population's demographics were evenly distributed: 25.8% under 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. A new Corolla FX, built at the US NUMMI plant, appeared in 1987. The average household size in 2000 was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.10. These AE86 models have been immortalized in the anime series Initial D, and have been also featured in the computer and video games Need for Speed: Underground 2, Gran Turismo 3 & 4, and Auto Modellista. Almost one third of households (31.7%) were made up of individuals living alone; 10.4% of these were 65 years of age or older. The Sprinter sports cars, in two-door coupe and three-door liftback forms, were notable for the line's first use of pop-up headlamps, which the equivalent Corolla Levin sports models did not have. There were 76,152 households in Tacoma in 2000; 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.7% were non-families. This engine was also combined with the front-drive transaxle to power the mid-engined Toyota MR-2.

6.85% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. It was a 1.6 L (1587 cc) I4 and produced an impressive 124 hp (92 kW), turning the Sprinter Trueno (Japan), Corolla GT Coupe (Europe) and Corolla GT-S into a popular sports car. The racial makeup of the city was 69.08% White, 11.24% African American, 1.96% Native American, 7.57% Asian, 0.93% Pacific Islander, 2.94% from other races, and 6.28% from two or more races. A hot DOHC 16-valve engine, designated 4A-GE, was added in 1984 on the rear-drive cars. There were 81,102 housing units at an average density of 625.3/km² (1,619.4/mi²). The five-door liftback was sold with the Corolla Seca name in Australia and the nameplate survived on successive five-door models. In 2000, Tacoma's population density was 1,492.3/km² (3,864.9/mi²). Although there was a five-door liftback model of the basic Corolla, the FX-based hatchback was sold alongside it.

2004]). The three- and five-door hatchbacks resembled the Corolla sedan with a truncated boot. D3 [Sept. A "short" hatchback range, called the Corolla FX in Japan and the Corolla Compact in Germany, arrived in 1984, on the front-wheel-drive platform. Census Bureau estimated that Tacoma's population had increased by 1.7%, to 196,800 (Trends, No. It was the first Corolla to top the New Zealand top-10 lists, ending Ford's dominance of that market. Four years later, the U.S. The front-wheel-drive wheelbase was now 95.6 in (2428 mm).

The censusGR2 of 2000 indicated that 193,556 persons, 76,152 households, and 45,919 families resided in Tacoma. This model, from 1984, moved the Corolla into front wheel drive, except for the AE85 Corolla Levin (SR5 coupe and GT Coupe outside Japan) and AE86 Sprinter Trueno which continued on the older rear wheel drive platform, along with the three-door "liftback" (TE72), three-door van (KE70) and five-door wagon (KE70) of the previous generation, that were still being produced. A daily newspaper has been in circulation in Tacoma since 1883; in the period from 1907 to 1918, three dailies were published: The Tacoma Ledger, The News, and The Tacoma Tribune. The fifth generation (AE8x) is generally regarded as the finest Corolla when measured against its contemporaries, and some 3.3 million units were produced. The paper's circulation is about 128,000 (Sundays 144,000), making it the third-largest newspaper in the state of Washington. The 1980-81 models had 4 lamps in the front in some markets, all 82-83 models have 2. The city's only daily newspaper is The News Tribune, since 1986 a subsidiary of McClatchy Newspapers. In 1980, during this model's life, Corolla daily production reached an all-time high, averaging 2,346 units.

Also, one of the elementary schools, Sheridan Elementary, operates three foreign language immersion programs (Spanish, French, and Japanese). The year 1983 introduced the Corolla's first overhead cam engine, the 1.6 L (1587 cc/96 in³) 4A-C in the AE71 model range. One of the district's high schools, Henry Foss High School, operates an acclaimed International Baccalaureate program. A new 1.8 L (1770 cc/108 in³) 3T engine was optional to some markets, producing 75 hp (56 kW), whilst parts of the world retained the old 4K. The district also has 5 high schools, one alternative high school, and one School of the Arts. This generation (apart from the wagon) got a new rear coil spring five-link rear end with panhard rod, and the wheelbase was longer at 94.5 in (2400 mm). The school district contains 36 elementary schools and 11 middle schools. The car were also avaliable in coupe versions (TE71 and TE72).

Tacoma's main public school district is Tacoma Public Schools. Equally, there was a Daihatsu Charmant variant. The total area is 20.01% water. Although most of the fourth generation was replaced by 1984, the station wagon and van versions soldiered on into 1987. 129.7 km² (50.1 mi²) of it is land and 32.5 km² (12.5 mi²) of it is water. The fourth-generation model (Ke70) released in 1979 in Japan, was a boxy, rear-wheel-drive offering. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 162.2 km² (62.6 mi²). US-market chassis:.

Its elevation is 116 meters (380 feet). A sporty 2T-G engine was also in the lineup in the Japanese model hardtop (AKA Levin) producing 124hp with a DOHC performance head, and later models with fuel injection. Tacoma is located at 47°14'29" North, 122°27'34" West (47.241371, -122.459389)GR1. The TE3x series 2T-C engines had an additional bump in horsepower thanks to their hemi-design and larger displacement (1588cc)giving the engines 75hp at the flywheel outmatching rival Datsun B210s engine output. In addition, Comcast also offers digital cable and internet services in the area. These figures are fairly optimistic (probably tested without ancillaries such as alternators or water pumps) to make the car look good for sales, in reality most Corollas of the time produced about 30 hp (22 kW) at the wheels, which can be estimated to 45 hp (34 kW) at the flywheel. Tacoma Power is, along with Tacoma Water and Tacoma Rail, a part of Tacoma Public Utilities. However emissions became a problem further into the 1970s, and the 4K engine in the KE5x series produced only 60 hp (45 kW), despite and increased capacity of 1290 cc.

Tacoma Power also operates the Click! Network, a cable television and internet service, one of the first public utilities to provide such a service. Early Corollas in this range (KE3x) with 3K engines produced 73 hp (54 kW) from just 1166 cc. Electrical power is furnished by Tacoma Power, a division of Tacoma Public Utilities, which owns hydroelectric plants on the North Fork of the Skokomish River. The base model cost US$2,711 in 1975, but one needed to step up to the $2,989 "deluxe" to get features comparable to the contemporary pack. On April 26, 2003 Tacoma's Chief of Police, David Brame, shot and killed his wife and himself in Gig Harbor, Washington. They also criticized the "relatively crude rear suspension" and lack of interior space and poor fuel economy when compared to the VW Rabbit. Tacoma was named after Mount Rainier, whose original name was Tahoma, which derived from the Puyallup tacobet, or "mother of waters.". Road & Track was critical of the 1975 Corolla, calling it "large and heavy" and "expensive" compared to the Honda Civic and Datsun B210.

The next day two Chinese settlements were burned to the ground.". USA (1974-1979). 3, 1885, "several hundred men, led by the mayor and other city officials, evicted the Chinese from their homes, corralled them at 7th Street and Pacific Avenue, marched them to the railway station at Lakeview, and forced them aboard the morning train to Portland, Oregon. JPN-market chassis:. To quote from the account prepared by the Chinese Reconciliation Project: On the morning of Nov. The KE40 series was assigned to the Sprinter variants. What came to be known as "Tacoma method" was used in November 1885 to expel several thousand Chinese peaceably living in the city. A three-door "liftback" (KE50) was added in 1976, along with a sporty-looking "sport coupe" body style.

A plaque in downtown Tacoma marks the start and finish point. A "Toyoglide" 2/3-speed automatic transmission was added as well as four-speed and for the "E/5, and "SR5" a five-speed manual transmissions. In 1880, he staged a global circumnavigation starting and ending in Tacoma to promote the city's centrality. These model codes were designated "TE3x". George Francis Train was a resident of Tacoma for a few years in the late 1800s, and was an early civic booster. All body styles—two- and four-door sedan (KE30), two-door hardtop (KE35) and three/five-door station wagon (KE36/KE38)—still used the 1.2 L (1166 cc/71 in³) 3K engine in certain markets, while most Japanese and American models got the stronger 1.6 L (1588 cc/96 in³) 2T engine. Its early hopes to live to be the "City of Destiny" were frustrated in the late 19th century, when the discovery of gold in the Klondike turned Seattle into a boom town, eclipsing Tacoma's early lead. While there were certain fourth-generation models with a longer model life, this generation, when considered as a whole, was the longest-lived one, possibly due to the worldwide recession in the 1970s.

Tacoma was officially incorporated on November 12, 1875. In addition to the Sprinter, there was a rebodied version built by Toyota affiliate Daihatsu, called the Daihatsu Charmant. (A replica of Job Carr's cabin, which also served as Tacoma's first post office, was erected in "Old Town" in 2000 near the original site.). The third-generation Toyota Corolla, built from 1974–81 (worldwide versions) (KE3x/KE5x), marked Toyota's greatest growth in the United States in the wake of the fuel crisis. The town was originally settled by pioneer and postmaster Job Carr, a Civil War veteran and land speculator who hoped to profit from the selection of Commencement Bay as the terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad. Japan (1974-1981). It was visited by European and American explorers, including George Vancouver and Charles Wilkes, who named many of the coastal landmarks. * TE-27 - Hardtop Coupe, SR5.

Tacoma was inhabited for thousands of years by Native American people, predominantly the Puyallup people. * TE-25 - Wagon, DX. . * TE-21 - Sedan, 2 Door Sedan. Chef-author Jeff Smith learned to cook and began his career in Tacoma at the Chaplain's Pantry, later known as the Gourmet Pantry (now closed), on Tacoma Avenue. US-market chassis:. A number of noteworthy individuals have come from Tacoma, among them bowling legend Earl Anthony, singer Bing Crosby, authors Richard Brautigan and Frank Herbert, cartoonist Gary Larson, serial killer Ted Bundy, serial sniper John Allen Muhammad, actress Dyan Cannon, conspiracy gadfly Fred Crisman, Andrew and Thea Foss, first owners and operators of Foss Launch and Tug Company, Puyallup Indian rights activist Robert Satiacum, auto racer Pat Austin, prize fighter Sugar Ray Seales, NFL receiver Ahmad Rashad, Major League baseball player Ron Cey, glass artist Dale Chihuly, and musicians the Wailers, Jerry Miller (Moby Grape), Jerry Cantrell and Neko Case. Corollas with this engine were designated TE21 or TE27.

In the late 1990s, however, Simpson Tacoma Kraft reduced total sulfur emissions by 90%, largely eliminating the problem, but a strong smell is occasionally still detectable. A 1.6 L (1588 cc/96 in³) 102 hp (76 kW) 2T engine came in 1971, quite impressive for the time, and the sporty SR5 (aka: Levin in Japan) was introduced in 1973. Beginning in the 1930s, Tacoma became known for its malodorousness, called the "Aroma of Tacoma" -- a distinctive, acrid odor produced by local paper manufacturing on the industrial tide flats. The above models were available, as well as a hardtop coupe called the "SR-5". It contains Wright Park Arboretum. USA (1971-1974). Schwagerl and Ebenezer Rhys Roberts. * TE-27 - Hardtop Coupe (Levin/Trueno).

Wright Park, located near downtown, is a large, English-style park designed in the late 1800s by E.O. * TE-25 - Wagon, DX. Another park in Tacoma is Titlow Beach, which is a popular scuba diving area. * TE-21 - Sedan, 2 Door Sedan. One of the largest urban parks in the U.S, Point Defiance Park, which includes the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Fort Nisqually, is located in Tacoma. JPN-market chassis:. Tacoma's downtown Cultural District is also the site of the Washington State History Museum (1996) and the Tacoma Art Museum (2003). The Corolla became the second-best selling car in the world that year.

It includes a functional glassblowing studio. There was a two and four-door sedan (KE20) available, as well as a two-door coupe (KE25), and three-door wagon (KE26). The Museum of Glass opened in downtown Tacoma in 2002, showcasing glass art from the region and around the world. The front suspension design was improved greatly, using a swaybar, however the rear remained relatively the same. Tacoma is a major international deep-water container port. It had a longer 91.9 in (2334 mm) wheelbase, and used the 1.2 L (1166 cc/71 in³) 3K I4 which made 73 hp (54 kW). and the Russell Investment Group, as well as institutions of higher learning, including Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, and the University of Washington's Tacoma campus. The second-generation KE2x model , launched 1970, had "coke-bottle" styling.

Tacoma is the home of such international companies as Labor Ready, Inc. Japan (1969-1978). 2004]). Exports to the United States began in 1968 at about US$1,700, and the car has been popular since. D3 [Sept. Toyota has been almost steadfast in facelifting each generation after two years, and replacing it with an all-new model every four years. Census Bureau to be 196,800, and a metropolitan area of 750,000 (Trends, No. USA (1968-1970).

1, 2004, was estimated by the U.S. The suspension in front was MacPherson struts supported by a transverse leaf spring beneath the engine crossmember, with leaf springs connected to a solid axle in back. The 2000 census reported Tacoma's population as 193,556; the city's population on Apr. A 4-speed manual transmission or 2 speed automatic transmission was available, and the car used rear wheel drive. Tacoma (IPA: [tə ˈko mə]) is the county seat of Pierce CountyGR6, Washington, USA, situated on Puget Sound's Commencement Bay, Tacoma Narrows, and the estuary of the Puyallup River. Power came from either a 1.1 L (1077 cc/65 in³) OHV I4, the K, which produced 60 hp (45 kW), or the 1.2 L (1166 cc/71 in³) 3K in later models.
Location of Tacoma in
Pierce County and Washington State. The initial car, the KE1x series, was small, with a 90 in (2286 mm) wheelbase, and came in two- and four-door sedan (KE10 and KE11), two-door coupe (KE15), and three-door station wagon (KE16 and KE18) versions.

West End. Eiji Toyoda, chairman of the company, said it worked hard to create popular demand, and disputes that Toyota rode a wave of private car ownership that was taking off in the mid-1960s. South Tacoma. The Corolla was launched in Japan in October 1966. South End. Japan (1966-1969). Northeast Tacoma. In Australia, the Corolla liftback (TE72) was at one point badged the T-18.

Dome District. Over the years, there have been rebadged versions of the Corolla, including the 1980s’ Holden Nova of Australia, and the Sprinter-based Chevrolet Nova, Geo Prizm and Chevrolet Prizm of the United States. Stadium District. There have also been several spin-offs over the years, including the Corolla II hatchback, Corolla Ceres (and similar Sprinter Marino) hardtop, Corolla Levin and Sprinter Trueno sports coupes and hatchbacks, and the Corolla FX hatckback (now Corolla Runx). North End. It was replaced in 2001 by the Toyota Allex. McKinley Hill. A slightly upmarket version is called the Toyota Sprinter, sold in the Japanese home market.

Hilltop. . Eastside. The Corolla's chassis designation code is "E", as described in Toyota's chassis and engine codes. Central. Corollas are currently manufactured in the United States (California), the United Kingdom, Canada (Cambridge, Ontario), India, South Africa, Brazil, Turkey and Thailand. Old Town. [1].

Route 3, "Downtown Tacoma – Lakewood via Tacoma Mall". Toyota has made 30 million cars under the Corolla name since its launch in 1966, making it the best selling car of all time. Route 2, "South 19th – Bridgeport Way via Tacoma Community College", and. In 1997, the Corolla became the best selling nameplate in the world. Route 1, "Pacific Avenue – 6th Avenue". The Toyota Corolla is a compact car produced by Toyota of Japan, known worldwide for its reliability, conventional engineering and low fuel consumption. AE-114 - AWD Sedan.

AE-110 - Sedan. AE-111 - Sedan, GT. AE95 - 4WD 5-Door Wagon with the 4A-F or 4A-FE engines. AE92 - with the 4A-F engine and the 4A-GE engine (GTi).

CE90 - with the C1 engine. EE90 - with the 2E engine. AE95 - 4WD 5-Door Wagon. AE92 - Sedan, SR5/GT-S Coupé, 2WD 5-Door Wagon.

AE-86 - FWD 4-door Sedan /5-door Hatchback. AE-82 - FWD 4-door Sedan /5-door Hatchback. AE-80 - FWD 4-door Sedan /5-door Hatchback. AE-86 - RWD GT-S/SR5 Coupé.

AE-84 - 4WD 5-door wagon. AE-82 - FWD Sedan, FWD 4/2-door hatchback (FX/FX16), FWD 5-door wagon. TE-55 - Liftback, SR5. TE-51 - Sport Coupe SR5.

TE-37 - Hardtop Coupe SR5,SR. TE-35 - Wagon, DX. TE-31 - Sedan, E/5,DX 2 Door Sedan, E/5,DX. TE-55 - Liftback.

TE-51 - Sport Coupe (Levin/Treuno). TE-37 - Hardtop Coupe (Levin/Trueno). TE-35 - Wagon. TE-31 - Sedan,2 Door Sedan.

04-21-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory