Street Rod

Street Rod is a racing video game series developed by Logical Design Works and published by California Dreams for DOS, Amiga, and Commodore 64. Street Rod exclusively feaured Muscle Cars, specifically those from GM, Ford, and Chrysler.

Image of a crash from Street Rod

Overview

You start the game as a protagonist that seeks to usurp the throne and claim the girlfriend of the local king of the streets. Equipped with a garage and a small amount of cash, you buy a used car out of the paper and embark on a journey to rise through the ranks by winning races against other racers. Using money you earn through races you can modify your car and eventually winning enough races earns you the right to challenge the king for his position.

Gameplay

The player starts off on the garage, where cars and parts may be purchased from the newspaper. New parts that are purchased must be installed by the player by entering the hood of or going under the car and then removing a series of screws to remove parts of the engine and transmission. Then, these parts must be re-installed in order and the screws replaced, otherwise the car will be undrivable. To install tires, the car must be jacked up. While racing, the car will eventually run out of fuel, which the payer must obtain from the gas station.

The player will proceed from the garage to the local diner in order to find some competiton to race. Races take place on either a dragstrip, Mulholland drive, or in an aquaduct. Wagers on the races can be set from "Just for fun!" (no wager) to cash to "Pink Slips" (the winner recieves the loser's car). When the race starts, the player must wait for a signal to be given to go or else they forfeit the race. Crashing during the race will either total your car, or requre you to pay a fee in order to get it fixed. Also, the police may fine you during a Pink slip race.

Series

  • Street Rod was released in 1989 and takes place in the year 1965.
  • Street Rod 2 was released in 1990 and takes place in the year 1971. Street Rod 2 was modeled on the same engine as the first game, which yielded an almost identical game with different cars, more parts, an additional track, and improved graphics.
  • Street Rod 3 is an unoffical sequel to the series that is being developed for Windows with the aim of recreating a game similar to Street Rod 2 with more cars and parts, as well as transitioning the series from 2D to 3D grahpics.

This page about Street Rod includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Street Rod
News stories about Street Rod
External links for Street Rod
Videos for Street Rod
Wikis about Street Rod
Discussion Groups about Street Rod
Blogs about Street Rod
Images of Street Rod

Also, the police may fine you during a Pink slip race. Organizational theorists such as Margaret Wheatley have also described the workings of organizational systems in new contexts, such as quantum physics, chaos theory, and the self-organization of systems. Crashing during the race will either total your car, or requre you to pay a fee in order to get it fixed. This is a basis of systemic coaching. When the race starts, the player must wait for a signal to be given to go or else they forfeit the race. Such people consider the potential consequences of their decisions on other parts of larger systems. Wagers on the races can be set from "Just for fun!" (no wager) to cash to "Pink Slips" (the winner recieves the loser's car). Some people can think globally while acting locally.

Races take place on either a dragstrip, Mulholland drive, or in an aquaduct. Systems thinking is a leadership competency. The player will proceed from the garage to the local diner in order to find some competiton to race. Organizational development theorist Peter Senge developed the notion of organizations as systems in his book The Fifth Discipline. While racing, the car will eventually run out of fuel, which the payer must obtain from the gas station. In operations research and organizational development (OD), organizations are viewed as human systems (conceptual systems) of interacting components such as sub-systems, processes and organizational structures. To install tires, the car must be jacked up. System can also be used referring to a framework, be it software or hardware, designed to allow software to run, see platform.

Then, these parts must be re-installed in order and the screws replaced, otherwise the car will be undrivable. This still fits with the definition of components which are connected together (in this case in order to facilitate the flow of information). New parts that are purchased must be installed by the player by entering the hood of or going under the car and then removing a series of screws to remove parts of the engine and transmission. Again, an example will illustrate: There are systems of counting, as with Roman numerals, and various systems for filing papers, or catalogues, and various library systems, of which the Dewey Decimal System is an example. The player starts off on the garage, where cars and parts may be purchased from the newspaper. In computer science and information science, system could also be a method or an algorithm. Using money you earn through races you can modify your car and eventually winning enough races earns you the right to challenge the king for his position. See system (thermodynamics).

Equipped with a garage and a small amount of cash, you buy a used car out of the paper and embark on a journey to rise through the ranks by winning races against other racers. Thermodynamic systems may be: open, closed, and isolated. You start the game as a protagonist that seeks to usurp the throne and claim the girlfriend of the local king of the streets. Human systems may be comprised of smaller groups or sub-systems that may strive to accomplish their own goals at the expense of other living systems or other human systems. . Human systems are people that attempt to accomplish goals together. Street Rod exclusively feaured Muscle Cars, specifically those from GM, Ford, and Chrysler. Living systems interact with inanimate elements of its environment.

Street Rod is a racing video game series developed by Logical Design Works and published by California Dreams for DOS, Amiga, and Commodore 64. Living systems can refer to parts of a living organism, members of a group of organisms, or groups of organisms that interact with other groups of organisms. Street Rod 3 is an unoffical sequel to the series that is being developed for Windows with the aim of recreating a game similar to Street Rod 2 with more cars and parts, as well as transitioning the series from 2D to 3D grahpics. Conceptual systems generally exist to aid in the accomplishment of specific goals or may be used to model physical systems. Street Rod 2 was modeled on the same engine as the first game, which yielded an almost identical game with different cars, more parts, an additional track, and improved graphics. Conceptual systems are made up of ideas. Street Rod 2 was released in 1990 and takes place in the year 1971. Physical systems are systems of matter and energy.

Street Rod was released in 1989 and takes place in the year 1965. Dynamic systems have components or flows or both, that change over time. However it is also an open system, because it depends on outside factors and the prisoners and wardens do go outside. For example a prison is a closed system because the prisoners can't get out, and the wardens spend most of their time at the prison. In practice many things are a mixture of the two.

A closed system is self-contained: outside events can have no influence upon the system. Open systems can be influenced by events outside the declared boundaries of a system. A number of material points considered simultaneously is called a system of material points, or briefly a system, if some common principle may be said to govern the collection. It might be supposed that there can be an infinite regression or progression of such systems, but in a finite world, all things come to an end (perhaps at the level of quarks, leptons, and photons at one end and the Universe at the other).

Describing this thing makes up information, and defines a system. The cup has a certain shape and a handle, it is made of non-porous material and so on, and it is put together in such a way as to provide a useful function. For example, a cup is an object, but it is also a system for holding hot or cold liquid, or other material. In addition, all so-called "things"— namely objects— are actually systems.

The entire body is also referred to as a system in terms of physiology. In the human body, such systems are referred to as the nervous system, the circulatory system, the digestive system, the reproductive system, and the respiratory system. For example, the solar system of nine planets orbiting the sun. In the natural world, one would declare that there are systems.

Going to the doctor is a process, but health care is a system. For example, a pulley is a machine, but an elevator, which incorporates pulleys (amongst other components), is a system. Depending on the type of system, a system can often be distinguished from individual (simple) machines, elements or processes of that system by the number, arrangements and complexity of those elements. An engineering example of a system is often a circuit or a physical series (but such a system does not have to physically exist).

(It is tempting to say that systems enable "things" to be done— but that is confusing in this context). Systems enable "activities" to be performed. At arbritary boundaries, a collection of interrelated components (or, subsystems) may be declared a system and may further be abstracted to be declared a component of a larger system. .

A sub-system is a system which is a proper subset of another system. Cladistics is a system for classifying evolutionary relationships among living things based on derived similarity. Grammar is a system which governs language usage (in this case, the grammatical elements are the system elements). Laws are a system which governs human social behavior.

A system may be a set of rules for governing behavior or organisation. The term is often used to describe a set of entities which 'act' on each other, and for which a mathematical model or a logical model may be constructed encompassing the elements and their allowed actions. A system typically consists of components (or elements) which interface in order to facilitate the 'flow' of information, matter or energy. From the Latin and Greek, the term system meant to combine, to set up, to place together.

It is generally recognized that while any element of a system need not have a (direct) relationship with any other particular element of a system, any element which has no relationship with any other element of a system, cannot be a part of that system. That is, each element is seen to be related to other elements of and/or the whole system. A system is an assemblage of related elements comprising a whole, such that each element may be seen to be a part of that whole in some sense.

04-18-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory