Steven Spielberg

Steven Spielberg

Steven Allan Spielberg (born on December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio but raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona), is an American film director whose films range from science fiction to historical drama to horror. He is noted in recent years for his willingness to tackle emotionally powerful issues, such as the horrors of the Holocaust in Schindler's List, the inhumanity of slavery in Amistad, and the hardships of war in Saving Private Ryan. One consistent theme in his work is a childlike, even na´ve sense of wonderment and faith, as attested by works like Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., Hook and A.I..

The director, the man

Spielberg is the most financially successful motion picture director of all time. He has helmed an astounding number of feature films that have become enormous box-office hits, and this has given him enormous influence in Hollywood. As of 2004, he has been listed in Premiere and other magazines as the most "powerful" and influential figure in the motion picture industry. He is seen as a figure who has the influence, financial resources, and acceptance of Hollywood studio authorities to make any movie he wants to make, be it a mainstream action-adventure movie (Jurassic Park) or a three-hour-long black and white drama about a controversial historical subject (Schindler's List).

His beginnings

Spielberg is known by film historians as one of the famous "movie brats" of the 1970s: along with fellow filmmakers (and personal friends) George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, John Milius, and Brian De Palma, Spielberg grew up making movies. He was making amateur 8mm "adventure" movies with his friends as a teenager (scenes from these amateur films have been included on the DVD edition of Saving Private Ryan), and he made his first short film for theatrical release, Amblin', in 1968 at the age of twenty one. (Spielberg's own production company, Amblin Entertainment, was named after this short film.) His maiden directorial work was a segment of the pilot film to Rod Serling's Night Gallery. While working on this segment its star Joan Crawford collared a production executive and said, "Keep an eye on this kid, he's going places." After directing episodes of various TV shows, including some early Columbo TV movies, Spielberg directed his first well-known feature with a 1971 TV "movie-of-the-week" entitled Duel (later released to theatres overseas and eventually in the U.S.). This film, about a truck mysteriously terrorizing an average citizen, has become a cult classic, having been released on video several times over the years.

Move to theatrical films

Spielberg's debut theatrical feature film, The Sugarland Express (takes place and filmed on location in Sugar Land, Texas and is about a husband and wife attempting to escape the law), won him critical praise and enough studio backing to be chosen as the director of a summer movie that would secure him a place in the history of motion pictures: Jaws, a horror film based on the Peter Benchley novel about encounters with a killer shark. Jaws won four Academy Awards (for editing and sound), and grossed over US$100 million at the box office, setting the domestic record for box office gross.

In 1976, Spielberg was asked by Alexander Salkind to direct Superman, but decided instead to expand on a pet project he had on his mind since his youth: a film about UFOs, which became Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977). The film remains a cult sci-fi classic among its fans.

The success Spielberg was beginning to enjoy, as well as his eventual tendency to make films with wide mainstream and commercial appeal, also subjected him to disdain in critical circles by film reviewers. For example, Spielberg's next film was 1941, a big-budgeted World War II comedy farce set in L.A. days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, with the two top stars from Saturday Night Live, Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi, along with other all-stars. Although the film did make a small profit, it is considered by some to be Spielberg's first flop, although today it is also considered a cult classic. An expanded version has been shown on network television and later on Laserdisc and DVD.

Spielberg at his pinnacle

But what some would consider Spielberg's greatest film work was still to come, beginning in the 1980s. In 1981, Spielberg teamed up for the first time with his friend George Lucas to make Raiders of the Lost Ark, his homage to the cliffhanger serials of the Golden Age of Hollywood, with Harrison Ford (whom Lucas directed in Star Wars) as the dashing hero Indiana Jones. Raiders itself spawned two sequels, also directed by Spielberg and executive produced by Lucas.

One year later, Spielberg returned to his alien visitors motif with E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, a Disney-inspired story of a boy and the alien whom he befriends (and is trying to get back "home" to outer space). E.T. went on to become the top-grossing film of all time for many years.

When E.T. was released, Steven Spielberg, a Porsche 928 aficionado, had his car's moon-roof button re-designed with the movie's logo as both a gag for passengers, and a tribute to the movie's success. Despite their enormous appeal, few film scholars and critics place such Spielberg films as Raiders or E.T. in the same class as The Godfather, Citizen Kane, or many other classics of the cinema.

In 1985, Spielberg made The Color Purple, an adaptation of Alice Walker's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Many critics were unsure of whether or not Spielberg could handle such serious material, as his output to that point had been viewed as "lighter" entertainment. The film was released to great acclaim and proved Spielberg's ability as a serious, dramatic filmmaker. It received 11 Academy Award nominations in 1986, but Spielberg was snubbed in the Best Director category, which sent shockwaves through Hollywood. However, Spielberg was awarded the Directors Guild Award for his work on the film.

Although nominated throughout his career for an Academy Award, the gold statuette had long eluded Spielberg, although in 1986 he was awarded The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for his work as a creative producer up to that point.

Spielberg had tried numerous times to film a live-action version of Peter Pan without success. He eventually decided to create his own take on the Pan legend in 1991. Hook focused on a middle-aged Pan (played by Robin Williams), who returns to Neverland to face the title character (Captain Hook, played by Dustin Hoffman). The over-budget film was not a box-office success.

In 1993, Spielberg decided to once again tackle the adventure genre, as he released the movie version of Michael Crichton's novel Jurassic Park, about killer dinosaurs rampaging through a tropical island resort. It would eventually overtake E.T. as the all-time top grossing film for several years (until James Cameron's Titanic).

It was in that same year that Spielberg finally won the critical acclaim he had long sought for making Schindler's List (based on a novel about a man who sacrificed everything to save thousands of people from the wrath of the Holocaust). That film earned him his first regular Academy Award for Best Director (it also won Best Picture).

Another of Spielberg's most critically acclaimed films, Saving Private Ryan, was released in 1998. Spielberg considered it one of his finest works, yet in a highly publicized "showdown", it lost the Best Picture Oscar at the 1999 Academy Awards to Shakespeare in Love.

Into a new century

In 2001, Spielberg filmed fellow director and friend Stanley Kubrick's final project, A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, a project planned for many years but which Kubrick was unable to finish during his lifetime. The futuristic story of a humanoid android longing for love, A.I. featured groundbreaking visual effects, but unfortunately was not the blockbuster film Spielberg had hoped for. The film drew mixed reviews.

In recent years, Spielberg has gained increased popularity through Minority Report (2002), starring Tom Cruise as a futuristic cop on the run from his own future; and Catch Me If You Can (also in 2002), a story about a con-man (with Leonardo di Caprio and Tom Hanks). Spielberg used Hanks again in 2004 for The Terminal, the story of an East European traveller living in an airport terminal.

As of 2004, he has won two Academy Awards for Best Director, one for Schindler's List and another for Saving Private Ryan.

In August 2004, Spielberg's newest project, a modernized adaptation of War of the Worlds was greenlit. Production started in October 2004 and is currently set for release on June 29, 2005. This movie will also feature Tom Cruise in a leading role. Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) will provide the special effects.

As of March 2005, Spielberg is slated to direct the Untitled 1972 Munich Olympics Project, formerly known as Vengeance. This film is written by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Tony Kushner.

Films by Spielberg

  • War of the Worlds (2005)
  • The Terminal (2004)
  • Catch Me If You Can (2002)
  • Minority Report (2002)
  • A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Saving Private Ryan (1998) (Academy Award, Best Director)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • Amistad (1997)
  • Schindler's List (1993) (Academy Award, Best Director, Best Picture)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Hook (1991)
  • Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)
  • Always (1989)
  • Empire of the Sun (1987)
  • The Color Purple (1985)
  • Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)
  • E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
  • 1941 (1979)
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
  • Jaws (1975)
  • The Sugarland Express (1974)

See also: List of Spielberg films

Side projects

Spielberg has produced (without directing) a considerable number of films, and can be credited with launching the career of Robert Zemeckis. He is also a lover of animated cartoons, and has produced several hit cartoons (and a few flops), including Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, and Freakazoid.

He was also, for a short time, the executive producer of the long-running medical drama ER which currently airs on NBC.

He is one of the co-founders of Dreamworks Pictures (Dreamworks SKG, with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen providing the other letters in the company name), which has released all of his movies since Amistad in 1997.

Following the critical and box office success of Schindler's List in 1993, Spielberg founded and continues to finance the Shoah Project, a non-profit organization with the goal of providing an archive for the filmed testimony of as many survivors of the Holocaust as possible, so that their stories will not be lost in the future.

Personal

Spielberg is married to actress Kate Capshaw, whom he cast in Indiana Jones and the Temple Of Doom. He has seven children—four biological: Max Spielberg (from his former marriage to actress Amy Irving), Sasha, Sawyer, and Destry Spielberg (from his current marriage to Capshaw); two adopted (Theo and Mikaela Spielberg); and one stepdaughter (Jessica Capshaw).

Trivia

  • While the films that Steven Spielberg directed have won numerous awards, no actor or actress has won an Academy Award for a performance for one of his films.
  • Spielberg had a cameo role as the Cook County assessor in the last minutes of the 1980 film The Blues Brothers.
  • In 1982 Ben Kingsley won Best Actor and Richard Attenborough won Best Director for the film Gandhi, which beat Steven Spielberg's film E.T. for Best Picture. Eleven years later, in 1993, Steven Spielberg cast Richard Attenborough as the grandfather in Jurassic Park (his first performance in 13 years) and Ben Kingsley in Schindler's List. Steven Spielberg won Best Director and Best Picture Oscars that year.
  • Spielberg, an Eagle Scout, designed the requirements for the Boy Scout Cinematography merit badge.
  • The asteroid 25930 Spielberg is named in his honour.
  • Supports the Democratic Party of United States.
  • He went to Saratoga High School and quipped that it was the "worst experience" of his life and "hell on Earth". [1] (http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/05.29.97/spielberg-9722.html)
  • In 2002 Spielberg was awarded a B.A. in Film Production and Electronic Arts with an option in Film/Video Production from California State University, Long Beach. He first enrolled at Long Beach State in 1965.
  • The A&E Network is expected to announce that it will produce a two-hour drama about the relationship between filmmakers George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. According to Daily Variety, the biopic, tentatively titled Celluloid Titans, is being executive produced by Jody Brockway.
  • For his work on the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation since 1994, he was awarded with the Great Cross of Merit with Star, the German version of the Great Officer's Cross, in September 1998 for "a very noticeable contribution to the issue of the Holocaust".

Urban legends

Spielberg started a fanciful story of how he broke into Hollywood by sneakily squatting in an unoccupied office on the Universal Studios lot. In fact, he had an unpaid summer job on the lot.


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Spielberg started a fanciful story of how he broke into Hollywood by sneakily squatting in an unoccupied office on the Universal Studios lot. In fact, he had an unpaid summer job on the lot. Rush Limbaugh visited US forces in Afghanistan in 2005. He has seven children—four biological: Max Spielberg (from his former marriage to actress Amy Irving), Sasha, Sawyer, and Destry Spielberg (from his current marriage to Capshaw); two adopted (Theo and Mikaela Spielberg); and one stepdaughter (Jessica Capshaw). On his June 17 radio show, he commented that: "This is a United States senator [Tom Harkin] amending the Defense appropriations bill with the intent being to get this program - only one hour of which is carried on Armed Forces Radio - stripped from that network." As of April 2005, the first hour of Limbaugh's show is still on AFRTS. Spielberg is married to actress Kate Capshaw, whom he cast in Indiana Jones and the Temple Of Doom. Limbaugh responded by calling the move "censorship". Following the critical and box office success of Schindler's List in 1993, Spielberg founded and continues to finance the Shoah Project, a non-profit organization with the goal of providing an archive for the filmed testimony of as many survivors of the Holocaust as possible, so that their stories will not be lost in the future. The amendment passed unanimously in the Senate.

He is one of the co-founders of Dreamworks Pictures (Dreamworks SKG, with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen providing the other letters in the company name), which has released all of his movies since Amistad in 1997. Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) introduced an amendment to the 2004 Defense Authorization bill that called for AFRTS to fulfill its stated goal of providing political balance in its news and public affairs programming. He was also, for a short time, the executive producer of the long-running medical drama ER which currently airs on NBC. On June 14, 2004, U.S. He is also a lover of animated cartoons, and has produced several hit cartoons (and a few flops), including Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, and Freakazoid. Other claims - for example, that there is no political counterbalance to Limbaugh on AFRTS - have been rebutted by Byron York, a columnist for the conservative National Review: "American military men and women abroad have access, for example, to the talk show of liberal host Diane Rehm...Jim Hightower and CBS News anchorman Dan Rather.". Spielberg has produced (without directing) a considerable number of films, and can be credited with launching the career of Robert Zemeckis. Critics have pointed out that other programs, such as the Howard Stern show, which draws eight million listeners a week is absent from AFRTS.

See also: List of Spielberg films. Because of that we provide him on our service.". This film is written by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Tony Kushner. 1 talk show host in the States; there's no question about that. As of March 2005, Spielberg is slated to direct the Untitled 1972 Munich Olympics Project, formerly known as Vengeance. [Limbaugh] is the No. Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) will provide the special effects. Melvin Russell, director of AFRTS, defended Limbaugh's presence, by pointing to Limbaugh's high ratings in the US: "We look at the most popular shows broadcast here in the United States and try to mirror that.

This movie will also feature Tom Cruise in a leading role. service men and women, DoD civilians, and their families serving outside the continental United States"), carries the first hour of Limbaugh's show. Production started in October 2004 and is currently set for release on June 29, 2005. The article discussed the controversy surrounding the fact that American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS), (which describes itself as "[providing] stateside radio and television programming, 'a touch of home', to U.S. In August 2004, Spielberg's newest project, a modernized adaptation of War of the Worlds was greenlit. On May 26, 2004, the article "Rush's Forced Conscripts (http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2004/05/26/rush_limbaugh/index.html)" appeared on the online news and opinion magazine Salon.com. As of 2004, he has won two Academy Awards for Best Director, one for Schindler's List and another for Saving Private Ryan. On Friday, June 11, 2004, Limbaugh announced that he was separating from his third wife Marta after ten years of marriage. Limbaugh indicated that he initiated the divorce.

Spielberg used Hanks again in 2004 for The Terminal, the story of an East European traveller living in an airport terminal. This investigation has, as of June 2005, brought no criminal charges. In recent years, Spielberg has gained increased popularity through Minority Report (2002), starring Tom Cruise as a futuristic cop on the run from his own future; and Catch Me If You Can (also in 2002), a story about a con-man (with Leonardo di Caprio and Tom Hanks). The ACLU, an organization often lambasted by Limbaugh, has come to his defense, claiming that the district attorney violated Limbaugh's constitutional rights by "fishing" through his private medical records. The film drew mixed reviews. Limbaugh's attorney Roy Black alleges that the chief county prosecutor investigating Limbaugh, an elected Democrat, is politically motivated. The futuristic story of a humanoid android longing for love, A.I. featured groundbreaking visual effects, but unfortunately was not the blockbuster film Spielberg had hoped for. An investigation into alleged "doctor shopping" is ongoing in the state of Florida.

In 2001, Spielberg filmed fellow director and friend Stanley Kubrick's final project, A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, a project planned for many years but which Kubrick was unable to finish during his lifetime. It charged network anchors with engaging in exaggerated and inflammatory rhetoric by implying Limbaugh was involved in "drug sales" or "drug gangs." Timeline (http://www.humaneventsonline.com/article.php?id=2787). Spielberg considered it one of his finest works, yet in a highly publicized "showdown", it lost the Best Picture Oscar at the 1999 Academy Awards to Shakespeare in Love. An article in the January 12, 2004 issue of Human Events (The National Conservative Weekly) presents its reaction to the media attention of Limbaugh's addiction, calling it a 'Network War' against Limbaugh. Another of Spielberg's most critically acclaimed films, Saving Private Ryan, was released in 1998. Speaking about his behavior, Limbaugh went on to say:. It was in that same year that Spielberg finally won the critical acclaim he had long sought for making Schindler's List (based on a novel about a man who sacrificed everything to save thousands of people from the wrath of the Holocaust). That film earned him his first regular Academy Award for Best Director (it also won Best Picture). He did not specifically mention to which type of pain medication he was addicted.

It would eventually overtake E.T. as the all-time top grossing film for several years (until James Cameron's Titanic). On October 10, 2003, Limbaugh admitted to listeners on his radio show that he was addicted to prescription painkillers and stated that he would enter inpatient treatment for 30 days, immediately following the broadcast. In 1993, Spielberg decided to once again tackle the adventure genre, as he released the movie version of Michael Crichton's novel Jurassic Park, about killer dinosaurs rampaging through a tropical island resort. and in 1998:. The over-budget film was not a box-office success. Several statements from the 1990s were found, in particular, on October 5, 1995:. Hook focused on a middle-aged Pan (played by Robin Williams), who returns to Neverland to face the title character (Captain Hook, played by Dustin Hoffman). Following Limbaugh's admission of drug addiction, his detractors reviewed prior statements by him about drug addicts as examples of hypocrisy.

He eventually decided to create his own take on the Pan legend in 1991. The highly addictive painkillers function similarly to morphine, heroin, or a stronger form of codeine. Spielberg had tried numerous times to film a live-action version of Peter Pan without success. Other news outlets quickly confirmed the beginnings of an investigation. Thalberg Memorial Award for his work as a creative producer up to that point. Limbaugh's former housekeeper, under investigation for drug dealing, alleged that Limbaugh was addicted to prescription opiate painkillers such as OxyContin, Lorcet (a combination of Tylenol and hydrocodone), and hydrocodone, and that he went through detox twice. Although nominated throughout his career for an Academy Award, the gold statuette had long eluded Spielberg, although in 1986 he was awarded The Irving G. In early October 2003 and in the same week as the McNabb controversy, the National Enquirer reported that Limbaugh was being investigated for illegally buying prescription drugs.

However, Spielberg was awarded the Directors Guild Award for his work on the film. In any event, they made no public response to the comment, on the air or off. It received 11 Academy Award nominations in 1986, but Spielberg was snubbed in the Best Director category, which sent shockwaves through Hollywood. It has been suggested that Limbaugh's fellow commentators on the program, both of whom were themselves former African-American football players, may have played a role behind the scenes in ending Limbaugh's career as a football commentator. The film was released to great acclaim and proved Spielberg's ability as a serious, dramatic filmmaker. Limbaugh insisted that his comments were aimed at the media, and not at McNabb or African Americans. Many critics were unsure of whether or not Spielberg could handle such serious material, as his output to that point had been viewed as "lighter" entertainment. On October 1, 2003, Limbaugh resigned from ESPN with the statement:.

In 1985, Spielberg made The Color Purple, an adaptation of Alice Walker's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Limbaugh responded by saying that he must have been right; otherwise, the comments would not have sparked such outrage. Despite their enormous appeal, few film scholars and critics place such Spielberg films as Raiders or E.T. in the same class as The Godfather, Citizen Kane, or many other classics of the cinema. Presidential candidates Howard Dean and Wesley Clark joined in the criticism, as did the NAACP. When E.T. was released, Steven Spielberg, a Porsche 928 aficionado, had his car's moon-roof button re-designed with the movie's logo as both a gag for passengers, and a tribute to the movie's success. The Reverend Al Sharpton, a Democratic Party candidate for President, encouraged Limbaugh's firing from ESPN, threatening a boycott of all Disney companies, including the American Broadcasting Company, Disneyland, and Walt Disney World. E.T. went on to become the top-grossing film of all time for many years. McNabb had suffered a broken leg during the 2002 season, and had been slow to recover.

the Extra-Terrestrial, a Disney-inspired story of a boy and the alien whom he befriends (and is trying to get back "home" to outer space). McNabb was the highest paid NFL player in history at the time [6] (http://www.bet.com/articles/1,,c1gb4043-4730,00.html), and defenders of Limbaugh's comments point out that McNabb had the worst start of his career in the 2003 season and was the NFL's lowest-rated starting quarterback. McNabb's defenders say that to his credit, McNabb was a runner-up for the year 2000 league Most Valuable Player, a member of three Pro Bowl teams, and led his team to two straight NFC championship games. One year later, Spielberg returned to his alien visitors motif with E.T. The controversy centered on his comment:. Raiders itself spawned two sequels, also directed by Spielberg and executive produced by Lucas. In September of 2003, Limbaugh ignited a controversy [5] (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=1627887) when, speaking as a football commentator on ESPN, he criticized the media for its support of Donovan McNabb, the African-American quarterback of the Philadelphia Eagles. In 1981, Spielberg teamed up for the first time with his friend George Lucas to make Raiders of the Lost Ark, his homage to the cliffhanger serials of the Golden Age of Hollywood, with Harrison Ford (whom Lucas directed in Star Wars) as the dashing hero Indiana Jones. Limbaugh's influence can be seen in the recent launch of the Air America Radio network and by author and commentator Ed Schultz's program [4] (http://www.wegoted.com) whose style and delivery are quite similar to Limbaugh's, though his perspective is opposite to Limbaugh (and a fraction of the audience).

But what some would consider Spielberg's greatest film work was still to come, beginning in the 1980s. Limbaugh has also received criticism from some competitors such as Michael Savage and The New American magazine. An expanded version has been shown on network television and later on Laserdisc and DVD. [3] (http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/_/id/5923659). Although the film did make a small profit, it is considered by some to be Spielberg's first flop, although today it is also considered a cult classic. Hynde only discovered its use years later and realized Limbaugh did not have permission to play it in that form. After some indecision and negotiating, Hynde decided in 1999 to let Limbaugh continue to use it, with Limbaugh donating royalties from it to the Hynde-supported animal rights organization PETA. days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, with the two top stars from Saturday Night Live, Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi, along with other all-stars. Limbaugh loved the riff, hated the message, and thought he could both attract listeners and annoy opponents by playing it.

For example, Spielberg's next film was 1941, a big-budgeted World War II comedy farce set in L.A. Since the 1980s he has used an edited and looped version of the powerful instrumental riff from The Pretenders' "My City Was Gone", a song written by Chrissie Hynde to bemoan the effects of overdevelopment on her native Ohio. The success Spielberg was beginning to enjoy, as well as his eventual tendency to make films with wide mainstream and commercial appeal, also subjected him to disdain in critical circles by film reviewers. Even Limbaugh's introductory theme music has attracted controversy. The film remains a cult sci-fi classic among its fans. His defenders have pointed out that Limbaugh talks unscripted for fifteen broadcast hours a week, and that the number of factual errors he makes is, under the circumstances, very small. In 1976, Spielberg was asked by Alexander Salkind to direct Superman, but decided instead to expand on a pet project he had on his mind since his youth: a film about UFOs, which became Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977). FAIR later published an entire book, The Way Things Aren't: Rush Limbaugh's Reign of Error: Over 100 Outrageously False and Foolish Statements from America's Most Powerful Radio and TV Commentator (ISBN 156584260X), documenting alleged errors and lies by Limbaugh.

Jaws won four Academy Awards (for editing and sound), and grossed over US$100 million at the box office, setting the domestic record for box office gross. For the full text of the original, the rebuttal and the rebuttal of the rebuttal, see [2] (http://www.fair.org/press-releases/fair-limbaugh-rebuttal.html). Spielberg's debut theatrical feature film, The Sugarland Express (takes place and filmed on location in Sugar Land, Texas and is about a husband and wife attempting to escape the law), won him critical praise and enough studio backing to be chosen as the director of a summer movie that would secure him a place in the history of motion pictures: Jaws, a horror film based on the Peter Benchley novel about encounters with a killer shark. Limbaugh responded to about half of the original claims; FAIR then rebutted his rebuttal. This film, about a truck mysteriously terrorizing an average citizen, has become a cult classic, having been released on video several times over the years. A group called Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR) released a report on October 17, 1994 listing forty-three errors Limbaugh allegedly made during various shows. While working on this segment its star Joan Crawford collared a production executive and said, "Keep an eye on this kid, he's going places." After directing episodes of various TV shows, including some early Columbo TV movies, Spielberg directed his first well-known feature with a 1971 TV "movie-of-the-week" entitled Duel (later released to theatres overseas and eventually in the U.S.). The liberal comedian and political satirist Al Franken released a book and CD titled Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations (ISBN 0440508649) which, among other political humor from a liberal perspective, included harsh criticism of Limbaugh and his allegedly meager fact-finding efforts. The title of the book came from the fact that during the time in which it was first published, Rush Limbaugh's weight was pushing the 400-pound mark; a few months afterward, Limbaugh began to go on various diets and his weight dropped down to around 270 pounds around the time the book's second edition was being released.

He was making amateur 8mm "adventure" movies with his friends as a teenager (scenes from these amateur films have been included on the DVD edition of Saving Private Ryan), and he made his first short film for theatrical release, Amblin', in 1968 at the age of twenty one. (Spielberg's own production company, Amblin Entertainment, was named after this short film.) His maiden directorial work was a segment of the pilot film to Rod Serling's Night Gallery. He refers to Robert Byrd as "Sheets" in reference to his former ties to the KKK, and he calls Harry Reid "Dingy Harry." Sometimes Limbaugh's opponents unwittingly provide fodder for comment, such as Ted Kennedy's ironic praise of presidential candidate John Kerry's wartime rescue of a fellow soldier from drowning. Spielberg is known by film historians as one of the famous "movie brats" of the 1970s: along with fellow filmmakers (and personal friends) George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, John Milius, and Brian De Palma, Spielberg grew up making movies. His references to Ted Kennedy invariably discuss Kennedy's alcohol use and Chappaquiddick (he has nicknamed Kennedy "the swimmer"). He is seen as a figure who has the influence, financial resources, and acceptance of Hollywood studio authorities to make any movie he wants to make, be it a mainstream action-adventure movie (Jurassic Park) or a three-hour-long black and white drama about a controversial historical subject (Schindler's List). The song "I Know I'll Never Love This Way Again" preceded reports about people dying of AIDS. As of 2004, he has been listed in Premiere and other magazines as the most "powerful" and influential figure in the motion picture industry. For example, news about the homeless is often preceded with the Clarence "Frogman" Henry song "Ain't Got No Home".

Spielberg is the most financially successful motion picture director of all time. He has helmed an astounding number of feature films that have become enormous box-office hits, and this has given him enormous influence in Hollywood. Limbaugh's satire is very sharp, though it has been criticized for what his detractors claim to be a juvenile and mean-spirited nature often bordering on hate speech. One consistent theme in his work is a childlike, even na´ve sense of wonderment and faith, as attested by works like Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., Hook and A.I.. He also has explained himself on occasion as being an entertainer, not a reporter. He is noted in recent years for his willingness to tackle emotionally powerful issues, such as the horrors of the Holocaust in Schindler's List, the inhumanity of slavery in Amistad, and the hardships of war in Saving Private Ryan. Limbaugh's response to this accusation is to assert that most news reporting is liberally biased (in particular, television and newspaper news); as he says, "I am equal time." He also does not claim to be a neutral reporter, and contrasts his stance with the major news media's claims of objectivity (in the United States). Steven Allan Spielberg (born on December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio but raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona), is an American film director whose films range from science fiction to historical drama to horror. Many liberal critics decry the lack of a balance between liberal and conservative viewpoints on talk radio.

For his work on the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation since 1994, he was awarded with the Great Cross of Merit with Star, the German version of the Great Officer's Cross, in September 1998 for "a very noticeable contribution to the issue of the Holocaust". As a result the words were preemptively introduced by wikipedians familiar with the occurrence, but other wikipedians later voted to delete them. According to Daily Variety, the biopic, tentatively titled Celluloid Titans, is being executive produced by Jody Brockway. On May 3, 2005, Rush said that he would enter the words afristocracy and ghettocracy into Wikipedia. The A&E Network is expected to announce that it will produce a two-hour drama about the relationship between filmmakers George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. During his radio program on April 22, 2005, Rush retracted the assertion, stating that he had received incorrect information from one of his staff members. He first enrolled at Long Beach State in 1965. On April 19, 2005, Limbaugh mentioned Wikipedia in the final minutes of his show, calling it "… some kind of left wing Internet encyclopedia," in response to the viewing of Pope Benedict XVI Wikipedia Article (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pope_Benedict_XVI&oldid=12528936) (most likely dated April 19, 2005 at 2:52 PM EST).

in Film Production and Electronic Arts with an option in Film/Video Production from California State University, Long Beach. Following a later news story of his addiction to painkillers, it was alleged by some that his deafness was probably due to a known side effect of the class of painkillers he abused. In 2002 Spielberg was awarded a B.A. In December 2001, Limbaugh underwent cochlear implant surgery, which restored a measure of hearing in one ear, and his voice and diction improved. [1] (http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/05.29.97/spielberg-9722.html). The system worked remarkably well, but did not deceive all listeners, some of whom noted a long delay between a caller ending his point and Limbaugh responding, and occasionally speaking over a caller. He went to Saratoga High School and quipped that it was the "worst experience" of his life and "hell on Earth". He also revealed that his radio staff was aiding him in concealing his rapidly progressing hearing loss by setting up a system where he could appear to hear his callers.

Supports the Democratic Party of United States. However, on October 8, 2001, Limbaugh admitted that the changes in his voice were due to complete deafness in his left ear and substantial hearing loss in his right ear. The asteroid 25930 Spielberg is named in his honour. By September 2001, Limbaugh's listeners had noted changes in his voice and diction, changes that Limbaugh initially denied. Spielberg, an Eagle Scout, designed the requirements for the Boy Scout Cinematography merit badge. He was inducted into Broadcasting's Hall of Fame in 1993. Steven Spielberg won Best Director and Best Picture Oscars that year. Limbaugh was the 1992, 1995, and 2000 recipient of the Marconi Radio Award for Syndicated Radio Personality of the Year, given by the National Association of Broadcasters.

Eleven years later, in 1993, Steven Spielberg cast Richard Attenborough as the grandfather in Jurassic Park (his first performance in 13 years) and Ben Kingsley in Schindler's List. (In many places it was aired at 1:30 AM or even later.). In 1982 Ben Kingsley won Best Actor and Richard Attenborough won Best Director for the film Gandhi, which beat Steven Spielberg's film E.T. for Best Picture. Reportedly, Limbaugh ended the show due to disappointment that it was aired too late in the evening in many markets. Spielberg had a cameo role as the Cook County assessor in the last minutes of the 1980 film The Blues Brothers. The television show discussed many of the same topics as his radio show, and was taped in front of a live audience, which he facetiously claimed had to pass an intelligence test in order to be admitted. While the films that Steven Spielberg directed have won numerous awards, no actor or actress has won an Academy Award for a performance for one of his films. Limbaugh then hosted a syndicated half-hour television show running from 1992 through 1996, with Roger Ailes as executive producer.

The Sugarland Express (1974). This ended badly when on one show Limbaugh got into a confrontation with some ACT-UP hecklers and had to clear the studio audience before continuing. Jaws (1975). Limbaugh's first television exposure came with a 1990 guest host stint on Pat Sajak's late-night program on CBS. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977). President George W. Bush "called in" to a live broadcast during the week of the 2004 Republican National Convention to give a preview of his nomination acceptance speech. 1941 (1979). Bush made an appearance on Limbaugh's show as part of his re-election campaign, in an effort to regain the support of the right wing of his own party (which he had earlier alienated by breaking a pledge not to raise taxes).

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981). W. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982). In 1992, President George H. E.T. Rush Limbaugh became as much a political symbol as he was a broadcaster, comedian, and political satirist. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984). He attracted widespread support and attention in 1998 when he complained that some radio stations were shortening his programs by cutting out his dramatic pauses to make room for more commercials.

The Color Purple (1985). Limbaugh has a dynamic voice and dramatic presentation; even many of his critics admit that he is an excellent broadcaster. Empire of the Sun (1987). Bush. Always (1989). The show is usually split between call-in segments and monologues by Limbaugh; on very rare occasions, Limbaugh will have guests on his show, such as Vice President Dick Cheney or even President George W. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989). The program has for over 15 years been the most popular talk radio show in the United States.

Hook (1991). The Rush Limbaugh Show was largely responsible for the shift in AM broadcasting to a news-talk format after an audience decline in the 1970s. Jurassic Park (1993). As the program grew in popularity, it was carried on stations with larger audiences. Schindler's List (1993) (Academy Award, Best Director, Best Picture). Limbaugh refers on-air to the "Excellence In Broadcasting Network", or "E-I-B"; however, there is no organization with that name. Amistad (1997). After achieving some local success, he moved to New York City (and his current flagship station, WABC) in the late 1980s and eventually became syndicated on August 1, 1988 via a company called Premiere Broadcasting.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997). In 1984, Limbaugh returned to radio as a talk show host at KFBK in Sacramento, California. Saving Private Ryan (1998) (Academy Award, Best Director). After several years in music radio, Limbaugh took a break from radio and accepted a position as director of promotions with the Kansas City Royals baseball team. A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (2001). (This claim is now a reality as Limbaugh does use a golden microphone on The Rush Limbaugh Show.). Minority Report (2002). It was in Pittsburgh that many of Limbaugh's trademarks developed, such as a claim to use a "golden microphone".

Catch Me If You Can (2002). He went on to Pittsburgh, as a Top 40 music radio disc jockey on station KQV, using the name Jeff Christie. The Terminal (2004). Limbaugh stated that he was not drafted because a physical found that he had an "inoperable pilonidal cyst" and "a football knee from high school" [Colford, pp 14 – 20]. War of the Worlds (2005). This would have normally made him eligible for the draft, but he was classified 1-Y due to an undisclosed medical problem [1] (http://www.snopes.com/military/limbaugh.htm). He attended Southeast Missouri State University for one year then dropped out.

His father, a judge whose wealth and power gave him considerable influence in Southeastern Missouri, had once owned the radio station where Limbaugh started his career. Limbaugh started out in radio as a teenager in the late 1960s in his hometown of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, using the name Rusty Sharpe. As of 2005, Rush Limbaugh is the most listened-to radio talk show host in the United States, and has an audience exceeding 20 million listeners weekly. A conservative, he discusses politics and current events on his show, The Rush Limbaugh Show.

Rush Hudson Limbaugh III (born January 12, 1951 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri) is an American radio talk show host. ISBN 1560256141. Thunder's Mouth Press. The I Hate Ann Coulter, Bill O'Reilly, Rush Limbaugh, Michael Savage, Sean Hannity...Reader: The Hideous Truth About America's Ugliest Conservatives.

Willis, Clint (2004). CD-ROM. ISBN 1592485545. 2004 Conservatives and Liberals: The Political Spectrum from Al Franken to Rush Limbaugh. Progressive Management.

Government (2003). U.S. ISBN 1565301005. Summit Publishing Group.

(1993). Rush Hour: Talk Radio, Politics, and the Rise of Rush Limbaugh. Seib, Philip M. ISBN 156584260X. New Press.

The Way Things Aren't: Rush Limbaugh's Reign of Error: Over 100 Outrageously False and Foolish Statements from America's Most Powerful Radio and TV. Rendall, Steve, Naureckas, Jim, and Cohen, Jeff (1995). ISBN B0006F58V0. Mighty Pen Pub.

Rahman, Michael (1995). Why Rush Limbaugh is Wrong, or, The Demise of Traditionalism and the Rise of Progressive Sensibility. ISBN 0812692942. Open Court Publishing Company. Limbaugh: A Dittohead's Guide to Fallacious Reasoning.

Logic and Mr. Perkins, Ray, Jr. (1995). ISBN 0971058709. Four-Star Press.

Meyers, Daniel D (2001). Confessions of a Hollywood Publicist: Revelations on How Publicists Create Star Power - and What Happens Behind the Scenes Everywhere...Stanley Kubrick, George Burns, and Rush Limbaugh. ISBN 0786000821. Pinnacle Books. Howard and Morris, Geoffrey (1994). Rush to Us/Americans Hail Rush Limbaugh.

King, D. ISBN 1564741028. Fithian Press. The Great Limbaugh Con: And Other Right-Wing Assaults on Common Sense.

Kelly, Charles M. (1994). ISBN 0898156106. Ten Speed Press. Flush Rush.

(1994). Keliher, Brian, Keliber, Brian, and Laurin, C. ISBN 096250405X. Legendary Publishing.

The Bum's Rush: The Selling of Environmental Backlash. Jacobs, Don Trent (1994). ISBN 0385314744. Delacorte Press.

Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot. Franken, Al (1996). ISBN 0889651043. Christian Pubications.

Rush Limbaugh and the Bible. (1993). Evearitt, Daniel J. ISBN 0964261901.

Group. MacArthur Pub. The Rise of Rush Limbaugh Toward the Presidency. Bradford (1994).

Davis, J. ISBN 0312952724. Martins. St.

(1994). The Rush Limbaugh Story: Talent on Loan from God an Unauthorized Biography. Colford, Paul D. ISBN 0380775395. Avon Books.

Arkush, Michael (1993). Rush!. Biographies and commentary

    . This was the best selling non-fiction hardback book of 1993. ISBN 067187120X.
      .

      Atria: New York. See, I Told You So. Limbaugh, Rush (1993). John Fund ghostwrote this book.

      This was the best selling non-fiction hardback book of 1992. ISBN 067175145X.

        . Pocket Books: New York. The Way Things Ought to Be.

        Limbaugh, Rush (1992). Books written by Limbaugh

          .

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