Staffordshire

Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. The county town is Stafford. Part of the National Forest lies within its borders. It adjoins the ceremonial counties of Cheshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Warwickshire, West Midlands, Worcestershire and Shropshire.

The major city in Staffordshire is Stoke-on-Trent. Lichfield is also a city but is considerably smaller. Major towns include Burton-upon-Trent, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Tamworth and Stafford itself.

Staffordshire is divided into a number of districts. These are Cannock Chase, East Staffordshire, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, South Staffordshire, Stafford, Staffordshire Moorlands and Tamworth. Stoke-on-Trent is administered as a separate unitary authority.

History

Main article History of Staffordshire.

The historic county of Staffordshire included Wolverhampton, Walsall, and West Bromwich, these were removed in 1974 to the new county of West Midlands. The resulting administrative area of Staffordshire has a narrow southwards protrusion that runs west of West Midlands to the border of Worcestershire. Further, Stoke-on-Trent was removed in the 1990s to form a unitary authority, but is still considered part of Staffordshire for ceremonial and geographical purposes.

Historically, Staffordshire was divided into the five hundreds of Cuttlestone, Offlow, Pirehill, Seisdon and Totmonslow.

Dogs

A type of bull terrier called the Staffordshire Bull Terrier was bred for hunting purposes in this county. Later, a fighting dog was created called the Staffordshire pit bull. They are known affectionately as "Staffies".

Railways

Due to Wedgewood's pottery being moved increasingly by road transport, and both the decline in mining, qarrying and farming in general, several once-busy stations were shut down. Staffordshire's railways were reduced by the Beeching report in the 1960s, and several stations, like Uttoxeter and Norton Bridge, only narrowly missed closure. Both Stone, Barlaston and Titensor, Wedgewood and Norton Bridge all closed in 2003, but may re-open due to heavy local campaigning around the town of Stone. Eturia, Longport and Kidsgrove closed in 2005, but only services to Eturia had any popular support.

  • Coald meace works - Closed by 1900.
  • Alton (Alton towers) - Closed by 1970. It may be reopened by the Alton Towers amusment park.
  • Great Bridgeford, Whitmore and Standon moor - Both freight-only by 1955 and closed by 1970.
  • Littelton colliery and Hume end - Closed by 1946.
  • Madeley - Freight-only by 1955 and closed by 2000.
  • Oakmoor - Freight-only by 1970 and closed by 2000. It may be reopened by the preservationists that now run Consall and some nearby stations on that line.
  • Consall - Closed by 1970, but was saved by a local steam preservation movement.
  • Leek, Chedale, Trentham guardens and Brownhills - All went freight-only by 1970 and closed by 2000.
  • Caldon Lowe - Station closed by 1946. A quarry-worker's halt was opened by 1970, but – like the quarry itself – closed by 2000.
  • Trentham colliery - Closed by 2000.
  • Florence colliery - Opened by 1970 and closed by 2000.
  • Stafford common- The station had closed by 1946 and the goods department closed by 2000.
  • Kingsley and Frognal goods depot - Closed by 1970.

The collieries handle mostly freight along with a few workers trains. Stoke-on-Trent's goods yard had closed by 2000 due to increased competition from road haulage.

Note: at both Brownhills, Oakmoor, Chedale, Caldon Lowe and Whitmore the lines are over-grown and/or the stations neglected; but they may re-open for freight trains or for use by railway enthusiasts.

References

Ian alan books - British railways atlas 1947, Complete atlas of railway station names (U.K., 2002 edition), Rail Atlas 1970, British railway atlas 1955. A few recent newspaper articles.

Geography

In the north and in the south the county is hilly, with wild moorlands in the far north and Cannock Chase an area of natural beauty in the south. In the middle regions the surface is low and undulating. Throughout the entire county there are vast and important coal fields. In the southern part there are also rich iron ore deposits. The largest river is the Trent. The soil is chiefly clay and agriculture was not highly developed until the mechanisation of farms.

Towns and villages

See the list of places in Staffordshire and the List of civil parishes in Staffordshire

Places of interest

  • Alton Towers
  • Lichfield Cathedral [1]
  • Shugborough Hall [2]
  • Blithfield Hall
  • Dovecliff Hall
  • Festival Park
  • Ford Green Hall, Smallthorne
  • Madeley Old Hall
  • Moseley Old Hall, Featherstone,_Staffordshire
  • Sandon Hall
  • Whitmore Hall
  • Biddulph Grange
  • Eccleshall Castle
  • Mow Cop Castle
  • Stafford Castle
  • Tamworth Castle
  • Tutbury Castle
  • Croxden Abbey
  • Broad Eye Windmill, Stafford
  • Cheddleton Flint Mill, watermill
  • Watermill housing Brindley Water Museum, Leek
  • Izaak Walton Cottage Museum
  • Weston Park
  • Cannock Chase
  • Hazel Slade Reserve
  • RSPB Coombes Valley
  • National Memorial Arboretum [3]
  • Trentham Gardens
  • Rudyard Lake
  • Tittesworth Reservoir [4]
  • Chasewater [5]
  • River Trent
  • River Blythe
  • River Churnet
  • Birmingham and Fazeley Canal
  • Caldon Canal
  • Coventry Canal
  • Shropshire Union Canal
  • Trent and Mersey Canal, Harecastle Tunnel
  • Heritage railways: Chasewater Railway, Foxfield Steam Railway, Manifold Valley Railway
  • Churnet Valley Railway [6]
  • Long distance footpaths: Heart of England Way, Staffordshire Way

Local Groups

  • West Midland Bird Club
  • Lichfield Cricket Club
  • Tipton Harriers

This page about Staffordshire includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Staffordshire
News stories about Staffordshire
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See the list of places in Staffordshire and the List of civil parishes in Staffordshire. . The soil is chiefly clay and agriculture was not highly developed until the mechanisation of farms. The word terminator is from Latin and means roughly the finisher. The largest river is the Trent. "Terminator" is also the code name (not the NATO reporting name) for the Sukhoi Su-37 Russian fighter plane. In the southern part there are also rich iron ore deposits. The name is also used for those warriors who wear the armor into combat.

Throughout the entire county there are vast and important coal fields. In the Warhammer 40,000 universe, Terminator or Tactical Dreadnought Armor is power armor used by the Space Marines, and enables the wearer to take massive damage and fire large weapons while moving. In the middle regions the surface is low and undulating. Terminators in Robotech is a reference to the clone elite footsoldiers of the Robotech Masters who used to serve as senate guards, then elite police officers designed to 'weed out the undesirable' members of the population and finally as soldiers. In the north and in the south the county is hilly, with wild moorlands in the far north and Cannock Chase an area of natural beauty in the south. T-X. A few recent newspaper articles. T-1000.

Ian alan books - British railways atlas 1947, Complete atlas of railway station names (U.K., 2002 edition), Rail Atlas 1970, British railway atlas 1955. T-800. Note: at both Brownhills, Oakmoor, Chedale, Caldon Lowe and Whitmore the lines are over-grown and/or the stations neglected; but they may re-open for freight trains or for use by railway enthusiasts. Terminator types.

    . Stoke-on-Trent's goods yard had closed by 2000 due to increased competition from road haulage. Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, another sequel to the movie. The collieries handle mostly freight along with a few workers trains. Terminator 2: Judgment Day, a sequel to the movie.

    Eturia, Longport and Kidsgrove closed in 2005, but only services to Eturia had any popular support. The Terminator is an American motion picture involving a cyborg that has been sent back through time to "terminate" (kill) a woman whose life will have importance in the future. Both Stone, Barlaston and Titensor, Wedgewood and Norton Bridge all closed in 2003, but may re-open due to heavy local campaigning around the town of Stone. Movies

      . Staffordshire's railways were reduced by the Beeching report in the 1960s, and several stations, like Uttoxeter and Norton Bridge, only narrowly missed closure. For instance a string of text, or an array. Due to Wedgewood's pottery being moved increasingly by road transport, and both the decline in mining, qarrying and farming in general, several once-busy stations were shut down. In programming, a terminator is usually a null byte/word/dword signifying the end of data.

      They are known affectionately as "Staffies". In biotechnology, Terminator Technology refers to proposed methods for restricting the use of genetically modified plants. Later, a fighting dog was created called the Staffordshire pit bull. In genetics, a terminator marks the end of a gene on the DNA for transcription; it is used in some genetically engineered crops to prevent collection and resowing of seed. A type of bull terrier called the Staffordshire Bull Terrier was bred for hunting purposes in this county. There are also active terminators which contain an electric circuit to perform the same basic function. Historically, Staffordshire was divided into the five hundreds of Cuttlestone, Offlow, Pirehill, Seisdon and Totmonslow. Often the terminator is a resistor.

      Further, Stoke-on-Trent was removed in the 1990s to form a unitary authority, but is still considered part of Staffordshire for ceremonial and geographical purposes. In electronics, a terminator (electrical termination) is placed at the end of a transmission line or daisy chain bus (such as in SCSI), designed to match impedance and hence minimize reflections of the signal. The resulting administrative area of Staffordshire has a narrow southwards protrusion that runs west of West Midlands to the border of Worcestershire. See terminator (solar). The historic county of Staffordshire included Wolverhampton, Walsall, and West Bromwich, these were removed in 1974 to the new county of West Midlands. In astronomy, the terminator is the line between the day side and the night side of a planetary body (also known as the "grey line"). Main article History of Staffordshire..

      . Stoke-on-Trent is administered as a separate unitary authority. These are Cannock Chase, East Staffordshire, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, South Staffordshire, Stafford, Staffordshire Moorlands and Tamworth. Staffordshire is divided into a number of districts.

      Major towns include Burton-upon-Trent, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Tamworth and Stafford itself. Lichfield is also a city but is considerably smaller. The major city in Staffordshire is Stoke-on-Trent. It adjoins the ceremonial counties of Cheshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Warwickshire, West Midlands, Worcestershire and Shropshire.

      Part of the National Forest lies within its borders. The county town is Stafford. Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. Tipton Harriers.

      Lichfield Cricket Club. West Midland Bird Club. Long distance footpaths: Heart of England Way, Staffordshire Way. Churnet Valley Railway [6].

      Heritage railways: Chasewater Railway, Foxfield Steam Railway, Manifold Valley Railway. Trent and Mersey Canal, Harecastle Tunnel. Shropshire Union Canal. Coventry Canal.

      Caldon Canal. Birmingham and Fazeley Canal. River Churnet. River Blythe.

      River Trent. Chasewater [5]. Tittesworth Reservoir [4]. Rudyard Lake.

      Trentham Gardens. National Memorial Arboretum [3]. RSPB Coombes Valley. Hazel Slade Reserve.

      Cannock Chase. Weston Park. Izaak Walton Cottage Museum. Watermill housing Brindley Water Museum, Leek.

      Cheddleton Flint Mill, watermill. Broad Eye Windmill, Stafford. Croxden Abbey. Tutbury Castle.

      Tamworth Castle. Stafford Castle. Mow Cop Castle. Eccleshall Castle.

      Biddulph Grange. Whitmore Hall. Sandon Hall. Moseley Old Hall, Featherstone,_Staffordshire.

      Madeley Old Hall. Ford Green Hall, Smallthorne. Festival Park. Dovecliff Hall.

      Blithfield Hall. Shugborough Hall [2]. Lichfield Cathedral [1]. Alton Towers.

      Kingsley and Frognal goods depot - Closed by 1970. Stafford common- The station had closed by 1946 and the goods department closed by 2000. Florence colliery - Opened by 1970 and closed by 2000. Trentham colliery - Closed by 2000.

      A quarry-worker's halt was opened by 1970, but – like the quarry itself – closed by 2000. Caldon Lowe - Station closed by 1946. Leek, Chedale, Trentham guardens and Brownhills - All went freight-only by 1970 and closed by 2000. Consall - Closed by 1970, but was saved by a local steam preservation movement.

      It may be reopened by the preservationists that now run Consall and some nearby stations on that line. Oakmoor - Freight-only by 1970 and closed by 2000. Madeley - Freight-only by 1955 and closed by 2000. Littelton colliery and Hume end - Closed by 1946.

      Great Bridgeford, Whitmore and Standon moor - Both freight-only by 1955 and closed by 1970. It may be reopened by the Alton Towers amusment park. Alton (Alton towers) - Closed by 1970. Coald meace works - Closed by 1900.

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