Snow White

Snow White (or Snow-White, and in German, Schneewittchen) is the title character of a well known fairy tale known from many places in Europe, the most known version being the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. The German version features elements such as the mirror and the seven dwarfs. In non-German versions the dwarfs are generally robbers, while the talking mirror is a dialog with the sun or moon. In a version from Albania, collected by Johann Georg von Hahn and published in Griechische und albanesische Märchen. Gesammelt, übersetz und erläutert (1864), the main character lives with 40 dragons. The sleep is caused by a ring. The start of the story also has an interesting twist in that a teacher urges the heroine to kill her own mother so that the teacher can take her place. The origin of the tale is debated; it is likely no older than the Middle Ages. Many scholars think it originated somewhere in Asia.

Story

In the traditional Brothers Grimm version of this tale, Snow White is born to a queen, who dies shortly after giving birth. The king takes a new wife who is beautiful but very proud. She possesses a magic mirror, to whom she would often ask "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?", and to which the mirror would always reply, "You are". But one day when she asks her mirror, it responds, "Queen, you're the fairest where you are, but Snow White is more beautiful by far".

The Queen is jealous, and orders a huntsman to take Snow White into the woods to be killed. She demands that the huntsman return with Snow White's lungs and liver as proof. The huntsman takes Snow White into the forest, but finds himself unable to kill the girl. Instead, he lets her go, and brings the queen the lungs and liver of a wild boar. (In the Disney movie, these are replaced by a heart.)

Snow White discovers a tiny cottage in the forest, belonging to seven dwarfs, where she rests. Meanwhile, the Queen asks her mirror once again, "Who's the fairest of them all?", and is horrified when the mirror tells her that Snow White, who is alive and well and living with the dwarfs, is still the fairest of them all.

Three times the Queen disguises herself and visits the dwarves' cottage where Snow White is staying to try to kill her. First, disguised as a peddler, the Queen offers colorful stay-laces and laces Snow White up so tight she faints and the Queen takes her for dead. Snow White is revived by the dwarves when they loosen the laces. Next the Queen dressed as a different old woman combs her hair with a poisoned comb. Snow White again collapses, and again the dwarves save her. Lastly the Queen makes a poison apple, and in the guise of a country woman offers it to Snow White. She is hesitant, so the Queen cuts the apple in half, eats the white part -- which has no poison -- and gives the poisoned red part to Snow White. She eats the apple eagerly and immediately falls into a deep, magical sleep. When the dwarfs find her, they cannot revive her; and so they mourn and place her in a glass coffin, thinking that she has died. (The Disney version only adopts the poison apple plot, and the queen meets her demise as she is chased by the dwarves.)

Snow White in her coffin

Time passes, and a prince travels through the land and sees Snow White in her coffin. The prince is enchanted by her beauty and instantly falls in love with her. He begs the dwarfs to let him have the coffin. The prince and his men carry the coffin away, but as they go they stumble, the coffin jerks and the piece of poison apple flies out of Snow White's mouth, awakening her. The prince then declares his love and soon a wedding is planned. (In the Disney version, the cure for this deep sleep was love's first kiss. The Prince takes a revived Snow White away, and the film ends.)

The vain Queen, still believing that Snow White is dead, again asks her mirror who is fairest in the land and yet again the mirror disappoints by responding that "You, my queen, are fair; it is true. But the young queen is a thousand times fairer than you."

Not knowing that this new queen is indeed her stepdaughter, she arrives at the wedding, and her heart fills with the deepest of dread when she realizes the truth.

As punishment for her wicked ways, a pair of heated iron shoes are brought forth with tongs and placed before the Queen. She is then forced to step into the red-hot shoes and dance until she falls down dead.

Other Versions

The story in Russian writer Alexander Pushkin's 1833 poem The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights is similar to that of Snow White, with knights replacing dwarves.

A 1916 silent film with the title Snow White was made by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and produced by Adolph Zukor and Daniel Frohman. Directed by J. Searle Dawley, it was adapted to the screen by Jessie Graham White from his play Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The film starred Marguerite Clark as Snow White, Creighton Hale as Prince Florimond and Dorothy Cumming as Queen Brangomar/Mary Jane.

Snow White in the Disney Cartoon.

A 1933 Betty Boop cartoon, Snow-White, was adapted from this story, as was the famous 1937 Disney animated feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. In the Disney version, Snow White wakes from her enchanted sleep as soon as the Prince kisses her, similar to Sleeping Beauty. That version is distinctly parodied in Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs.

Snow White is an important character in the Fables comic book. As presented there, she is an amalgam of the two characters that share this name---she is very touchy about her adventures with the dwarfs, is the first ex-wife of Prince Charming, and has a sister named Rose Red from whom she was estranged for some time. She was assistant mayor of Fabletown for many years, succeeding to the post after Ichabod Crane was fired for sexually harassing her. Due to Prince Charming replacing Old King Cole as mayor, as well as her giving birth to the (mostly) non-human-appearing children of Bigby (the Big Bad Wolf), she moved from the New York City Fabletown to the "Farm" upstate, where non-human-appearing Fables must live.

The story was very loosely adapted by Mercedes Lackey into her Elemental Masters novel The Serpent's Shadow, turning the main character into the Eurasian Doctor Maya Witherspoon, who must suffer the multiple stigmas of being a medically-qualified half-caste female (in other words, most of her problems stem from being not white) in turn-of-the-century London; the seven dwarves are transformed into animal avatars of various benign Hindu deities.

In 1961 the story was paradied in the film "Snow White and The Three Stooges", starring Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Joe "Curly-Joe" DeRita. This film is widely regarded by fans of the Three Stooges as their worst feature film. In the film, the dwarfs had gone on vacation and lent Moe, Larry and Curly Joe the use their cottage. The 3 are traveling entertainers, along with a young man who was born a prince, but lost his memory in a kidnapping attempt that was thwarted by the Stooges. The boy suffers amnesia and the Stooges "adopt" him and raise him to manhood. He is only shown as a boy in a flasback segment. This man ends up marrying Snow White, played by real life figure skating champion, Carol Heiss. The film is a musical and features many ice skating scenes. There are few other things that differ from the original story, such as Count Oga (villainous henchman of the evil queen), magic sword that transports the Stooges to various places and a carriage chase scene.

Snow White And Rose Red

There is another Brothers Grimm tale called Snow-White and Rose-Red which also includes a character called Snow White. However this Snow White is a completely separate character from the one found in this tale. For more information about the other Snow White, see the Snow-White and Rose-Red article. The original German names are different: Schneewittchen (the Princess) and Schneeweißchen (together with Rosenrot). There is actually no difference in the meaning, but the first name is more influenced by the dialects of Lower Germany while the second one is the Higher German version.


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There is actually no difference in the meaning, but the first name is more influenced by the dialects of Lower Germany while the second one is the Higher German version. These include:. The original German names are different: Schneewittchen (the Princess) and Schneeweißchen (together with Rosenrot). Some fictional characters are predominantly depicted as wearing sunglasses. For more information about the other Snow White, see the Snow-White and Rose-Red article. These people include:. However this Snow White is a completely separate character from the one found in this tale. Some celebrities are predominantly seen in public wearing sunglasses, even indoors.

There is another Brothers Grimm tale called Snow-White and Rose-Red which also includes a character called Snow White. There are also various words referring to eyepieces with darkened lenses:. There are few other things that differ from the original story, such as Count Oga (villainous henchman of the evil queen), magic sword that transports the Stooges to various places and a carriage chase scene. In 2004, Oakley developed Thump, sunglasses with built-in digital audio player. The film is a musical and features many ice skating scenes. Land began experimenting with making lenses with his patented Polaroid filter. This man ends up marrying Snow White, played by real life figure skating champion, Carol Heiss. Sunglasses would not become polarized, however, until 1936, when Edwin H.

He is only shown as a boy in a flasback segment. Foster found a ready market on the beaches of Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he began selling Foster Grants from a Woolworth on the Boardwalk. The boy suffers amnesia and the Stooges "adopt" him and raise him to manhood. Sunglasses as such were introduced by Sam Foster in 1929. The 3 are traveling entertainers, along with a young man who was born a prince, but lost his memory in a kidnapping attempt that was thwarted by the Stooges. Protection from the sun's rays was not a concern of his. In the film, the dwarfs had gone on vacation and lent Moe, Larry and Curly Joe the use their cottage. These were not "sunglasses" as such; Ayscough believed blue- or green-tinted glass could correct for specific vision impairments.

This film is widely regarded by fans of the Three Stooges as their worst feature film. James Ayscough began experimenting with tinted lenses in spectacles in the mid-18th century. In 1961 the story was paradied in the film "Snow White and The Three Stooges", starring Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Joe "Curly-Joe" DeRita. Compare the representation of "blind Justice" in Western art. The story was very loosely adapted by Mercedes Lackey into her Elemental Masters novel The Serpent's Shadow, turning the main character into the Eurasian Doctor Maya Witherspoon, who must suffer the multiple stigmas of being a medically-qualified half-caste female (in other words, most of her problems stem from being not white) in turn-of-the-century London; the seven dwarves are transformed into animal avatars of various benign Hindu deities. Contemporary documents describe the use of such glasses by judges in Chinese courts to conceal their facial expressions while questioning witnesses. Due to Prince Charming replacing Old King Cole as mayor, as well as her giving birth to the (mostly) non-human-appearing children of Bigby (the Big Bad Wolf), she moved from the New York City Fabletown to the "Farm" upstate, where non-human-appearing Fables must live. The "lenses" of these glasses were flat panes of smoky quartz, which offered no corrective powers but did protect the eyes from glare.

She was assistant mayor of Fabletown for many years, succeeding to the post after Ichabod Crane was fired for sexually harassing her. Sunglasses were first used in China in the 12th century or possibly earlier. As presented there, she is an amalgam of the two characters that share this name---she is very touchy about her adventures with the dwarfs, is the first ex-wife of Prince Charming, and has a sister named Rose Red from whom she was estranged for some time. It is said that the Roman emperor Nero liked to watch gladiator fights through polished gems. Snow White is an important character in the Fables comic book.
. That version is distinctly parodied in Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs. Their popularity with the Pilots in the United States has earned them the nickname "Pilots Glasses".

In the Disney version, Snow White wakes from her enchanted sleep as soon as the Prince kisses her, similar to Sleeping Beauty. Aviators are sunglasses with a dark lens. A 1933 Betty Boop cartoon, Snow-White, was adapted from this story, as was the famous 1937 Disney animated feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Their popularity with police officers in the United States has earned them the nickname "cop shades". The film starred Marguerite Clark as Snow White, Creighton Hale as Prince Florimond and Dorothy Cumming as Queen Brangomar/Mary Jane. Mirrorshades are sunglasses with a mirrored coating on the surface. Searle Dawley, it was adapted to the screen by Jessie Graham White from his play Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. While originally worn by Onassis in the 1960's, the glasses eventually became popular with younger American girls around the year 2000.

Directed by J. This style of sunglasses is said to mimic the kind most famously worn by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. A 1916 silent film with the title Snow White was made by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and produced by Adolph Zukor and Daniel Frohman. Onassis glasses are very large sunglasses worn by women. The story in Russian writer Alexander Pushkin's 1833 poem The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights is similar to that of Snow White, with knights replacing dwarves. Styles that use two lenses also exist, but less common. She is then forced to step into the red-hot shoes and dance until she falls down dead. The most common type of sunglasses with interchangable lenses have a single lens or shield that covers both eyes.

As punishment for her wicked ways, a pair of heated iron shoes are brought forth with tongs and placed before the Queen. It also allows easy replacement of a set of lenses if they are damaged. Not knowing that this new queen is indeed her stepdaughter, she arrives at the wedding, and her heart fills with the deepest of dread when she realizes the truth. The reason for this is because the cost of a set of lenses is less than the cost of a separate pair of glasses and carrying extra lenses is less bulky than carrying multiple pairs of glasses. But the young queen is a thousand times fairer than you.". The purpose of this is to allow the wearer to easily change lenses when light conditions or activities change. The vain Queen, still believing that Snow White is dead, again asks her mirror who is fairest in the land and yet again the mirror disappoints by responding that "You, my queen, are fair; it is true. Lenses can be easily removed and swapped with a different lens, usually a different colored lens.

The Prince takes a revived Snow White away, and the film ends.). Some sports oriented sunglasses have interchangeable lens options. (In the Disney version, the cure for this deep sleep was love's first kiss. There are two styles of frameless glasses, those that have a piece of frame material connecting the two lenses together, and those that are a single lens with ear stems on each side. The prince then declares his love and soon a wedding is planned. Frameless glasses have no frame around the lenses and the ear stems are attached directly to the lenses. The prince and his men carry the coffin away, but as they go they stumble, the coffin jerks and the piece of poison apple flies out of Snow White's mouth, awakening her. Half frames go around only half the lens, typically the frames attach to the top of the lenses and on the side near the top.

He begs the dwarfs to let him have the coffin. Full frame glasses have the frame go all around the lenses. The prince is enchanted by her beauty and instantly falls in love with her. There are three common styles: full frame, half frame, and frameless. Time passes, and a prince travels through the land and sees Snow White in her coffin. Frames can be made to hold the lenses in several different ways. (The Disney version only adopts the poison apple plot, and the queen meets her demise as she is chased by the dwarves.). Oakley, for example, has straight ear pieces on all their glasses.

When the dwarfs find her, they cannot revive her; and so they mourn and place her in a glass coffin, thinking that she has died. The end of the ear pieces are usually curved so that they wrap around the ear; however, some models have straight ear pieces. She eats the apple eagerly and immediately falls into a deep, magical sleep. The end of the ear pieces and the bridge over the nose can be textured or have a rubber or plastic material to hold better. She is hesitant, so the Queen cuts the apple in half, eats the white part -- which has no poison -- and gives the poisoned red part to Snow White. Because metal frames are more rigid, some models have spring loaded hinges to help them grip the wearer's face better. Lastly the Queen makes a poison apple, and in the guise of a country woman offers it to Snow White. Metal frames are usually more rigid than nylon frames thus they can be more easily damaged when participating in sporty activities, but this is not to say that they cannot be used for such activities.

Snow White again collapses, and again the dwarves save her. This flex can also help the glasses grip better on the wearer's face. Next the Queen dressed as a different old woman combs her hair with a poisoned comb. They are able to bend slightly instead of breaking when pressure is applied to them. Snow White is revived by the dwarves when they loosen the laces. Nylon frames are usually used in sports because they are light weight and flexible. First, disguised as a peddler, the Queen offers colorful stay-laces and laces Snow White up so tight she faints and the Queen takes her for dead. Frames are generally made from plastic, nylon, a metal or metal alloy.

Three times the Queen disguises herself and visits the dwarves' cottage where Snow White is staying to try to kill her. CR-39 lenses are the most common plastic lenses, due to their low weight, high scratch resistance, low transparency for ultraviolet and infrared radiation, and other advantageous properties. Meanwhile, the Queen asks her mirror once again, "Who's the fairest of them all?", and is horrified when the mirror tells her that Snow White, who is alive and well and living with the dwarfs, is still the fairest of them all. Polycarbonate lenses are the lightest, and are also almost shatterproof, making them good for impact protection. Snow White discovers a tiny cottage in the forest, belonging to seven dwarfs, where she rests. They do however, offer more resistance to shattering than glass. (In the Disney movie, these are replaced by a heart.). Plastic lenses are lighter than glass lenses, but are more prone to scratching.

Instead, he lets her go, and brings the queen the lungs and liver of a wild boar. They can also shatter or break on impact. The huntsman takes Snow White into the forest, but finds himself unable to kill the girl. Glass lenses have the best optical clarity and scratch resistance, but are heavier than plastic lenses. She demands that the huntsman return with Snow White's lungs and liver as proof. Plastic lenses are typically made from acrylic, polycarbonate, or CR-39. The Queen is jealous, and orders a huntsman to take Snow White into the woods to be killed. Sunglass lenses are made from either glass or plastic.

But one day when she asks her mirror, it responds, "Queen, you're the fairest where you are, but Snow White is more beautiful by far". Some people who are severely visually impaired but still sighted wear sunglasses in order to protect their vision against glare. She possesses a magic mirror, to whom she would often ask "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?", and to which the mirror would always reply, "You are". Before the introduction of sunglasses, one-eyed people could wear an eyepatch to not disturb other people. The king takes a new wife who is beautiful but very proud. People with severe visual impairment, such as the blind, often wear sunglasses so they do not make others uncomfortable with the fact that they cannot make eye contact with them (not seeing eyes may be better than seeing eyes which seem to look in the wrong direction), or to hide the eyes if their appearance is abnormal, for example due to cataracts. In the traditional Brothers Grimm version of this tale, Snow White is born to a queen, who dies shortly after giving birth. These are known as photochromic lenses.

. Some lenses gradually darken with bright light and lighten in darkness. Many scholars think it originated somewhere in Asia. Corrective lenses can be darkened to serve the same purpose, or secondary clip-on dark lenses can be placed in front of the regular lenses. The origin of the tale is debated; it is likely no older than the Middle Ages. With the introduction of office computing, ergonomists can recommend mildly tinted glasses for display operators to increase contrast. The start of the story also has an interesting twist in that a teacher urges the heroine to kill her own mother so that the teacher can take her place. The manufacturer, any of the above features: color, polarization, degradation, and mirroring, can be combined into a set of lenses for a pair of sunglasses.

The sleep is caused by a ring. These type of sunglasses are sometimes called mirrorshades. Gesammelt, übersetz und erläutert (1864), the main character lives with 40 dragons. For example, a gray lens can have a blue mirror coating, and a brown lens can have a silver coating. In a version from Albania, collected by Johann Georg von Hahn and published in Griechische und albanesische Märchen. The color of the mirrored surface is irrelevant to the color of the lens. In non-German versions the dwarfs are generally robbers, while the talking mirror is a dialog with the sun or moon. These mirrored coatings can be made any color by the manufacturer for styling and fashion purposes.

The German version features elements such as the mirror and the seven dwarfs. This mirrored coating reflects some of the light when it hits the lens before it is transmitted through the lens making it useful in bright conditions. Snow White (or Snow-White, and in German, Schneewittchen) is the title character of a well known fairy tale known from many places in Europe, the most known version being the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. A mirrored coating can also be applied to the lens. Some models use a degradation where the top of the glass (through which the sky is looked at) is darker and the bottom is transparent. Some models have polarized lenses to reduce glare caused by light reflected from polarizing surfaces such as water as well as by polarized diffuse sky radiation (skylight).

Some sunglasses with interchangeable lens have optional clear lenses to protect the eyes during low light or night time activities. Clear lenses are used typically to protect the eyes from impact, debris, dust, or chemicals. Blue and purple lenses offer no real benefits and are mainly cosmetic. Yellow lenses are commonly used by golfers and shooters for its contrast enhancement and depth perception properties.

Orange and yellow lenses have the best contrast enhancement and depth perception but cause color distortion. Red lenses are good for medium and lower light conditions because they are good at enhancing contrast but causes color distortion. Brown and green lenses cause some minimal color distortion, but have contrast-enhancing properties. Grey lenses are considered neutral because they do not enhance contrast or distort colors.

The color of the lens can vary by style, fashion, and purpose, but for general use, green, grey, or brown is recommended to avoid or minimize color distortion, that could be dangerous when, for instance, driving a car. In both tests, no part of the lens can touch the eye. In the high velocity test, a 1/4 in (6.35mm) steel ball is shot at the lens at 150 ft/s(45.72 m/s). In the basic impact test, a 1 in (2.54 cm) steel ball is dropped on the lens from 50 in (127 cm).

These are voluntary standards, so not all sunglasses comply, nor are manufacturers required to comply. Some sunglasses also pass ANSI Z87.1 requirements for basic impact and high impact protection. Cheaper sunglasses look good but maximum protection is not guaranteed. The rule of thumb is, the more expensive and the more known the manufacteror of the sunglasses the more protection.

In the preparation for solar eclipses, health authorities often warn against looking at the sun through only sunglasses. In the European Union, a CE mark () identifies glasses fulfilling quality regulations. It is important that the makers of one's sunglasses ensure that the glasses protect against UV (ultraviolet) rays. Various types of disposable sunglasses are dispensed to patients after receiving mydriatic eye drops during eye examinations.

Eyeglasses improve visual comfort. People also wear sunglasses when they don't want others to see that they're high by looking at their bloodshot eyes. The impact on nonverbal communication and the cool image can be the reasons for wearing sunglasses by night or indoors. Curiously, they can project an image of uncool nerdiness that sunglasses do not have.

Note that normal glasses are very rarely worn without a practical purpose. Darkened sunglasses of particular shapes may be in vogue as a fashion accessory. Many cultures do not take them kindly. Hiding one's eyes has implications in face-to-face communication: It can hide weeping, being one of the signs of mourning, makes eye contact impossible which can be intimidating, as in the stereotype of the guardian of a chain gang, or can show detachment, which is considered cool in some circles.

. From the 1950s to the 1990s sunglasses were popular as a fashion statement, especially on the beach. Sunglasses have also been associated with celebrities and film actors primarily due to the desire to mask identity, but in part due to the lighting involved in production being typically stronger than natural light and uncomfortable to the naked eye. It has been recommended to wear these kind of glasses on sunny days to protect the eyes from ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to the development of a cataract.

In outdoor activities like skiing and flying, the eye can receive more light than usual. Many people find direct sunlight too bright to be comfortable, especially when reading from paper on which the sun directly shines. Sunglasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to screen out strong light from the eyes. Riff from Sluggy Freelance.

Scar from Fullmetal Alchemist. The MacManus brothers from The Boondock Saints. Duke Nukem( as of Duke Nukem 3D). Jimmy from WarioWare, Inc..

Johnny and Bunny Bravo from Johnny Bravo. Steven Hyde's red aviator sunglasses from That '70s Show. The mirrored aviator sunglasses of the silent boss figure prominently in the plot of Cool Hand Luke. Rude, a member of the Turks from Final Fantasy VII.

Gendo Ikari, from the anime Neon Genesis Evangelion. Anthony Crowley, from the novel Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The Energizer Bunny. Clifford, a Muppet character.

Albert Wesker from the video game Resident Evil. Most of the mafia members from the anime Gungrave. The crew from Reservoir Dogs. Interestingly, all of the protagonists wear rounded lenses, while the antagonists wear rectangular lenses.

Most characters from The Matrix movie. The Men in Black and the Men in Black of urban legend. Matt Murdock, blind lawyer from "Daredevil". Cyclops, from the X-Men - wears sunglasses when he is not in costume with his visor.

Max Headroom - 1980s "computer generated" celebrity. The reporter crew of the Argentinian and Spanish shows Caiga Quien Caiga. The Blues Brothers, musicians. John Munch, Detective in Homicide: Life on the Street,Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (played by Richard Belzer, see above).

Blade (comics), A fictional Marvel Comics comic-book character about a vampire-hunter.Blade (comics) has been turned in a series of 3 films. and all three members of ZZ Top, who had a 1980 hit with Cheap Sunglasses. Stevie Wonder, blind musician. - country music singer.

Hank Williams, Jr. Andy Warhol, artist. Thompson, journalist, deceased. Hunter S.

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz artist. Masayuki Suzuki, Japanese singer of Rats & Star. Howard Stern, shock jock. Paul Shaffer - bandleader.

Richard Petty, NASCAR legend. Roy Orbison, singer. Yoko Ono, Japanese artist and John Lennon's wife. Ric Ocasek - musician and producer.

Kennedy. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, widow of John F. Jack Nicholson, actor. Karl Lagerfeld, German fashion designer.

Lenny Kravitz, Singer/Entertainer. Umm Kalthum, Egyptian singer, now deceased. Elton John, in unusual tints. Wojciech Jaruzelski, Polish chief of state.

Michael Jackson, pop star. Heino, German singer. Liam and Noel Gallagher of Oasis. Enzo Ferrari, Italian automotive pioneer.

Jose Feliciano, blind musician. Bootsy Collins, funk musician. Ray Charles, blind musician, now deceased. Bono, singer of U2.

Richard Belzer comedian and actor. Robert Ashley, American composer. Pedro Abrunhosa, Portuguese singer. Smoked Spectacles usually refers to the darkened eyepieces worn by blind people.

Sunnies is Australian slang. Dark glasses (also preceded by 'pair of') - generic term in common usage. Also in use is the derivative abbreviation, shades. Sun-shades can also refer to the sun-shading eyepiece-type, although the term is not exclusive to these.

Sunglasses is a term in common usage in Britain and North America, and it is also used when preceded by "pair of". Sun specs (also sunspecs) is the shortened form of the above term. Spekkies is a term used predominantly in southern Australia. Sun spectacles is a term used by some opticians.

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