Snow White

Snow White (or Snow-White, and in German, Schneewittchen) is the title character of a well known fairy tale known from many places in Europe, the most known version being the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. The German version features elements such as the mirror and the seven dwarfs. In non-German versions the dwarfs are generally robbers, while the talking mirror is a dialog with the sun or moon. In a version from Albania, collected by Johann Georg von Hahn and published in Griechische und albanesische Märchen. Gesammelt, übersetz und erläutert (1864), the main character lives with 40 dragons. The sleep is caused by a ring. The start of the story also has an interesting twist in that a teacher urges the heroine to kill her own mother so that the teacher can take her place. The origin of the tale is debated; it is likely no older than the Middle Ages. Many scholars think it originated somewhere in Asia.

Story

In the traditional Brothers Grimm version of this tale, Snow White is born to a queen, who dies shortly after giving birth. The king takes a new wife who is beautiful but very proud. She possesses a magic mirror, to whom she would often ask "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?", and to which the mirror would always reply, "You are". But one day when she asks her mirror, it responds, "Queen, you're the fairest where you are, but Snow White is more beautiful by far".

The Queen is jealous, and orders a huntsman to take Snow White into the woods to be killed. She demands that the huntsman return with Snow White's lungs and liver as proof. The huntsman takes Snow White into the forest, but finds himself unable to kill the girl. Instead, he lets her go, and brings the queen the lungs and liver of a wild boar. (In the Disney movie, these are replaced by a heart.)

Snow White discovers a tiny cottage in the forest, belonging to seven dwarfs, where she rests. Meanwhile, the Queen asks her mirror once again, "Who's the fairest of them all?", and is horrified when the mirror tells her that Snow White, who is alive and well and living with the dwarfs, is still the fairest of them all.

Three times the Queen disguises herself and visits the dwarves' cottage where Snow White is staying to try to kill her. First, disguised as a peddler, the Queen offers colorful stay-laces and laces Snow White up so tight she faints and the Queen takes her for dead. Snow White is revived by the dwarves when they loosen the laces. Next the Queen dressed as a different old woman combs her hair with a poisoned comb. Snow White again collapses, and again the dwarves save her. Lastly the Queen makes a poison apple, and in the guise of a country woman offers it to Snow White. She is hesitant, so the Queen cuts the apple in half, eats the white part -- which has no poison -- and gives the poisoned red part to Snow White. She eats the apple eagerly and immediately falls into a deep, magical sleep. When the dwarfs find her, they cannot revive her; and so they mourn and place her in a glass coffin, thinking that she has died. (The Disney version only adopts the poison apple plot, and the queen meets her demise as she is chased by the dwarves.)

Snow White in her coffin

Time passes, and a prince travels through the land and sees Snow White in her coffin. The prince is enchanted by her beauty and instantly falls in love with her. He begs the dwarfs to let him have the coffin. The prince and his men carry the coffin away, but as they go they stumble, the coffin jerks and the piece of poison apple flies out of Snow White's mouth, awakening her. The prince then declares his love and soon a wedding is planned. (In the Disney version, the cure for this deep sleep was love's first kiss. The Prince takes a revived Snow White away, and the film ends.)

The vain Queen, still believing that Snow White is dead, again asks her mirror who is fairest in the land and yet again the mirror disappoints by responding that "You, my queen, are fair; it is true. But the young queen is a thousand times fairer than you."

Not knowing that this new queen is indeed her stepdaughter, she arrives at the wedding, and her heart fills with the deepest of dread when she realizes the truth.

As punishment for her wicked ways, a pair of heated iron shoes are brought forth with tongs and placed before the Queen. She is then forced to step into the red-hot shoes and dance until she falls down dead.

Other Versions

The story in Russian writer Alexander Pushkin's 1833 poem The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights is similar to that of Snow White, with knights replacing dwarves.

A 1916 silent film with the title Snow White was made by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and produced by Adolph Zukor and Daniel Frohman. Directed by J. Searle Dawley, it was adapted to the screen by Jessie Graham White from his play Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The film starred Marguerite Clark as Snow White, Creighton Hale as Prince Florimond and Dorothy Cumming as Queen Brangomar/Mary Jane.

Snow White in the Disney Cartoon.

A 1933 Betty Boop cartoon, Snow-White, was adapted from this story, as was the famous 1937 Disney animated feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. In the Disney version, Snow White wakes from her enchanted sleep as soon as the Prince kisses her, similar to Sleeping Beauty. That version is distinctly parodied in Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs.

Snow White is an important character in the Fables comic book. As presented there, she is an amalgam of the two characters that share this name---she is very touchy about her adventures with the dwarfs, is the first ex-wife of Prince Charming, and has a sister named Rose Red from whom she was estranged for some time. She was assistant mayor of Fabletown for many years, succeeding to the post after Ichabod Crane was fired for sexually harassing her. Due to Prince Charming replacing Old King Cole as mayor, as well as her giving birth to the (mostly) non-human-appearing children of Bigby (the Big Bad Wolf), she moved from the New York City Fabletown to the "Farm" upstate, where non-human-appearing Fables must live.

The story was very loosely adapted by Mercedes Lackey into her Elemental Masters novel The Serpent's Shadow, turning the main character into the Eurasian Doctor Maya Witherspoon, who must suffer the multiple stigmas of being a medically-qualified half-caste female (in other words, most of her problems stem from being not white) in turn-of-the-century London; the seven dwarves are transformed into animal avatars of various benign Hindu deities.

In 1961 the story was paradied in the film "Snow White and The Three Stooges", starring Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Joe "Curly-Joe" DeRita. This film is widely regarded by fans of the Three Stooges as their worst feature film. In the film, the dwarfs had gone on vacation and lent Moe, Larry and Curly Joe the use their cottage. The 3 are traveling entertainers, along with a young man who was born a prince, but lost his memory in a kidnapping attempt that was thwarted by the Stooges. The boy suffers amnesia and the Stooges "adopt" him and raise him to manhood. He is only shown as a boy in a flasback segment. This man ends up marrying Snow White, played by real life figure skating champion, Carol Heiss. The film is a musical and features many ice skating scenes. There are few other things that differ from the original story, such as Count Oga (villainous henchman of the evil queen), magic sword that transports the Stooges to various places and a carriage chase scene.

Snow White And Rose Red

There is another Brothers Grimm tale called Snow-White and Rose-Red which also includes a character called Snow White. However this Snow White is a completely separate character from the one found in this tale. For more information about the other Snow White, see the Snow-White and Rose-Red article. The original German names are different: Schneewittchen (the Princess) and Schneeweißchen (together with Rosenrot). There is actually no difference in the meaning, but the first name is more influenced by the dialects of Lower Germany while the second one is the Higher German version.


This page about Snow White includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Snow White
News stories about Snow White
External links for Snow White
Videos for Snow White
Wikis about Snow White
Discussion Groups about Snow White
Blogs about Snow White
Images of Snow White

There is actually no difference in the meaning, but the first name is more influenced by the dialects of Lower Germany while the second one is the Higher German version. To the readers of the Metro section, vehicular traffic does not reinforce, but rather detracts from, the essential "street-ness" of a street. The original German names are different: Schneewittchen (the Princess) and Schneeweißchen (together with Rosenrot). For instance, a New York Times writer lets casually slip the observation that automobile-laden Houston Street is "a street that can hardly be called 'street' anymore, transformed years ago into an eight-lane raceway that alternately resembles a Nascar event and a parking lot." [1] Published in the paper's Metro section, the article evidently presumes an audience with an innate grasp of the full urban role of the street. For more information about the other Snow White, see the Snow-White and Rose-Red article. the facilitation of vehicular traffic as an incidental benefit). However this Snow White is a completely separate character from the one found in this tale. Among urban residents of the English-speaking world, the word appears to carry its original connotations (i.e.

There is another Brothers Grimm tale called Snow-White and Rose-Red which also includes a character called Snow White. A mother may tell her toddlers "Don't go out into the street, so you don't get hit by a car.". There are few other things that differ from the original story, such as Count Oga (villainous henchman of the evil queen), magic sword that transports the Stooges to various places and a carriage chase scene. Thus, sidewalks and tree lawns would not be thought of as part of the street. The film is a musical and features many ice skating scenes. In an even narrower sense, some may think of a street as only the vehicle-driven and parking part of the thoroughfare. This man ends up marrying Snow White, played by real life figure skating champion, Carol Heiss. In this view, pedestrian traffic is incidental to the street's purpose; a street consists of a thoroughfare running through the middle (in essence, a road), and may or may not have sidewalks along the sides.

He is only shown as a boy in a flasback segment. In some parts of the English-speaking world, such as North America, many think of the street as a thoroughfare for vehicular traffic first and foremost. The boy suffers amnesia and the Stooges "adopt" him and raise him to manhood. However, modern civilization in much of the New World developed around transportation provided by motor vehicles. The 3 are traveling entertainers, along with a young man who was born a prince, but lost his memory in a kidnapping attempt that was thwarted by the Stooges. Streets have existed for as long as humans have lived in permanent settlements (see civilization). In the film, the dwarfs had gone on vacation and lent Moe, Larry and Curly Joe the use their cottage. In Auckland, for example, the main shopping precinct is around Queen Street and Karangahape Road, and the main urban thoroughfare connecting the south of the city to the city centre is Dominion Road.

This film is widely regarded by fans of the Three Stooges as their worst feature film. In some other English-speaking countries, such as New Zealand and Australia, cities are often divided by a main "Road," with "Streets" leading from this "Road", or are divided by thoroughfares known as "Streets" or "Roads" with no apparent differentiation between the two. In 1961 the story was paradied in the film "Snow White and The Three Stooges", starring Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Joe "Curly-Joe" DeRita. Thus the town's so-called "Roads" will actually be more streetlike than a road. The story was very loosely adapted by Mercedes Lackey into her Elemental Masters novel The Serpent's Shadow, turning the main character into the Eurasian Doctor Maya Witherspoon, who must suffer the multiple stigmas of being a medically-qualified half-caste female (in other words, most of her problems stem from being not white) in turn-of-the-century London; the seven dwarves are transformed into animal avatars of various benign Hindu deities. In the United Kingdom many towns will refer to their main thoroughfare as the High Street (in the United States it would be called the Main Street), and many of the ways leading off it will be named "Road" despite the urban setting. Due to Prince Charming replacing Old King Cole as mayor, as well as her giving birth to the (mostly) non-human-appearing children of Bigby (the Big Bad Wolf), she moved from the New York City Fabletown to the "Farm" upstate, where non-human-appearing Fables must live. A desolate road in rural Montana, on the other hand, may bear a sign proclaiming it "Davidson Street", but this does not make it a "street".

She was assistant mayor of Fabletown for many years, succeeding to the post after Ichabod Crane was fired for sexually harassing her. For example, London's Abbey Road serves all the vital functions of a street, despite its name, and locals are more apt to refer to the "street" outside than the "road". As presented there, she is an amalgam of the two characters that share this name---she is very touchy about her adventures with the dwarfs, is the first ex-wife of Prince Charming, and has a sister named Rose Red from whom she was estranged for some time. There is a haphazard relationship, at best, between a thoroughfare's function and its name. Snow White is an important character in the Fables comic book. A town square is a little more like a street, but a town square is rarely paved with asphalt and may not make any concessions for through traffic at all. That version is distinctly parodied in Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs. The street, not the road, is home to the homeless, and even Kerouac's hero finally returned to find his friends on a New York street.

In the Disney version, Snow White wakes from her enchanted sleep as soon as the Prince kisses her, similar to Sleeping Beauty. Nobody has ever seen a "road" vendor or a "road" performer, and you'll never find yourself on a long "street" to nowhere. A 1933 Betty Boop cartoon, Snow-White, was adapted from this story, as was the famous 1937 Disney animated feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. It is "on the street" where one hears an interesting rumor, where one bumps into an old acquaintance, where one acquires smarts. The film starred Marguerite Clark as Snow White, Creighton Hale as Prince Florimond and Dorothy Cumming as Queen Brangomar/Mary Jane. One may "hit the road" to see the wonders of the world—Jack Kerouac famously chronicled one such journey—but the latest bling will "hit the streets" before it ever appears on a road. Searle Dawley, it was adapted to the screen by Jessie Graham White from his play Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. If a road connects places, then a street connects people.

Directed by J. Still, even here, what is called a "street" is usually a smaller thoroughfare, such as a road within a housing development feeding directly into individual driveways. A 1916 silent film with the title Snow White was made by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation and produced by Adolph Zukor and Daniel Frohman. In rural and suburban environments where street life is rare, the terms "street" and "road" are frequently considered interchangeable. The story in Russian writer Alexander Pushkin's 1833 poem The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights is similar to that of Snow White, with knights replacing dwarves. Street performers, beggars, patrons of sidewalk cafés, peoplewatchers, and a diversity of other characters are habitual users of a street; the same people would not typically be found on a road. She is then forced to step into the red-hot shoes and dance until she falls down dead. However, a street is characterized by the degree and quality of street life it facilitates, whereas a road serves primarily as a through passage for road vehicles or (less frequently) pedestrians.

As punishment for her wicked ways, a pair of heated iron shoes are brought forth with tongs and placed before the Queen. A road, like a street, is often paved and used for travel. Not knowing that this new queen is indeed her stepdaughter, she arrives at the wedding, and her heart fills with the deepest of dread when she realizes the truth. Streets also tend to aggregate similar establishments. But the young queen is a thousand times fairer than you.". into north and south. The vain Queen, still believing that Snow White is dead, again asks her mirror who is fairest in the land and yet again the mirror disappoints by responding that "You, my queen, are fair; it is true. For example, Yonge Street divides Toronto into east and west sides, and East Capitol Street divides Washington, D.C.

The Prince takes a revived Snow White away, and the film ends.). Other streets have marked divisions between neighborhoods of a city. (In the Disney version, the cure for this deep sleep was love's first kiss. Similarly, the Bowery in New York City was once known as the center of the nation's underground punk scene. The prince then declares his love and soon a wedding is planned. New Orleans’ Bourbon Street is famous not only for its active nightlife but also for its role as the center of the city’s French Quarter. The prince and his men carry the coffin away, but as they go they stumble, the coffin jerks and the piece of poison apple flies out of Snow White's mouth, awakening her. Much as a string in a jar can precipitate a beautiful, delicate crystal, a street can serve as the catalyst for neighborhood culture and solidarity.

He begs the dwarfs to let him have the coffin. Jane Jacobs, an economist and prominent urbanist, wrote extensively on the ways that interaction among the people who live and work on a particular street--"eyes on the street"--can reduce crime, encourage the exchange of ideas, and generally make the world a better place. The prince is enchanted by her beauty and instantly falls in love with her. Streets assume the role of a town square for its regulars. Time passes, and a prince travels through the land and sees Snow White in her coffin. See also: Graffiti. (The Disney version only adopts the poison apple plot, and the queen meets her demise as she is chased by the dwarves.). It is also a neutral zone where business associates can meet for coffee as easily as friends can meet for drinks.

When the dwarfs find her, they cannot revive her; and so they mourn and place her in a glass coffin, thinking that she has died. The street is a place for expression, protest, and revolution. She eats the apple eagerly and immediately falls into a deep, magical sleep. Such assembly need not be as dramatic as marching, parading, or erecting barricades as Parisians are wont to do. She is hesitant, so the Queen cuts the apple in half, eats the white part -- which has no poison -- and gives the poisoned red part to Snow White. Streets are also a forum for public assembly. Lastly the Queen makes a poison apple, and in the guise of a country woman offers it to Snow White. The length of a lot of land along a street is referred to as the frontage of the lot.

Snow White again collapses, and again the dwarves save her. Alleys typically do not have names. Next the Queen dressed as a different old woman combs her hair with a poisoned comb. Practically all public streets are given a name or at least a number to identify them and any addresses located along the streets. Snow White is revived by the dwarves when they loosen the laces. Beyond these public strips of land are bordered the front of lots commonly owned by private parties. First, disguised as a peddler, the Queen offers colorful stay-laces and laces Snow White up so tight she faints and the Queen takes her for dead. Streets are often lighted at night with streetlights, which are typically located far overhead on tall poles.

Three times the Queen disguises herself and visits the dwarves' cottage where Snow White is staying to try to kill her. Alternatively, there may be openings in wider sidewalks in which trees grow. Meanwhile, the Queen asks her mirror once again, "Who's the fairest of them all?", and is horrified when the mirror tells her that Snow White, who is alive and well and living with the dwarfs, is still the fairest of them all. Grass and trees are often grown there for landscaping the sides of the street. Snow White discovers a tiny cottage in the forest, belonging to seven dwarfs, where she rests. There may be an unpaved strip of land between the vehicle-driveable part of the street and the sidewalk on either side of the street, which can be called the tree lawn. (In the Disney movie, these are replaced by a heart.). Sidewalks are often located on these public land strips beyond the curbs on one or usually both sides of the street.

Instead, he lets her go, and brings the queen the lungs and liver of a wild boar. Usually, there are strips of land beyond the driving/parking parts of the streets owned by the government entity owning the streets. The huntsman takes Snow White into the forest, but finds himself unable to kill the girl. Bordering the driving/parking sides of many urban streets, there are curbs. She demands that the huntsman return with Snow White's lungs and liver as proof. Where vehicular traffic is allowed on a street, traffic and parking regulatory signs are often placed near the sides. The Queen is jealous, and orders a huntsman to take Snow White into the woods to be killed. Occasionally, a street may have enough width on the side that there is angle parking.

But one day when she asks her mirror, it responds, "Queen, you're the fairest where you are, but Snow White is more beautiful by far". There may be parking lane markings on the pavement effectively designating which meter a parking space corresponds to. She possesses a magic mirror, to whom she would often ask "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?", and to which the mirror would always reply, "You are". On the side of some streets, particularly in business areas, there may be parking meters into which coins must be paid to allow parking in the adjacent space for a limited time. The king takes a new wife who is beautiful but very proud. Signs off to the side of the street often state regulations about parking. In the traditional Brothers Grimm version of this tale, Snow White is born to a queen, who dies shortly after giving birth. Sometimes parking on the sides of streets is allowed only at certain times.

. Some streets are too busy or not wide enough for to allow parking on the side. Many scholars think it originated somewhere in Asia. A somewhat recent trend has been to start marking off parking lanes on more important streets. The origin of the tale is debated; it is likely no older than the Middle Ages. Most minor side streets allowing free parallel parking do not have pavement markings designating the parking lane. The start of the story also has an interesting twist in that a teacher urges the heroine to kill her own mother so that the teacher can take her place. Many streets, especially side streets in residential areas, have an extra lane's width on either or both sides for a parallel parking vehicles.

The sleep is caused by a ring. Side streets often do not have center lines or lane lines. Gesammelt, übersetz und erläutert (1864), the main character lives with 40 dragons. If there is more than one lane going in one direction on a main street, these lanes may be separated by intermittent lane lines marked on the street pavement. In a version from Albania, collected by Johann Georg von Hahn and published in Griechische und albanesische Märchen. Occasionally, there may be a median strip separating lanes of opposing traffic. In non-German versions the dwarfs are generally robbers, while the talking mirror is a dialog with the sun or moon. On broader two-way streets, there is often a center line marked down the middle of the street separating those lanes on which vehicular traffic goes in one direction from other lanes in which traffic goes in the opposite direction.

The German version features elements such as the mirror and the seven dwarfs. Which lane is for which direction of traffic depends on what country the street is located in. Snow White (or Snow-White, and in German, Schneewittchen) is the title character of a well known fairy tale known from many places in Europe, the most known version being the one collected by the Brothers Grimm. Two-way streets are wide enough for at least two lanes of traffic. One way streets typically have signs reading "ONE WAY" and an arrow showing the direction of allowed travel. As far as concerns the driver, a street can be one-way or two-way: vehicles on one-way streets may travel in only one direction, while on two-way streets may travel both ways.

Despite this, the operator of a motor vehicle may (incompletely) regard a street as merely a thoroughfare for vehicular travel or parking. A feature universal to all streets is a human-scale design that gives its users the space and security to feel engaged in their surroundings, whatever through traffic may pass. These measures are often taken in a city's busiest areas, the "destination" districts, when the volume of activity outgrows the capacity of private passenger vehicles to support it. Many streets are bracketed by bollards or Jersey barriers so as to prevent passage unless on foot.

A street may be temporarily blocked to all through traffic in order to secure the space for other uses, such as a street fair, a flea market, or children at play. This has never been the case, and even in the automobile age, is still demonstrably false. Transportation is often misunderstood to be the defining characteristic, or even the sole purpose, of a street. These plans were never implemented on a large scale, a fact which today's urban theorists regard as fortunate for vitality and diversity.

Such an arrangement, it was said, would allow for even denser development in the future. To this end, proposals were advanced to build "vertical streets" where road vehicles, pedestrians, and trains would each occupy their own levels. Le Corbusier, for one, perceived an ever-stricter segregation of traffic as an essential affirmation of social order--a desirable, and ultimately inevitable, expression of modernity. In the mid-20th century, as the automobile threatened to overwhelm city streets with pollution and ghastly accidents, many urban theorists came to see this segregation as not only helpful but necessary in order to maintain mobility.

This is usually done by carving a road through the middle for motorists, reserving sidewalks on either side for pedestrians; other arrangements allow for streetcars, trolleys, and even wastewater and rainfall runoff ditches (common in Japan and India). In the interest of order and efficiency, an effort may be made to segregate different types of traffic. The unrestricted movement of people and goods within a city is essential to its commerce and vitality, and streets provide the physical space for this activity. Circulation, or less broadly transportation, is perhaps a street's most visible use, and certainly among the most important.

Side streets are quieter, often residential in use and character, and may be used for vehicular parking. Commerce and public interaction are more visible on main streets, and vehicles may use them for longer-distance travel. Main streets are usually broad with a relatively high level of activity. Streets can be loosely categorized as main streets and side streets.

Its roles are as numerous and diverse as its ever-changing cast of characters. As a component of the built environment as ancient as human habitation, the street sustains a range of activities vital to civilization. The street is a relentlessly public environment, one of the few shared between all sorts of people. .

Conversely, highways and motorways are examples of roads but not streets. Examples of streets include pedestrian streets, alleys, and center-city streets too crowded for road vehicles to pass, none of which are usually considered roads. A street is superficially similar to a road, but they are not the same. Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt, embedded with rails, or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic.

A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt, but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as cobblestone or brick. A street is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about.

01-29-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory