Sleepless in Seattle

Sleepless In Seattle is a 1993 movie, directed by Nora Ephron, based on the book by Jeff Arch. The film stars Tom Hanks as Sam Baldwin and Meg Ryan as Annie Reed.

The movie is about Sam Baldwin's bind; to live life and move on, or to mourn and stay away from women. His eight year old son Jonah thinks that his father needs a woman in order to get his life back on track, and calls into a Seattle talk show. The voice and call is heard by hundreds of woman, including Annie Reed; she can't find a rest until she really knows for sure that Sam Baldwin is not the one person for her.

In the 1994 Academy Awards, the movie was nominated for two awards (Best Music, Original Song, Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly For the Screen) but failed to win a single one.

Cast And Credits

Starring:

  • Tom Hanks: Sam Baldwin
  • Meg Ryan: Annie Reed
  • Bill Pullman: Walter
  • Ross Malinger: Jonah Baldwin
  • Rosie O'Donnell: Becky
  • Gaby Hoffmann: Jessica
  • Victor Garber: Greg
  • Rita Wilson: Suzy
  • Barbara Garrick: Victoria
  • Carey Lowell: Maggie Abbott Baldwin
  • David Hyde Pierce: Dennis Reed
  • Dana Ivey: Claire Bennett
  • Rob Reiner: Jay

Credits:

  • Director: Nora Ephron
  • Writer: Jeff Arch
  • Producer: Jane Bartelme
  • Music: Gene Autry
  • Cinematography: Sven Nykvist
  • Editor: Robert M. Reitano

Plot

Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.


Filming locations

The following is a list of locations on which Sleepless in Seattle was shot on:

Soundtrack listing


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The following is a list of locations on which Sleepless in Seattle was shot on:. "Uncle Trusty" then starts telling the puppies about his good old friend "Old Reliable", and the film ends.
. Just then, Jock and Trusty arrive— it turns out Trusty survived the accident with an injured leg. Credits:. At Christmastime, Lady gives birth to her and Tramp's four puppies ,and they are all photographed together with the baby. Starring:. Jock is convinced Trusty is dead and he begins to cry.

In the 1994 Academy Awards, the movie was nominated for two awards (Best Music, Original Song, Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly For the Screen) but failed to win a single one. Tramp is released from the wagon, while Trusty is trapped under the wheel. The voice and call is heard by hundreds of woman, including Annie Reed; she can't find a rest until she really knows for sure that Sam Baldwin is not the one person for her. Several passers-by are helping the driver and trying to release the horses when a taxi pulls up and Jim Dear and Lady get out. His eight year old son Jonah thinks that his father needs a woman in order to get his life back on track, and calls into a Seattle talk show. They confront the horses which are pulling the wagon and it topples over into a tree. The movie is about Sam Baldwin's bind; to live life and move on, or to mourn and stay away from women. Jock and Trusty are both waiting outside the house and hear about the rat. They decide to go after the dog catcher's wagon and finally sniff its scent, and run towards the wagon while it is just yards away from the dog pound.

The film stars Tom Hanks as Sam Baldwin and Meg Ryan as Annie Reed. They see the dead rat and everyone knows that Lady and Tramp had entered the house to catch the rat. Sleepless In Seattle is a 1993 movie, directed by Nora Ephron, based on the book by Jeff Arch. Aunt Sarah, Jim Dear and Darling all follow her. Editor: Robert M. Reitano. Lady begins barking frantically and runs upstairs. Cinematography: Sven Nykvist. They then unlock the cellar door and release Lady, despite Aunt Sarah's fears that Lady would harm the baby.

Music: Gene Autry. Just as the dog catcher is collecting Tramp, Jim Dear and Darling return. Producer: Jane Bartelme. She tries to convince him to destroy Tramp; meanwhile, Lady is locked in the cellar. Writer: Jeff Arch. Aunt Sarah calls the dog pound and demands that the dog catcher come to collect Tramp. Director: Nora Ephron. Tramp eventually manages to kill the rat but in the process tips over the baby's cot, and Aunt Sarah is awakened by the baby crying.

Rob Reiner: Jay. Just as the fight is reaching its climax, Lady comes in. Dana Ivey: Claire Bennett. He chases the rat all around the bedroom. David Hyde Pierce: Dennis Reed. Tramp enters the house and soon comes face to face with the rat. Carey Lowell: Maggie Abbott Baldwin. Then Tramp re-appears and Lady tells him that the rat has gone into the baby's room.

Barbara Garrick: Victoria. She barks so loud that Aunt Sarah wakes up and tells her to stop barking. Rita Wilson: Suzy. Just as Tramp is leaving, a rat appears in the garden and Lady begins to bark. Victor Garber: Greg. And when Tramp comes, she is angry with him for getting her locked up in the pound, and tells him she does not want to see him again. Gaby Hoffmann: Jessica. Jock and Trusty both come to see Lady, but she is not in the mood for visitors.

Rosie O'Donnell: Becky. Because she has a name tag, she is soon identified and taken home—but Aunt Sarah chains her to a kennel in the garden. Ross Malinger: Jonah Baldwin. Lady is captured by the dog catcher and taken to the dog pound, where she does not stay for long. Bill Pullman: Walter. The next morning, they chase chickens around a chicken pen, and narrowly escape being shot by the owner of the chicken house. Meg Ryan: Annie Reed. They sleep for the night in a nearby park.

Tom Hanks: Sam Baldwin. Tramp then takes Lady to Tony's Italian Restaurant, where Tony the cook prepares them a special spaghetti meal. Tramp then takes Lady around the town, introducing her to a few of his friends, including a beaver who removes Lady's muzzle. Lady comes face to face with a group of vicious dogs on the other side of town, but Tramp arrives on the scene and rescues Lady. Aunt Sarah then takes Lady to a pet shop to have her fitted with a muzzle, but Lady runs away while the shopkeeper is trying to fit her with a muzzle.

Lady scares Si and Am and they pretend to have been hurt, which causes Aunt Sarah to come downstairs. But she begins to bark when the two cats go up the stairs to see the baby. Lady manages to keep the goldfish and canary safe from harm, but is unable to prevent the two cats from knocking over furniture and tearing the curtains. Aunt Sarah, who is not fond of dogs, has two Siamese cats—Si and Am—who run wild in the house.

Soon after the baby is born, Jim Dear and Darling go away for a few days and Aunt Sarah comes to the house to look after the baby. She is mystified by this but soon grows to like the new baby boy. Darling then has a baby and Lady feels that Jim Dear and Darling are not giving her as much attention as before. A short time afterwards, she becomes friends with another dog—a stray dog called Tramp.

She makes friends with two dogs living nearby, Jock and Trusty. When Lady is six months old, she has to have a licence and is able to leave Jim Dear and Darling's house. She quickly becomes the centre of their attention and is pampered with many presents. Lady is a gift from Jim Dear to his wife Darling one Christmas.

Scamp also starred in a direct-to-video sequel in 2002 titled Lady and the Tramp 2: Scamp's Adventure. This film begat a spinoff comic titled Scamp, named after one of Lady and Tramp's puppies. Greene later wrote a novelization of the film, which was released two years before the film itself, at Walt Disney's insistence, so that audiences would be familiar with the story. The film was based loosely on two previous works, the 1937 book Happy Dan, The Whistling Dog by Ward Greene about a mutt from the wrong side of the tracks, and a story line worked on for several years by Disney story man Joe Grant about a Cocker Spaniel named Lady, based on his own pet.

Once of the two of them meet, they share an adventure together and eventually fall in love. The story pairs a Cocker Spaniel named Lady who lives with a rich family with a mutt (possibly part Great Dane) named Tramp who lives on the streets. It was the first animated feature filmed in the CinemaScope widescreen film process. It was produced by Walt Disney Productions and was originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution, a new division of Disney which assumed distribution rights of the studio's product from RKO Radio Pictures.

Lady and the Tramp is the fifteenth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon.

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