Skateboarding

A skateboarder in the middle of a trick

Skateboarding is the act of rolling on or interacting with a skateboard. Someone who skateboards is a skater (or skateboarder or most fully skateboard rider), though the shortest term may also refer to someone ice skating or roller skating.

Like roller skating, skateboarding is often done for recreation and as a sport, but, more often than ice skating, it is a method of transportation. Skateboarding has been thought of by many as part of the extreme sports family, which also includes (but not restricted to) snowboarding, BMX, and surfing.

History of the skateboard

The history of skateboarding goes hand in hand with the history of the skateboard. Improvements in skateboarding equipment have spurred advancement in skateboarding techniques and new techniques have required new equipment.

Skateboarding has its origins in surfing, and was originally called "sidewalk surfing". While surfing influenced skateboarding in it's early days, now the reverse is also true. Surfers are adapting skateboarding tricks into surfing, and the result is evolution in both sports.

The first skateboard

The first commercial skateboard was the Roller Derby Skateboard that was introduced in 1959. Before this skateboards were home made pieces of wooden planks with roller skates attached to the bottom. At the time there was a rapidly growing interest in skateboarding (sometimes referred to as sidewalk surfing) and soon many other similar products emerged. The boards were from 6 to 7 inches wide. These boards used wheels made of clay. They had poor traction and would come to a dead stop when rolling over even small pebbles. This made skateboarding inherently a dangerous sport and after a few years many cities banned skateboarding because of liability concerns. This development caused the first skateboarding fad to die completely in the fall of 1965. Many skateboard manufacturers went out of business because of losing money on cancelled orders for the Christmas holiday season.

The second generation

In 1970 Frank Nasworthy started to develop a skateboard wheel made of urethane. The improvement in traction and performance was so immense that popularity of skateboarding started to rise rapidly again. With the growing interest companies started to invest more in product development and many companies started to manufacture trucks especially designed for skateboarding. As the equipment became more maneuverable the decks started to get wider, reaching widths of 10 inches and over in the end, thus giving the skateboarder even more control. Manufacturers started to experiment with more exotic composites, like fiberglass and aluminium but the common skateboards were made of maple plywood. The skateboarders took advantage of the improved handling of their skateboards and started inventing new tricks. Skateboarders, most notably the Z-Boys, started to skate the vertical walls of swimming pools that were left empty in the 1976 California drought. With increased control skateboarders could skate faster and perform more dangerous tricks. This caused liability concerns and increased insurance costs to skatepark owners. Many skateparks went out of business and the parks were torn down or bulldozed. In the end of 1980, skateboarding had died again.

The third generation

The third skateboard generation, from early eighties to early nineties, was started by skateboard companies that actively promoted their sport. The focus was initially on halfpipe and vert ramp skateboarding. The invention of the ollie made it possible for skaters to perform huge airs off vertical ramps. With vert skating being dominant decks were initially very wide with large and wide wheels, though as time progressed and skateparks became fewer in number, street skating was gaining popularity, causing a change in both deck shape and wheel size. Manufacturers preferred maple plywood over more exotic composite materials almost exclusively. The third skateboarding generation was killed by the global economical recession in the early 90's.

The current generation

The size and shape of the fourth and current generation of skateboards is dominated by one trick: the ollie. The boards are all about 7.75" wide and 31.5" long. The wheels have an extremely hard durometer so that they will slide better during grind and slide tricks. The wheel sizes are relatively small so that the boards will rotate more easily during flip tricks. In the early 1990's, the wheels were only marginally larger than the bearings they encased to make complicated flip tricks easier but that fad died in 1994 and wheels currently are around 50 to 58mm in diameter. The decks are still almost always maple plywood but interest in high technology materials has increased slightly after the cost of manufacturing them has dropped.

Trick skating

see: Skateboarding trick for detailed description of trick skating maneuvers

Even young children can have fun at the skatepark.

With the evolution of skateboard parks (or skateparks) and ramp riding, the skateboard began to change. Skating was originally basically two-dimensional tricks (e.g. riding on only the front wheels (nose manual), spinning like an ice skater on the back wheels (a 360), high jumping over a bar, long jumping from one board to another (often over fearless teenagers lying on their backs), slalom, etc.) Around 1978 or so, street riding became transformed by the invention of the ollie or no hands aerial, the first modern skateboarding trick, by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand. To ollie is to fly off the ground (flat or a wall) with the board, but without holding onto the board and then landing back on the board. It involves using your feet to press against the board in various complicated combinations, depending on the trick to be performed. The trick was reinvented by Rodney Mullen in the 80's, being transferred to the horizontal plane and used as a trick for freestyle skating (a style of skating popular in the 70's and 80's based on stationary maneuvers). No longer is the trick to fly from one place to another. On the way the board can twist and flip, as can the rider, then to be united before hitting ground. The development of these complex tricks went from the street to the vertical tops of the half pipes (and other terrains).

Very skillful skateboarders often become famous through sponsorship and endorsements. Examples include Tony Hawk (who has a series of video games in his name), Bob Burnquist, Rodney Mullen, Mike Vallely, Steve Caballero, Bam Margera and Josh Kalis (who has appeared in numerous television advertisements for DC Shoes). Hawk has recently appeared in the MTV music video awards. In the vert world, some are surpassing the skills of Tony Hawk. Recently his signature trick, the "900," was performed by an Italian skater named Georgio Zattoni and a Brazillian skater by the name of Sandro Dias. Also, Danny Way is considered by some to be the most innovative and daring skater, flying across the "DC Megaramps", and planning on jumping both the Great Wall of China and the Grand Canyon. Many styles today are a mimic of Tom Penny, who is a pioneer and in the early 1990s was the first skater to catch his flip tricks in mid air.

All this from an object that was never designed to lock into grinds, flip in the air or do the tricks performed by today's skateboarders. Throwing themselves down large stairs and handrails only ups the ante in the modern skateboarding world. Today's skateboarders not only differ greatly from those only 10 years ago in terms of tricks and consistency, but also style, which is a very important aspect in the way skateboarders are marketed by skateboarding companies.

Famous Skateboarders

  • Jay Adams
  • Tony Alva
  • Mark Appleyard
  • Stephen Berra
  • Bob Burnquist
  • Steve Caballero
  • Kareem Campbell
  • Rune Glifberg
  • Mark Gonzales
  • Tony Hawk
  • Heath Kirchart
  • Eric Koston
  • Bucky Lasek
  • Jason Lee
  • Bam Margera
  • Guy Mariano
  • Rodney Mullen
  • Chad Muska
  • Tom Penny
  • Stacy Peralta
  • Andrew Reynolds
  • Geoff Rowley
  • Kanten Russell
  • Arto Saari
  • Elissa Steamer
  • Aaron Suski
  • Ed Templeton
  • Jamie Thomas
  • Tony Trujillo
  • Mike Vallely
  • Danny Way

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Today's skateboarders not only differ greatly from those only 10 years ago in terms of tricks and consistency, but also style, which is a very important aspect in the way skateboarders are marketed by skateboarding companies. See List of Las Vegans for more. Throwing themselves down large stairs and handrails only ups the ante in the modern skateboarding world. Las Vegas is frequently depicted in film and television:. All this from an object that was never designed to lock into grinds, flip in the air or do the tricks performed by today's skateboarders. The Las Vegas Motor Speedway (LVMS), just north of the city hosts NASCAR and other automotive events. Many styles today are a mimic of Tom Penny, who is a pioneer and in the early 1990s was the first skater to catch his flip tricks in mid air. There are also many options for boating, golf, hiking, rock climbing, and parks which offer a wide range of activities.

Recently his signature trick, the "900," was performed by an Italian skater named Georgio Zattoni and a Brazillian skater by the name of Sandro Dias. Also, Danny Way is considered by some to be the most innovative and daring skater, flying across the "DC Megaramps", and planning on jumping both the Great Wall of China and the Grand Canyon. Not having a professional sports team does not mean there is a lack of sports activities in the area. In the vert world, some are surpassing the skills of Tony Hawk. A number of museums are available around Las Vegas. Hawk has recently appeared in the MTV music video awards. The city and surrounding areas offer many attractions for both visitors and locals to enjoy. Examples include Tony Hawk (who has a series of video games in his name), Bob Burnquist, Rodney Mullen, Mike Vallely, Steve Caballero, Bam Margera and Josh Kalis (who has appeared in numerous television advertisements for DC Shoes). Plans to restore Los Angeles–Las Vegas Amtrak service using a Talgo train have been discussed since the Desert Wind was discontinued, however, as of 2005, no such service has been established.

Very skillful skateboarders often become famous through sponsorship and endorsements. Until 1997, the Amtrak Desert Wind train service ran through Las Vegas using the Union Pacific Railroad (UP) rails that run through the city; Amtrak service to Las Vegas has since been replaced by Amtrak's Thruway Motorcoach bus service. The development of these complex tricks went from the street to the vertical tops of the half pipes (and other terrains). Primary roadways into Las Vegas include I-15 (north to Salt Lake City–south to San Diego), US 93 (north to Ely and Jackpot–south to Kingman, Arizona) and US 95 (north towards Reno–south to Searchlight) provide interstate highway access. On the way the board can twist and flip, as can the rider, then to be united before hitting ground. Intercity bus service to Las Vegas is provided by traditional intercity bus carriers, including Greyhound; many charter services, including Green Tortoise; and several Chinatown bus lines. No longer is the trick to fly from one place to another. Although general aviation traffic flies into McCarran International, Other airstrips are available.

The trick was reinvented by Rodney Mullen in the 80's, being transferred to the horizontal plane and used as a trick for freestyle skating (a style of skating popular in the 70's and 80's based on stationary maneuvers). The airport also serves private aircraft, domestic and international passenger flights, and freight/cargo flights. It involves using your feet to press against the board in various complicated combinations, depending on the trick to be performed. McCarran International Airport provides commercial flights into the Las Vegas valley. To ollie is to fly off the ground (flat or a wall) with the board, but without holding onto the board and then landing back on the board. The Las Vegas Monorail runs from the MGM Grand Hotel at the south end of the Strip to the Sahara Hotel at the north end of the Strip. riding on only the front wheels (nose manual), spinning like an ice skater on the back wheels (a 360), high jumping over a bar, long jumping from one board to another (often over fearless teenagers lying on their backs), slalom, etc.) Around 1978 or so, street riding became transformed by the invention of the ollie or no hands aerial, the first modern skateboarding trick, by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand. The CAT Bus is the a popular means of public transportation among locals and tourists with 52 bus routes operating covering a large portion of the valley.

Skating was originally basically two-dimensional tricks (e.g. In 2002, on a lot adjacent to the city's 61 ac (247,000 m²), the World Market Center was announced and is intended to be the nations and possibly the worlds preeminent furniture wholesale showroom and market place. With the evolution of skateboard parks (or skateparks) and ramp riding, the skateboard began to change. The IRS is expected to create a demand for additional businesses in the area, epecially in the daytime hours. see: Skateboarding trick for detailed description of trick skating maneuvers. It is hoped that the condominium projects bring a younger crowd to the urban setting. The decks are still almost always maple plywood but interest in high technology materials has increased slightly after the cost of manufacturing them has dropped. The city successfully lured the Internal Revenue Service to move operations from outside the city limits to a new building downtown that opened in April 2005.

In the early 1990's, the wheels were only marginally larger than the bearings they encased to make complicated flip tricks easier but that fad died in 1994 and wheels currently are around 50 to 58mm in diameter. Several high rise condominium projects were announced for Las Vegas. The wheel sizes are relatively small so that the boards will rotate more easily during flip tricks. In the early 2000s, some promising signs emerged. The wheels have an extremely hard durometer so that they will slide better during grind and slide tricks. These changes have yet to make a noticeable impact. The boards are all about 7.75" wide and 31.5" long. The city council agreed on zoning changes on Fremont Street, allowing bars to be closer together duplicating what other cities have, like the Gaslamp Quarter of San Diego.

The size and shape of the fourth and current generation of skateboards is dominated by one trick: the ollie. After several proposals, virtually all of that piece of land has no firm development plans. The third skateboarding generation was killed by the global economical recession in the early 90's. The city purchased 61 ac (247,000 m²) of property from Union Pacific Railroad during the 1990s with the goal of creating something that would draw tourists and locals to the downtown area. Manufacturers preferred maple plywood over more exotic composite materials almost exclusively. As of March 2005, the property is for sale. With vert skating being dominant decks were initially very wide with large and wide wheels, though as time progressed and skateparks became fewer in number, street skating was gaining popularity, causing a change in both deck shape and wheel size. While there have been changes in ownership and management, Neonopolis has not been able to lease all the space available.

The invention of the ollie made it possible for skaters to perform huge airs off vertical ramps. The multi-level Neonopolis, complete with food court and theaters, was built offer more retail and services downtown. The focus was initially on halfpipe and vert ramp skateboarding. While greatly slowing the decline, it did not stop the decline in tourism and revenue. The third skateboard generation, from early eighties to early nineties, was started by skateboard companies that actively promoted their sport. The Fremont Street Experience (FSE) was built in an effort to draw tourists downtown. In the end of 1980, skateboarding had died again. With the Strip expansion in the 1990s, downtown Las Vegas began to suffer.

Many skateparks went out of business and the parks were torn down or bulldozed. Chinatown initially consisted of only one large shopping center complex, but the area was recently expanded for new shopping centers that contain various Asian businesses. This caused liability concerns and increased insurance costs to skatepark owners. As a reflection of the city's rapid growing population, the new Chinatown of Las Vegas was constructed in the early 1990s on Spring Mountain Road. Skateboarders, most notably the Z-Boys, started to skate the vertical walls of swimming pools that were left empty in the 1976 California drought. With increased control skateboarders could skate faster and perform more dangerous tricks. The Las Vegas Valley metropolitan area is home to 1,583,172 residents according to the county's 2003 estimate. The skateboarders took advantage of the improved handling of their skateboards and started inventing new tricks. Las Vegas's incorporated population of 478,434 is an understatement of the city's recent population boom, as much of the greater Las Vegas metropolitan area is unincorporated.

Manufacturers started to experiment with more exotic composites, like fiberglass and aluminium but the common skateboards were made of maple plywood. As of 2001, the greater Las Vegas metropolitan area is the fastest growing population center in the United States. As the equipment became more maneuverable the decks started to get wider, reaching widths of 10 inches and over in the end, thus giving the skateboarder even more control. Consequently, the city has recently enjoyed an enormous boom both in population and in tourism. With the growing interest companies started to invest more in product development and many companies started to manufacture trucks especially designed for skateboarding. Having been late to develop an urban core of any substantial size, Las Vegas has retained very affordable real estate prices in comparison to nearby urban centers. The improvement in traction and performance was so immense that popularity of skateboarding started to rise rapidly again. The lack of any state, individual or corporate income tax, and very simple incorporation requirements, have fostered the success of this effort.

In 1970 Frank Nasworthy started to develop a skateboard wheel made of urethane. A concerted effort has been made by city fathers to diversify the Las Vegas economy from tourism by attracting light manufacturing, banking, and other commercial interests. Many skateboard manufacturers went out of business because of losing money on cancelled orders for the Christmas holiday season. This resulted in a drop in tourism from which the downtown area is still trying to recover. This development caused the first skateboarding fad to die completely in the fall of 1965. When The Mirage opened in 1989, it started a movement of people and construction away from downtown Las Vegas to the Las Vegas Strip. This made skateboarding inherently a dangerous sport and after a few years many cities banned skateboarding because of liability concerns. The World Market Center is an example of this.

They had poor traction and would come to a dead stop when rolling over even small pebbles. The redevelopment listed below shows how the city's trying to diversify the economy and revitalize the downtown area. These boards used wheels made of clay. The primary driver is, and has been, tourism and gaming which have fueled the Las Vegas economy. The boards were from 6 to 7 inches wide. Although winter snows are usually visible from December to June on the mountains surrounding the valley, it rarely snows in Las Vegas itself. At the time there was a rapidly growing interest in skateboarding (sometimes referred to as sidewalk surfing) and soon many other similar products emerged. July through September, the Mexican Monsoon often brings enough moisture from the Gulf of Mexico across Mexico and into the southwest to cause afternoon thunderstorms.

Before this skateboards were home made pieces of wooden planks with roller skates attached to the bottom. Showers also occur, but less frequently, in the Spring or Fall. The first commercial skateboard was the Roller Derby Skateboard that was introduced in 1959. Winters are cool and windy, with the balance of Las Vegas' annual 4.2 in (102 mm) of rainfall coming from January to March. Surfers are adapting skateboarding tricks into surfing, and the result is evolution in both sports. Las Vegas has a desert climate with very little rainfall, and extreme heat in the summer; highs of 105 °F (40 °C) are common from May to September, and for several days each year, temperatures may exceed 115 °F (46 °C). While surfing influenced skateboarding in it's early days, now the reverse is also true. As of April 2005, the population of the entire Las Vegas Valley is about 2 million people.

Skateboarding has its origins in surfing, and was originally called "sidewalk surfing". Out of the total population, 15.4% of those under the age of 18 and 8.3% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Improvements in skateboarding equipment have spurred advancement in skateboarding techniques and new techniques have required new equipment. 11.9% of the population and 8.6% of families are below the poverty line. The history of skateboarding goes hand in hand with the history of the skateboard. The per capita income for the city is $22,060. Skateboarding has been thought of by many as part of the extreme sports family, which also includes (but not restricted to) snowboarding, BMX, and surfing. Males have a median income of $35,511 versus $27,554 for females.

Like roller skating, skateboarding is often done for recreation and as a sport, but, more often than ice skating, it is a method of transportation. The median income for a household in the city is $44,069, and the median income for a family is $50,465. Someone who skateboards is a skater (or skateboarder or most fully skateboard rider), though the shortest term may also refer to someone ice skating or roller skating. For every 100 females there are 103.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 102.5 males. Skateboarding is the act of rolling on or interacting with a skateboard. The median age is 34 years. Danny Way. In the city the population is spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 32.0% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who are 65 years of age or older.

Mike Vallely. The average household size is 2.66 and the average family size is 3.20. Tony Trujillo. 25.0% of all households are made up of individuals and 7.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. Jamie Thomas. There are 176,750 households out of which 31.9% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% are married couples living together, 12.2% have a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% are non-families. Ed Templeton. 23.61% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Aaron Suski. The racial makeup of the city is 69.86% White, 10.36% African American, 0.75% Native American, 4.78% Asian, 0.45% Pacific Islander, 9.75% from other races, and 4.05% from two or more races. Elissa Steamer. There are 190,724 housing units at an average density of 649.9/km² (1,683.3/mi²). Arto Saari. The population density is 1,630.3/km² (4,222.5/mi²). Kanten Russell. As of the census2 of 2000, there are 478,434 people, 176,750 households, and 117,538 families residing in the city.

Geoff Rowley. As befits a desert, much of the landscape is rocky and dusty, although, within the city, there is a great deal of greenery including lawns despite a movement to encourage xeriscaping. Andrew Reynolds. The city is located in an arid basin surrounded by mountains varying in color from pink to rust to gray. Stacy Peralta. The total area is 0.04% water. Tom Penny. 293.5 km² (113.3 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.1 mi²) of it is water.

Chad Muska. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 293.6 km² (113.4 mi²). Rodney Mullen. Las Vegas is located at 36° 11′ 39″ N 115° 13′ 19″ W (http://kvaleberg.com/extensions/mapsources/index.php?params=36_11_39_N_115_13_19_W_) (36.194168, -115.222060)1. Guy Mariano. Marriage licenses are filed at the Clark County Courthouse.. Bam Margera. Elected and Government Officials of the City of Las Vegas:
(For Councilmembers' official websites, see City of Las Vegas official website under external links).

Jason Lee. A Paiute Indian reservation occupies about 1 acre (4,000 m²) in the downtown area of Las Vegas. Bucky Lasek. The City Manager also maintains an intergovernmental relationships with federal, state, county and other local governments. Eric Koston. The City Manager is responsible for the administration and the day to day operation of all of the municipal services and city departments. Heath Kirchart. In the event that the Mayor cannot preside over a City Council meeting the Mayor Pro-Tem is the presiding body of the meeting until such time as the Mayor returns to his seat.

Tony Hawk. The Mayor sits as a Councilmember-At-Large and presides over all of the City Council meetings. Mark Gonzales. The City of Las Vegas government operates as a council-manager government. Rune Glifberg. They are also represented by advisory boards, which are appointed by and give nonbinding suggestions to the Clark County Commission. Kareem Campbell. Residents of these towns cannot vote for the Mayor and City Council of Las Vegas, but they can vote for members of the Clark County Commission, which governs their areas.

Steve Caballero. These towns formed during a 1940s water dispute between the City of Las Vegas and early homeowners south of San Francisco Street, now Sahara Avenue. Bob Burnquist. The largest of these towns are Paradise (188,768) between Las Vegas and Henderson, Sunrise Manor (184,801) east of Las Vegas and North Las Vegas, and Spring Valley (161,286) southwest of Las Vegas. Stephen Berra. In fact, of the nearly 1.6 million people who live in the Las Vegas valley, only 478,434 live inside Las Vegas city limits. Mark Appleyard. Most of the people and businesses who call Las Vegas home actually live in neighboring unicorporated communities that have no city government or in other nearby cities, some of which are listed below.

Tony Alva. Exceptions are those with their own law enforcement agency; including North Las Vegas, Henderson and Boulder City. Jay Adams. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department provides most law enforcement services in the city and surrounding county. The nickname favored by local government and promoters of tourism is The Entertainment Capital of the World. The city's glamorous image has made it a popular setting for films and television programs. Las Vegas is sometimes called Sin City due to the popularity of legalized gambling, availability of alcoholic beverages any time of the day and night (like all of Nevada), various forms and degrees of adult entertainment, and legalized prostitution in nearby counties (Nevada law prohibits prostitution in counties which have large populations).

Ever since then, Las Vegas has been a major international center for gambling. Gangsters Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel and Meyer Lansky are widely credited as the organizers and prime movers behind early development of Las Vegas. Several such early enterprises are widely reputed to have been backed by money from crime syndicates based in the eastern United States. Incorporated in 1911 [6] (http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/history/default.htm), and with gambling legalized in 1931, Las Vegas started its rise to world fame in 1941, when developers began building large hotels incorporating gambling casinos.

[5] (http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/history/default.htm). Las Vegas was founded on May 15, 1905 when 110 ac (445,000 m²), in what would later become downtown, were auctioned to ready buyers. This allowed Las Vegas to become a water stop, first for wagon trains and later railroads, on the trail between Los Angeles, California, and points east such as Albuquerque, New Mexico. During the 1900s, the springs were piped into the town providing a reliable source of fresh water.

[4] (http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/history/default.htm). The Mormons returned in 1895. Farmers used the local springs to irrigate their crops. The State Land Act of 1885 offered land at $1.25 per acre ($309/km²) and farming became the primary industry for the next 20 years.

Army built Fort Baker there in 1864. The U.S. The Mormons built a fort in 1855 but abandoned the site in 1857 due to the natives raiding the supplies and rejecting the teachings. In 1855, following annexation by the United States, Brigham Young assigned 30 Mormon missionaries to the area and convert the Paiute Indian population.

Frémont traveled into the Las Vegas Valley in 1844, while it was still part of Mexico. John C. At that time, some low areas of the Las Vegas Valley contained artesian springs that created extensive green areas in contrast to the surrounding desert, hence the name "Las Vegas", Spanish for "The Meadows" (some translation tools report "The Fertile Valleys"). Las Vegas was given its name by Spaniards in the Antonio Armijo party, who watered there while heading north and west along the Old Spanish Trail from Texas.

This 4½ mi (7¼ km) stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard is mostly outside the Las Vegas city limits, in the township of Paradise. The name Las Vegas is often also applied to the unincorporated areas of Clark County that surround the city, especially the resort areas on and near the Las Vegas Strip. Las Vegas is the largest city founded in the 20th century. The metropolitan area of Las Vegas boasts a population of 1,650,671 people (July 1, 2004 estimate [3] (http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DTTable?_bm=y&-context=dt&-ds_name=PEP_2004_EST&-CONTEXT=dt&-mt_name=PEP_2004_EST_G2004_T001&-tree_id=804&-redoLog=true&-transpose=N&-_caller=geoselect&-geo_id=05000US32003&-search_results=04000US32&-format=&-_lang=en&-show_geoid=Y)).

Las Vegas is the original county seat of Clark County since 1909 [2] (http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/history/default.htm). In the 2000 census, the city reported a population of 478,434 [1] (http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/GCTTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=04000US32&-_box_head_nbr=GCT-PH1&-ds_name=DEC_2000_SF1_U&-format=ST-7). The Census Bureau's official population estimate as of 2003 was 518,313. Las Vegas is the largest city in Nevada, United States, and a major tourist, shopping, vacation and gambling destination. On May 21, 2005, Las Vegas was the subject of the Swedish entry in the 50th Eurovision Song Contest.

Television stations in Las Vegas. List of television stations in Nevada. List of radio stations in Nevada. List of mayors of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines. Brisbane, Australia (July 1995). Huludao, China. An San, South Korea.

Phuket, Thailand (February 10, 1977). Steve Wynn (Casino Owner). Mike Tyson (Boxer). Kevin Sorbo (actor).

Bugsy Siegel (Gangster). Siegfried and Roy, Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn, (Magicians). Debbie Reynolds (Entertainer). Page O'Hara (Actress).

Wayne Newton (Entertainer). Greg Maddux (Former Atlanta Braves Baseball Player). Liberace (Entertainer). Jerry Lewis (Entertainer).

Robin Leach (Writer, TV show host). King Lizzard (Entertainer). Larry Johnson (NBA Basketball Player). Howard Hughes.

Clint Holmes (Singer, Song Writer). Goodman (Mayor). Oscar B. Danny Gans (Entertainer).

Céline Dion (Singer). Tony Curtis (Actor). Randall Cunningham (NFL Football Player). David Brenner (Comic).

Stephanie Louden (LPGA). Jenna Jameson (Adult Film Star). Charisma Carpenter (Actress, Buffy's Cordelia Chase). Kurt Busch (NASCAR).

Andre Agassi (Tennis Player). List of television shows filmed in Las Vegas. List of television shows set in Las Vegas. List of movies shot in Las Vegas.

List of movies set in Las Vegas. Michael Mack – 6th Ward Councilmember (Term Expires in 2005, not running for re-election). Lawrence Weekly – 5th Ward Councilmember (Term Expires in 2007). Larry Brown – 4th Ward Councilmember (Term Expires in 2005, has no opponent in 2005 election).

Steve Wolfson, Esq – 2nd Ward Councilmember (Term Expires in 2009, has no opponent in 2005 election)¹. Lois Tarkanian – 1st Ward Councilmember (Term Expires in 2007)². Gary Reese – Mayor Pro-Tem and 3rd Ward Councilmember (Term Expires in 2007). Goodman – Mayor and Councilmember at Large (Term Expires in 2007).

Oscar B. Barbara Jo (Roni) Ronemus – City Clerk. Douglas Selby – City Manager.

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