Sewing

Turn of the century sewing in Detroit, Michigan Antique Singer sewing machine

Sewing is an ancient craft involving the stitching of cloth, leather, animal skins, furs, or other materials, using needle and thread. Its use is nearly universal among human populations and dates back to Paleolithic times (30,000 BC). Sewing predates the weaving of cloth.

Sewing is used primarily to produce clothing and household furnishings as curtains, bedclothes, upholstery, and table linens. It is also used for sails, bellows, skin boats, and other items shaped out of flexible materials such as canvas and leather.

Most sewing in the industrial world is done by machines. Pieces of a garment are often firstly tacked together. The machine has a complex set of gears and arms which pierces thread through the layers of the cloth and semi-securely interlocks the thread.

Some people sew clothes for themselves and their families. More often home sewers sew to repair clothes, such as mending a torn seam or replacing a loose button. A person who sews for a living is known as a seamstress, dressmaker, tailor, or garment worker.

"Plain" sewing is done for functional reasons: making or mending clothing or household linens. "Fancy" sewing is primarily decorative, including techniques such as shirring, embroidery, or quilting.

Sewing is the foundation for many needle arts and crafts, such as applique, canvas work, and patchwork.

General sewing methods

Machine sewing is the most popular method. Hand sewing is still done to some extent for finishing and repairing garments. Sergers are becoming more popular for home use, but are not capable of all the functions of a traditional sewing machine. Because of this, people usually purchase a traditional sewing machine first, and purchase a serger at a later date. Sergers prices typically start at two to three times the cost of a traditional sewing machine.

  • Hand-sewing: using a needle and thread with your hands to produce stitches.
  • Machine-sewing: using a machine to produce similar effects to hand-sewing, but at a much quicker speed. Sewing machines can be electrically or mechanically operated. Electric machines are by far more common.
  • Serging: trimming the edge of fabric and overcasting all in one step, sometimes with the option of stitching as well. Also used for creating artistic effects. Serging is ideal for stretchy fabrics or fabrics that should have neat edges. Virutally all commercially-sold clothing is completely made with one or more specialized industrial sergers.

General sewing applications

Almost all of these methods can be done by either hand, sewing machine, or a serger; however, the specific techniques used can be quite different. Some methods are not appropriate for some applications, even though it may be possible to replicate another method. As an extreme, you could technically duplicate serging with hand sewing, but it would take at least several hundred times as long to do the same work. Furthermore, some techniques are not possible with other methods: making an embroidery stitch called a french knot is easy by hand, but impossible by sewing machine or serger.

  • Dressmaking/Tailoring/General: general techniques to create clothing and other textile projects.
  • Mending: using general techniques and specialized methods such as darning to repair textiles.
  • Quilting: sewing together layers of fabric and/or fibrefill to make warm blankets and clothing, or used for effect. Machine quilting is most common, but quilting "purists" and traditionalists do all quilting by hand.
  • Serging: uses multiple threads to produce a stretchy and secure edge finish or seam that keeps raw edges of fabric neat. The term "serging" is commonly used to refer both to the act of sewing with a serger, and the type of effect the serger produces.
  • Embroidery or machine embroidery: artistic embellishment.

Occupations requiring sewing

  • Cobbler
  • Corsetier
  • Draper
  • Dressmaker
  • Glover
  • Hatter
  • Quilting
  • Sailmaker
  • Tailor
  • Upholsterer

Sewing tools and accessories

Sewing box (~1955) with sewing notions
  • awl
  • bobbin
  • bodkin
  • dressmaker's or tailor's shears
  • measuring tape
  • needle
  • pattern
  • pattern weights
  • pin
  • pincushion
  • rotary cutter
  • scissors
  • seam ripper
  • tailor's chalk
  • thimble
  • thread
  • tracing paper
  • tracing wheel
  • wax, often beeswax

Notions (objects sewn into garments or soft goods)

Closures:

  • buckle
  • button (buttons can be sew-through or have shanks.)
    • toggle
  • chinese frog
  • eye
  • hook
  • hook-and-loop tape (often known by brand name Velcro)
  • snap
  • zipper

Finishing and embellishment:

  • bias tape
  • elastic
  • eyelet
  • grommet
  • heading
  • interfacing
  • rivet
  • trims (fringe, beaded fringe, ribbons, lace, sequin tape)

List of stitches

  • back tack
  • backstitch
  • basting stitch (or tacking) - for temporary fixing
  • blanket stitch
  • blind stitch (or hem stitch)
  • buttonhole stitch
  • chain stitch
  • cross-stitch
  • darning stitch
  • feather stitch
  • hemming stitch
  • lockstitch
  • overlock
  • padding stitch
  • running stitch - for seams and gathering
  • sailmakers stitch
  • slip stitch - for fastening a folded edge to a flat piece of fabric, or to another folded edge
  • stretch stitch
  • straight stitch
  • topstitch
  • whipstitch (or oversewing stitch) - for protecting edges
  • zig-zag stitch

References

  • Singer: The New Sewing Essentials by The Editors of Creative Publishing International ISBN 0865733082

This page about Sewing includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Sewing
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Finishing and embellishment:.
. Closures:. Susannah Stone Trousdale by Elizabeth Reaser. Furthermore, some techniques are not possible with other methods: making an embroidery stitch called a french knot is easy by hand, but impossible by sewing machine or serger. Thad Stone played by Tyrone Giordano. As an extreme, you could technically duplicate serging with hand sewing, but it would take at least several hundred times as long to do the same work. Amy Stone played by Rachel McAdams.

Some methods are not appropriate for some applications, even though it may be possible to replicate another method. Ben Stone played by Luke Wilson. Almost all of these methods can be done by either hand, sewing machine, or a serger; however, the specific techniques used can be quite different. Everett Stone played by Dermot Mulroney. Sergers prices typically start at two to three times the cost of a traditional sewing machine. Sybil Stone played by Diane Keaton. Because of this, people usually purchase a traditional sewing machine first, and purchase a serger at a later date. Nelson.

Sergers are becoming more popular for home use, but are not capable of all the functions of a traditional sewing machine. Kelly Stone played by Craig T. Hand sewing is still done to some extent for finishing and repairing garments. The members of the Stone family in the 2005 comedy The Family Stone

    . Machine sewing is the most popular method. Michael Moriarty played Benjamin Stone on Law & Order. . Stone in Night Court.

    Sewing is the foundation for many needle arts and crafts, such as applique, canvas work, and patchwork. Harry Anderson played Judge Harold T. "Fancy" sewing is primarily decorative, including techniques such as shirring, embroidery, or quilting. Mike Stone in The Streets of San Francisco. "Plain" sewing is done for functional reasons: making or mending clothing or household linens. Karl Malden played Lt. A person who sews for a living is known as a seamstress, dressmaker, tailor, or garment worker. Stone (1846-1820), governor of Pennsylvania (1899-1903).

    More often home sewers sew to repair clothes, such as mending a torn seam or replacing a loose button. William A. Some people sew clothes for themselves and their families. Walter Napleton Stone (1891-1917), an English recipient of the Victoria Cross. The machine has a complex set of gears and arms which pierces thread through the layers of the cloth and semi-securely interlocks the thread. Clement Stone (1902-2002), businessman, philanthropist and self-help book author. Pieces of a garment are often firstly tacked together. W.

    Most sewing in the industrial world is done by machines. Thomas Stone (1743–1787), a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a delegate from Maryland. It is also used for sails, bellows, skin boats, and other items shaped out of flexible materials such as canvas and leather. Tori Stone. Sewing is used primarily to produce clothing and household furnishings as curtains, bedclothes, upholstery, and table linens. Tawnee Stone. Sewing predates the weaving of cloth. Sumner Stone, typographer.

    Its use is nearly universal among human populations and dates back to Paleolithic times (30,000 BC). Steve Stone (baseball player), (born 1947), former Major League Baseball player and current sportscaster. Sewing is an ancient craft involving the stitching of cloth, leather, animal skins, furs, or other materials, using needle and thread. Steve Stone (footballer) (born 1971), an English football (soccer) player. Singer: The New Sewing Essentials by The Editors of Creative Publishing International ISBN 0865733082. Vet Stone (born 1949) singer. zig-zag stitch. Freddie Stone (born 1946) singer/guitarist.

    whipstitch (or oversewing stitch) - for protecting edges. Rose Stone (born 1945) singer/keyboardist. topstitch. Sly Stone (born 1944), singer-songwriter, frontman. straight stitch. The members of the Stewart family who performed as part of Sly & the Family Stone:

      . stretch stitch. actress.

      slip stitch - for fastening a folded edge to a flat piece of fabric, or to another folded edge. Sharon Stone (born 1958), U.S. sailmakers stitch. Sharman Stone (born 1951), member of the Australian House of Representatives since 1996. running stitch - for seams and gathering. Robert Stone (composer) (1516-1613), English composer. padding stitch. Robert Stone (born 1937), American novelist.

      overlock. Richard Stone (1913-1991), British economist. lockstitch. Peter Stone (1930-2003), writer for theater, film, and television. hemming stitch. film director. feather stitch. Oliver Stone (born 1946), U.S.

      darning stitch. Milburn Stone (died 1980), actor. cross-stitch. Mike Stone, American recording engineer and record producer. chain stitch. Secretary of the Army. buttonhole stitch. Michael Stone (politician) (born 1925), English-born U.S.

      blind stitch (or hem stitch). Michael Stone (Russell murder case), English convicted murderer. blanket stitch. Michael Stone (loyalist paramilitary) (born 1955), Northern Ireland, loyalist paramilitary. basting stitch (or tacking) - for temporary fixing. Michael Stone:

        . backstitch. Merlin Stone, sculptor, author, academic.

        back tack. Matt Stone (born 1971), comedian, a co-creator of the TV series South Park. trims (fringe, beaded fringe, ribbons, lace, sequin tape). Marshall Harvey Stone (1903-1989), an American mathematician. rivet. Lucy Stone (1818-1893), women's rights activist. interfacing. Lewis Stone, (1879-1953), actor.

        heading. Joss Stone (born 1987), British soul singer. grommet. Jordan Stone (born 1984), an American soccer player. eyelet. John Stone Stone (1869-1943), physicist and inventor. elastic. Stone (1830–1900), Governor of Mississippi (1876-1882 and 1890-1896).

        bias tape. John M. zipper. Irving Stone (1903-1989), American author. snap. Stone (1907–1989), American journalist. hook-and-loop tape (often known by brand name Velcro). F.

        hook. I. eye. Harlan Fiske Stone (1872-1946), Chief Justice of the United States. chinese frog. Stone (1887-1936), US aviator and Commander in the US Coast Guard. toggle. Elmer F.

        button (buttons can be sew-through or have shanks.)

          . Edward James Stone (1831-1897), astronomer. buckle. Edward Durrell Stone (1902-1978), architect. wax, often beeswax. David Stone (1770-1818), governor of North Carolina (1808-1810). tracing wheel. Christopher Stone, the first disc jockey in the UK (1927).

          tracing paper. Stone (1847-1938), an American silversmith. thread. Arthur J. thimble. Stone, Worcestershire. tailor's chalk. Stone, Staffordshire.

          seam ripper. Stone, Kent. scissors. Stone, Gloucestershire. rotary cutter. Stone, Buckinghamshire. pincushion. An alternate name for Amara, the world in fantasy author Graham Edwards' Stone trilogy.

          pin. Stones (album), an early album by Psychadelic Percussion featuring the Moog synthesizer. pattern weights. A nightclub in San Francisco, California, which featured famous punk bands such as the Dead Kennedys and Black Flag. pattern. "The Stones" is an informal term for the British rock band The Rolling Stones. needle. One of the playing pieces used in go.

          measuring tape. A calculus. dressmaker's or tailor's shears. Stone, a Finnish heavy metal band. bodkin. As a verb, the intoxicating effects of cannabis, as in to be stoned. bobbin. The hard covering enclosing the seed of a drupe such as a peach.

          awl. A stone is a unit of weight equal to fourteen pounds. Upholsterer. A gemstone, as used in jewelry. Tailor. As a verb, to stone, a method of execution using rocks, stoning. Sailmaker. See also stone skipping, curling.

          Quilting. A rock. Hatter. Glover. Dressmaker.

          Draper. Corsetier. Cobbler. Embroidery or machine embroidery: artistic embellishment.

          The term "serging" is commonly used to refer both to the act of sewing with a serger, and the type of effect the serger produces. Serging: uses multiple threads to produce a stretchy and secure edge finish or seam that keeps raw edges of fabric neat. Machine quilting is most common, but quilting "purists" and traditionalists do all quilting by hand. Quilting: sewing together layers of fabric and/or fibrefill to make warm blankets and clothing, or used for effect.

          Mending: using general techniques and specialized methods such as darning to repair textiles. Dressmaking/Tailoring/General: general techniques to create clothing and other textile projects. Virutally all commercially-sold clothing is completely made with one or more specialized industrial sergers. Serging is ideal for stretchy fabrics or fabrics that should have neat edges.

          Also used for creating artistic effects. Serging: trimming the edge of fabric and overcasting all in one step, sometimes with the option of stitching as well. Electric machines are by far more common. Sewing machines can be electrically or mechanically operated.

          Machine-sewing: using a machine to produce similar effects to hand-sewing, but at a much quicker speed. Hand-sewing: using a needle and thread with your hands to produce stitches.

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