Robert Donat

Robert Donat (March 18, 1905 - June 9, 1958) was an English actor, best remembered for his roles in The 39 Steps (1935) and Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939 film) (for which he won an Academy Award). Donat was born in Withington, Manchester, of Polish descent, but his success was largely due to typecasting as the quintessential English gentleman.

Donat made his first stage appearance in 1921 and his film debut in 1932 in The Private Life of Henry VIII (as Thomas Culpepper), under the renowned film director and producer Alexander Korda. However, he suffered from ill-health (asthma) which blighted his career, and his last role, as the Mandarin of Yang Cheng in The Inn of the Sixth Happiness is memorable because it was apparent that he knew he was close to death. He died from a cerebral haemorrage in London aged 53.

Robert Donat was married to Ella Annesley Voysey (1929-1946) and to the British actress Renee Asherson (1953-1958).

Other films:

  • The Count of Monte Cristo (1934) - Edmond Dantes/The Count of Monte Cristo
  • The Winslow Boy (1948)- Sir Robert Morton

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Robert Donat was married to Ella Annesley Voysey (1929-1946) and to the British actress Renee Asherson (1953-1958). Gordon was 6 foot 5 inches tall and consequently known as Long Tall Dex. He died from a cerebral haemorrage in London aged 53. Gordon is a member of the Jazz Hall of Fame and was voted musician of the year by Down Beat magazine in 1978 and 1980. However, he suffered from ill-health (asthma) which blighted his career, and his last role, as the Mandarin of Yang Cheng in The Inn of the Sixth Happiness is memorable because it was apparent that he knew he was close to death. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for the role. Donat made his first stage appearance in 1921 and his film debut in 1932 in The Private Life of Henry VIII (as Thomas Culpepper), under the renowned film director and producer Alexander Korda. In 1986, he starred in the movie 'Round Midnight, in which he played the role of a musician much like himself; some have suggested the role is thinly-veiled autobiography.

Donat was born in Withington, Manchester, of Polish descent, but his success was largely due to typecasting as the quintessential English gentleman. After this appearance he would release several more albums that proved he was as good if not better than before his years in Europe and finally gained appreciation as one of the great jazz tenors. Chips (1939 film) (for which he won an Academy Award). Gordon finally returned to the United States for good in 1976, and appeared in the Village Vanguard, NY for a gig that was dubbed as his "homecoming". Robert Donat (March 18, 1905 - June 9, 1958) was an English actor, best remembered for his roles in The 39 Steps (1935) and Goodbye, Mr. He also visited the States occasionally for recording dates, resulting in several albums being released under his name. The Winslow Boy (1948)- Sir Robert Morton. He concerted regularly with fellow ex-pat jazzmen like Bud Powell, Freddie Hubbard, Bobby Hutcherson, Kenny Drew, Horace Parlan and Billy Higgins.

The Count of Monte Cristo (1934) - Edmond Dantes/The Count of Monte Cristo. After that, he spent 15 years playing and living in Europe, mostly in Paris and Copenhaegen. He was composer, musician, and actor in the play The Connection in 1960. He portrayed an inmate playing in the prison band in Unchained, though the soundtrack was later overdubbed. The first movie appearance occurred, oddly enough, while in prison for possession of heroin.

Gordon notably made two appearances in cinema during his life. He was also known for his habit of reciting the lyrics of all ballads before performing them. While never considered as revolutionary as Charlie Parker or John Coltrane, his influence can still be heard in many jazz saxophonists. One of his major influences was Lester Young.

Gordon's sound has been characterized as "large" and his tendency to play behind the beat has often been emphasized. He was particularly noted for his titanic saxophone duels with fellow tenorman Wardell Gray, a popular live attraction that also produced several albums between 1947 and 1952. for a few weeks in 1947. He also played with the Fletcher Henderson band in L.A.

From 1940 to 1980, he played with such jazz greats as Lionel Hampton, Tadd Dameron, Charles Mingus, Louis Armstrong and Billy Eckstine. He is considered the first important hard bop tenor player. Dexter Gordon (February 27, 1923 - April 25, 1990) was an American tenor saxophone musician.

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