Richard Quine

Richard Quine (November 12, 1920 - June 10, 1989) was an American stage, film, and radio actor and film director.

He was born in Detroit, Michigan. He began his acting career aged eleven on Broadway, and appeared in his first film in 1934 - John Ford's The World Moves On. During the war he served in the US Coast Guard, marrying the actress Susan Peters in November of 1943. After WW II he tried directing, first as co-producer and co-director on Leather Gloves (1948), with William Asher, before his first solo effort on the musical The Sunny Side of the Street (1951). His most successful films came in the late 1950s, including Operation Madball (1957), Bell, Book and Candle (1958), Strangers When We Meet and The World of Suzie Wong both 1960.

He also produced such films as the William Holden / Audrey Hepburn comedy Paris When it Sizzles (1964).

His output fell in the 1960s and in the 1970s he made only three disappointing films. His final work was on Peter Sellers' The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), although he was briefly part of the crew for another Sellers film - The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu (1980).

After an extended period of depression and poor health he committed suicide in his Los Angeles home. He had divorced Peters in 1948 and married entertainer, singer, and noted beauty Fran Jeffries in 1965, his second marriage produced a daughter and lasted until his death.


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He had divorced Peters in 1948 and married entertainer, singer, and noted beauty Fran Jeffries in 1965, his second marriage produced a daughter and lasted until his death. He won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar and the SAG Award for his work in Mystic River (2003). After an extended period of depression and poor health he committed suicide in his Los Angeles home. In 2003 a 15th-anniversary celebration of Bull Durham at the National Baseball Hall of Fame was cancelled due to controversy over his and Sarandon's public anti-war stance. Fu Manchu (1980). Robbins lives in New York City with Sarandon and their three children. He is a prominent spokesperson for anti-globalization, and vocally opposed the 2003 invasion of Iraq. His final work was on Peter Sellers' The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), although he was briefly part of the crew for another Sellers film - The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Robbins also continues to act in mainstream Hollywood thrillers like Arlington Road (1999) and Antitrust (2001), and to act in and direct Actors' Gang theater productions.

His output fell in the 1960s and in the 1970s he made only three disappointing films. Since that time he has written, produced, and directed several films with strong but subtle political content, such as the critically-acclaimed capital punishment saga Dead Man Walking in 1995, which earned him a directorial Oscar nomination, and 1999's Depression-era musical Cradle Will Rock. He also produced such films as the William Holden / Audrey Hepburn comedy Paris When it Sizzles (1964). Robbins then starred alongside Morgan Freeman in the critically acclaimed The Shawshank Redemption based on Stephen King's short story. His most successful films came in the late 1950s, including Operation Madball (1957), Bell, Book and Candle (1958), Strangers When We Meet and The World of Suzie Wong both 1960. His directorial and screenwriting debut was 1992's Bob Roberts, a mockumentary about a populist right-wing presidential candidate. After WW II he tried directing, first as co-producer and co-director on Leather Gloves (1948), with William Asher, before his first solo effort on the musical The Sunny Side of the Street (1951). He received critical acclaim for his starring role as an amoral movie executive in the 1992 film The Player.

During the war he served in the US Coast Guard, marrying the actress Susan Peters in November of 1943. On the set of that movie he began a relationship with fellow actor Sarandon that continues to the present day. He began his acting career aged eleven on Broadway, and appeared in his first film in 1934 - John Ford's The World Moves On. He also took small parts in films, with a breakthrough part as pitcher "Nuke" LaLoosh in the 1988 baseball movie Bull Durham. He was born in Detroit, Michigan. On graduation in 1981, Robbins founded the Actors' Gang in Los Angeles, an experimental theater group, with actor friends from his college softball team. Richard Quine (November 12, 1920 - June 10, 1989) was an American stage, film, and radio actor and film director. Robbins spent two years at Plattsburgh State University, then returned to California to attend drama school at UCLA.

Robbins joined Theater for a New City at age twelve, and participated in the drama club at Stuyvesant High School. Robbins was born in West Covina, California, but moved to Greenwich Village with his family at a young age while his father, Gil Robbins, pursued a career as a member of the folk music group The Highwaymen. He is the longtime companion of actress Susan Sarandon, with whom he shares strong leftist political views. Tim Robbins (born October 16, 1958, also Timothy Robbins) is an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer.

Mystic River (2003). Code 46 (2003). Human Nature (2001). Antitrust (2001).

High Fidelity (2000). Cradle Will Rock writer, director (1999). Dead Man Walking writer, director (1995). The Shawshank Redemption (1994).

The Hudsucker Proxy (1994). Bob Roberts writer, director (1992). The Player (1992). Jacob's Ladder (1990).

Tapeheads (1988). Bull Durham (1988).

07-28-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.