Richard Quine

Richard Quine (November 12, 1920 - June 10, 1989) was an American stage, film, and radio actor and film director.

He was born in Detroit, Michigan. He began his acting career aged eleven on Broadway, and appeared in his first film in 1934 - John Ford's The World Moves On. During the war he served in the US Coast Guard, marrying the actress Susan Peters in November of 1943. After WW II he tried directing, first as co-producer and co-director on Leather Gloves (1948), with William Asher, before his first solo effort on the musical The Sunny Side of the Street (1951). His most successful films came in the late 1950s, including Operation Madball (1957), Bell, Book and Candle (1958), Strangers When We Meet and The World of Suzie Wong both 1960.

He also produced such films as the William Holden / Audrey Hepburn comedy Paris When it Sizzles (1964).

His output fell in the 1960s and in the 1970s he made only three disappointing films. His final work was on Peter Sellers' The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), although he was briefly part of the crew for another Sellers film - The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu (1980).

After an extended period of depression and poor health he committed suicide in his Los Angeles home. He had divorced Peters in 1948 and married entertainer, singer, and noted beauty Fran Jeffries in 1965, his second marriage produced a daughter and lasted until his death.


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He had divorced Peters in 1948 and married entertainer, singer, and noted beauty Fran Jeffries in 1965, his second marriage produced a daughter and lasted until his death. His death came while he was in the middle of filming Gladiator, and his remaining scenes were produced using electronically-simulated images. After an extended period of depression and poor health he committed suicide in his Los Angeles home. Julian's, Malta reportedly after drinking three bottles of rum and after beating five sailors at arm wrestling. Fu Manchu (1980). He died suddenly of a heart attack in St. His final work was on Peter Sellers' The Prisoner of Zenda (1979), although he was briefly part of the crew for another Sellers film - The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Reed was often irritated that his appearances on TV chat shows concentrated on his drinking feats, rather than his latest film.

His output fell in the 1960s and in the 1970s he made only three disappointing films. He claimed of the story that he drank 106 pints of beer on a 2-day binge before marrying Josephine; "The event that was reported actually took place during an arm-wrestling competition in Guernsey about 15 years ago, it was highly exaggerated." Despite occassional reports in publications such as the Sydney Morning Herald, Reed never played for the Sunday rugby team the Entertainers. He also produced such films as the William Holden / Audrey Hepburn comedy Paris When it Sizzles (1964). Reed's drinking bouts fitted in with the "social" attitude of many rugby teams in the sixties and seventies, and there are numerous anecdotes such as Reed and 36 friends drinking, in an evening, 60 gallons of beer, 32 bottles of Scotch, 17 bottles of gin, four crates of wine and one bottle of Babycham. His most successful films came in the late 1950s, including Operation Madball (1957), Bell, Book and Candle (1958), Strangers When We Meet and The World of Suzie Wong both 1960. He was famous for his heavy drinking, and was once forced to leave the set of a television discussion programme after arriving drunk and attempting to kiss feminist writer Kate Millett. After WW II he tried directing, first as co-producer and co-director on Leather Gloves (1948), with William Asher, before his first solo effort on the musical The Sunny Side of the Street (1951). He began his career playing romantic leads, but gradually acquired a tougher image.

During the war he served in the US Coast Guard, marrying the actress Susan Peters in November of 1943. His last wife was Josephine Burge, whom he married in 1985. He began his acting career aged eleven on Broadway, and appeared in his first film in 1934 - John Ford's The World Moves On. He then married Jackie Daryl in 1969, but they divorced in 1970, after having a daughter, Sarah. He was born in Detroit, Michigan. In 1959 he wed Kate Burn, they had one son, Mark, before their divorce in 1969. Richard Quine (November 12, 1920 - June 10, 1989) was an American stage, film, and radio actor and film director. Reed married three times.

A major international star in the late 1960s and 1970s, Reed's career declined in the 1980s. His films include Women In Love, The Assassination Bureau, The Devils, I'll Never Forget What's 'Isname, Oliver!, Tommy, The Three Musketeers, Zero Population Growth, Castaway, and Gladiator. He was born in Wimbledon, England. Oliver Reed (February 13, 1938-May 2, 1999) was a British actor known for his macho image on and off screen.

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