Phat Farm

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Phat Farm is an urban fashion line created by Russell Simmons, the founder of Def Jam in 1992. The brand is fairly expensive and worn for fashion instead of sport. The broken flag logo visible on every clothing article except footwear is touted as a symbol of the state of separation the world is in right now. Some Phat Farm articles are political.

Simmons sold his interest in Phat Farm for 140 million dollars in 2004.

Store Location- 129 Prince Street New York NY


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Store Location- 129 Prince Street New York NY. The 914/8 was not considered for production as a regular model. Simmons sold his interest in Phat Farm for 140 million dollars in 2004. The chassis remained largely unchanged, although retuned shocks and custom coil springs cut from titanium were added to the package along with the upgraded bodywork, larger wheels and tires and uprated brakes. Some Phat Farm articles are political. Wheel arches were flared out, larger wheels were fit, and a cooling aperture for the oil cooler was affixed to the front bumper. The broken flag logo visible on every clothing article except footwear is touted as a symbol of the state of separation the world is in right now. The 914/8 bodywork differed from that of the standard 914 in only a few small but noticeable ways.

The brand is fairly expensive and worn for fashion instead of sport. The third was sold to a dentist in Maryland, and a relative inherited the car thereafter, but crashed the car and sold it to a mechanic. Phat Farm is an urban fashion line created by Russell Simmons, the founder of Def Jam in 1992. The second, a red unit powered by the full-blown, 400 horsepower (298 kW) 908 motor was presented to Ferdinand Piech, Ferry's son-in-law and then chairman of the Volkswagen group. The first, a silver unit, was built to comemorate "Ferry" Porsche's 60th birthday, and was powered by a carburated and de-tuned 908 race motor making 260 hp (194 kW). Two prototype 914s, dubbed 914/8, were built during 1969.

These can be easily recognized by their flared fenders and more aggressive front ends when compared to the 914. A supercar version known as the Porsche 916 was planned for production in the mid-70's, but was cancelled after the production of approximately 16 prototypes. The 914 was Motor Trend's Import Car of the Year for 1970. The 2.0 litre Type IV contuinued to be used in the 912E, which provided an entry-level model until the 924 could be delivered.

914 production ended in 1975 (though some leftover 1975 models were sold as 1976 models), two years prior to the introduction of its eventual replacement, the 924. bound units to help with emissions control. For 1974, the 1.7 was bored out to 1.8 litres, and the new Bosch fuel injection system from the 2.0 was added to U.S. Slow sales and rising costs prompted Porsche to discontinue the 914/6 variant in 1972 after producing only a little over 3,000 of them; its place in the lineup was filled by a variant powered by a new 2.0 litre, fuel injected version of VW's Type IV 4-cylinder engine in 1973.

Many enthusiasts regard this as having been a big mistake on Porsche's part. Porsche handled export to the U.S., where both versions were badged and sold as Porsches. 914/6 models used the same suspension and brakes as the 911, giving the car handling and braking superiority over the 4-cylinder VW models in addition to higher power output. Karmann manufactured the rolling chassis at their own plant, then either sent them to Porsche for fitment of the Porsche suspension and flat-six engine or kept them in house for VW hardware.

Porsche's 914/6 variant came with a carburetted 2.0 litre 110hp flat six-cylinder engine, taken from the 1969 911T. Volkswagen versions originally came with an 80hp fuel-injected 1.7 litre flat-4 engine based on the unit that powered the VW 411 and 412 saloon cars (the VW Type 4). Although this had an effect on sales, people soon realized that the 914/6, which shared the 911T's powerplant but was lighter weight and better balanced, was actually a quite competent sports car, and the car became Porsche's top seller during its entire model run, outselling the 911 by a wide margin, with over 118,000 units sold worldwide. As a result, the price of the chassis went up considerably, and the 914/6 ended up costing only a bit less than the 911T, Porsche's next lowest price car.

Unfortunately for Porsche, complications arose after the death of Volkswagen's chairman, forcing the deal to be re-worked. market, and convinced VW to allow them to sell both versions as Porsches in North America. Although they stuck with this setup in Europe, Porsche decided during development that having VW and Porsche models sharing the same body would be risky for business in the U.S. As a cost saving measure, and in part because VW wanted engineering help from Porsche, the two decided to share a platform, originally intending to sell the vehicle in four-cylinder trim as a Volkswagen and in six-cylinder trim as a Porsche.

By the late 1960s, both VW and Porsche were in need of new models; Porsche was looking for a model to replace the 912 and VW was looking to add a sporty, inexpensive 2-door to the lineup. The Porsche 914 was a sports car automobile built and sold collaboratively by Volkswagen and Porsche from 1969 through 1975.

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