Patsy Cline

Patsy Cline, (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer.

Patsy Cline

Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, Virginia, United States, she received her first contract as a country singer in 1953 and, despite her short life, would become one of the most influential singers in history. Cline was the last name of her first husband, Gerald Cline, a construction industry mogul, from whom she married in 1953 and divorced in 1957.

Her breakthrough hit was "Walkin' After Midnight" (1957), written by Don Hecht and Alan Block. She became a mainstay on the country music showcase "Grand Ole Opry" in 1960. Though she began her career recording rockabilly, it became clear that Cline's voice was best suited for pop/country crossover tunes. Some signature songs are "Crazy" (written by Willie Nelson but forever linked to Cline), "She's Got You," "I Fall To Pieces", and "Sweet Dreams."

On June 14, 1961, Patsy Cline and her brother were involved in a head-on car collision. The impact of the accident threw Patsy through the windshield, nearly killing her. Suffering from a jagged cut across her forehead that required stitches, a broken wrist, and a dislocated hip, she spent a month in the hospital. When she left the hospital, her forehead was still visibly scarred.

Cline died in a plane crash at Camden, Tennessee while returning from Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 30, in 1963. On the airplane with her and also killed were three other country music figures who were fairly well-known at the time, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Randy Hughes, and Cowboy Copas. Hughes, then Cline's lover and manager, was the plane's pilot. Country singer Jack Anglin died in an automobile accident while driving to her funeral.

In 1957, Cline married Charles Allen Dick, who worked as a linotype operator for the Winchester Star. They had a daughter, Julia Simadore Dick (1958-; now known as Julie Fudge), and a son, Allen Randolph "Randy" Dick (1961-). Were she alive today, she would have had four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In addition to her affair with Randy Hughes, Cline also had an affair with Bill Peer, her first manager. (*The reports of Miss Cline's affairs are personal assumptions from various persons interviewed many years after her death. Most of these interviews were for use in the makings of books and such about Miss Cline. Since most of the parties mention to have been involved in these affairs were deceased, these affairs could not be proven.*) After Cline's death, Charlie Dick married and divorced Jamey Ryan, also a singer, and had a son, Charles Allen Dick, Jr.

Cline is interred in the Shenendoah Memorial Park cemetery, in her hometown of Winchester, Virginia.

Among her many honors, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6160 Hollywood Blvd, she was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, in 1993 she was honored with her image on a United States postage stamp and in 1995, she was awarded posthumously a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

The 1985 movie Sweet Dreams starring Jessica Lange, is based on her adult life and is said by some familiar with her to be fairly accurate in many respects, although some have disputed its portrayal of her mercurial relationship with second husband Charlie Dick (portrayed in the film by Ed Harris). However, its depiction of the plane crash as occurring in high desert mountains totally unlike any terrain found in West Tennessee is wildly inaccurate.

"I Fall to Pieces" was voted #107 on the RIAA list of the Songs of the Century.

Further reading

  • In The Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music,

Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998, ISBN 0-375-70082-x


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Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998, ISBN 0-375-70082-x. The following albums were released under the name Bootsy Collins or William "Bootsy" Collins. "I Fall to Pieces" was voted #107 on the RIAA list of the Songs of the Century. Bootsy recently provided "vocal spice" on the TobyMac album, Welcome to Diversity. However, its depiction of the plane crash as occurring in high desert mountains totally unlike any terrain found in West Tennessee is wildly inaccurate. Collins has collaborated extensively with Bill Laswell and made bright appearances on two Fatboy Slim records. The 1985 movie Sweet Dreams starring Jessica Lange, is based on her adult life and is said by some familiar with her to be fairly accurate in many respects, although some have disputed its portrayal of her mercurial relationship with second husband Charlie Dick (portrayed in the film by Ed Harris). Most of Bootsy's albums in the post-Parliament and Funkadelic days were released under the name Bootsy's Rubber Band.

Among her many honors, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6160 Hollywood Blvd, she was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, in 1993 she was honored with her image on a United States postage stamp and in 1995, she was awarded posthumously a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Bootsy's Rubber Band is a part of the P Funk umbrella of bands. Cline is interred in the Shenendoah Memorial Park cemetery, in her hometown of Winchester, Virginia. When Bootsy, Catfish, Waddy, Joel Johnson, Mudbone Cooper, Robert Johnson and The Horny Horns formed Bootsy's Rubber Band in 1976, the character of Bootsy evolved into Bootzilla, a rhinestone-bedecked, flashy rock god. Since most of the parties mention to have been involved in these affairs were deceased, these affairs could not be proven.*) After Cline's death, Charlie Dick married and divorced Jamey Ryan, also a singer, and had a son, Charles Allen Dick, Jr. He also took the name "Bootsy" during this time, adopting it as part of an ever-evolving character, an alien rock star who grew gradually more alien, bizarre and flashy as time went on (see P Funk mythology). Most of these interviews were for use in the makings of books and such about Miss Cline. His bass playing was hard, driving and rhythmic, and has been very influential in the development of Funk, Heavy Metal and Soul music.

(*The reports of Miss Cline's affairs are personal assumptions from various persons interviewed many years after her death. Bootsy played on most of their early albums, garnering several songwriting credits as well. In addition to her affair with Randy Hughes, Cline also had an affair with Bill Peer, her first manager. Franklin introduced both Collins brothers to George Clinton, and 1972 saw both of the Collins brothers, along with Waddy and Wynne, join Funkadelic. Were she alive today, she would have had four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Regardless of his reasons for leaving Brown's band, Collins then moved to Detroit, following the advice of singer and future Parliament member Mallia Franklin. They had a daughter, Julia Simadore Dick (1958-; now known as Julie Fudge), and a son, Allen Randolph "Randy" Dick (1961-). A possibly apocryphal story states than Brown fired Collins after the latter suffered LSD hallucinations on-stage.

In 1957, Cline married Charles Allen Dick, who worked as a linotype operator for the Winchester Star. Until 1971, the Pacesetters were the backing band for James Brown, and were known in that context as The JB's. Country singer Jack Anglin died in an automobile accident while driving to her funeral. With his brother, Catfish Collins, and Kash Waddy and Philippe Wynne, Collins formed a group called The Pacesetters in 1968. Hughes, then Cline's lover and manager, was the plane's pilot. William Collins (born October 26, 1951, Cincinnati, Ohio), best known as Bootsy Collins, is a pioneering funk bassist, singer and songwriter. On the airplane with her and also killed were three other country music figures who were fairly well-known at the time, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Randy Hughes, and Cowboy Copas.

Cline died in a plane crash at Camden, Tennessee while returning from Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 30, in 1963. When she left the hospital, her forehead was still visibly scarred. Suffering from a jagged cut across her forehead that required stitches, a broken wrist, and a dislocated hip, she spent a month in the hospital. The impact of the accident threw Patsy through the windshield, nearly killing her.

On June 14, 1961, Patsy Cline and her brother were involved in a head-on car collision. Some signature songs are "Crazy" (written by Willie Nelson but forever linked to Cline), "She's Got You," "I Fall To Pieces", and "Sweet Dreams.". Though she began her career recording rockabilly, it became clear that Cline's voice was best suited for pop/country crossover tunes. She became a mainstay on the country music showcase "Grand Ole Opry" in 1960.

Her breakthrough hit was "Walkin' After Midnight" (1957), written by Don Hecht and Alan Block. Cline was the last name of her first husband, Gerald Cline, a construction industry mogul, from whom she married in 1953 and divorced in 1957. Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, Virginia, United States, she received her first contract as a country singer in 1953 and, despite her short life, would become one of the most influential singers in history. Patsy Cline, (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer.

In The Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music,
.

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