Patsy Cline

Patsy Cline, (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer.

Patsy Cline

Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, Virginia, United States, she received her first contract as a country singer in 1953 and, despite her short life, would become one of the most influential singers in history. Cline was the last name of her first husband, Gerald Cline, a construction industry mogul, from whom she married in 1953 and divorced in 1957.

Her breakthrough hit was "Walkin' After Midnight" (1957), written by Don Hecht and Alan Block. She became a mainstay on the country music showcase "Grand Ole Opry" in 1960. Though she began her career recording rockabilly, it became clear that Cline's voice was best suited for pop/country crossover tunes. Some signature songs are "Crazy" (written by Willie Nelson but forever linked to Cline), "She's Got You," "I Fall To Pieces", and "Sweet Dreams."

On June 14, 1961, Patsy Cline and her brother were involved in a head-on car collision. The impact of the accident threw Patsy through the windshield, nearly killing her. Suffering from a jagged cut across her forehead that required stitches, a broken wrist, and a dislocated hip, she spent a month in the hospital. When she left the hospital, her forehead was still visibly scarred.

Cline died in a plane crash at Camden, Tennessee while returning from Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 30, in 1963. On the airplane with her and also killed were three other country music figures who were fairly well-known at the time, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Randy Hughes, and Cowboy Copas. Hughes, then Cline's lover and manager, was the plane's pilot. Country singer Jack Anglin died in an automobile accident while driving to her funeral.

In 1957, Cline married Charles Allen Dick, who worked as a linotype operator for the Winchester Star. They had a daughter, Julia Simadore Dick (1958-; now known as Julie Fudge), and a son, Allen Randolph "Randy" Dick (1961-). Were she alive today, she would have had four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In addition to her affair with Randy Hughes, Cline also had an affair with Bill Peer, her first manager. (*The reports of Miss Cline's affairs are personal assumptions from various persons interviewed many years after her death. Most of these interviews were for use in the makings of books and such about Miss Cline. Since most of the parties mention to have been involved in these affairs were deceased, these affairs could not be proven.*) After Cline's death, Charlie Dick married and divorced Jamey Ryan, also a singer, and had a son, Charles Allen Dick, Jr.

Cline is interred in the Shenendoah Memorial Park cemetery, in her hometown of Winchester, Virginia.

Among her many honors, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6160 Hollywood Blvd, she was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, in 1993 she was honored with her image on a United States postage stamp and in 1995, she was awarded posthumously a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

The 1985 movie Sweet Dreams starring Jessica Lange, is based on her adult life and is said by some familiar with her to be fairly accurate in many respects, although some have disputed its portrayal of her mercurial relationship with second husband Charlie Dick (portrayed in the film by Ed Harris). However, its depiction of the plane crash as occurring in high desert mountains totally unlike any terrain found in West Tennessee is wildly inaccurate.

"I Fall to Pieces" was voted #107 on the RIAA list of the Songs of the Century.

Further reading

  • In The Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music,

Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998, ISBN 0-375-70082-x


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Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998, ISBN 0-375-70082-x. Gothic rock, Siouxsie and the Banshees. "I Fall to Pieces" was voted #107 on the RIAA list of the Songs of the Century. The Cure, Join the Dots: B-Sides and Rarities 1978-2001 (15). However, its depiction of the plane crash as occurring in high desert mountains totally unlike any terrain found in West Tennessee is wildly inaccurate. 2. The 1985 movie Sweet Dreams starring Jessica Lange, is based on her adult life and is said by some familiar with her to be fairly accurate in many respects, although some have disputed its portrayal of her mercurial relationship with second husband Charlie Dick (portrayed in the film by Ed Harris). The Cure, Join the Dots: B-Sides and Rarities 1978-2001 (13).

Among her many honors, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6160 Hollywood Blvd, she was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, in 1993 she was honored with her image on a United States postage stamp and in 1995, she was awarded posthumously a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. 1. Cline is interred in the Shenendoah Memorial Park cemetery, in her hometown of Winchester, Virginia. Given that the group had just recently released a four-disc set of b-sides, the amount of non-album material the band possesses appears to be rather high. Since most of the parties mention to have been involved in these affairs were deceased, these affairs could not be proven.*) After Cline's death, Charlie Dick married and divorced Jamey Ryan, also a singer, and had a son, Charles Allen Dick, Jr. Inspired by Elvis Costello's reissues, other albums ("Faith", "Seventeen Seconds" and "Pornography") are planned in the series. Most of these interviews were for use in the makings of books and such about Miss Cline. In 2004, a reissue of Three Imaginary Boys was released, with a second bonus disc of unreleased material, demos, live tracks etc.

(*The reports of Miss Cline's affairs are personal assumptions from various persons interviewed many years after her death. The show was hosted by Marilyn Manson. In addition to her affair with Randy Hughes, Cline also had an affair with Bill Peer, her first manager. In the event, many artists ranging from AFI to Blink 182 covered various Cure songs as a tribute to the band. Were she alive today, she would have had four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The Cure have been made 2004's MTV Icon. They had a daughter, Julia Simadore Dick (1958-; now known as Julie Fudge), and a son, Allen Randolph "Randy" Dick (1961-). The album also received a generally positive reaction with some critics rating it as the group's best since Disintegration.

In 1957, Cline married Charles Allen Dick, who worked as a linotype operator for the Winchester Star. The album The Cure made a top ten debut on both sides of the Atlantic in July 2004 and debuted in the top 30 in Australia. Country singer Jack Anglin died in an automobile accident while driving to her funeral. They also appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Hughes, then Cline's lover and manager, was the plane's pilot. To promote this album, the band headlined the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on May 2. On the airplane with her and also killed were three other country music figures who were fairly well-known at the time, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Randy Hughes, and Cowboy Copas. The Cure released their first eponymous album on iam records on June 28, 2004.

Cline died in a plane crash at Camden, Tennessee while returning from Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 30, in 1963. This album peaked at #106 on the Billboard 200 album charts. When she left the hospital, her forehead was still visibly scarred. The set includes seventy Cure songs, some previously unreleased, and a 76-page full-colour book of photographs, history and quotes, packaged in a hard cover. Suffering from a jagged cut across her forehead that required stitches, a broken wrist, and a dislocated hip, she spent a month in the hospital. In 2004 The Cure released a new four-disc boxed set on Fiction Records titled Join the Dots: B-Sides and Rarities, 1978-2001 (The Fiction Years). The impact of the accident threw Patsy through the windshield, nearly killing her. In the spring of 2003, The Cure signed to iam Records.

On June 14, 1961, Patsy Cline and her brother were involved in a head-on car collision. These performances were relased as the Trilogy DVD in 2003. Some signature songs are "Crazy" (written by Willie Nelson but forever linked to Cline), "She's Got You," "I Fall To Pieces", and "Sweet Dreams.". In 2002 they continued recording, and also headlined twelve major music festivals, in addition to playing several three-hour concerts during which they performed the albums Pornography, Disintegration and Bloodflowers in their entirety in Berlin. Though she began her career recording rockabilly, it became clear that Cline's voice was best suited for pop/country crossover tunes. In 2001 The Cure left Fiction and released their Greatest Hits album. She became a mainstay on the country music showcase "Grand Ole Opry" in 1960. The band also embarked on the nine-month Dream Tour, attended by over one million people worldwide.

Her breakthrough hit was "Walkin' After Midnight" (1957), written by Don Hecht and Alan Block. This album was widely seen as the third in a trilogy including Pornography and Disintegration. Cline was the last name of her first husband, Gerald Cline, a construction industry mogul, from whom she married in 1953 and divorced in 1957. The Grammy-nominated album Bloodflowers was released in 2000. Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, Virginia, United States, she received her first contract as a country singer in 1953 and, despite her short life, would become one of the most influential singers in history. The Cure also contributed to the soundtrack album for The X-Files: Fight the Future as well as For the Masses, a Depeche Mode tribute album. Patsy Cline, (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer. In 1996 The Cure released the album Wild Mood Swings, and in 1998 Smith appeared as himself on the animated TV show South Park.

In The Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music,
. Boris Williams (drums) left the band, and was replaced by Jason Cooper (formerly with My Life Story), and Roger O'Donnell rejoined. During 1994, Lol Tolhurst sued Robert Smith and Fiction Records over royalties payments, also claiming joint ownership of the name "The Cure" with Smith; after a long legal battle Tolhurst eventually lost. Porl Thompson (guitar) left the band once more during 1993 to play with Robert Plant and Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin. The EP has since become an extremely sought after item, copies exchanging hands for approaching 100.

Entitled Lost Wishes, the proceeds from the four track cassette tape went to charity. As a promotional exercise with the Our Price music chain in the UK, a limited edition EP was released consisting of instrumental outtakes from the Wish sessions. The Cure also embarked on the "Wish Tour" and released the live albums Show and Paris. "Mixed Up" was followed in 1992 by the album Wish, which went straight to #1 in the UK and to #2 in the US.

In 1990 The Cure released a collection of remixes called Mixed Up, a collection which was roundly panned by both critics and fans (Smith says that he expected this, but decided to release the collection anyway). This tour featured some of the band's longest ever shows; their final gig at Wembley Arena (announced By Robert as "probably our last show") lasted over three and a half hours. The Cure embarked on the "Prayer" tour. In 1989 they released the album Disintegration, which became their highest-charting album to date at #3 and featured four Top 20 singles ("Lullaby", "Fascination Street", "Pictures of You", and "Lovesong"). Shortly before the release, Tolhurst left permanently, leaving Smith as the only remaining founding member of The Cure.

In 1988 the band history Ten Imaginary Years was released, and Lol Tolhurst, though he had not yet left the band, was replaced by Roger O'Donnell. In 1987 The Cure released the double album Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me, and embarked on the "Kissing Tour.". Throughout 1986 Lol Tolhurst's alcohol consumption was interfering with his ability to perform, and Roger O'Donnell was frequently called upon to stand in for him. The album's title was taken from a line in the song "Killing an Arab." This release was accompanied by a video version called Staring at the Sea and by another tour, as well as a live concert film called The Cure In Orange.

Following this release and another world tour, the band released Standing on a Beach, a collection featuring all The Cure's singles and B-sides. In 1985 the new lineup released The Head on the Door which reached #7 in the UK and #59 on the American charts. Robert Smith later expressed his satisfaction with the reunited Cure, saying "we're a band again.". At the end of the tour, however, Anderson was fired and replaced by Boris Williams, and Thornalley was replaced by returnee Simon Gallup.

The Cure then embarked on their "Top Tour" with Thompson, Anderson, and bassist Phil Thornalley on board. In 1984 The Cure released The Top, an album on which Smith played all the instruments except the drums (played by Andy Anderson) and the saxophone (played by returnee Porl Thompson). Reduced to the duo of Smith and Tolhurst, the Cure released four studio singles and their B-sides as the album Japanese Whispers. The singles from this period were uncharacteristically upbeat and accessible, though Smith would soon return to writing more melancholy (if not as somber) material. The same year, Smith also recorded and toured with Siouxsie and the Banshees, contributing his writing and playing skills on their Hyaena and Nocturne albums, as well as recording the Blue Sunshine album as The Glove (see above).

In 1983 The Cure released two more singles, "The Walk" (UK #12) and "The Lovecats," which became the band's first UK top 10 single at #7. Smith says that he "doesn't even remember making a lot of Pornography" (2). After an altercation in a club between Smith and Simon Gallup, Gallup left the group and started another one called Fools Dance. The release was followed by the "Fourteen Explicit Moments" tour, and by increasing problems among the members.

Perhaps because of the rumours, Pornography became the band's first UK Top 10 album, hitting the charts at #9. In 1982 The Cure recorded Pornography, a bleak, nihilist offering that led to more rumours that Smith was suicidal. The band members' lives began to be marked by increasing drug use. Smith's increasing depression was embodied in the album, Faith, released in 1981.

In the next two years, I genuinely felt that I wasn't going to be alive for much longer, and I tried pretty hard to make this feeling come true" (1). Now 21, Smith "didn't see that there was much point in continuing with life. Carnage Visors was used as a "tour support" film for their "Picture Tour". In 1981 came the album Faith, which hit #14 on the UK charts, as well as an instrumental soundtrack for the film Carnage Visors (these were packaged together as a long-play cassette called Faith/Carnage Visors).

The Cure set out on their first world tour, at the end of which Matthieu Hartley left the band. "A Forest" became the band's first UK hit single. In 1980 the 4-piece Cure released "Seventeen Seconds" which reached #20 on the UK charts. Member Michael Dempsey left the band, and Simon Gallup (bass) and Matthieu Hartley (keyboards) joined.

The next single "Boys Don't Cry" was a minor hit in the US, and Three Imaginary Boys was repackaged for sale there as Boys Don't Cry. In 1979, The Cure released the album Three Imaginary Boys and embarked on an extensive period of touring, during which they performed with various other iconic bands such as Joy Division and Siouxsie & the Banshees, leading eventually to a collaboration between Smith and Banshees member Steven Severin, released under the name The Glove. The Cure released their first single "Killing an Arab" to both acclaim and controversy; while the single's provocative title led to accusations of racism, the song is actually based on French existentialist Albert Camus' story The Stranger. The single was packaged with a sticker label that denied the racist connotations. The B-Side to the single "Boys Don't Cry", "Do the Hansa" was The Cure's way of getting back at Hansa Records for not signing them.

A year later, following disagreements about the direction the group should take, the newly named The Cure were signed as a trio (minus Porl Thompson) by former Polydor records scout Chris Parry's new Fiction label (distributed by Polydor). In 1977, The Easy Cure auditioned for Hansa Records and received a recording contract worth 1000. They began writing their own songs almost immediately, and quickly amassed both an impressive repertoire of original material and a growing following. Wilfrid's Catholic Comprehensive School in Crawley, Sussex.

In 1976 Robert Smith, a 17-year-old student, formed The Easy Cure with classmates Michael Dempsey (bass), Lol Tolhurst (drums) and Porl Thompson (guitar) from St. The band is often considered as being part of the Gothic genre, possibly because of lead singer Robert Smith's image, but Smith rejects this, saying that he considers the band to be mainstream. The Cure is a British rock band widely seen as one of the leading pioneers of the British alternative rock and post-punk scenes of the 1980s. Jason Cooper (percussion; member 1995-present).

Perry Bamonte (keyboards, guitars; member 1990-present). Roger O'Donnell (keyboards; member 1987-1990 & 1995-present). Boris Williams (percussion; member 1984-1994). Andy Anderson (percussion; member 1983-1984).

Phil Thornalley (bass guitar; member 1983-1984). Matthieu Hartley (keyboards; member 1979-1980). Simon Gallup (bass guitar; member 1979-1982 & 1985-present). Michael Dempsey (bass guitar; member 1976-1979).

Lol Tolhurst (percussion, keyboards; member 1976-1989). Porl Thompson (guitars; member 1977-1978 & 1984-1992). Robert Smith (vocals, guitar, keyboards; member 1976-present). Trilogy.

Greatest Hits. Galore. The Cure Play Out. Picture Show.

The Cure in Orange. Standing on a Beach. "I want to be old" - demo from '77/'78. "Need Myself" - demo from '77/'78.

"Listen" - demo from '77/'78. "Meathook" - demo from '77/'78. "See the children" - demo from '77/'78. Join the Dots: B-Sides and Rarities, 1978-2001 (The Fiction Years) (2004) #106 US.

Greatest Hits (2001, compilation of singles 1978-2001/two new tracks) #33 UK, #58 US. Galore (1997, compilation of singles 1987-1997) #37 UK, #32 US. Show (1993, live) #29 UK, #42 US. Paris (1993, live) #118 US.

Mixed Up (1990, remixes) #8 UK, #14 US. Integration (boxed set). Entreat (1991) (songs from Distintegration live) #10 UK. Standing on a Beach (1986, singles compilation) #4 UK, #48 US.

Available only on cassette. Concert and Curiosity (1984), The Concert album with unreleased tracks on the b-side. Concert (1984, live) #26 UK. Happily Ever After (Seventeen Seconds and Faith together U.S.-only release).

Faith/Carnage Visors (1981), a special long-play cassette. Three Imaginary Boys (2CD Deluxe edition)(2004). The Cure (2004) #8 UK, #7 US

    . Bloodflowers (2000) #14 UK, #16 US.

    Wild Mood Swings (1996) #9 UK, #12 US. Wish (1992) #1 UK, #2 US. Disintegration (1989) #3 UK, #12 US. Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me (1987) #6 UK, #35 US.

    The Head on the Door (1985) #7 UK, #60 US. The Top (1984) #10 UK, #180 US. Japanese Whispers (singles/b-sides) (1983) #26 UK, #181 US. Pornography (1982) #8 UK

      .

      Faith (1981) #14 UK. Seventeen Seconds (1980) #20 UK. Boys Don't Cry (a renamed version of Three Imaginary Boys with a slightly different song lineup) (1980). Three Imaginary Boys (1979)

        .

        "Taking Off" (2004) #39 UK. "The End of the World" (2004) #25 UK. "Cut Here" (2002). "Wrong Number" (1997).

        "Mint Car" (1996) #31 UK. "The 13th" (1996) #15 UK. "A Letter to Elise" (1992) #28 UK. "Friday I'm in Love" (1992) #6 UK, #18 US.

        "High" (1992) #8 UK. "Close to Me" (remix) (1990) #13 UK. "Never Enough" (b-side: "Harold and Joe") (1990) #13 UK. "Pictures of You" (1990) #24 UK.

        "Lovesong" (1989) #18 UK, #2 US. "Fascination Street" (1989) #46 US. "Lullaby" (b-side "Babble"/"Out Of Mind") (1989) #5 UK, #74 US. "Hot Hot Hot" (1988) #65 US.

        "Just Like Heaven" (b-side "Snow In Summer"/"Sugar Girl") (1988) #29 UK, #40 US. "Catch" (b-side: "Breathe") (1987) #27 UK. "Why Can't I Be You?" (b-side: "A Japanese Dream") (1987) #21 UK, #54 US. "Boys Don't Cry" (re-issue) (1986) #22 UK.

        "Close To Me" (1985) #24 UK. "Inbetween Days" (1985) #15 UK, #99 US. "The Caterpillar" (1984) #14 UK. "The Lovecats" (b-side "Speak My Language")(1983) #7 UK.

        "The Walk" (b-side: "The Dream") (1983) #12 UK. "Let's Go To Bed" (b-side: "Just One Kiss") (1982). "The Hanging Garden" (1982) #34 UK. "Charlotte Sometimes" (b-side: "Splintered in Her Head") (1981).

        "Primary" (b-side: "Descent") (1981). "A Forest" (b-side "Another Journey By Train") (1980) #31 UK. "Jumping Someone Else's Train (b-side "I'm Cold") (1979). "Boys Don't Cry" (b-side "Plastic Passion") (1979).

        "Killing an Arab" (b-side: "10:15 Saturday Night") (1979).

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