Patsy Cline

Patsy Cline, (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer.

Patsy Cline

Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, Virginia, United States, she received her first contract as a country singer in 1953 and, despite her short life, would become one of the most influential singers in history. Cline was the last name of her first husband, Gerald Cline, a construction industry mogul, from whom she married in 1953 and divorced in 1957.

Her breakthrough hit was "Walkin' After Midnight" (1957), written by Don Hecht and Alan Block. She became a mainstay on the country music showcase "Grand Ole Opry" in 1960. Though she began her career recording rockabilly, it became clear that Cline's voice was best suited for pop/country crossover tunes. Some signature songs are "Crazy" (written by Willie Nelson but forever linked to Cline), "She's Got You," "I Fall To Pieces", and "Sweet Dreams."

On June 14, 1961, Patsy Cline and her brother were involved in a head-on car collision. The impact of the accident threw Patsy through the windshield, nearly killing her. Suffering from a jagged cut across her forehead that required stitches, a broken wrist, and a dislocated hip, she spent a month in the hospital. When she left the hospital, her forehead was still visibly scarred.

Cline died in a plane crash at Camden, Tennessee while returning from Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 30, in 1963. On the airplane with her and also killed were three other country music figures who were fairly well-known at the time, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Randy Hughes, and Cowboy Copas. Hughes, then Cline's lover and manager, was the plane's pilot. Country singer Jack Anglin died in an automobile accident while driving to her funeral.

In 1957, Cline married Charles Allen Dick, who worked as a linotype operator for the Winchester Star. They had a daughter, Julia Simadore Dick (1958-; now known as Julie Fudge), and a son, Allen Randolph "Randy" Dick (1961-). Were she alive today, she would have had four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In addition to her affair with Randy Hughes, Cline also had an affair with Bill Peer, her first manager. (*The reports of Miss Cline's affairs are personal assumptions from various persons interviewed many years after her death. Most of these interviews were for use in the makings of books and such about Miss Cline. Since most of the parties mention to have been involved in these affairs were deceased, these affairs could not be proven.*) After Cline's death, Charlie Dick married and divorced Jamey Ryan, also a singer, and had a son, Charles Allen Dick, Jr.

Cline is interred in the Shenendoah Memorial Park cemetery, in her hometown of Winchester, Virginia.

Among her many honors, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6160 Hollywood Blvd, she was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, in 1993 she was honored with her image on a United States postage stamp and in 1995, she was awarded posthumously a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

The 1985 movie Sweet Dreams starring Jessica Lange, is based on her adult life and is said by some familiar with her to be fairly accurate in many respects, although some have disputed its portrayal of her mercurial relationship with second husband Charlie Dick (portrayed in the film by Ed Harris). However, its depiction of the plane crash as occurring in high desert mountains totally unlike any terrain found in West Tennessee is wildly inaccurate.

"I Fall to Pieces" was voted #107 on the RIAA list of the Songs of the Century.

Further reading

  • In The Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music,

Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998, ISBN 0-375-70082-x


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Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998, ISBN 0-375-70082-x. He re-recorded some old singles, and worked with The Specials for 1992's King of Kings's, which used hits from Dekker's musical heroes, including Derrick Morgan. "I Fall to Pieces" was voted #107 on the RIAA list of the Songs of the Century. Only a single live album was released in the late 80s, but a new version of "The Israelites" reawakened public interest in 1990, following its use in a Maxell ad. However, its depiction of the plane crash as occurring in high desert mountains totally unlike any terrain found in West Tennessee is wildly inaccurate. In the early 80s, as the Two Tone movement died out, he saw his fortunes dwindle, and he declared bankruptcy in 1984. The 1985 movie Sweet Dreams starring Jessica Lange, is based on her adult life and is said by some familiar with her to be fairly accurate in many respects, although some have disputed its portrayal of her mercurial relationship with second husband Charlie Dick (portrayed in the film by Ed Harris). Though Compass Point did not sell well, Dekker was still a popular live performer, and he toured with The Rumour.

Among her many honors, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6160 Hollywood Blvd, she was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, in 1993 she was honored with her image on a United States postage stamp and in 1995, she was awarded posthumously a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. His next album was Compass Point, produced by Robert Palmer. Cline is interred in the Shenendoah Memorial Park cemetery, in her hometown of Winchester, Virginia. His first single was "Israelites", a Top Ten Belgian hit, and was followed by "Please Don't Bend", Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers to Cross" and "Book of Rules". Since most of the parties mention to have been involved in these affairs were deceased, these affairs could not be proven.*) After Cline's death, Charlie Dick married and divorced Jamey Ryan, also a singer, and had a son, Charles Allen Dick, Jr. He recorded an album called Black & Dekker, which featured his previous hits backed by The Rumour, Graham Parker's backing band. Most of these interviews were for use in the makings of books and such about Miss Cline. At the end of the 1970s, Dekker signed with Stiff Records, a punk label linked with the Two-Tone movement, a fusion of punk and ska.

(*The reports of Miss Cline's affairs are personal assumptions from various persons interviewed many years after her death. He was unable to follow its success, however, and did not chart in the UK for some time, also finding only a limited audience in Jamaica. In addition to her affair with Randy Hughes, Cline also had an affair with Bill Peer, her first manager. His first hit with the pair was 1975's "Sing a Little Song", which was a British Top Ten. Were she alive today, she would have had four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Dekker continued recording, but with only limited success, until he began working with the production duo Bruce Anthony in 1974. They had a daughter, Julia Simadore Dick (1958-; now known as Julie Fudge), and a son, Allen Randolph "Randy" Dick (1961-). Among his best known releases of this period was "You Can Get It If You Really Want", written by Jimmy Cliff, which Dekker had not wanted to record but was convinced by Leslie Kong. Kong, whose production had been an instrumental part of both Dekker's and Cliff's careers, died in 1971, and both his protegé's were lost for a period before returning to music.

In 1957, Cline married Charles Allen Dick, who worked as a linotype operator for the Winchester Star. In the 1970s, Dekker spent most of his time touring and moved to the UK, where he continued to record. Country singer Jack Anglin died in an automobile accident while driving to her funeral. He also released "Problems" and "Pickney Gal", both of which were popular in Jamaica, but saw only limited success elsewhere. Hughes, then Cline's lover and manager, was the plane's pilot. 1969 saw the release of "It Mek", which first saw only lukewarm success but was re-recorded and became a hit both in Jamaica and the UK. On the airplane with her and also killed were three other country music figures who were fairly well-known at the time, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Randy Hughes, and Cowboy Copas. That same year saw the release of "Beautiful and Dangerous", "Writing on the Wall", "Music Like Dirt", "Bongo Girl" and "Shing a Ling".

Cline died in a plane crash at Camden, Tennessee while returning from Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 30, in 1963. He was the first Jamaican performer to enter US markets with pure Jamaican music, though he never repeated the feat. When she left the hospital, her forehead was still visibly scarred. In 1968, Dekker's "The Israelites" was released, appearing on both the US and UK charts, eventually topping the latter and peaking in the Top Ten of the former. Suffering from a jagged cut across her forehead that required stitches, a broken wrist, and a dislocated hip, she spent a month in the hospital. Many of the hits from this era came from his debut album, 007 (Shanty Town). The impact of the accident threw Patsy through the windshield, nearly killing her. His "Pretty Africa" is a long-standing favorite among his fans, and may be the earliest popular song promoting repatriation.

On June 14, 1961, Patsy Cline and her brother were involved in a head-on car collision. Dekker continued with songs along the same vein, such as "Rude Boy Train" and "Rudie Got Soul", as well as continuing with his previous themes of religion and morality in songs like "It's a Shame", "Wise Man", "Hey Grandma", "Unity", "It Pays", "Mother's Young Girl" and "Sabotage". Some signature songs are "Crazy" (written by Willie Nelson but forever linked to Cline), "She's Got You," "I Fall To Pieces", and "Sweet Dreams.". "007 (Shanty Town)" was a Top 15 hit in the UK, and he toured the country with a posse of mods following him. Though she began her career recording rockabilly, it became clear that Cline's voice was best suited for pop/country crossover tunes. The song established Dekker as a rude boy icon, and also became an established hero in the United Kingdom's mod scene. She became a mainstay on the country music showcase "Grand Ole Opry" in 1960. Dekker's own songs did not go to the extremes of many other popular tunes, though he did introduce lyrics which resonated with the rude boys, starting with one of his best-known songs, "007 (Shanty Town)".

Her breakthrough hit was "Walkin' After Midnight" (1957), written by Don Hecht and Alan Block. In that year, however, he appeared on Derrick Morgan's "Tougher Than Tough", which helped begin a trend of popular songs glamourizing the violent rude boy culture. Cline was the last name of her first husband, Gerald Cline, a construction industry mogul, from whom she married in 1953 and divorced in 1957. Until 1967, Dekker's songs were polite and conveyed respectable, mainstream messages. Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, Virginia, United States, she received her first contract as a country singer in 1953 and, despite her short life, would become one of the most influential singers in history. Dekker and the Howards recorded a number of hits, including "Parents", "Get Up Edina", "This Woman" and "Mount Zion". Patsy Cline, (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer. Dekker then recruited four brothers, Carl, Patrick, Clive and Barry Howard, who became his backing band, known as The Four Aces.

In The Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music,
. The song remains well-known among ska afficionados. It was "King of Ska", a rowdy and jubilant song on which Dekker was backed by The Cherrypies (also known as The Maytals). His fourth hit, however, made him into one of the island's biggest stars. "Honour Your Father and Mother" was a hit, and was followed by "Sinners Come Home" and "Labour for Learning", as well as a name change (from Desmond Dacres to Desmond Dekker).

Dekker's "Honour Your Father and Mother" was to be that song. With Morgan's suport, Dekker was signed but did not record until 1963, because Leslie Kong wanted to wait for the perfect song. Neither were impressed by his talents, and the young man moved on to Leslie Kong's Beverley record label, where he auditioned before Derrick Morgan, then the label's biggest star. In 1961, he auditioned for Coxsone Dodd (Studio One) and Duke Reid (Treasure Isle).

Dekker began working as a welder, singing around his workplace while his coworkers encouraged him. He was born in Kingston in 1941, and became an orphan as a teenager. Before the ascent of Bob Marley, Desmond Dekker was the most well-known Jamaican musician outside of his country, and one of the most popular within it. Other hits include "007 (Shanty Town)" (1967), "It Mek" (1968), "The Israelites" and "You Can Get It If You Really Want".

Together with his backing group, The Aces (consisting of Wilson James and Easton Barrington Howard), he had the first international Jamaican hit with "Israelites". Desmond Dekker (born Desmond Dacres in Kingston, Jamaica on July 16, 1941) is a ska and reggae singer and songwriter.

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