Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Nickname: "The City of Festivals", "The Genuine American City", "Cream City", "Brewtown/Brew City"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.city.milwaukee.gov
Location


Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Government
County Milwaukee
Mayor Tom Barrett
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 251.0 km²
Land 248.8 km²
Water 2.2 km²
Population
Total (2000) 596,974
Metro area 1,709,926
Density 2399.5/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude {{{latitude}}}
Longitude {{{longitude}}}
Coordinates 43°03′00″ N
87°57′00″ W
Elevation m
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan.

History

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s.

In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. Walker. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century.

From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. states. This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects.

Geography and climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). 248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.88% water.

Cityscape

Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange.

View of the Milwaukee River from downtown.

Climate

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is.

Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures.

Demographics

In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%.

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25.

In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 31 years. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

Transportation

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus.

Economy

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city.

Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. Paul region. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies.

Culture and sports

Culture

The Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions.

Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model.

Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage.

Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old.

Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day.

Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records.

Sports

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:

The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:

In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:

The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. The Packers won, 27-0.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests.

Education

Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools.

Colleges and universities

High schools

Media

Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:

Broadcast media:

Airports

Colloquialisms


This page about Milwaukee includes information from a Wikipedia article.
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Broadcast media:.
Helmet Developers. Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:. Some well-known manufacturers of motorcycle helmets are:. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools. Besides as protection in vehicle crashes, the full face motorcycle helmet is sometimes used in robberies and other crimes and in riots, as a mask to prevent recognition and to protect the head from injury by weapon, as at Riot control#Helmets. Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. This choice is described in greater detail in the standards section.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests. Most standard helmet tests use speeds between 5 and 7 m/s. The Packers won, 27-0. In practice, motorcycle helmet manufacturers choose the impact speed they will design for based on the speed used in standard helmet tests. The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. So helmets help most in impacts at the speeds they were designed for, and continue to help but not as much in impacts that are at different speeds. In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:. Still, a helmet with a stiffer foam that stopped the head before the liner crush space ran out would have done a better job.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:. However, in the absence of the helmet, the head would have been brought to a sudden stop from a higher speed causing more injury. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating. When the crush space of the liner runs out, the head will stop suddenly which is not ideal. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. If the impact is faster than the one the helmet was designed for, the head will completely crush the liner and slow down but not stop in the process. The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. If the helmet is in a real impact that is slower than the one for which it was designed, it will still help but the head will be decelerated a little more violently than was actually necessary given the available space between the inside and outside of the helmet, although that deceleration will still be much less than what is would have been in the absence of the helmet.

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:. The result is that the manufacturer must choose a likely speed of impact and optimize the helmet for that impact speed. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records. It depends on the impact speed of the head, which is of course unknown at the time of manufacture of the helmet. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. So how stiff is that? The answer, significantly, is that it depends. Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. This means that an ideal helmet liner is stiff enough to decelerate the impacting head to a dead stop in a smooth uniform manner just before it completely crushes the liner and no stiffer.

Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day. The head cannot move any further so after crushing the liner it comes suddenly to a dead stop, causing high accelerations that injure the brain. Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. What happens then? Well, beyond the liner is a hard plastic shell and beyond that is whatever the helmet is hitting, which is presumably an unyielding surface. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". If the liner is too soft, the head will crush it completely upon impact without coming to a stop. Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. This implies a limit to how soft the liner can be.

A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Unfortunately, there is a limit to how thick the helmet can be for the simple reason that the helmet quickly becomes impractical if the liner is more than 1 or 2 inches thick. Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. It is clear then that it is very important that the liner in a motorcycle helmet is soft and thick so the head decelerates at a gentle rate as it sinks into it. Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old. Small blood vessels are also damaged causing bleeding (petechial hemorrhages) deep within the brain. Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). This movement produces stretching and tearing of axons (diffuse axonal injury) and the insulating myelin sheath, injuries which are the major cause of loss of consciousness in a head trauma.

Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage. The resulting shearing forces cause different levels in the brain to move relative to one another. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. These forces, associated with the rapid acceleration and deceleration of the head, are smallest at the point of rotation of the brain near the lower end of the brain stem and successively increase at increasing distances from this point. Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. In these situations rotational forces such as might occur in whiplash-type injuries are particularly important. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model. Another characteristic, susceptibility to shearing forces, plays a role primarily in injuries which involve rapid and forceful movements of the head, such as in motor vehicle accidents.

Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. Blood vessels linking the brain to the inside of the skull may also break during this process, causing dangerous bleeds. Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Then the brain rebounds in the opposite direction, stretching the tissue near the impact site and squeezing the tissue on the other side of the head. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions. During an impact to the front of the head, the brain lurches forwards inside the skull, squeezing the tissue near the impact site and stretching the tissue on the opposite side of the head. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. Think of how you lurch backwards and forwards while standing on a bus as it accelerates or stops.

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. Closed head injury results from violent acceleration of the head which causes the brain to move around inside the skull. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies. The most common type of head injury in motorcycle accidents is closed head injury, meaning injury in which the skull is not broken as distinct from an open head injury like a bullet wound. Paul region. Therefore, the primary purpose of a helmet is to prevent traumatic brain injury while skull and face injuries are a significant secondary concern. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. They frequently result in death, permanent disability or personality change and, unlike bone, neurological tissue has very limited ability to recover after an injury.

Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. Brain injuries are much more serious. Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. Skull fractures are usually not life threatening unless the fracture is depressed and impinges on the brain beneath and bone fractures usually heal over a relatively short period. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city. The common perception that a helmet's purpose is to save you from splitting your head open is misleading. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. To understand the action of a helmet, it is first necessary to understand the mechanism of head injury.

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. The purpose of the foam liner is to crush during an impact, thereby increasing the distance and period of time over which the helmet stops and reducing its acceleration. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus. The purpose of the hard outer shell is. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. The conventional motorcycle helmet has two principal protective components: a thin, hard, outer shell made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic, fiberglass or kevlar and a soft, thick, inner liner usually made of expanded polystyrene foam or expanded polypropylene foam. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. For the best protection, helmets should be replaced after any impact, and every three or so years even if no impact is known to have occurred.

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. Note that impacts may, of course, come from things other than crashing, such a dropping a helmet, and may not cause any externally visible damage. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Motorcycle helmets are generally designed to break in a crash (thus expending the energy otherwise destined for the wearer's skull), so they provide little or no protection after their first impact. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. They generally have fabric and foam interiors for both comfort and protection. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. Modern helmets are constructed from plastics, often reinforced with kevlar or carbon fiber.

Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. Some motorcycle helmets have a built-in so-called MROS (Multiple Reflective Optic System): a set of reflective surfaces inside the helmet which together function as a rear-view mirror [1]. The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. A "novelty helmet" can protect the scalp against sunburn while riding and - if it stays on during a crash - might protect the scalp against abrasion, but it has no capability to protect the skull or brain. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males. Such helmets are often smaller and lighter than DOT-approved helmets, and are unsuitable for crash protection because they lack the energy-absorbing foam that protects the brain by allowing it to come to a gradual stop during an impact. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. There are other helmets - often called "beanies" or "novelty helmets" - which are not certified and generally only used to provide the illusion of compliance with mandatory helmet laws.

The median age is 31 years. All of these types of helmets are secured by a chin strap, and their protective benefits are greatly reduced if the chin strap is not fastened. In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. The rider may thus eat or drink without unfastening the chinstrap and removing the helmet. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25. A subset called "Convertible", "Flip-face" or "Flip-up" is also available; in these helmets, the chin bar pivots upwards (or, in some cases, may be removed). 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. From most to least protective, they are:.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. There are three basic types of motorcycle helmets. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Modern standards setters choose the severity of the standard test impact to be somewhere between these two extremes, so that manufacturers are doing their best to protect the riders who can be helped by their helmet during a head impact. The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. On the other hand, if an impact is so mild that the rider is unlikely to be injured at all so long as he is wearing a helmet than that impact is not a demanding test. There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). If currently available data suggest that the rider is unlikely to survive in such an impact, regardless of how well his helmet performs, then there is little point in demanding that helmets be optimized for this impact.

The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). It is possible to deduce how well the 'perfect' helmet outlined in the Function section of this page would perform in an impact of a given severity. As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The speeds are chosen based on modern knowledge of the human tolerance for head impact, which is by no means complete. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%. Some of these are more severe than the impacts used in the standard tests and some are less so. In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. Overall, there is a very wide range of severity in the impacts that could conceivably happen in a motorcycle impact.

The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures. So a perpendicular impact against a flat steel anvil at 5 m/s might be about as severe as a 30 m/s oblique impact against a concrete surface or a 30 m/s perpendicular impact against a sheet metal car door or windscreen. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. The sheet metal wall of a car door may bend inwards to a depth of 7.5 - 10 cm (3 - 4 inches) during a helmeted head impact, meaning that it generates more stopping distance for the rider's head than the helmet itself. Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. The other vital factor in determining the severity of an impact is the nature of the surface struck. Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is. Of course, other surfaces are perpendicular to the motorcylists velocity such as trees, walls and the sides of other vehicles.

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). For example, the surface of the road is almost parallel to the direction the motorcyclist moves in so only a small component of his velocity is directed perpendicular to the road while he is riding. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange. This confusion is relieved by understanding that the perpendicular impact speed of the helmet is usually not the same as the road speed of the motor cycle and that the severity of the impact is determined not only by the speed of the head but also by the nature of the surface it hits. Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. At first glance, this is confusing given that motorcyclists frequently ride at speeds of 20 or 30 m/s. The total area is 0.88% water. Most motorcycle helmet standards use impacts at speeds between 4 and 7 m/s.

248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. drag racing, bicycling, horseback riding), and many riders in North America consider Snell certification a benefit when considering buying a helmet. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). The Snell Memorial Foundation has developed stricter requirements and testing procedures for motorcycle helmets, as well as helmets for other activities (e.g. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects. Of the above standards, the DOT standard is by far the most lax. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. Among them are:.

This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. Worldwide, many developed countries have defined their own sets of standards that are used to judge the effectiveness of a motorcycle helmet in an accident, and define the minimal acceptable standard thereof. states. In some countries, most notably the USA, there is significant popular opposition to compulsory helmet use, based on these safety and also philosophical objections (see Helmet law defense league). From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. As with seat belt legislation the actual effects of imposing helmet wearing are a matter of dispute with evidence available indicating a risk compensation effect. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century. These laws vary considerably, often exempting mopeds and other small-displacement bikes.

Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. Motorcycle helmets are generally believed to greatly reduce injuries and fatalities in motorcycle accidents, thus many countries have laws requiring acceptable helmets to be worn by motorcycle riders. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. . Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. The primary goal of a motorcycle helmet is to protect the rider's head during impact, although many helmets provide additional conveniences, such as face shields, ear protection, intercom etc. Walker. A motorcycle helmet is a type of protective headgear used by motorcycle riders.

In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. Philips (scalp-like membrane to protect against rotational injury). Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. Z1R. In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. Suomy. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s. Shoei (pronounced show-eh).

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. Schuberth. . Nolan. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan. HJC. The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. Bell.

The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). Arai. Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. AGV.
Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. This is important because the foams used have very little resistance to penetration and abrasion. Some Milwaukeeans use the unique expression "ainahey", short for "ain't it, hey?" to reaffirm something obvious, used in the same way as "of course", and similar to the colloquial "don'chaknow", short for "don't you know?". to provide structure to the inner liner so it does not disintegrate upon abrasive contact with pavement.

It is also common for people to refer to ATMs as a "Tyme Machine," referring to the name of the dominant debit card in Wisconsin. to prevent penetration of the helmet by a pointed object that might otherwise puncture the skull, and. One well known colloquialism common to Milwaukee and the surrounding area, is the word "bubbler," which refers to a drinking fountain. DOT FMVSS 218 (USA). Timmerman Airport. BS 6658 (United Kingdom). Lawrence J. NZ 5430 (New Zealand).

General Mitchell International Airport. JIS T8133 (Japan). List of Milwaukee area radio stations. 22 (Europe). List of Milwaukee area television stations. UN/ECE Regulation No. Vital Source Magazine. CSA CAN3-D230-M85 (Canada).

UWM Post. AS 1698 (Australia). The Leader. Marquette Tribune. Shepherd Express.

MKE (magazine). Milwaukee Magazine. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Wisconsin Lutheran High School.

Washington High School. Vincent High School. Thomas More. South Division High School.

Rufus King High School. Riverside University High School. Reagan College Preparatory. Pulaski High School.

Professional Learning Institute. Pius XI High School. North Division Virtual University High School. New School for Community Service.

Milwaukee School of Languages. Milwaukee School of Entrepreneurship. Milwaukee Lutheran High School. Milwaukee High School of the Arts.

Metropolitan High School. Marquette University High School. Madison University High School. Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School.

Juneau Business High School. John Marshall High School. Hamilton High School. Divine Savior Holy Angels High School.

Custer High School. Bradley (Lynde & Harry) Technology & Trade High School. Bay View High School. Wisconsin Lutheran College.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Mount Mary College. Milwaukee School of Engineering. Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design.

Milwaukee Area Technical College. Medical College of Wisconsin. Marquette University. Cardinal Stritch University.

Alverno College. Milwaukee County Stadium, 1953-1994. Marquette Stadium, 1952. Wisconsin State Fair Park, 1934-51.

Borchert Field, 1933. Milwaukee Wave United (Outdoor Soccer) 2003 - They only played one season. Milwaukee Rampage (Outdoor Soccer) 1994 - 2002. Milwaukee Mustangs (American football—Arena Football League), played at the Bradley Center from 1994 to 2001.

Milwaukee Does (Basketball—Women's Pro Basketball League), played at MECCA Arena from 1978 to 1980. The Milwaukee Braves won the National League pennant in 1957 and 1958, and won the World Series in 1957. Milwaukee Braves (Baseball—MLB), played at Milwaukee County Stadium from 1953-1965. Louis.

Milwaukee Hawks (Basketball—NBA) played at the Milwaukee Arena from 1951 to 1955 before moving to St. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—Minor League Baseball), member of the American Association from 1902 through 1952, played at Borchert Field. Milwaukee Badgers (American football—NFL), played from 1922 to 1926. Cellular Arena.

Milwaukee Wave (Indoor Soccer) playing at the U.S. Milwaukee Admirals (Ice hockey) playing at the Bradley Center. Milwaukee Bucks (Basketball—NBA) playing at the Bradley Center. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—MLB) playing at Miller Park.

Average July high/low temperatures: 79°F/62°F (26°C/17°C). Average January high/low temperatures: 26°F/11°F (-3°C/-12°C).

07-31-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.