Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Nickname: "The City of Festivals", "The Genuine American City", "Cream City", "Brewtown/Brew City"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.city.milwaukee.gov
Location


Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Government
County Milwaukee
Mayor Tom Barrett
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 251.0 km²
Land 248.8 km²
Water 2.2 km²
Population
Total (2000) 596,974
Metro area 1,709,926
Density 2399.5/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude {{{latitude}}}
Longitude {{{longitude}}}
Coordinates 43°03′00″ N
87°57′00″ W
Elevation m
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan.

History

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s.

In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. Walker. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century.

From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. states. This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects.

Geography and climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). 248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.88% water.

Cityscape

Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange.

View of the Milwaukee River from downtown.

Climate

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is.

Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures.

Demographics

In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%.

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25.

In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 31 years. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

Transportation

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus.

Economy

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city.

Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. Paul region. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies.

Culture and sports

Culture

The Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions.

Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model.

Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage.

Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old.

Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day.

Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records.

Sports

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:

The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:

In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:

The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. The Packers won, 27-0.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests.

Education

Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools.

Colleges and universities

High schools

Media

Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:

Broadcast media:

Airports

Colloquialisms


This page about Milwaukee includes information from a Wikipedia article.
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Images of Milwaukee

Broadcast media:. They also were used as a portal to another world in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass. Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:. In Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius, a fictional heresiarch declares that "mirrors and copulation are abominable, since they both multiply the numbers of men.". As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools. In Dreamtigers, he writes of fearing that his reflection would move independently or change shape before his eyes. Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. Mirrors, along with labyrinths, figure prominently in the work of Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges, who often used them as symbols of infinity, impersonation, and illusion.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests. Illuminated rotating disco balls covered with small mirrors are used to cast moving spots of light around a dance floor. The Packers won, 27-0. Mirrors are often used in magic to create an illusion. The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. The hall of mirrors, commonly found in amusement parks, is an attraction in which a number of distorted mirrors are used to produce unusual reflections of the visitor. In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:. This technique was used by Native American tribes and numerous militaries to transmit information between distant outposts.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:. The signal can be used over long distances, possibly up to 60 kilometres on a clear day. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating. With the sun as light source, a mirror can be used to signal, by variations in the orientation of the mirror. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. A decorative reflecting sphere of thin metal-coated glass, working as a reducing wide-angle mirror, is sold as a Christmas tree decoration called a bauble. The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. Mirrors, typically large and unframed, are frequently used in interior decoration to create an illusion of space, and amplify the apparent size of a room.

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:. Its purpose is to split a beam of light so that half passes straight through, while the other half is reflected — this is useful for interferometry. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records. The same type of mirror, when used in an optical instrument, is called a half-silvered mirror or beam splitter. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. It may be used to observe criminal suspects or customers (to watch out for theft). Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. Persons on the dark side see through it - it looks like a transparent window.

Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day. Persons on the brightly lit side see their own reflection - it looks like a normal mirror. Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. It is used between a dark room and a brightly lit room. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". It is a sheet of glass coated with a layer of metal only a few dozen atoms thick, allowing some of the light through the surface (from both sides). Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. A one-way mirror, also called two-way mirror, reflects about half of the light and lets the other half pass.

A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Use of a large number of mirrors in a confined space can act to satisfy people's desire for satisfication of their ego, as in the hall of mirrors in the Palace of Versailles. Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. Other uses of mirrors in hedonistic acts include the classic 'mirror on the ceiling' for use during sex (see The Eagles' Hotel California), and the use of mirrors for 'cutting' and snorting cocaine. Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old. upskirt. Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). A mirror is sometimes used for voyeurism, e.g.

Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage. High quality flat mirrors are essential for making corner reflectors, which are used for emergency location, and even laser ranging to the Moon. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. Mirrors are also sometimes used as part of security systems, so that a single video camera can show more than one angle at a time. Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. Rounded (convex) mirrors are sometimes placed at road junctions, and corners of places such as parking lots or stores, allowing people to see around corners to avoid crashing into other vehicles or shopping carts. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model. There exist rear view sunglasses, of which the left end of the left glass and the right end of the right glass work as mirrors.

Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. Some motorcycle helmets have a built-in so-called MROS (Multiple Reflective Optic System): a set of reflective surfaces inside the helmet which together function as a rear-view mirror [1]. Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Rear-view mirror are applied in and on vehicles (such as cars, or bicycles), to allow drivers to see other vehicles coming up behind them. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions. In astronomy, adaptive optics is a technique to measure variable image distortions and adapt a mirror accordingly on a timescale of milliseconds, to compensate for the distortions. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. Such mirrors are often used in lasers.

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. The best mirrors of this type can reflect >99.999% of the light (in a narrow range of wavelengths) which is incident on the mirror. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies. By careful choice of the type and thickness of the dielectric layers, the range of wavelengths and amount of light reflected from the mirror can be specified. Paul region. These are glass (or sometimes other material) substrates on which one or more layers of dielectric material are deposited, to form an optical coating. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. For scientific optical work, dielectric mirrors are often used.

Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. The reflectivity as a function of wavelength depends on both the thickness of the coating and on how it is applied. Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. For instance, aluminum mirrors are commonly coated with magnesium fluoride. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city. Mirror surfaces are sometimes given thin film overcoatings both to retard degradation of the surface and to increase their reflectivity in parts of the spectrum where they will be used. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. A hot mirror is the opposite, the coating preferentially reflects infrared.

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. A cold mirror is made by using a transparent substrate and choosing a coating material that is more reflective to visible light and more transmissive to infrared light. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus. This is exploited in some optical work to make cold mirrors and hot mirrors. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. The reflectivity of the mirror coating can be measured using a reflectometer and depends on the wavelength of light as well as the metal. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. Front silvered mirrors have to be resurfaced occasionally to keep their quality.

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. A protective overcoat is usually applied before the mirror is removed from the vacuum, because the coating otherwise begins to corrode as soon as it is exposed to oxygen and humidity in the air. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The coatings are typically applied by vacuum deposition. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. They reflect 90% to 95% of the incident light when new. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. All of these coatings are easily damaged and require special handling.

Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. Some of them use silver, but most are aluminum, which is more reflective at short wavelengths than silver. The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Telescopes and other precision instruments use front silvered mirrors, where the reflecting surface is placed on the front surface of the glass, which gives better image quality. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males. This may be to check physical appearance (including clothing, make-up, hair, etc.) or to control applying make-up, shaving, cutting hair, fixing one's tie, etc. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. A mirror is used for inspecting parts of one's body which are difficult or impossible to see directly, such as the face, neck or the whole body.

The median age is 31 years. The "back side" of the mirror is often painted black to completely seal the metal from corrosion. In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. This type of mirror reflects about 80% of the incident light. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25. They are back silvered, where the reflecting surface is viewed through the glass sheet; this makes the mirror durable, but lowers the image quality of the mirror due to extraneous reflections from the front surface of the glass. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. Most modern mirrors consist of a thin layer of aluminium deposited on a sheet of glass.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. Early mirrors were usually a sheet of polished metal, often silver or copper, for example the Aranmula kannadi. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. In either case, an observer farther from the mirror than you will see your normal orientation directly and in the mirror before you turn, and will then observe that you put your right hand where your left was if you rotate the usual way, or your head where your feet were if you stand on your head. The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. If one rotated about a horizontal axis parallel to the mirror surface, one would appear upside down. There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). The question is sometimes asked, "Why does the mirror reverse left to right and not top to bottom?" The answer is that one has rotated (as is most comfortable) about a vertical axis to face the mirror.

The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). When the rotation is so obvious that it is not worth mentioning, the second component in this decomposition of the effect of the mirror is sometimes emphasized, by saying that a mirror "reverses left and right". As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. In particular, if one looks at one's image in a vertical mirror in left-right orientation, the image corresponds to a rotation by 180° about the vertical axis in the mirror, combined with a reflection in one's approximate symmetry plane. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%. In this case the image of the person is in normal standing orientation and vertically in a normal position, at a horizontally different position and with an orientation rotated about a vertical axis, the latter except if the mirror is parallel to the approximate symmetry plane of the person. In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. This is the case iff the mirror is vertical.

The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures. The image is the most realistic if it is still vertical, i.e., if the rotation is about a vertical axis. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. We can apply this to the image in a mirror of, say, a standing person, because people have approximate bilateral symmetry. Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. For an object with approximate reflection symmetry, a reflection in some mirror plane corresponds to a combination of:. Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is. That is, if the beam of light is shining on a mirror's surface at a 30° angle from vertical, then it reflects from the point of incidence at a 30° angle from vertical in the opposite direction.

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). A beam of light reflects off a mirror at an angle of reflection that is equal to its angle of incidence. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange. Note that spherical concave and convex mirrors do not have a single focal point, as often described in high school physics text books (see spherical aberration in lens (optics) and aberration in optical systems). Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. Finally, there are convex mirrors, where a parallel beam becomes divergent, with the apparent intersection occurring behind the mirror. The total area is 0.88% water. There are also parabolic concave mirrors, where a parallel beam of light becomes a convergent beam, whose rays intersect in the focus of the mirror.

248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. In a plane mirror, a parallel beam of light changes its direction as a whole, whilst still remaining parallel; the images formed by a plane mirror are virtual images, of the same size as the original object (see mirror image). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). . While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects. The most common use is in the home for personal grooming but mirrors are also used in scientific apparatus such as telescopes and lasers, and in industrial machinery. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. The best known example is the plane mirror.

This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. A mirror is a surface with good specular reflection that is smooth enough to form an image. states. a reflection in the approximate symmetry plane of the object (due to the assumption this is a minor change). From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. a translation if the mirror is parallel to the symmetry plane of the object, and otherwise a rotation about the line of intersection of the two planes by an angle which is twice the angle between the two planes. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century.

Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. Walker.

In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s.

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. . The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States.

The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee.
Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Some Milwaukeeans use the unique expression "ainahey", short for "ain't it, hey?" to reaffirm something obvious, used in the same way as "of course", and similar to the colloquial "don'chaknow", short for "don't you know?".

It is also common for people to refer to ATMs as a "Tyme Machine," referring to the name of the dominant debit card in Wisconsin. One well known colloquialism common to Milwaukee and the surrounding area, is the word "bubbler," which refers to a drinking fountain. Timmerman Airport. Lawrence J.

General Mitchell International Airport. List of Milwaukee area radio stations. List of Milwaukee area television stations. Vital Source Magazine.

UWM Post. The Leader. Marquette Tribune. Shepherd Express.

MKE (magazine). Milwaukee Magazine. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Wisconsin Lutheran High School.

Washington High School. Vincent High School. Thomas More. South Division High School.

Rufus King High School. Riverside University High School. Reagan College Preparatory. Pulaski High School.

Professional Learning Institute. Pius XI High School. North Division Virtual University High School. New School for Community Service.

Milwaukee School of Languages. Milwaukee School of Entrepreneurship. Milwaukee Lutheran High School. Milwaukee High School of the Arts.

Metropolitan High School. Marquette University High School. Madison University High School. Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School.

Juneau Business High School. John Marshall High School. Hamilton High School. Divine Savior Holy Angels High School.

Custer High School. Bradley (Lynde & Harry) Technology & Trade High School. Bay View High School. Wisconsin Lutheran College.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Mount Mary College. Milwaukee School of Engineering. Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design.

Milwaukee Area Technical College. Medical College of Wisconsin. Marquette University. Cardinal Stritch University.

Alverno College. Milwaukee County Stadium, 1953-1994. Marquette Stadium, 1952. Wisconsin State Fair Park, 1934-51.

Borchert Field, 1933. Milwaukee Wave United (Outdoor Soccer) 2003 - They only played one season. Milwaukee Rampage (Outdoor Soccer) 1994 - 2002. Milwaukee Mustangs (American football—Arena Football League), played at the Bradley Center from 1994 to 2001.

Milwaukee Does (Basketball—Women's Pro Basketball League), played at MECCA Arena from 1978 to 1980. The Milwaukee Braves won the National League pennant in 1957 and 1958, and won the World Series in 1957. Milwaukee Braves (Baseball—MLB), played at Milwaukee County Stadium from 1953-1965. Louis.

Milwaukee Hawks (Basketball—NBA) played at the Milwaukee Arena from 1951 to 1955 before moving to St. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—Minor League Baseball), member of the American Association from 1902 through 1952, played at Borchert Field. Milwaukee Badgers (American football—NFL), played from 1922 to 1926. Cellular Arena.

Milwaukee Wave (Indoor Soccer) playing at the U.S. Milwaukee Admirals (Ice hockey) playing at the Bradley Center. Milwaukee Bucks (Basketball—NBA) playing at the Bradley Center. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—MLB) playing at Miller Park.

Average July high/low temperatures: 79°F/62°F (26°C/17°C). Average January high/low temperatures: 26°F/11°F (-3°C/-12°C).

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