Mickey Mantle

Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player, regarded as one of the best of all time. He played his entire professional career for the New York Yankees.

Youth

This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Mickey Mantle was born in Spavinaw, Oklahoma. He was named in honor of Mickey Cochrane, the Hall of Fame catcher from the Detroit Tigers, by his father, who was an amateur player and fervent fan. Apparently his father was not aware that Cochrane's real name was Gordon. In later life, Mickey Mantle expressed great relief that his father had not known Cochrane's real first name, as he would have hated to be named Gordon. Mantle always spoke warmly of his beloved father and said he was the bravest man he ever knew. "No boy ever loved his father more," he said. Sadly, his father died of cancer at the age of 39, just as his son was starting his career. Mantle said one of the great heartaches of his life was that he never told his father he loved him.

When Mantle was four years old, the family moved to the nearby town of Commerce, Oklahoma. Mantle was an all-around athlete at Commerce High School, playing basketball and football in addition to his first love, baseball. It was his football playing that nearly ended his athletic career, and indeed his life. Kicked in the shin during a game, Mantle's leg soon became infected with osteomyelitis, a crippling disease that would have been incurable just a few years earlier. A midnight ride to Tulsa enabled Mantle to be treated with newly available penicillin, saving his leg from amputation. He would suffer from the effects of the disease for the rest of his life, and it would lead to many other injuries that hampered his accomplishments. Additionally, Mantle's osteomyelitic condition exempted him from military service, a fact which caused him to become very unpopular with fans, as his earliest days in baseball coincided with the Korean War. This unpopularity, mainly with older fans, would dramatically reverse after he finished second to Roger Maris in the pursuit of Babe Ruth's home run record in 1961. He spent the last years of his career as a wildly popular icon of the entire sport.

Playing career

"Mutt" Mantle taught his son how to be a switch-hitter. Mickey had played shortstop in the minor leagues, but on arrival at the Yankees, he became the regular right fielder (playing only a few games at shortstop and third base in 1952 to 1955). He moved to center field in 1952, replacing Joe DiMaggio, who retired at the end of the 1951 season after one year playing alongside Mantle in the Yankees outfield. He played center field until 1967, when he was moved to first base. Among Mantle's many accomplishments are all-time World Series records for home runs (18), runs scored (42), and runs batted in (40).

Mantle also hit some of the longest home runs in Major League history. On September 10, 1960, he hit a ball that cleared the right-field roof at Tiger Stadium in Detroit and, based on where it was found, was estimated years after the fact to have traveled more than 600 feet, though it probably was closer to 500 feet. Another Mantle homer at Griffith Stadium in Washington on April 17, 1953, was said to have traveled 565 feet. Years later William J. Jenkinson, who specializes on information of long distance homeruns, said that the actual distance was probably 510 feet.

In 1956, Mantle won the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year. This was his "favorite summer," a year that saw him win the Triple Crown, leading the majors with a .353 batting average, 52 HR, and 130 RBI on the way to his first of three MVP awards. Though the American League Triple Crown has been won twice since then, Mantle remains the last man to win the Major League Triple Crown.

On January 16, 1961, Mantle became the highest-paid baseball player by signing a $75,000 contract. DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg and Ted Williams, who had just retired, had been paid over $100,000 in a season, and Ruth had a peak salary of $80,000. But Mantle became the highest-paid active player of his time.

Retirement

Mantle announced his retirement on March 1, 1969, and in 1974, as soon as he was eligible, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; his uniform number 7 was retired by the Yankees. (He had briefly worn uniform number 6, as a continuation of Babe Ruth's 3, Lou Gehrig's 4, and Joe DiMaggio's 5, in 1951, but his poor performance led to his temporary demotion to a minor league in mid-season. When he returned, Bobby Brown, who had worn number 6 before Mantle, had reclaimed it, so Mantle was given number 7. Nowadays, certain future number-retiree manager Joe Torre wears 6, and the 8 belonging to catchers Bill Dickey and Yogi Berra has already been retired - Derek Jeter's 2 may very well also join the list of consecutive retired numbers.) When he retired, the Mick was third on the all-time home run list with 536.

Despite being among the best-paid players of the pre-free agency era, Mantle was a poor businessman, having made several unlucky investments. His lifestyle would be restored to one of luxury, and his hold on his fans raised to an amazing level, by his position of leadership in the sports memorabilia craze that swept the USA beginning in the 1980's. Mantle was a prize guest at any baseball card show, commanding fees far in excess of any other player for his appearances and autographs. This popularity continues long after his death, as Mantle-related items far outsell those of any other player except possibly the unmatched Babe Ruth, whose items, due to the distance of years, now exist in far smaller quantities.

Despite the failure of Mickey Mantle's Country Cookin' restaurants in the early 1970s, Mickey Mantle's Restaurant & Sports Bar opened in New York at 42 Central Park South (59th Street) in 1988. It became one of New York's most popular restaurants, and his original Yankee Stadium Monument Park plaque is displayed at the front entrance. Mantle let others run the business operations, but made frequent appearances. But his drinking led radio show host Don Imus to joke, "If you get to Mickey Mantle's restaurant after midnight, you win a free dinner if you can guess which table Mickey's under."

In 1983, Mantle and Willie Mays took jobs promoting Atlantic City casinos, and were suspended from baseball by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. They were reinstated in 1985 by Kuhn's successor, Peter Ueberroth.

Troubled family

On December 23, 1951, he married Merlyn Johnson in their hometown of Commerce, Oklahoma; they had four sons. In an autobiography, Mantle said he married Merlyn not because he loved her, but because his domineering father told him to. While his drinking became public knowledge during his lifetime, the press kept his many marital infidelities quiet.

The couple had four children, all sons: Mickey Jr. (born in 1953), David (1955), and Billy (1957, whom Mickey named for Billy Martin, his best friend among his Yankee teammates), and Danny (1960). Like Mickey, Merlyn and the sons all became alcoholics, and Billy developed Hodgkin's disease as several previous Mantle men had. This led to him developing a dependence on prescription painkillers.

Mickey Mantle has four grandchildren. Mickey Jr. had a daughter, Mallory. David and his wife Marla have a daughter, Marilyn. Danny and his wife Kay have a son, Will, and a daughter, Chloe. Danny and Will played a father and son watching Mickey, played by Thomas Jane, hit a home run in the 2001 film 61*.

Mickey and Merlyn had been separated for 15 years when he died, but neither ever filed for divorce. Mantle lived with his agent, Greer Johnson. Johnson was taken to federal court in November 1997 by the Mantle family to stop her from auctioning many of Mantle's personal items, including a lock of hair, a neck brace and expired credit cards.

He loved cherry pie and slept with his socks on inside out. During the final years of his life, Mantle purchased a luxury condominium on Lake Oconee near Greensboro, Georgia, near Greer Johnson's home, and freqently stayed there for months at the time. He occasionally attended the local Methodist church, and sometimes ate Sunday dinner with members of the congregation. He was well-liked by the citizens of Greensboro, and seemed to like them in return. This was probably because the town respected Mantle's privacy, refusing either to talk about their famous neighbor to outsiders or to direct fans to his home. In one interview, Mickey stated that the people of Greensboro had "gone out of their way to make me feel welcome, and I've found something there I haven't enjoyed since I was a kid."

Mantle's last days

Well before he finally sought treatment for alcoholism, Mantle admitted that his hard living had hurt his playing and his family. His rationale was that the men in his family had all died young, so he expected to as well. "I'm not gonna be cheated," he'd say. As the years passed, and he realized he had outlived the men in his family -- not realizing that working in mines and inhaling lead and zinc dust aided Hodgkin's and other cancers as much as heredity did -- he frequently used a line popularized by elderly comedian George Burns: "If I'd known I was gonna live this long, I'd have taken a lot better care of myself."

Mantle's wife and sons all completed treatment for alcoholism, and told him he needed to do the same. He checked into the Betty Ford Clinic on January 7, 1994, after being told by a doctor that his liver was so badly damaged, "Your next drink could be your last."

Shortly after completing treatment, his son Billy died on March 12, at age 36, of heart trouble, brought on by years of substance abuse. Despite the fears of those who knew him, who feared that this tragedy would send him back to drinking, he remained sober. Mickey Jr. would also die of liver cancer on December 20, 2000, at age 47. Danny would later battle prostate cancer.

Mantle spoke with great remorse of his drinking in a Sports Illustrated article, "My Life In A Bottle." He said that he was telling the same old stories, and realizing how much of them involved himself and others being drunk, and he decided they weren't funny anymore. He admitted he had often been cruel and hurtful to family, friends, and fans because of his alcoholism, and sought to make amends. He became a born-again Christian due to his former teammate Bobby Richardson, an ordained Baptist minister, sharing his faith with him. After the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, he joined with fellow Oklahoman and Yankee legend Bobby Murcer to raise money for the victims.

Mantle received a liver transplant at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, on June 8, 1995, after his liver had been damaged by years of chronic alcoholism, cirrhosis, and hepatitis C. In July, he had recovered enough to deliver a press conference at Baylor, and noted that many fans had looked to him as a role model. "This is a role model: Don't be like me," he said. He also established the Mickey Mantle Foundation to raise awareness for organ donations. Soon, he was back in the hospital, where it was found that his liver cancer spread throughout his body.

Mickey Mantle died on August 13, 1995, at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. He was 63 years old. He was interred in the Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery in Dallas. Mantle had asked country singer Roy Clark, his good friend, to perform his favorite song "Yesterday, When I Was Young" at his funeral:

In eulogizing Mantle, Bob Costas described the legend as "a fragile hero to whom we had an emotional attachment so strong and lasting that it defied logic. In the last years of his life, Mickey Mantle, always so hard on himself, finally began to appreciate the difference between a role model and a hero. The first, he often was not. The last, he forever will be. And, in the end, people got it kid."

Honors

On Mickey Mantle Day, June 8, 1969, in addition to the retirement of his uniform number 7, Mantle was given a plaque that would hang on the center field wall at Yankee Stadium, near the monuments to Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Miller Huggins. The plaque was given to him by Joe DiMaggio, and Mantle then gave DiMaggio a similar plaque, telling the crowd, "His should be just a little bit higher than mine." When Yankee Stadium was reopened in 1976 following its renovation, the plaques and monuments were moved to Monument Park, behind the left-center field fence. Shortly before his death, Mantle videotaped a message to be played on Old-Timers' Day, which he was too ill to attend. He said, "When I died, I wanted on my tombstone, 'A great teammate.' But I didn't think it would be this soon." The words were indeed carved on the plaque marking his resting place at the family mausoleum in Dallas. On August 25, 1996, about a year after his death, Mantle's Monument Park plaque was replaced with a monument, bearing the words "A great teammate" and keeping a phrase that had been included on the original plaque: "A magnificent Yankee who left a legacy of unequaled courage."

Mantle and former teammate Whitey Ford were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame together in 1974, Mantle in his first year of eligibility, Ford in his second. In 1999, The Sporting News placed Mantle at number 17 on their list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players. That same year, he was one of 100 nominees for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team, and was chosen by fan balloting as one of the Team's outfielders. While most fans who remember them both tend to rate Willie Mays as a better player than Mantle, Mantle remains the most popular player of the 1950s and 1960s, even as Mays, Hank Aaron and others outlived him by many years.

In 2006, Mantle will be featured on a United States postage stamp [1]. The stamp is one of a series of four honoring Baseball Sluggers.


Present

Mickey Mantle has some decendents in Wichita, Kansas. The decendents own Campbell Castle or The Castle Inn.


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The decendents own Campbell Castle or The Castle Inn. This version is rumoured to be released in 2006. Mickey Mantle has some decendents in Wichita, Kansas. Recent signtings of the mk 4 suggest that it will be more in line with the mk 2 as the size of the car has once again increased.
. However, the MR2 was discontinued after the 2005 model year. The stamp is one of a series of four honoring Baseball Sluggers. There was speculation that the 2005 model could be a hybrid car.

In 2006, Mantle will be featured on a United States postage stamp [1]. Many had hoped that Toyota would continue MR2 production because the leap along the price-axis to the next alternatives (Porsche Boxster, Lotus Elise and Exige, Honda NSX) is so large that many enthusiasts would have to settle for a front-engined car, should the MR2 be discontinued. While most fans who remember them both tend to rate Willie Mays as a better player than Mantle, Mantle remains the most popular player of the 1950s and 1960s, even as Mays, Hank Aaron and others outlived him by many years. Toyota is cutting down its selection of sports cars and replacing them with less aggressive "sports packages" offered on their more sedate cars. That same year, he was one of 100 nominees for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team, and was chosen by fan balloting as one of the Team's outfielders. For two decades, the MR2 has been a delight to car enthusiasts around the world, offering an affordable way to experience the marvellous handling of a mid-engine sports car. In 1999, The Sporting News placed Mantle at number 17 on their list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players. [4] The ZZW30 sold just 7,233 units in its debut year, falling to 6,254 in 2001 and 4,705 in 2002.

Mantle and former teammate Whitey Ford were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame together in 1974, Mantle in his first year of eligibility, Ford in his second. In July 2004, Toyota announced that the MR2 would be discontinued in the US at the end of the 2005 model year because of increasing competition and lack of sales. On August 25, 1996, about a year after his death, Mantle's Monument Park plaque was replaced with a monument, bearing the words "A great teammate" and keeping a phrase that had been included on the original plaque: "A magnificent Yankee who left a legacy of unequaled courage.". For 2004, the body was strengthened, adding 10 kg to the vehicle's weight. He said, "When I died, I wanted on my tombstone, 'A great teammate.' But I didn't think it would be this soon." The words were indeed carved on the plaque marking his resting place at the family mausoleum in Dallas. The suspension was uprated with new springs and shock absorbers and a brace was added to the bottom of the car to improve rigidity. Shortly before his death, Mantle videotaped a message to be played on Old-Timers' Day, which he was too ill to attend. The rear wheels were increased to 16" while the front ones remained 15", and both transmissions received an additional gear.

The plaque was given to him by Joe DiMaggio, and Mantle then gave DiMaggio a similar plaque, telling the crowd, "His should be just a little bit higher than mine." When Yankee Stadium was reopened in 1976 following its renovation, the plaques and monuments were moved to Monument Park, behind the left-center field fence. The air intakes on the sides of the car were now color coded and the interior was modified with new seats and a gauge cluster. On Mickey Mantle Day, June 8, 1969, in addition to the retirement of his uniform number 7, Mantle was given a plaque that would hang on the center field wall at Yankee Stadium, near the monuments to Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Miller Huggins. For 2003, the ZZW30 received some exterior changes, including a new front bumper, front and rear lights, a new rear grille, and the computer also received an upgrade allowing the gears to change and engage much quicker than the pre-2003 models which were equipped with the sequential transmission. And, in the end, people got it kid.". The MR-S was originally introduced in October of 1999 and received a sequential transmission in August 2000. The last, he forever will be. Although it lost, the ZZW30 proved the top-class handling abilities of the ZZW30.

The first, he often was not. However, the driver of the ZZW30, Manabu Orido, allowed the other vehicles (a much higher powered S15 Silvia, S14 Silvia, and Amuse S2000) to catch up and ended in the ZZW30 losing to the much quicker S15 Silvia. In the last years of his life, Mickey Mantle, always so hard on himself, finally began to appreciate the difference between a role model and a hero. Turbo", the Techno Spirits ZZW30, outdrove several more powerful cars. In eulogizing Mantle, Bob Costas described the legend as "a fragile hero to whom we had an emotional attachment so strong and lasting that it defied logic. During a comparison test during a Japanese motorsports show, "NA vs. Mantle had asked country singer Roy Clark, his good friend, to perform his favorite song "Yesterday, When I Was Young" at his funeral:. Although some complained of the relative lack of power the vehicle had, many owners have recently discovered a way to switch out the 1ZZ-FE engine in exchange for the 2ZZ-GE, bringing up the power to 190 hp, drastically bringing up the accelerating properties of the ZZW30.

He was interred in the Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery in Dallas. For example, Tiff Needell, a very experienced race driver and the former host of the BBC TV show Top Gear, praised the handling of the ZZW30. He was 63 years old. The ZZW30 is considered to be the best-handling MR2. Mickey Mantle died on August 13, 1995, at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. All agreed, however, that the ZZW30 had nearly perfect handling, allowing one to brake into corners and throw the car through the corner in slight drift. Soon, he was back in the hospital, where it was found that his liver cancer spread throughout his body. The feedback for the new model was somewhat mixed - others liked its return to the AW11's design concept, while the fans of the SW20 would've liked it to continue along the path of the previous model.

He also established the Mickey Mantle Foundation to raise awareness for organ donations. In addition to the 5-speed manual transmission, a sequential transmission controllable from the steering wheel was also available. "This is a role model: Don't be like me," he said. The 140 hp (104 kW) maximum power was quite a drop from the SW20 GT, but thanks to the lightness of the car it could move quite quickly, accelerating from 0 to 100 km/h in 7.5 to 7.9 s. In July, he had recovered enough to deliver a press conference at Baylor, and noted that many fans had looked to him as a role model. Unlike its predecessors, however, the engine was placed onto the car the other way round, making the exhaust manifold point towards the rear of the car. Mantle received a liver transplant at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, on June 8, 1995, after his liver had been damaged by years of chronic alcoholism, cirrhosis, and hepatitis C. The intake camshaft's timing was adjustable via the VVT-i system, which was introduced earlier on the 1998 SW20.

Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, he joined with fellow Oklahoman and Yankee legend Bobby Murcer to raise money for the victims. Like its predecessors, the engine used dual overhead camshafts and 16 valves. After the bombing of the Alfred P. The engine of the ZZW30 was the brand-new all-aluminium 1ZZ-FE, a 1794 cc I4. He became a born-again Christian due to his former teammate Bobby Richardson, an ordained Baptist minister, sharing his faith with him. Toyota changed the American name to "MR2 Spyder" reportedly because the idea of a car with the nickname of "Mrs." would sound funny. He admitted he had often been cruel and hurtful to family, friends, and fans because of his alcoholism, and sought to make amends. In Japan, the car is called the MR-S, which purportedly is derived from the forementioned designation.

Mantle spoke with great remorse of his drinking in a Sports Illustrated article, "My Life In A Bottle." He said that he was telling the same old stories, and realizing how much of them involved himself and others being drunk, and he decided they weren't funny anymore. The biggest change was, however, the replacement of either the solid or targa top with a convertible soft top, giving the car the 'Spyder' designation. Danny would later battle prostate cancer. The new MR2 was, in a way, return to the design concept of the AW11 since the weight of the car was once again dropped below a metric ton and it was significantly smaller than the SW20. would also die of liver cancer on December 20, 2000, at age 47. After having been in the market for almost ten years, the SW20 had to move aside as Toyota released the new MR2, designated ZZW30. Mickey Jr. Very little is known about these cars outside of Japan.[3].

Despite the fears of those who knew him, who feared that this tragedy would send him back to drinking, he remained sober. The car track width is extended and body dimensions dramatically changing the cars overall visuals, giving the car a "supercar" look, and also better handling and weight reduction. Shortly after completing treatment, his son Billy died on March 12, at age 36, of heart trouble, brought on by years of substance abuse. In many respects the extended body can be compared to that of a Porsche Turbo widebody. He checked into the Betty Ford Clinic on January 7, 1994, after being told by a doctor that his liver was so badly damaged, "Your next drink could be your last.". It is unknown how many original (non factory replica) cars still exist today. Mantle's wife and sons all completed treatment for alcoholism, and told him he needed to do the same. This makes these officially built TRD2000GTs the rarest of all MR2s and ultimately the most sought after and difficult to find.

As the years passed, and he realized he had outlived the men in his family -- not realizing that working in mines and inhaling lead and zinc dust aided Hodgkin's and other cancers as much as heredity did -- he frequently used a line popularized by elderly comedian George Burns: "If I'd known I was gonna live this long, I'd have taken a lot better care of myself.". Only 3 complete cars are known to have been shipped into Europe with only 10 complete kit conversions allocated to TRD USA for the entire American market. "I'm not gonna be cheated," he'd say. TRD Japan never sold body parts for third-party conversion separately (except rear wing), they transformed complete cars. His rationale was that the men in his family had all died young, so he expected to as well. Some cars left the factory boasting up to 500 PS (493 hp/368 kW) and less than 1100 kg (2425 lb) for a very impressive power to weight ratio. Well before he finally sought treatment for alcoholism, Mantle admitted that his hard living had hurt his playing and his family. Virtually every car converted also had other TRD parts fitted too including extensive changes to both the suspension and engine.

In one interview, Mickey stated that the people of Greensboro had "gone out of their way to make me feel welcome, and I've found something there I haven't enjoyed since I was a kid.". All official TRD2000GT's had a 60 mm (2.4 in) wider front and rear track which improved handling considerably over the original suspension design. This was probably because the town respected Mantle's privacy, refusing either to talk about their famous neighbor to outsiders or to direct fans to his home. Each official car converted was made using lightweight fibreglass components (in place of heavy steel original parts, front wings/fenders, boot lid, rear quarter panels, front and rear bumpers, etc.) and re-classified as completely new cars (with their own specially numbered TRD vin plate rivited to the body to indicate their authenticity and rarity). He was well-liked by the citizens of Greensboro, and seemed to like them in return. In order to ensure exclusivity, a high price tag was charged and total of just 35 factory car conversions where completed by Toyota Technocraft Ltd. He occasionally attended the local Methodist church, and sometimes ate Sunday dinner with members of the congregation. Toyota also did the same with their Supra Twin Turbo model, offering a conversion service to transform these cars into a TRD3000GT[2].

During the final years of his life, Mantle purchased a luxury condominium on Lake Oconee near Greensboro, Georgia, near Greer Johnson's home, and freqently stayed there for months at the time. This was to pay homage to the wins by their TRD2000GTs in the GT-C Japanese racing series, the TRD2000GT racing series cars where based on the SW20 floorpan. He loved cherry pie and slept with his socks on inside out. In 1998, Toyota Racing Development [1] offered an official kit body conversion and tuning programme for Japanese Domestic Market (JDM) owners to transform their existing SW20 MR2 into a widebody TRD2000GT kit replica car. Johnson was taken to federal court in November 1997 by the Mantle family to stop her from auctioning many of Mantle's personal items, including a lock of hair, a neck brace and expired credit cards. Some of these V6 MR2 owners have claimed to have been able complete the swap within the price range of $2,500 USD without the labor. Mantle lived with his agent, Greer Johnson. The 1MZFE motor that comes from the V6 powered Solara and Camry, has quickly become a popular modification as it is relatively cheap and easy to modify to.

Mickey and Merlyn had been separated for 15 years when he died, but neither ever filed for divorce. The SW20 has become a major collector's car since the 2003 Ultimate Street Car Challenge win of Brad Bedell and his yellow V6-powered MR2. Danny and Will played a father and son watching Mickey, played by Thomas Jane, hit a home run in the 2001 film 61*. All models also received new wheels, optional Recaro seats, and a three-way adjustable rear spoiler. Danny and his wife Kay have a son, Will, and a daughter, Chloe. This, and some other changes improved the engine's power output to a respectable 198 hp (148 kW). David and his wife Marla have a daughter, Marilyn. While the turbocharged engine remained the same, in JDM models the normally aspirated 3S-GE engine was equipped with Toyota's VVT-i system which allowed the timing of the intake camshafts to be modified according to the engine's rotation speed and load.

had a daughter, Mallory. On the SW20's last production year in 1999, the car was updated with a few significant changes. Mickey Jr. In 1996, the front and side signals were changed to use a clear lens but no other modifications were made. Mickey Mantle has four grandchildren. The side stripes and skirts were also color coded. This led to him developing a dependence on prescription painkillers. The original three-piece rear spoiler was replaced with the lighter one-piece spoiler which attached only to the trunklid.

Like Mickey, Merlyn and the sons all became alcoholics, and Billy developed Hodgkin's disease as several previous Mantle men had. New round taillights and a color-coded center panel replaced the old square-shaped lights and the rear grille. (born in 1953), David (1955), and Billy (1957, whom Mickey named for Billy Martin, his best friend among his Yankee teammates), and Danny (1960). Having been an option earlier, a limited-slip differential was introduced as standard on all turbocharged models. The couple had four children, all sons: Mickey Jr. The normally aspirated 3S-GE received fewer changes but still improved its maximum power to 172 hp (128.3 kW). While his drinking became public knowledge during his lifetime, the press kept his many marital infidelities quiet. For 3S-GTE the use a MAP-sensor, the removal T-VIS in favor of smaller intake ports and the new CT20B turbocharger increased the maximum power to 240 hp (179 kW).

In an autobiography, Mantle said he married Merlyn not because he loved her, but because his domineering father told him to. The next big change occurred in 1994, when SW20 received all-new engines for each model and some considerable changes to its exterior. On December 23, 1951, he married Merlyn Johnson in their hometown of Commerce, Oklahoma; they had four sons. Some shifting problems which plagued the first revisions were remedied with stronger synchronization rings. They were reinstated in 1985 by Kuhn's successor, Peter Ueberroth. Along with the suspension changes, the SW20 also got new 15" wheels to fit the larger brakes that were also introduced. In 1983, Mantle and Willie Mays took jobs promoting Atlantic City casinos, and were suspended from baseball by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. To respond to the feedback they had received, Toyota changed the 1993 model to include wider rear tires and changed the rear suspension, mainly the vehicle's height, shock absorbing properties and a larger rear crossmember, so that the car would be more prone to understeer, thus making it more difficult to push the car into "snap oversteer".

But his drinking led radio show host Don Imus to joke, "If you get to Mickey Mantle's restaurant after midnight, you win a free dinner if you can guess which table Mickey's under.". Some magazines made overstatements where they claimed that the SW20 was downright dangerous to drive. Mantle let others run the business operations, but made frequent appearances. This trait was not considered very desirable among the press, because the MR2, unlike expensive supercars, was priced so that even "average people" were able to buy one. It became one of New York's most popular restaurants, and his original Yankee Stadium Monument Park plaque is displayed at the front entrance. This made the SW20's cornering abilities quite excellent, but it was much too easy for an inexperienced driver to make a mistake, leading to sudden oversteer (also called "snap oversteer") which can result in a spin unless the driver reacts both quickly and correctly. Despite the failure of Mickey Mantle's Country Cookin' restaurants in the early 1970s, Mickey Mantle's Restaurant & Sports Bar opened in New York at 42 Central Park South (59th Street) in 1988. Toyota's goal was to make the car's suspension geometry work the same way that true supercars do.

This popularity continues long after his death, as Mantle-related items far outsell those of any other player except possibly the unmatched Babe Ruth, whose items, due to the distance of years, now exist in far smaller quantities. The SW20's entry to the market was not quite as smooth as the AW11's. Mantle was a prize guest at any baseball card show, commanding fees far in excess of any other player for his appearances and autographs. The Japanese MR2 GT model was able to accelerate from 0-100 km/h in a stunning 5.9 to 6.2 s. His lifestyle would be restored to one of luxury, and his hold on his fans raised to an amazing level, by his position of leadership in the sports memorabilia craze that swept the USA beginning in the 1980's. The most powerful engine was the turbocharged 3S-GTE, which was again only available in Japan at 220 hp (164 kW) (as the MR2 GT) and the USA at 200 hp (149 kW) (as the MR2 Turbo) so Europeans had to settle with the naturally-aspirated 156 hp (116 kW) 3S-GE engine. Despite being among the best-paid players of the pre-free agency era, Mantle was a poor businessman, having made several unlucky investments. All engines were 2000 cc I4 engines with DOHC and 16 valves, excluding the naturally-aspirated US model which used the 2200 cc 5S-FE engine.

Nowadays, certain future number-retiree manager Joe Torre wears 6, and the 8 belonging to catchers Bill Dickey and Yogi Berra has already been retired - Derek Jeter's 2 may very well also join the list of consecutive retired numbers.) When he retired, the Mick was third on the all-time home run list with 536. When the SW20 went on sale in spring 1990, it was offered with four different engine choices depending on the market area. When he returned, Bobby Brown, who had worn number 6 before Mantle, had reclaimed it, so Mantle was given number 7. Since the resemblance between the Ferrari 348tb and the Ferrari F355 and the new MR2 was quite striking, the SW20 is sometimes referred to as a "poor man's Ferrari". (He had briefly worn uniform number 6, as a continuation of Babe Ruth's 3, Lou Gehrig's 4, and Joe DiMaggio's 5, in 1951, but his poor performance led to his temporary demotion to a minor league in mid-season. While the AW11 was a pure sports car, made in the spirit of Lotuses, the SW20, being quite larger, could be classed as a GT-car. Mantle announced his retirement on March 1, 1969, and in 1974, as soon as he was eligible, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; his uniform number 7 was retired by the Yankees. The new MR2, designated SW20 (in America the chassis codes were SW20 for the turbocharged model and SW21 for the naturally-aspirated model), was longer, wider and heavier than its predecessor and had smoother bodylines.

But Mantle became the highest-paid active player of his time. The MR2 went through a complete redesigned in 1989, when the new Mk II body was produced. DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg and Ted Williams, who had just retired, had been paid over $100,000 in a season, and Ruth had a peak salary of $80,000. http://www.padandwheels.com/mr2/index.html. On January 16, 1961, Mantle became the highest-paid baseball player by signing a $75,000 contract. http://shell.deru.com/~sgn1/AW11/Mkifaq.htm. Though the American League Triple Crown has been won twice since then, Mantle remains the last man to win the Major League Triple Crown. http://shell.deru.com/~sgn1/AW11/4age.htm.

This was his "favorite summer," a year that saw him win the Triple Crown, leading the majors with a .353 batting average, 52 HR, and 130 RBI on the way to his first of three MVP awards. http://www.benreedjohnson.com. In 1956, Mantle won the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year. http://www.mr2oc.com. Jenkinson, who specializes on information of long distance homeruns, said that the actual distance was probably 510 feet. For more information about the Mark I visit these websites:. Years later William J. The MR2 was on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 1986 and 1987.

Another Mantle homer at Griffith Stadium in Washington on April 17, 1953, was said to have traveled 565 feet. In 2004, Sports Car International named the MR2 number eight on the list of Top Sports Cars of the 1980s. On September 10, 1960, he hit a ball that cleared the right-field roof at Tiger Stadium in Detroit and, based on where it was found, was estimated years after the fact to have traveled more than 600 feet, though it probably was closer to 500 feet. The MR2 was Motor Trend's Import Car of the Year for 1985. Mantle also hit some of the longest home runs in Major League history. The Australian Wheels magazine chose the 1988 AW11 as its favourite sports car. Among Mantle's many accomplishments are all-time World Series records for home runs (18), runs scored (42), and runs batted in (40). American car magazines Road & Track and Car and Driver both chose the AW11 on their lists of ten best cars which included some tough competition, such as the Ferrari Testarossa.

He played center field until 1967, when he was moved to first base. The press received the AW11 with open arms and praised its innovation, great feeling, and responsive engine. He moved to center field in 1952, replacing Joe DiMaggio, who retired at the end of the 1951 season after one year playing alongside Mantle in the Yankees outfield. Unfortunately, this model was never sold in European markets, although some cars were privately imported. Mickey had played shortstop in the minor leagues, but on arrival at the Yankees, he became the regular right fielder (playing only a few games at shortstop and third base in 1952 to 1955). In addition to the new engine, the MR2 SC was also equipped with stiffer stabilizer bars and reinforcements in the bodyshell to improve rigidity. "Mutt" Mantle taught his son how to be a switch-hitter. The engine produced a maximum power of 145 hp (108 kW) and accelerated the small car from 0 to 100 km/h (0 to 60 mph) in 6.7 to 7.0s.

He spent the last years of his career as a wildly popular icon of the entire sport. Based on the same block and head, the 4A-GZE was equipped with a roots-type supercharger and therefore the compression ratio, valve timing and ports were modified. This unpopularity, mainly with older fans, would dramatically reverse after he finished second to Roger Maris in the pursuit of Babe Ruth's home run record in 1961. In 1988, Toyota brought a new choice for an engine for people longing for more power. Additionally, Mantle's osteomyelitic condition exempted him from military service, a fact which caused him to become very unpopular with fans, as his earliest days in baseball coincided with the Korean War. Some further changes were made to the exterior the following year, but more notable were the addition of larger brakes and a heavier C52 transmission which replaced the older C50. He would suffer from the effects of the disease for the rest of his life, and it would lead to many other injuries that hampered his accomplishments. Other new options included a leather interior and a four-speed automatic transmission.

A midnight ride to Tulsa enabled Mantle to be treated with newly available penicillin, saving his leg from amputation. The exterior was modified by color-coding the bumpers and side stripes, adding small side skirts and a translucent spoiler to the rear of the roof. Kicked in the shin during a game, Mantle's leg soon became infected with osteomyelitis, a crippling disease that would have been incurable just a few years earlier. The most important addition was probably having the option of a removable targa top, not available in the US. It was his football playing that nearly ended his athletic career, and indeed his life. For the 1986 model year, the AW11 went through several changes which affected both its looks and performance. Mantle was an all-around athlete at Commerce High School, playing basketball and football in addition to his first love, baseball. There was also a JDM model AW10 which used the more economical 1500 cc 3A-U engine, but it didn't gain too much popularity.

When Mantle was four years old, the family moved to the nearby town of Commerce, Oklahoma. The engine had already been introduced earlier on the sportier Toyota AE86 Sprinter Trueno, gathering a lot of positive publicity. Mantle said one of the great heartaches of his life was that he never told his father he loved him. US-spec engines were rated at 112 hp (84 kW), Euro-spec at 124 hp (93 kW). Sadly, his father died of cancer at the age of 39, just as his son was starting his career. The engine was also equipped with a Bosch L-Jetronic type multi-point fuel injection and a variable intake geometry (T-VIS), giving the engine a maximum power output of 128 hp (95 kW). "No boy ever loved his father more," he said. As a powerplant, Toyota chose to use the 4A-GE 1600 cc I4 engine with two overhead camshafts which allowed the use of 16 valves for a better gas flow through the combustion chamber.

Mantle always spoke warmly of his beloved father and said he was the bravest man he ever knew. Toyota's cooperation with Lotus during the prototype phase can be seen in the AW11, and it owes much to Lotus's legendary sports cars of the 1960s and 1970s. In later life, Mickey Mantle expressed great relief that his father had not known Cochrane's real first name, as he would have hated to be named Gordon. Its behavior mimics that of highly expensive supercars and is easy to control and nimble in its movements. Apparently his father was not aware that Cochrane's real name was Gordon. Thanks to these features, the AW11 is considered by many to be very enjoyable to drive. He was named in honor of Mickey Cochrane, the Hall of Fame catcher from the Detroit Tigers, by his father, who was an amateur player and fervent fan. The most important features of the AW11 were its light body, superior handling and relatively powerful, small-displacement engine.

Mickey Mantle was born in Spavinaw, Oklahoma. The two-seat MR2 was definitely not practical as a family car, but the design criteria were different from that of most previous cars. . The small and light MR2, designated AW11, was perhaps something no one had expected from any of the Japanese car manufacturers, known for their economical and practical cars. He played his entire professional career for the New York Yankees. The car, scheduled to be launched in spring 1984 in the Japanese market under the name MR2 (initially standing for "Midship Runabout, 2-seater" but later claimed to be "Mid-engine, Rear-wheel drive, 2-seater") was to become the first mass-produced mid-engined car to come from a Japanese manufacturer. Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player, regarded as one of the best of all time. Toyota made its SV-3 concept car public in the autumn of 1983 at the Tokyo Motor Show, gathering a huge amount of publicity both from the press and the audience.

A significant amount of testing was performed on actual race circuits such as Willow Springs, where former Formula One driver Dan Gurney tested the car. From its base design, the car began evolving into an actual sports car, and further prototypes were tested intensely both in Japan and in California. The result was the first prototype in 1981, dubbed the SA-X. It was finally decided to place the engine transversely in the middle of the car.

The actual designwork began in 1979 when Akio Yoshida from Toyota's testing department started to evaluate different alternatives for engine placement and drive method. Initially, the purpose of the project was not a sports car. The MR2's life began in 1976 when Toyota launched a design project with the goal of producing a car which would be both enjoyable to drive, yet still provide decent fuel economy. .

The MR2 was eventually designed by Toyota with Lotus engineer Roger Becker involved on its suspension and handling. the X100) project was scrapped and Lotus was later bought out by GM. Actually the Lotus M90 (a.k.a. It is a common misconception that the MR2 was Lotus designed, but assembled and distributed by Toyota.

Thus, the car was sold there only as the MR. When said in French, the name MR2 [ɛm ɛʀ ˈdø] sounds like merde [ˈmɛʀd] (fr: shit). The latest version was called the Toyota MR-S in Japan, the Toyota MR2 Spyder in the United States, and the Toyota MR2 Roadster in Europe. The Toyota MR2 was a two-seat, mid-engined, rear wheel drive sports car produced by Toyota from 1984 to 2005.

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