Max

For other uses, see Max (disambiguation). A Max/MSP patch written and used by Autechre

Max is a graphical development environment for music and multimedia developed and maintained by San Francisco-based software company Cycling'74. It has been used for over fifteen years by composers, performers, software designers, researchers and artists interested in creating interactive software.

The Max program itself is highly modular, with most routines existing in the form of shared libraries. An API allows third-party development of new routines (called "external objects"). As a result, Max has a large userbase of programmers not affiliated with Cycling'74 who enhance the software with commercial and non-commercial extensions to the program. Because of its extensible design and graphical interface (which in a novel way represents the program structure and the GUI as presented to the user simultaneously), Max is widely regarded as the lingua franca for developing interactive music performance software.

History

Max was originally written by Miller Puckette at IRCAM in the 1980s to give composers access to an authoring system for interactive computer music. In the early 1990s a commercial version of the program (developed and extended by David Zicarelli) was released by Opcode Systems. The current commercial version of Max has been distributed by Zicarelli's company, Cycling'74, since 1999.

Max has a number of extensions and incarnations; most notably, a set of audio extensions to the software appeared in 1997. Called MSP, this "add-on" package for Max allowed for the manipulation of digital audio signals in real-time, allowing users to create their own synthesizers and effects processors (Max had previously been designed to interface with hardware synthesizers, samplers, etc. as a "control" language using MIDI or some other protocol). A second major package called Jitter was released in 2003, adding real-time video, 3-D, and matrix processing capability to the software.

In addition, a number of sibling and Max-like programs exist. IRCAM developed and maintained a concurrent version of Max for the NeXT (and later SGI and Linux), called Max/FTS (FTS standing for "Faster Than Sound", and being analogous to a forerunner to MSP enhanced by a hardware DSP board on the computer). A later version of the program was developed in Java (jMax) and is open-source. Puckette himself released an entirely re-designed program in the mid-1990s called Pd ("pure data", alternately "public domain"), which has a number of fundamental differences from the IRCAM original. Native Instruments markets a similar software called Reaktor. Reaktor is generally considered easier to use and learn than Max, albeit less powerful.

Apple has a very similar program called Quartz Composer focused on graphical compositions

Max Mathews

Max is named for Max Mathews, and can be considered a descendant of MUSIC, though its graphical nature disguises that fact. Additionally, the real-time image processing capability of Max also makes it the first MUSIC-N program capable of doing other things than music.

A large number of people use Max, even if they aren't aware of it. Max documents (called patchers) can be bundled into standalone applications and distributed free or sold commercially. In addition, Max can be used to author audio plugin software for major audio production systems.

With the increased integration of laptop computers into live music performance (in electronic music and elsewhere), Max/MSP and Max/Jitter have received quite a bit of attention as the development environment of choice for those serious about laptop music / laptop video performance.

Notable artists

  • Autechre
  • Monolake
  • Kit Clayton
  • Leafcutter John
  • Kevin Blechdom
  • Jamie Lidell
  • R. Luke DuBois / The Freight Elevator Quartet
  • Pauline Oliveros
  • Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead

Many other artists use Max/MSP/Jitter, but prefer not to mention it. For more on this subject, see this discussion on the Max/MSP mailing list.


This page about Max includes information from a Wikipedia article.
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For more on this subject, see this discussion on the Max/MSP mailing list. The brand product Cup-a-Soup is served in a mug, despite the title including the word cup. Many other artists use Max/MSP/Jitter, but prefer not to mention it. The solution to drinking from a puzzle mug is often to cover up all the holes or to discover a hidden method of drinking, such as drinking through a hollow handle. With the increased integration of laptop computers into live music performance (in electronic music and elsewhere), Max/MSP and Max/Jitter have received quite a bit of attention as the development environment of choice for those serious about laptop music / laptop video performance. It will usually have several holes in it, making it impossible to drink from in the normal way. In addition, Max can be used to author audio plugin software for major audio production systems. A puzzle mug is a novelty mug that is counter-intuitive to drink from.

Max documents (called patchers) can be bundled into standalone applications and distributed free or sold commercially. Sublimation is an easy way of doing this and readily available on ebay. A large number of people use Max, even if they aren't aware of it. It can also be custom printed. Additionally, the real-time image processing capability of Max also makes it the first MUSIC-N program capable of doing other things than music. It may or may not be a vacuum flask, but is usually well insulated and completely enclosed, with an easily closed opening on the top for drinking and a handle on the side. Max is named for Max Mathews, and can be considered a descendant of MUSIC, though its graphical nature disguises that fact. A travel mug is a variation on the traditional mug that is better for transporting hot liquids.

Apple has a very similar program called Quartz Composer focused on graphical compositions. Mugs are usually made of porcelain (china) but some are made of Pyrex and some (usually intended for campers) are made of plastic, steel, or enameled metal. Reaktor is generally considered easier to use and learn than Max, albeit less powerful. In polite society, a tea cup is the preferred method of serving tea and sometimes coffee (then called a coffee cup). Native Instruments markets a similar software called Reaktor. The mug is usually used in less formal settings. Puckette himself released an entirely re-designed program in the mid-1990s called Pd ("pure data", alternately "public domain"), which has a number of fundamental differences from the IRCAM original. A mug or coffee mug is a sturdily built type of ceramic cup often used for hot beverages, such as coffee, tea, and hot chocolate.

A later version of the program was developed in Java (jMax) and is open-source. Coli bacteria. IRCAM developed and maintained a concurrent version of Max for the NeXT (and later SGI and Linux), called Max/FTS (FTS standing for "Faster Than Sound", and being analogous to a forerunner to MSP enhanced by a hardware DSP board on the computer). MUG is also an acronym for 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide, a chemical used to test for the presence of E. In addition, a number of sibling and Max-like programs exist. Games are usually referred to as MUGS when they use their own unique code and Command Line Interface, although a more common acronym is MUD (Multi User Dungeon, Dimension or Domain). A second major package called Jitter was released in 2003, adding real-time video, 3-D, and matrix processing capability to the software. MUG is an acronym for Multi User Game, a less specific classification for an online roleplaying game than others in the MU* genre.

as a "control" language using MIDI or some other protocol). MUG is an acronym for Male Unbifurcated Garment, a generic term for any type of skirt, such as a kilt or sarong, designed to be worn by a man. Called MSP, this "add-on" package for Max allowed for the manipulation of digital audio signals in real-time, allowing users to create their own synthesizers and effects processors (Max had previously been designed to interface with hardware synthesizers, samplers, etc. A gambler who makes ill-informed decisions, such as betting larger and larger amounts in order to recover previous losses, is sometimes referred to as a "mug". Max has a number of extensions and incarnations; most notably, a set of audio extensions to the software appeared in 1997. a mug of water.). The current commercial version of Max has been distributed by Zicarelli's company, Cycling'74, since 1999. The quantity mug identifies the amount of something that can be stored inside a mug (e.g.

In the early 1990s a commercial version of the program (developed and extended by David Zicarelli) was released by Opcode Systems. Reference to someone's face, as in mug shot, being a picture of the face, or ugly mug. Max was originally written by Miller Puckette at IRCAM in the 1980s to give composers access to an authoring system for interactive computer music. See spedders wig and saperia. . Mug can also be used to mean chump. Because of its extensible design and graphical interface (which in a novel way represents the program structure and the GUI as presented to the user simultaneously), Max is widely regarded as the lingua franca for developing interactive music performance software. To mug can mean to assault with intent to rob, see mugging.

As a result, Max has a large userbase of programmers not affiliated with Cycling'74 who enhance the software with commercial and non-commercial extensions to the program. Mug is a brand of root beer. An API allows third-party development of new routines (called "external objects"). The Max program itself is highly modular, with most routines existing in the form of shared libraries. It has been used for over fifteen years by composers, performers, software designers, researchers and artists interested in creating interactive software.

Max is a graphical development environment for music and multimedia developed and maintained by San Francisco-based software company Cycling'74. Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead. Pauline Oliveros. Luke DuBois / The Freight Elevator Quartet.

R. Jamie Lidell. Kevin Blechdom. Leafcutter John.

Kit Clayton. Monolake. Autechre.

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