Louise Leveque de Vilmorin

Louise Leveque de Vilmorin (1902-1969) was a French woman of letters: novelist, poet, journalist.

Scion of a great French seed company fortune and afflicted with a slight limp that became a personal trademark, Vilmorin was best known as a writer of delicate but mordant tales, often set in aristocratic and/or artistic milieus. Her most famous novel was "Madame de", published in 1951, which was made into a celebrated film in 1953 starring Charles Boyer and Danielle Darrieux and directed by Vittorio de Sica. Vilmorin's other works included "Juliette," "La lettre dans un taxi," "Les belles amours," "Saintes-Une fois," and "Intimités."

Her letters to Jean Cocteau were published to acclaim, after the deaths of both correspondents.

Vilmorin's first husband was an American real-estate heir, Henry Leigh Hunt. They married in 1925, moved to Las Vegas, Nevada, where Hunt's family owned extensive properties, and divorced in 1937. They had three daughters: Jessie, Alexandra, and Helena.

Her second husband was Count Paul Pálffy ab Erdöd, a much-married Austrian-born Slovakian playboy. They married in 1938 and soon divorced.

For a number of years, Vilmorin was the mistress of Duff Cooper, the British ambassador to France. As a young woman, in 1923, she was engaged to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. She ended her life as the companion of André Malraux.


This page about Louise Leveque de Vilmorin includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
News stories about Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
External links for Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
Videos for Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
Wikis about Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
Discussion Groups about Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
Blogs about Louise Leveque de Vilmorin
Images of Louise Leveque de Vilmorin

She ended her life as the companion of André Malraux. and one for television at 6141 Hollywood Blvd. As a young woman, in 1923, she was engaged to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Young has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; one for motion pictures at 6104 Hollywood Blvd. For a number of years, Vilmorin was the mistress of Duff Cooper, the British ambassador to France. She died of ovarian cancer in 2000 at the age of 87 and was interred in the Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California. They married in 1938 and soon divorced. Her trademark at the beginning of each show was to appear dramatically in a doorway, dressed in the latest of high fashion evening gowns.

Her second husband was Count Paul Pálffy ab Erdöd, a much-married Austrian-born Slovakian playboy. Instead, she moved to television, where she hosted and starred in the well-received anthology series The Loretta Young Show. They had three daughters: Jessie, Alexandra, and Helena. In 1953 she made her last movie, It Happens Every Thursday. They married in 1925, moved to Las Vegas, Nevada, where Hunt's family owned extensive properties, and divorced in 1937. In 1949, she received another Academy Award nomination, for Come to the Stable. Vilmorin's first husband was an American real-estate heir, Henry Leigh Hunt. The same year she starred in The Bishop's Wife, a perennial favorite that still airs on television during the Christmas season.

Her letters to Jean Cocteau were published to acclaim, after the deaths of both correspondents. But although she was receiving fan and critical appreciation, it wasn't until 1947 that she received her first Oscar nomination -- and win -- for The Farmer's Daughter. Vilmorin's other works included "Juliette," "La lettre dans un taxi," "Les belles amours," "Saintes-Une fois," and "Intimités.". Young made several movies, working on as many as seven or eight a year. Her most famous novel was "Madame de", published in 1951, which was made into a celebrated film in 1953 starring Charles Boyer and Danielle Darrieux and directed by Vittorio de Sica. The daughter herself, known as Judy Lewis (she took Young's second husband's last name), did not know the true story until she herself was an adult. Scion of a great French seed company fortune and afflicted with a slight limp that became a personal trademark, Vilmorin was best known as a writer of delicate but mordant tales, often set in aristocratic and/or artistic milieus. They told the whole world that the little girl had been adopted.

Louise Leveque de Vilmorin (1902-1969) was a French woman of letters: novelist, poet, journalist. She and her mother moved to Europe, returning with a daughter. In 1934, Young had an affair with Clark Gable, and became pregnant. (They had acted together in The Second Floor Mystery.) The marriage was annulled the next year, just as their second movie together, ironically called Too Young to Marry, came out. In 1930, Young, then only seventeen, ran off with 26-year-old actor Grant Withers and married him in Yuma, Arizona.

The next year, she was anointed one of the WAMPAS Baby Stars. It was not until 1928 that she first had her Loretta Young billing, in The Whip Woman. She was billed as Gretchen Young in her next film, also in 1917, Sirens of the Sea. Her half-sister Georgiana (daughter of her mother and step-father George Belzer) eventually married actor Ricardo Montalban.

Even though her mother said no, Gretchen was allowed to live with Murray for two years. The movie's star, Mae Murray, so fell in love with little Gretchen that she asked to adopt her. Her first role was at age 4 in the silent film The Primrose Ring. Born Gretchen Michaela Young in Salt Lake City, Utah, she moved with her family to Hollywood when she was three years old. Her sisters, Polly Ann Young and Elizabeth Jane Young (screen name Sally Blane) appeared in child parts in movies, and young Gretchen did the same.

Loretta Young (January 6, 1913 — August 12, 2000) was an American actress.

05-22-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory