Kansas City Chiefs

Conference AFC
Division West
Founded 1960
Home Field Arrowhead Stadium
City Kansas City, Missouri
Colors Red, white and gold
Head Coach Dick Vermeil
All-Time Record (W-L-T)
(At Start of 2005 Season)
364-320-12

The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas City, Missouri.

Franchise Founded: 1959
First Season: 1960 (charter American Football League member; joined NFL in 1970 league merger)
Formerly known as: Dallas Texans, 1960-62, then moved to Kansas City (1963-).
Home field: Arrowhead Stadium
Previous home fields:
Cotton Bowl, Dallas, TX (1960-1962)
Municipal Stadium, Kansas City, MO (1963-1971)
Uniform colors: Red, White, and Gold
Helmet design: Red helmet with white arrowhead bearing initials K.C.
League championships won: AFL 1962, 1966, 1969
AFC West Championships: 1971, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2003
AFC Championships: None
Super Bowl appearances: I (lost), IV (won)
Current President: Carl Peterson (he is also the General Manager and CEO) [2003]
Current Head coach: Dick Vermeil [2003]

Franchise history

AFL logo Dallas Texans logo (1960-1962)

The team is owned by Lamar Hunt, who founded the team along with their original league, the American Football League, in 1960. The Dallas Texans, as they were known then, defeated the Houston Oilers in a dramatic 1962 AFL championship which went into double overtime. The Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City in 1963. The name, "Chiefs" was selected by a fan contest, and is derived from the then-Mayor of Kansas City, H. Roe Bartle. Bartle was the founder of the Native American-based honor society known as The Tribe of Mic-O-Say within the Boy Scouts of America organization, which earned him the nickname, "The Chief," and was instumental in persuading Lamar Hunt to move his team to Mid-America. It is said that Hunt actually considered keeping the team name as it was, and playing as the "Kansas City Texans."[1 (http://www.kcchiefs.com/history/60s/)]

The Texans/Chiefs franchise was the flagship team of the American Football League, with the most playoff appearances as an AFL team, six (tied with Oakland), the most American Football League Championships (3), and the most Super Bowl appearances, playing in the first Super Bowl, and in the last to be played between League champions. The Texans won the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers, 20 - 17, at the time the longest, and still one of the best professional football championship games ever played. The Chiefs dropped the first Super Bowl to the Packers, then pulverized the Vikings 23 - 7 in the final "true" AFL-NFL World Championsip game after the AFL's last season in 1969. They have the largest presence in the American Football League Hall of Fame, with 24 representatives, and they had just one coach throughout their AFL history, Hall-of-Famer Hank Stram.

The Kansas City Chiefs' (under Dallas Texans name) first stadium was at 22nd and Brooklyn, called "Municipal Stadium". Municipal Stadium opened in 1923 and had 49,002 seats. In 1971, Municipal Stadium was abandoned in favor of the new Arrowhead Stadium. Municipal Stadium was demolished in 1976; it is now a community garden. The Chiefs' first game at Arrowhead Stadium was against the St. Louis Cardinals (Chiefs 24, St. Louis Cardinals 14).

As the Chiefs, under coach Hank Stram, the team played in the first Super Bowl, losing 35-10 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. They earned revenge three years later, upsetting the Minnesota Vikings 23-7. The team won 43 games between 1966 and 1969. The Chiefs had only two winning seasons between 1974 and 1986. They did not get to the playoffs for 15 straight years.

In 1989, Carl Peterson became the team's new President and General Manager. Peterson hired Marty Schottenheimer as the team's coach. Marty Schottenheimer helped establish six straight playoff appearances, three AFC West championships, nine winning seasons, and 76 consecutive soldout games at Arrowhead. Since 1992, no NFL team has a better regular season home winning percentage than Kansas City (27-5 (.844) record).

After going from 13-3 in 1997 and losing the playoff game to the Denver Broncos (10-14), the Chiefs fell to 7-9 in 1998. Marty Schottenheimer took much of the blame for his failed attempts at clock control (also nicknamed Martyball by his critics). He was also in the midst of a quarterback controversy.

In 1997, he started with Elvis Grbac as quarterback. After a loss to Denver, Grbac was injured and Rich Gannon took over. After going 13-2 during the season, Gannon was replaced by Grbac in the playoff game against Denver. The choice to play Grbac over Gannon made many fans angry with Schottenheimer. The following losing seaon with Grbac at quarterback did not help.

Schottenheimer left as head coach, replaced by his defensive coach Gunther Cunningham. In two years, Cunningham showed little improvement, going 9-7 and 7-9. After the loss of Derrick Thomas, the collapse of the defense was unmistakable. The Chiefs' wins were mostly made by a high scoring offense rather than a powerful defense.

After coaching the St. Louis Rams to the Super Bowl and retiring, Dick Vermeil took over as head coach in 2001 with the statement that it takes three years to get a team ready for the Super Bowl. He immediately dropped Elvis Grbac, replacing him with his primary pick for the Rams' quartback, Trent Green. Another notable replacement was Priest Holmes at running back. Three years later, the Chiefs went 13-3 in 2003 and set many records along the way. However, the season sputtered by November and the Chiefs lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the playoffs. As with the loss to the Broncos in the 1997 season, this loss led to a poor following season.

In 2004 Gunther Cunningham was brought back as the defensive coach. However, the defense showed little improvement. The offense, unable to record the same high scores as the previous year, was unable to bring in the wins as they had the previous year.

Team records

The following are team and league records. They may have been surpassed between the time of making the record and the current date. Records are listed in chronological order.

League Records

Franchise Records

Players of note

Pro Football Hall of Famers

Items are listed as Player Name (date inducted; years played as a chief) Short Bio. Names are in italics for players who made a majority of their contributions with another team.

Retired numbers

Chiefs Hall of Fame

External Link: Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (http://www.kcchiefs.com/halloffame/)

Current players

Not to be forgotten

Historical


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External Link: Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (http://www.kcchiefs.com/halloffame/).
. Names are in italics for players who made a majority of their contributions with another team. This nickname had been commonly used decades before the football team came to town. Items are listed as Player Name (date inducted; years played as a chief) Short Bio. Locals also got into the habit of using "Redbirds" to refer specifically to the baseball team. Records are listed in chronological order. Louis Football Cardinals" to distinguish the two.

They may have been surpassed between the time of making the record and the current date. Louis Baseball Cardinals" or "the St. The following are team and league records. Sports fans and local news coverage got into the habit of saying "the St. The offense, unable to record the same high scores as the previous year, was unable to bring in the wins as they had the previous year. Louis was home to two big-league Cardinals teams, baseball and football. However, the defense showed little improvement. Between 1960 and 1987, St.

In 2004 Gunther Cunningham was brought back as the defensive coach. Louis' KMOX radio. His son Joe Buck took over for Jack as the radio and television announcer for the Cardinals in 1991. As with the loss to the Broncos in the 1997 season, this loss led to a poor following season. For much of the last half of the 20th century, the legendary broadcaster, Jack Buck, was the voice of the Cardinals, calling play-by-play on St. However, the season sputtered by November and the Chiefs lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the playoffs. "The Bambino". Three years later, the Chiefs went 13-3 in 2003 and set many records along the way. The Cardinals were unceremoniously swept by the Sox in four games, with the Sox winning their first World Series championship since 1918 and burying the so-called "Curse of the Bambino." Ironically the last out of the World Series came off of the bat of Edgar Renteria, wearing the number three jersey, the same number worn by Babe Ruth, a.k.a.

Another notable replacement was Priest Holmes at running back. Louis' troubles in the Series: Pujols, Scott Rolen, and Jim Edmonds, the normally fearsome 3-4-5 hitters for the Cards, were a dismal 6-for-45 with 1 RBI. He immediately dropped Elvis Grbac, replacing him with his primary pick for the Rams' quartback, Trent Green. The best demonstration of St. Louis Rams to the Super Bowl and retiring, Dick Vermeil took over as head coach in 2001 with the statement that it takes three years to get a team ready for the Super Bowl. And the Cardinals apparently were not. After coaching the St. As TV announcer (and former Cardinal) Tim McCarver said, "They are playing with a world of confidence".

The Chiefs' wins were mostly made by a high scoring offense rather than a powerful defense. The Cardinals also had the misfortune of meeting a Red Sox team that had just made baseball history by taking 4 straight against their arch-rivals, the New York Yankees after losing the first 3 in their ALCS matchup, and the BoSox had major momentum. After the loss of Derrick Thomas, the collapse of the defense was unmistakable. However, the spirit and zest of the Cardinals seemed to elude them in this championship series, as the Red Sox retained a leading position through the entire series. In two years, Cunningham showed little improvement, going 9-7 and 7-9. The Cardinals then played the Boston Red Sox in the 2004 World Series, the third time the teams have faced each other in the Fall Classic. Schottenheimer left as head coach, replaced by his defensive coach Gunther Cunningham. Louis win Game 7 to clinch the series, and was named MVP.

The following losing seaon with Grbac at quarterback did not help. The next night, Albert Pujols helped St. The choice to play Grbac over Gannon made many fans angry with Schottenheimer. Jim Edmonds hit a walk-off homer in the bottom of the 12th to win the game. After going 13-2 during the season, Gannon was replaced by Grbac in the playoff game against Denver. Coming home for Game 6, the Cardinals took a 4-3 lead into the 9th inning, but blew it. After a loss to Denver, Grbac was injured and Rich Gannon took over. In the Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Cardinals rolled, winning the series 3-1. Facing off against rival Houston in the NLCS, the Cards took a 2-0 lead, then lost three straight in Houston.

In 1997, he started with Elvis Grbac as quarterback. Louis posted the best record in the National League, tallying their most wins since the 1940s and earning home advantage for the NLDS and NLCS. He was also in the midst of a quarterback controversy. In 2004, St. Marty Schottenheimer took much of the blame for his failed attempts at clock control (also nicknamed Martyball by his critics). The biggest shock of all came just four days after Buck's passing when ace pitcher Darryl Kile died suddenly of heart failure while in Chicago for a series against the Cubs. After going from 13-3 in 1997 and losing the playoff game to the Denver Broncos (10-14), the Chiefs fell to 7-9 in 1998. Just ten months earlier, Buck stirred emotions when he addressed the crowd at Busch Stadium when Major League Baseball resumed after the September 11th terrorist attacks.

Since 1992, no NFL team has a better regular season home winning percentage than Kansas City (27-5 (.844) record). On June 18, beloved broadcaster Jack Buck passed away at the age of 77. Marty Schottenheimer helped establish six straight playoff appearances, three AFC West championships, nine winning seasons, and 76 consecutive soldout games at Arrowhead. The year was also marred with tragedy for the Cardinal family. Peterson hired Marty Schottenheimer as the team's coach. In 2002, the Cardinals won the Central Division and this time defeated the Diamondbacks 3 games to none to reach the NLCS, but lost 4 games to 1 to the San Francisco Giants. In 1989, Carl Peterson became the team's new President and General Manager. Many St. Louisians were unhappy with this decision and refer to the 2001 Cardinals as "co-division champions," along with Houston.

They did not get to the playoffs for 15 straight years. Louis received a wild card berth. The Chiefs had only two winning seasons between 1974 and 1986. Since Houston won the season series against the Cardinals, Houston was declared the division champion and St. The team won 43 games between 1966 and 1969. Since the two teams finished tied in the standings, the league went to a tie breaker to determine the division champion. They earned revenge three years later, upsetting the Minnesota Vikings 23-7. The Houston Astros, also in the National League Central, finished with an identical record.

As the Chiefs, under coach Hank Stram, the team played in the first Super Bowl, losing 35-10 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. In 2001, the Cardinals finished the season with a 93-69 record. Louis Cardinals 14). The eventual World Series champion Arizona Diamondbacks defeated the Cardinals in a five-game playoff series. Louis Cardinals (Chiefs 24, St. In 2001, the Cardinals advanced to the post-season as a "Wild Card" team after posting the second-best record in the National League, but losing the division to the Houston Astros. The Chiefs' first game at Arrowhead Stadium was against the St. In 2000, the Cardinals lost to the New York Mets in the National League Championship Series.

Municipal Stadium was demolished in 1976; it is now a community garden. McGwire went on to finish with 70, a record that stood until Barry Bonds hit 73 in 2001. In 1971, Municipal Stadium was abandoned in favor of the new Arrowhead Stadium. McGwire broke Roger Maris's 37 year-old record of 61 on September 8 with a low line drive over Busch Stadium's left field fence. The Kansas City Chiefs' (under Dallas Texans name) first stadium was at 22nd and Brooklyn, called "Municipal Stadium". Municipal Stadium opened in 1923 and had 49,002 seats. In 1998 Cardinals' first baseman Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa of the Chicago Cubs battled to set the record for most home runs in one season. They have the largest presence in the American Football League Hall of Fame, with 24 representatives, and they had just one coach throughout their AFL history, Hall-of-Famer Hank Stram. Louis in 1998.

The Chiefs dropped the first Super Bowl to the Packers, then pulverized the Vikings 23 - 7 in the final "true" AFL-NFL World Championsip game after the AFL's last season in 1969. Mark McGwire broke the single-season home run record while playing with St. The Texans won the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers, 20 - 17, at the time the longest, and still one of the best professional football championship games ever played. The Cards reached the playoffs 1996, but the Atlanta Braves defeated them for the National League pennant. The Texans/Chiefs franchise was the flagship team of the American Football League, with the most playoff appearances as an AFL team, six (tied with Oakland), the most American Football League Championships (3), and the most Super Bowl appearances, playing in the first Super Bowl, and in the last to be played between League champions. The Cardinals again won the National League in 1987, losing to Minnesota 4 games to 3 in the World Series. It is said that Hunt actually considered keeping the team name as it was, and playing as the "Kansas City Texans."[1 (http://www.kcchiefs.com/history/60s/)]. In the 9th inning, umpire Don Denkinger called Royals batter Jorge Orta safe at first base - a call later refuted by instant replay. The Cardinals, leading 1-0 at the time of the play and needing that victory to clinch the title, went on to lose Game 6 and ultimately Game 7 by the score of 11-0 the following night.

Bartle was the founder of the Native American-based honor society known as The Tribe of Mic-O-Say within the Boy Scouts of America organization, which earned him the nickname, "The Chief," and was instumental in persuading Lamar Hunt to move his team to Mid-America. The 1985 World Series, christened the "I-70 Series" because it featured in-state rival Kansas City, is perhaps the most controversial in Cardinal history. Game 6 of that series featured "The Call". Roe Bartle. The 1980s era Cardinals included stars Ozzie Smith, Willie McGee (who won two batting titles in a Cardinal uniform), John Tudor, Tom Herr, Jack Clark, Bruce Sutter, Keith Hernandez, Terry Pendleton, and Joaquín Andujar. The name, "Chiefs" was selected by a fan contest, and is derived from the then-Mayor of Kansas City, H. In his 11 years as Cardinal manager, Herzog won three National League pennants, and a 1982 World Series title. The Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City in 1963. Herzog's brand of baseball, known in St. Louis as "Whiteyball", featured speed on the base paths, sparkling defense, and unconventional roster moves.

The Dallas Texans, as they were known then, defeated the Houston Oilers in a dramatic 1962 AFL championship which went into double overtime. After a less-than-successful 1970s, new Cardinal manager Whitey Herzog revived the winning tradition at Busch Stadium. The team is owned by Lamar Hunt, who founded the team along with their original league, the American Football League, in 1960. The Cards then lost to the Detroit Tigers in a closely contested 7 game affair in 1968, the last series before baseball adopted a divisional format. The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas City, Missouri. Hall of Famers such as Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, Steve Carlton, and Orlando Cepeda led the "Redbirds" to World Series titles in 1964 over the Yankees and in 1967 over the Boston Red Sox. Jack Steadman (General Manager). Louis.

Lloyd Burruss. The 1960s brought three National League pennants to St. Tony Reed. The Cardinals did not sign a black regular until Curt Flood in 1958. Smith. National League president Ford Frick threatened to ban any players who boycotted any games, and the boycott never happened. T. The alleged ringleader of the boycott was Enos Slaughter.

J. In 1947, the Cardinals (who were effectively the South's only major league team until the 1960s) gained notoriety by attempting to boycott games against the Brooklyn Dodgers to protest the Dodgers' signing of a black player, Jackie Robinson. Gary Barbaro. In 1968, a statue of Musial was constructed outside Busch Stadium. Jerrell Wilson (Punter 1963-77; Chiefs Hall of Fame 1987, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Known to loyal fans as "Ol' Number 6", Musial spent 23 years in a Cardinal uniform. Tyrer is a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Outfielder Stan "The Man" Musial led the ’44 team.

Jim Tyrer (Tackle 1969 Super Bowl IV Champion; 6-foot-6, 270 pound Tackle would take on two defensive linemen at once. The Cardinals beat the Browns 4 games to 2 to win the 1944 World Series. Died shortly after a car accident in 2000). Louis Browns, in the "trolley car Series". Derrick Thomas (school record with 52 quarterback sacks and 74 tackles behind the line of scrimmage; Finished 10th in the Heisman Trophy voting; Kansas City Chief for eleven years; team career records: 119.5 sacks, 3 safeties and 18 fumble recoveries. In the World Series they met their crosstown rivals, the St. Otis Taylor (46-yard touchdown reception in Super Bowl IV, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). In the 1940s, the Cardinals dominated the National League, and in 1944 they posted the best record in team history at 105-49.

5, 1980].). Dean's country humor made him a popular favorite, particularly in the rural south and midwest where Cardinals fans were numerous. Oakland [Oct. Dizzy, whose real name was Jerome Herman Dean, won 30 of them, with Paul (nicknamed "Daffy") contributing 19 wins. Art Still (Career Sacks, 72.5, 1978-87; Season Sacks, 14.5 1980 and 1984; Game Sacks, 4.0 : vs. In 1934, Dean and his younger brother, Paul, combined to win 49 games - still a single season record for brothers. A member of the All-time All-AFL team, one of only twenty players who were in the American Football League for its entire ten-year existence, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Highlights from Cardinal history include the 1930s era "Gas House Gang" featuring Dizzy Dean, Joe Medwick, Pepper Martin, and Enos Slaughter.

Johnny Robinson (In Super Bowl IV, helped defeat the Vikings, 23-7, picking off a Joe Kapp pass). By the mid-1920s, the Cardinals began to turn their fortunes around, and soon they would become the city's favorite team once again. Christian Okoye (Nigerian; omitted from his Country's Olympic team in track and field; drafted in 1987 by the Chiefs in the second round; Chiefs rushing records, including total yards in a season, attempts in a season, touchdowns in a season, attempts in a single game, 100-yard games in a season, and was the first Chiefs running back to rush for 1,000 yards for more than one season.). The Cardinals became the Browns' tenants in 1920. Curtis McClinton (scored a touchdown in Super Bowl I). The Cardinals languished for some 40 years after their mid-1880s triumphs, while their crosstown rivals, the American League's version of the Browns, were competitive, though not victorious. Bill Maas. They were briefly called the Perfectos in 1899 before settling on their present name, a name reportedly inspired by switching their uniform colors from brown to red.

Also played for the San Diego Chargers and the Houston Oilers, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). The Browns joined the National League in 1892 following the bankruptcy of the American Association. Ernie Ladd (Defensive tackle; 1967-1968. The Maroons had the misfortune of arriving at the time when the Browns were in their glory, and they soon folded. Bobby Hunt (1962 [Dallas Texans] - 1967 [Kansas City Chiefs]; Defensive Back, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Louis entry, the Maroons, which had come in from the Union Association. Holub (started the first world championship game between the AFL and NFL (before it was called the Super Bowl) at linebacker and started Super Bowl IV, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). During the mid-1880s, the National League also had a St.

E.J. Louis rivalry continues to this day. Headrick played the entire game and the next game. Headrick is a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). The vigorous Chicago-St. Sherrill "Psycho" Headrick (Texan and Chief linebacker that withstood pain and injury when he played with a fractured neck vertebrae. Louis won the 1886 Series outright. All-time AFL leader in all-purpose yards with 12,065, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). St.

Abner Haynes (1960 Rookie of the Year and MVP. The Series of 1885 ended in dispute and with no resolution. In June 29, 1983, Joe drowned attempting to rescue two boys from a rain-swollen pit shortly after rescuing one other; posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal and the NCAA Award of Valor.) 37Forever.org (http://www.37forever.org) was formed to teach KC area kids how to swim in honor of the valor that Joe Delaney demonstrated. The Browns squared off against the National League's Chicago White Stockings twice in the early version of the World Series. Joe Delaney (Running back 1981-82, Rookie of the Year 1981, Pro Bowl 1981, College Football Hall of Fame 1997, Chiefs Hall of Fame 2004. The team was formed as part of the American Association in 1882 where they enjoyed a four-year dynasty under flamboyant owner Chris von der Ahe. Initially they were known as the "Brown Stockings", which was quickly shortened to "Browns". Deron Cherry (50 interceptions; 15 career fumble recoveries; Byron White Humanitarian Award for service to his team, community, and country).
.

Chris Burford (391 Pass Receptions, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Louisians were unhappy with this decision and refer to the 2001 Cardinals as "co-division champions," along with Houston. Ed Budde (14 years as a Chief, member of the All-time AFL team, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Many St. #82 Dante Hall (NFL record returning a kick or a punt for a touchdown for four consecutive weeks; won four consecutive NFL weekly awards). Louis received a wild card berth. #31 Priest Holmes (NFL record for most touchdowns in a season at 27). Since Houston won the season series against the Cardinals, Houston was declared the division champion and St.

#10 Trent Green. Since the two teams finished tied in the standings, the league went to a tie breaker to determine who would be the division champion and who would be the National League Wild-Card winner. #88 Tony Gonzalez (2004 Season Lead the NFL in receptions with 102). The Houston Astros, in the same division as the Cardinals finished with the same record. #86 Buck Buchanan (Defense Tackle). * In 2001, the Cardinals finished the season with a record of 93-69. #78 Bobby Bell (Linebacker). They are the defending champions of the National League.

#63 Willie Lanier (Linebacker). They are in the Central Division of the National League. #36 Mack Lee Hill (Running Back). Louis Cardinals are a Major League Baseball team based in Saint Louis, Missouri. #33 Stone Johnson (Running Back). The St. #28 Abner Haynes (Running Back). Johnson City Cardinals.

#16 Len Dawson (Quarterback). Palm Beach Cardinals
Swing of the Quad Cities
New Jersey Cardinals. #3 Jan Stenerud (Placekicker). Springfield Cardinals. Mike Webster (1997; 1989-1990). Memphis Redbirds. Head coach of the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs for the entire ten-year history of the AFL. National League
.

Post-season record 5-1. Pitching ERA: 1.12 Bob Gibson (1968). Post-season appearances 6. Pitching Strikeouts: 274 Bob Gibson (1970). Victories 87. Pitching Wins: 30 Dizzy Dean (1934). Hank Stram (2003; 1960-1974) Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs coach won three AFL titles. Walks: 162 Mark McGwire (1998).

48-yard field goal, the longest in Super Bowl history, against the Vikings in Super Bowl IV. Strikeouts: 167 Jim Edmonds (2000). six postseason All-Star games (four NFL Pro Bowl). Hitting Streak: 33 games - Rogers Hornsby (1922). 7 field goal attempts in a game. Stolen Bases: 118 Lou Brock (1974). 44 field goals in a season. Triples: 25 Tom Long (1915).

Career 409 PATs and 436 field goals attempted. Doubles: 64 Joe Medwick (1936). 186 consecutive games played. Runs: 141 Rogers Hornsby (1922). Only pure kicker in the Hall of Fame. 19-year career. Hits: 250 Rogers Hornsby (1922). Jan Stenerud (1991; 1967-1979) Placekicker. Batting Average: .424 Rogers Hornsby (1924) (Major League Record).

Popular for come-from-behind wins, including the 1993 playoffs and the outdueling of Elway in 1994 as a Chief. Runs Batted In: 154 Joe Medwick (1937). Joe Montana (2000; 1993-1994) Quarterback. Home Runs: 70 Mark McGwire (1998). Marv Levy (2001; 1978-1982). 85 August "Gussie" Busch (owner). 1969 Super Bowl IV Champion. 45 Bob Gibson.

Second Chief selected to go into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 42 Jackie Robinson (retired throughout baseball). Willie "Contact" Lanier (1986; 1967-1977) Outside linebacker. 20 Lou Brock. Started American Football League that was the genesis of modern professional football. 17 Dizzy Dean. Lamar Hunt (1972; 1959-present) Owner. 14 Ken Boyer.

1). 9 Enos Slaughter. 11th ranked passer in NFL history (retired No. 6 "Stan the Man" Musial. 19-year career, passed for 28,711 yards and 239 touchdowns. 2 Red Schoendienst. MVP of Super Bowl IV. 1 Ozzie Smith.

Two AFL championships. Rogers Hornsby (has retirement honors, as he played in the era prior to uniform numbers). Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1978. Branch Rickey. Len Dawson (1987; 1963-1975) Quarterback. Tony La Russa. NAIA All-America in 1962. Walt Jocketty.

First player taken in 1963 American Football League Draft. Whitey Herzog. Buck Buchanan (1990; 1963-1975) Lineman. August "Gussie" Busch. Bobby Bell (July 30, 1983; 1963-1974) Linebacker. Sam Breadon. Inducted into the Pro Hall of Fame as a Chief. Todd Worrell.

Scored the 100th rushing touchdown of his career as a Chief. Tony Womack. Marcus Allen (November 9, 2003; 1992-1997) Running Back. Bill White. December 5, 2004: Trent Green extends team record of consecutive quarterback starts to 60. John Tudor. December 5, 2004: Will Shields extends team record of consecutive starts to 187 (actual consecutive games also a team record of 188). Joe Torre.

November 28, 2004: Dante Hall sets team record with 213 kickoff returns. Fernando Tatis. 2003: Will Shields extends franchise record of consecutive starts to 175. Bruce Sutter. 2003: Priest Holmes surpasses Otis Taylor for most career touchdowns by a Chief. Lee Smith. November 9, 2003: the Chiefs beat the Cleveland Browns (41-20), winning their ninth straight game which sets a new franchise record for consecutive victories. Ted Simmons.

2002: Priest Holmes sets the single-season rushing record with 1,615 yards. Edgar Rentería. 2002: Team sets franchise record for most offensive yards with 6,000. Wally Moon. 2001: Priest Holmes sets the single-season rushing record with 1,555 yards. Mark McGwire. 1996: Chiefs have first 4-0 start. Willie McGee.

1995: Chiefs make team record sixth consecutive playoff berth. Tim McCarver. 1990: Derrick Thomas sets team record with 20.0 sacks in a season. Tino Martinez. October 24, 2004: the Chiefs completed 8 running touchdowns against the Atlanta Falcons, setting the league record for most running touchdowns in a single game. Pepper Martin. 2003: Priest Holmes sets league record for most touchdowns as well as most rushing touchdowns with 27. Marty Marion.

2003: Dante Hall ties league record with 4 kick-returns for touchdowns in a single season. Arlie Latham. 2003: Morten Andersen has record 316 consecutive scoring games. Darryl Kile. 2003: Morten Andersen of Kansas City and Gary Anderson of Pittsburg tie for most seaons with 100 or more points with 14. Jim Kaat. December 22, 2002: Trent Green to Mark Boerigter tied for longest pass completion of 99 yards. Keith Hernández.

2002: Morten Andersen sets record with 40 field goals over 50 yards in a career. Joe Garagiola. 1998: Chiefs set the record for most penalties (158) and most penalty yardage (1,304) in a season. Curt Flood. Kansas City fans like having that record broken in 1998 by John Elway. Drew. 1993: Dave Krieg gets record 494 times sacked in a career. J.D.

1993: Nick Lowery sets record for most seasons with 100 or more points with 11. Charles Comiskey. November 11, 1990: Derrick Thomas sets league record for most sacks in a game with 7.0. Vince Coleman. 1975: Len Dawson records 8 seasons leading the league in pass completions. Bob Caruthers. December 25, 1971: Ed Podolak amasses 350 all-purpose yards against the Miami Dolphins, a playoff record. Nelson Briles.

1969: Len Dawson records 6 consecutive seasons leading the league in pass completions. Harry Brecheen. 1966: Len Dawson ties Johnny Unitas for 4 seasons leading the league in touchdowns. Oyster Burns (RF). Curt Welch (CF). Tip O'Neill (LF).

Arlie Latham (3B). Bill Gleason (SS). Yank Robinson (2B). Charlie Comiskey (1B and manager).

Doc Bushong (C). Adonis Terry (SP). Silver King (SP). Dave Foutz (SP).

Bob Caruthers (SP). 24 Joe Pettini (bench). 11 José Oquendo (third base).       Hal McRae (hitting).

39 Dave McKay (first base). 38 Marty Mason (bullpen). 18 Dave Duncan (pitching). Coaches

    .

    10 Tony La Russa. Manager

      . Cy Young. Vic Willis.

      Hoyt Wilhelm. Bobby Wallace. Dazzy Vance. Ozzie Smith.

      Enos Slaughter. Red Schoendienst. Wilbert Robinson. Kid Nichols.

      Stan Musial. Johnny Mize. Joe Medwick. John McGraw.

      Rabbit Maranville. Miller Huggins. Rogers Hornsby. Jesse Haines.

      Chick Hafey. Burleigh Grimes. Bob Gibson. Pud Galvin.

      Frankie Frisch. Dennis Eckersley. Leo Durocher. Dizzy Dean.

      Roger Connor. Orlando Cepeda. Steve Carlton. Jesse Burkett.

      Mordecai Brown. Lou Brock. Roger Bresnahan. "Sunny" Jim Bottomley.

      Jake Beckley. Walter Alston. Pete Alexander.

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