Kansas City Chiefs

Conference AFC
Division West
Founded 1960
Home Field Arrowhead Stadium
City Kansas City, Missouri
Colors Red, white and gold
Head Coach Dick Vermeil
All-Time Record (W-L-T)
(At Start of 2005 Season)
364-320-12

The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas City, Missouri.

Franchise Founded: 1959
First Season: 1960 (charter American Football League member; joined NFL in 1970 league merger)
Formerly known as: Dallas Texans, 1960-62, then moved to Kansas City (1963-).
Home field: Arrowhead Stadium
Previous home fields:
Cotton Bowl, Dallas, TX (1960-1962)
Municipal Stadium, Kansas City, MO (1963-1971)
Uniform colors: Red, White, and Gold
Helmet design: Red helmet with white arrowhead bearing initials K.C.
League championships won: AFL 1962, 1966, 1969
AFC West Championships: 1971, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2003
AFC Championships: None
Super Bowl appearances: I (lost), IV (won)
Current President: Carl Peterson (he is also the General Manager and CEO) [2003]
Current Head coach: Dick Vermeil [2003]

Franchise history

AFL logo Dallas Texans logo (1960-1962)

The team is owned by Lamar Hunt, who founded the team along with their original league, the American Football League, in 1960. The Dallas Texans, as they were known then, defeated the Houston Oilers in a dramatic 1962 AFL championship which went into double overtime. The Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City in 1963. The name, "Chiefs" was selected by a fan contest, and is derived from the then-Mayor of Kansas City, H. Roe Bartle. Bartle was the founder of the Native American-based honor society known as The Tribe of Mic-O-Say within the Boy Scouts of America organization, which earned him the nickname, "The Chief," and was instumental in persuading Lamar Hunt to move his team to Mid-America. It is said that Hunt actually considered keeping the team name as it was, and playing as the "Kansas City Texans."[1 (http://www.kcchiefs.com/history/60s/)]

The Texans/Chiefs franchise was the flagship team of the American Football League, with the most playoff appearances as an AFL team, six (tied with Oakland), the most American Football League Championships (3), and the most Super Bowl appearances, playing in the first Super Bowl, and in the last to be played between League champions. The Texans won the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers, 20 - 17, at the time the longest, and still one of the best professional football championship games ever played. The Chiefs dropped the first Super Bowl to the Packers, then pulverized the Vikings 23 - 7 in the final "true" AFL-NFL World Championsip game after the AFL's last season in 1969. They have the largest presence in the American Football League Hall of Fame, with 24 representatives, and they had just one coach throughout their AFL history, Hall-of-Famer Hank Stram.

The Kansas City Chiefs' (under Dallas Texans name) first stadium was at 22nd and Brooklyn, called "Municipal Stadium". Municipal Stadium opened in 1923 and had 49,002 seats. In 1971, Municipal Stadium was abandoned in favor of the new Arrowhead Stadium. Municipal Stadium was demolished in 1976; it is now a community garden. The Chiefs' first game at Arrowhead Stadium was against the St. Louis Cardinals (Chiefs 24, St. Louis Cardinals 14).

As the Chiefs, under coach Hank Stram, the team played in the first Super Bowl, losing 35-10 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. They earned revenge three years later, upsetting the Minnesota Vikings 23-7. The team won 43 games between 1966 and 1969. The Chiefs had only two winning seasons between 1974 and 1986. They did not get to the playoffs for 15 straight years.

In 1989, Carl Peterson became the team's new President and General Manager. Peterson hired Marty Schottenheimer as the team's coach. Marty Schottenheimer helped establish six straight playoff appearances, three AFC West championships, nine winning seasons, and 76 consecutive soldout games at Arrowhead. Since 1992, no NFL team has a better regular season home winning percentage than Kansas City (27-5 (.844) record).

After going from 13-3 in 1997 and losing the playoff game to the Denver Broncos (10-14), the Chiefs fell to 7-9 in 1998. Marty Schottenheimer took much of the blame for his failed attempts at clock control (also nicknamed Martyball by his critics). He was also in the midst of a quarterback controversy.

In 1997, he started with Elvis Grbac as quarterback. After a loss to Denver, Grbac was injured and Rich Gannon took over. After going 13-2 during the season, Gannon was replaced by Grbac in the playoff game against Denver. The choice to play Grbac over Gannon made many fans angry with Schottenheimer. The following losing seaon with Grbac at quarterback did not help.

Schottenheimer left as head coach, replaced by his defensive coach Gunther Cunningham. In two years, Cunningham showed little improvement, going 9-7 and 7-9. After the loss of Derrick Thomas, the collapse of the defense was unmistakable. The Chiefs' wins were mostly made by a high scoring offense rather than a powerful defense.

After coaching the St. Louis Rams to the Super Bowl and retiring, Dick Vermeil took over as head coach in 2001 with the statement that it takes three years to get a team ready for the Super Bowl. He immediately dropped Elvis Grbac, replacing him with his primary pick for the Rams' quartback, Trent Green. Another notable replacement was Priest Holmes at running back. Three years later, the Chiefs went 13-3 in 2003 and set many records along the way. However, the season sputtered by November and the Chiefs lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the playoffs. As with the loss to the Broncos in the 1997 season, this loss led to a poor following season.

In 2004 Gunther Cunningham was brought back as the defensive coach. However, the defense showed little improvement. The offense, unable to record the same high scores as the previous year, was unable to bring in the wins as they had the previous year.

Team records

The following are team and league records. They may have been surpassed between the time of making the record and the current date. Records are listed in chronological order.

League Records

Franchise Records

Players of note

Pro Football Hall of Famers

Items are listed as Player Name (date inducted; years played as a chief) Short Bio. Names are in italics for players who made a majority of their contributions with another team.

Retired numbers

Chiefs Hall of Fame

External Link: Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (http://www.kcchiefs.com/halloffame/)

Current players

Not to be forgotten

Historical


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External Link: Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (http://www.kcchiefs.com/halloffame/). Recent Draft Picks: 2005. Names are in italics for players who made a majority of their contributions with another team. Super Bowl XX Championship Roster:. Items are listed as Player Name (date inducted; years played as a chief) Short Bio. The team is currently owned by Halas' daughter Virginia McCaskey and has been run on a day-to-day basis since 1999 by President and CEO Ted Phillips . Records are listed in chronological order. For the most part, the Bears have stayed in the Halas family.

They may have been surpassed between the time of making the record and the current date. Halas also coached the team off-and-on for forty seasons, an NFL record. The following are team and league records. They were founded by George Halas, who maintained control of the team until his death in 1983. The offense, unable to record the same high scores as the previous year, was unable to bring in the wins as they had the previous year. The Bears are one of the storied NFL teams. However, the defense showed little improvement. The Chicago Bears are a National Football League team based in Chicago.

In 2004 Gunther Cunningham was brought back as the defensive coach. Cedric Benson Running Back - 1st Round 4th Selection - University of Texas. As with the loss to the Broncos in the 1997 season, this loss led to a poor following season. Donnell Woolford. However, the season sputtered by November and the Chiefs lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the playoffs. Ed Sprinkle. Three years later, the Chiefs went 13-3 in 2003 and set many records along the way. Marcus Robinson.

Another notable replacement was Priest Holmes at running back. Doug Plank. He immediately dropped Elvis Grbac, replacing him with his primary pick for the Rams' quartback, Trent Green. Alan Page. Louis Rams to the Super Bowl and retiring, Dick Vermeil took over as head coach in 2001 with the statement that it takes three years to get a team ready for the Super Bowl. Jim Osbourne. After coaching the St. Ed O'Bradovich.

The Chiefs' wins were mostly made by a high scoring offense rather than a powerful defense. Larry Morris. After the loss of Derrick Thomas, the collapse of the defense was unmistakable. Johnny Morris. In two years, Cunningham showed little improvement, going 9-7 and 7-9. Mike Hartenstine. Schottenheimer left as head coach, replaced by his defensive coach Gunther Cunningham. Raymont Harris.

The following losing seaon with Grbac at quarterback did not help. Jim Harbaugh. The choice to play Grbac over Gannon made many fans angry with Schottenheimer. Rick Casares. After going 13-2 during the season, Gannon was replaced by Grbac in the playoff game against Denver. Mark Carrier. After a loss to Denver, Grbac was injured and Rich Gannon took over. Doug Buffone.

In 1997, he started with Elvis Grbac as quarterback. Marty Booker. He was also in the midst of a quarterback controversy. Neal Anderson. Marty Schottenheimer took much of the blame for his failed attempts at clock control (also nicknamed Martyball by his critics). 77 Harold (Red) Grange. After going from 13-3 in 1997 and losing the playoff game to the Denver Broncos (10-14), the Chiefs fell to 7-9 in 1998. 66 Clyde (Bulldog) Turner.

Since 1992, no NFL team has a better regular season home winning percentage than Kansas City (27-5 (.844) record). 61 Bill George. Marty Schottenheimer helped establish six straight playoff appearances, three AFC West championships, nine winning seasons, and 76 consecutive soldout games at Arrowhead. 56 Bill Hewitt. Peterson hired Marty Schottenheimer as the team's coach. 51 Dick Butkus. In 1989, Carl Peterson became the team's new President and General Manager. 42 Sid Luckman.

They did not get to the playoffs for 15 straight years. 41 Brian Piccolo (the subject of the film Brian's Song). The Chiefs had only two winning seasons between 1974 and 1986. 40 Gale Sayers. The team won 43 games between 1966 and 1969. 34 Walter Payton. They earned revenge three years later, upsetting the Minnesota Vikings 23-7. 28 Willie Gallimore.

As the Chiefs, under coach Hank Stram, the team played in the first Super Bowl, losing 35-10 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. 7 George Halas. Louis Cardinals 14). 5 George McAfee. Louis Cardinals (Chiefs 24, St. 3 Bronko Nagurski. The Chiefs' first game at Arrowhead Stadium was against the St. Cameron Worrell.

Municipal Stadium was demolished in 1976; it is now a community garden. LeVar Woods. In 1971, Municipal Stadium was abandoned in favor of the new Arrowhead Stadium. Greg White. The Kansas City Chiefs' (under Dallas Texans name) first stadium was at 22nd and Brooklyn, called "Municipal Stadium". Municipal Stadium opened in 1923 and had 49,002 seats. Cliff Washburn. They have the largest presence in the American Football League Hall of Fame, with 24 representatives, and they had just one coach throughout their AFL history, Hall-of-Famer Hank Stram. Bobby Wade.

The Chiefs dropped the first Super Bowl to the Packers, then pulverized the Vikings 23 - 7 in the final "true" AFL-NFL World Championsip game after the AFL's last season in 1969. Nathan Vasher. The Texans won the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers, 20 - 17, at the time the longest, and still one of the best professional football championship games ever played. Brian Urlacher. The Texans/Chiefs franchise was the flagship team of the American Football League, with the most playoff appearances as an AFL team, six (tied with Oakland), the most American Football League Championships (3), and the most Super Bowl appearances, playing in the first Super Bowl, and in the last to be played between League champions. Charles Tillman. It is said that Hunt actually considered keeping the team name as it was, and playing as the "Kansas City Texans."[1 (http://www.kcchiefs.com/history/60s/)]. John Tait.

Bartle was the founder of the Native American-based honor society known as The Tribe of Mic-O-Say within the Boy Scouts of America organization, which earned him the nickname, "The Chief," and was instumental in persuading Lamar Hunt to move his team to Mid-America. John Shivers. Roe Bartle. Nicholas Setta. The name, "Chiefs" was selected by a fan contest, and is derived from the then-Mayor of Kansas City, H. Ian Scott. The Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City in 1963. Darnell Sanders.

The Dallas Texans, as they were known then, defeated the Houston Oilers in a dramatic 1962 AFL championship which went into double overtime. Fred Russell. The team is owned by Lamar Hunt, who founded the team along with their original league, the American Football League, in 1960. Ricker. The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas City, Missouri. A.J. Jack Steadman (General Manager). Gabriel Reid.

Lloyd Burruss. Marcus Reese. Tony Reed. Jerrell Pippens. Smith. Shurron Pierson. T. Adrian Peterson.

J. John Owens. Gary Barbaro. Adewale Ogunleye. Jerrell Wilson (Punter 1963-77; Chiefs Hall of Fame 1987, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Joe Odom. Tyrer is a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Muhsin Muhammad.

Jim Tyrer (Tackle 1969 Super Bowl IV Champion; 6-foot-6, 270 pound Tackle would take on two defensive linemen at once. Qasim Mitchell. Died shortly after a car accident in 2000). Fred Miller. Derrick Thomas (school record with 52 quarterback sacks and 74 tackles behind the line of scrimmage; Finished 10th in the Heisman Trophy voting; Kansas City Chief for eleven years; team career records: 119.5 sacks, 3 safeties and 18 fumble recoveries. Terrence Metcalf. Otis Taylor (46-yard touchdown reception in Super Bowl IV, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Todd McMillion.

5, 1980].). Jason McKie. Oakland [Oct. Brad Maynard. Art Still (Career Sacks, 72.5, 1978-87; Season Sacks, 14.5 1980 and 1984; Game Sacks, 4.0 : vs. Alfonso Marshall. A member of the All-time All-AFL team, one of only twenty players who were in the American Football League for its entire ten-year existence, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Patrick Mannelly.

Johnny Robinson (In Super Bowl IV, helped defeat the Vikings, 23-7, picking off a Joe Kapp pass). Dustin Lyman. Christian Okoye (Nigerian; omitted from his Country's Olympic team in track and field; drafted in 1987 by the Chiefs in the second round; Chiefs rushing records, including total yards in a season, attempts in a season, touchdowns in a season, attempts in a single game, 100-yard games in a season, and was the first Chiefs running back to rush for 1,000 yards for more than one season.). Bo Lacy. Curtis McClinton (scored a touchdown in Super Bowl I). Olin Kruetz. Bill Maas. Craig Krenzel.

Also played for the San Diego Chargers and the Houston Oilers, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Kurt Kittner. Ernie Ladd (Defensive tackle; 1967-1968. Kareem Kelly. Bobby Hunt (1962 [Dallas Texans] - 1967 [Kansas City Chiefs]; Defensive Back, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Alain Kashama. Holub (started the first world championship game between the AFL and NFL (before it was called the Super Bowl) at linebacker and started Super Bowl IV, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Tyler Jones.

E.J. Thomas Jones. Headrick played the entire game and the next game. Headrick is a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Todd Johnson. Sherrill "Psycho" Headrick (Texan and Chief linebacker that withstood pain and injury when he played with a fractured neck vertebrae. Tank Johnson. All-time AFL leader in all-purpose yards with 12,065, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Ron Johnson.

Abner Haynes (1960 Rookie of the Year and MVP. Bryan Johnson. In June 29, 1983, Joe drowned attempting to rescue two boys from a rain-swollen pit shortly after rescuing one other; posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal and the NCAA Award of Valor.) 37Forever.org (http://www.37forever.org) was formed to teach KC area kids how to swim in honor of the valor that Joe Delaney demonstrated. Ben Johnson. Joe Delaney (Running back 1981-82, Rookie of the Year 1981, Pro Bowl 1981, College Football Hall of Fame 1997, Chiefs Hall of Fame 2004. Jonathan Jackson. Deron Cherry (50 interceptions; 15 career fumble recoveries; Byron White Humanitarian Award for service to his team, community, and country). Israel Idonije.

Chris Burford (391 Pass Receptions, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Chad Hutchinson. Ed Budde (14 years as a Chief, member of the All-time AFL team, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Hunter Hillenmeyer. #82 Dante Hall (NFL record returning a kick or a punt for a touchdown for four consecutive weeks; won four consecutive NFL weekly awards). MIchael Haynes. #31 Priest Holmes (NFL record for most touchdowns in a season at 27). Tommie Harris.

#10 Trent Green. Chris Harris. #88 Tony Gonzalez (2004 Season Lead the NFL in receptions with 102). Rex Grossman. #86 Buck Buchanan (Defense Tackle). Mike Green. #78 Bobby Bell (Linebacker). Roberto Garza.

#63 Willie Lanier (Linebacker). Justin Gage. #36 Mack Lee Hill (Running Back). Carl Ford. #33 Stone Johnson (Running Back). Jamin Elliott. #28 Abner Haynes (Running Back). Steve Edwards.

#16 Len Dawson (Quarterback). Rob Droege. #3 Jan Stenerud (Placekicker). Quinn Dorsey. Mike Webster (1997; 1989-1990). Ryan Dinwiddle. Head coach of the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs for the entire ten-year history of the AFL. Alrese Currie.

Post-season record 5-1. Marc Colombo. Post-season appearances 6. Desmond Clark. Victories 87. Darrell Campbell. Hank Stram (2003; 1960-1974) Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs coach won three AFL titles. Jeremy Cain.

48-yard field goal, the longest in Super Bowl history, against the Vikings in Super Bowl IV. Ruben Brown. six postseason All-Star games (four NFL Pro Bowl). Mike Brown. 7 field goal attempts in a game. Alex Brown. 44 field goals in a season. Lance Briggs.

Career 409 PATs and 436 field goals attempted. Doug Brien. 186 consecutive games played. Mark Bradley. Only pure kicker in the Hall of Fame. 19-year career. Alfonso Boone. Jan Stenerud (1991; 1967-1979) Placekicker. Bernard Berrian.

Popular for come-from-behind wins, including the 1993 playoffs and the outdueling of Elway in 1994 as a Chief. Eddie Berlin. Joe Montana (2000; 1993-1994) Quarterback. Cedric Benson. Marv Levy (2001; 1978-1982). Keith Belton. 1969 Super Bowl IV Champion. Derrick Ballard.

Second Chief selected to go into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Jerry Azumah. Willie "Contact" Lanier (1986; 1967-1977) Outside linebacker. Bryan Anderson. Started American Football League that was the genesis of modern professional football. Zack Abron. Lamar Hunt (1972; 1959-present) Owner. Otis Wilson.

1). Mike Singletary. 11th ranked passer in NFL history (retired No. Reggie Phillips. 19-year career, passed for 28,711 yards and 239 touchdowns. Ron Rivera. MVP of Super Bowl IV. Mike Richardson.

Two AFL championships. William Perry. Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1978. Steve McMichael. Len Dawson (1987; 1963-1975) Quarterback. Wilber Marshall. NAIA All-America in 1962. Dan Hampton.

First player taken in 1963 American Football League Draft. Leslie Frazier. Buck Buchanan (1990; 1963-1975) Lineman. Gary Fencik. Bobby Bell (July 30, 1983; 1963-1974) Linebacker. Dave Duerson. Inducted into the Pro Hall of Fame as a Chief. Richard Dent.

Scored the 100th rushing touchdown of his career as a Chief. Keith Van Horne. Marcus Allen (November 9, 2003; 1992-1997) Running Back. Tom Thayer. December 5, 2004: Trent Green extends team record of consecutive quarterback starts to 60. Matt Suhey. December 5, 2004: Will Shields extends team record of consecutive starts to 187 (actual consecutive games also a team record of 188). Walter Payton.

November 28, 2004: Dante Hall sets team record with 213 kickoff returns. Emery Moorehead. 2003: Will Shields extends franchise record of consecutive starts to 175. Jim McMahon. 2003: Priest Holmes surpasses Otis Taylor for most career touchdowns by a Chief. Dennis McKinnon. November 9, 2003: the Chiefs beat the Cleveland Browns (41-20), winning their ninth straight game which sets a new franchise record for consecutive victories. Jay Hilgenberg.

2002: Priest Holmes sets the single-season rushing record with 1,615 yards. Willie Gault. 2002: Team sets franchise record for most offensive yards with 6,000. Mark Bortz. 2001: Priest Holmes sets the single-season rushing record with 1,555 yards. Jim Covert. 1996: Chiefs have first 4-0 start. Maury Buford.

1995: Chiefs make team record sixth consecutive playoff berth. Kevin Butler. 1990: Derrick Thomas sets team record with 20.0 sacks in a season. October 24, 2004: the Chiefs completed 8 running touchdowns against the Atlanta Falcons, setting the league record for most running touchdowns in a single game. 2003: Priest Holmes sets league record for most touchdowns as well as most rushing touchdowns with 27.

2003: Dante Hall ties league record with 4 kick-returns for touchdowns in a single season. 2003: Morten Andersen has record 316 consecutive scoring games. 2003: Morten Andersen of Kansas City and Gary Anderson of Pittsburg tie for most seaons with 100 or more points with 14. December 22, 2002: Trent Green to Mark Boerigter tied for longest pass completion of 99 yards.

2002: Morten Andersen sets record with 40 field goals over 50 yards in a career. 1998: Chiefs set the record for most penalties (158) and most penalty yardage (1,304) in a season. Kansas City fans like having that record broken in 1998 by John Elway. 1993: Dave Krieg gets record 494 times sacked in a career.

1993: Nick Lowery sets record for most seasons with 100 or more points with 11. November 11, 1990: Derrick Thomas sets league record for most sacks in a game with 7.0. 1975: Len Dawson records 8 seasons leading the league in pass completions. December 25, 1971: Ed Podolak amasses 350 all-purpose yards against the Miami Dolphins, a playoff record.

1969: Len Dawson records 6 consecutive seasons leading the league in pass completions. 1966: Len Dawson ties Johnny Unitas for 4 seasons leading the league in touchdowns.

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