Kansas City Chiefs

Conference AFC
Division West
Founded 1960
Home Field Arrowhead Stadium
City Kansas City, Missouri
Colors Red, white and gold
Head Coach Dick Vermeil
All-Time Record (W-L-T)
(At Start of 2005 Season)
364-320-12

The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas City, Missouri.

Franchise Founded: 1959
First Season: 1960 (charter American Football League member; joined NFL in 1970 league merger)
Formerly known as: Dallas Texans, 1960-62, then moved to Kansas City (1963-).
Home field: Arrowhead Stadium
Previous home fields:
Cotton Bowl, Dallas, TX (1960-1962)
Municipal Stadium, Kansas City, MO (1963-1971)
Uniform colors: Red, White, and Gold
Helmet design: Red helmet with white arrowhead bearing initials K.C.
League championships won: AFL 1962, 1966, 1969
AFC West Championships: 1971, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2003
AFC Championships: None
Super Bowl appearances: I (lost), IV (won)
Current President: Carl Peterson (he is also the General Manager and CEO) [2003]
Current Head coach: Dick Vermeil [2003]

Franchise history

AFL logo Dallas Texans logo (1960-1962)

The team is owned by Lamar Hunt, who founded the team along with their original league, the American Football League, in 1960. The Dallas Texans, as they were known then, defeated the Houston Oilers in a dramatic 1962 AFL championship which went into double overtime. The Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City in 1963. The name, "Chiefs" was selected by a fan contest, and is derived from the then-Mayor of Kansas City, H. Roe Bartle. Bartle was the founder of the Native American-based honor society known as The Tribe of Mic-O-Say within the Boy Scouts of America organization, which earned him the nickname, "The Chief," and was instumental in persuading Lamar Hunt to move his team to Mid-America. It is said that Hunt actually considered keeping the team name as it was, and playing as the "Kansas City Texans."[1 (http://www.kcchiefs.com/history/60s/)]

The Texans/Chiefs franchise was the flagship team of the American Football League, with the most playoff appearances as an AFL team, six (tied with Oakland), the most American Football League Championships (3), and the most Super Bowl appearances, playing in the first Super Bowl, and in the last to be played between League champions. The Texans won the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers, 20 - 17, at the time the longest, and still one of the best professional football championship games ever played. The Chiefs dropped the first Super Bowl to the Packers, then pulverized the Vikings 23 - 7 in the final "true" AFL-NFL World Championsip game after the AFL's last season in 1969. They have the largest presence in the American Football League Hall of Fame, with 24 representatives, and they had just one coach throughout their AFL history, Hall-of-Famer Hank Stram.

The Kansas City Chiefs' (under Dallas Texans name) first stadium was at 22nd and Brooklyn, called "Municipal Stadium". Municipal Stadium opened in 1923 and had 49,002 seats. In 1971, Municipal Stadium was abandoned in favor of the new Arrowhead Stadium. Municipal Stadium was demolished in 1976; it is now a community garden. The Chiefs' first game at Arrowhead Stadium was against the St. Louis Cardinals (Chiefs 24, St. Louis Cardinals 14).

As the Chiefs, under coach Hank Stram, the team played in the first Super Bowl, losing 35-10 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. They earned revenge three years later, upsetting the Minnesota Vikings 23-7. The team won 43 games between 1966 and 1969. The Chiefs had only two winning seasons between 1974 and 1986. They did not get to the playoffs for 15 straight years.

In 1989, Carl Peterson became the team's new President and General Manager. Peterson hired Marty Schottenheimer as the team's coach. Marty Schottenheimer helped establish six straight playoff appearances, three AFC West championships, nine winning seasons, and 76 consecutive soldout games at Arrowhead. Since 1992, no NFL team has a better regular season home winning percentage than Kansas City (27-5 (.844) record).

After going from 13-3 in 1997 and losing the playoff game to the Denver Broncos (10-14), the Chiefs fell to 7-9 in 1998. Marty Schottenheimer took much of the blame for his failed attempts at clock control (also nicknamed Martyball by his critics). He was also in the midst of a quarterback controversy.

In 1997, he started with Elvis Grbac as quarterback. After a loss to Denver, Grbac was injured and Rich Gannon took over. After going 13-2 during the season, Gannon was replaced by Grbac in the playoff game against Denver. The choice to play Grbac over Gannon made many fans angry with Schottenheimer. The following losing seaon with Grbac at quarterback did not help.

Schottenheimer left as head coach, replaced by his defensive coach Gunther Cunningham. In two years, Cunningham showed little improvement, going 9-7 and 7-9. After the loss of Derrick Thomas, the collapse of the defense was unmistakable. The Chiefs' wins were mostly made by a high scoring offense rather than a powerful defense.

After coaching the St. Louis Rams to the Super Bowl and retiring, Dick Vermeil took over as head coach in 2001 with the statement that it takes three years to get a team ready for the Super Bowl. He immediately dropped Elvis Grbac, replacing him with his primary pick for the Rams' quartback, Trent Green. Another notable replacement was Priest Holmes at running back. Three years later, the Chiefs went 13-3 in 2003 and set many records along the way. However, the season sputtered by November and the Chiefs lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the playoffs. As with the loss to the Broncos in the 1997 season, this loss led to a poor following season.

In 2004 Gunther Cunningham was brought back as the defensive coach. However, the defense showed little improvement. The offense, unable to record the same high scores as the previous year, was unable to bring in the wins as they had the previous year.

Team records

The following are team and league records. They may have been surpassed between the time of making the record and the current date. Records are listed in chronological order.

League Records

Franchise Records

Players of note

Pro Football Hall of Famers

Items are listed as Player Name (date inducted; years played as a chief) Short Bio. Names are in italics for players who made a majority of their contributions with another team.

Retired numbers

Chiefs Hall of Fame

External Link: Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (http://www.kcchiefs.com/halloffame/)

Current players

Not to be forgotten

Historical


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External Link: Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (http://www.kcchiefs.com/halloffame/). Previously, people entered the movie theater whenever they showed up and left whenever they wanted; after Psycho, movie theaters quickly began adopting a policy of setting specific times for showing films and (generally) not letting people in afterwards. Names are in italics for players who made a majority of their contributions with another team. This was so the surprises of the film would remain surprises. Items are listed as Player Name (date inducted; years played as a chief) Short Bio. In the advertising campaign in its original run, Hitchcock told movie theater owners not to allow seating after the movie began. Records are listed in chronological order. Psycho is often considered to be the first of the slasher movie genre.

They may have been surpassed between the time of making the record and the current date. Its box office success helped propel Hollywood toward more graphic displays of previous censorsed themes. The following are team and league records. It was unprecedented in its depiction of sexuality and violence (in addition, it was the first film ever to depict a flushing toilet onscreen). The offense, unable to record the same high scores as the previous year, was unable to bring in the wins as they had the previous year. Psycho is an example of the types of film that appeared in the 1960s after the erosion of the Production Code. However, the defense showed little improvement. Part of its effect was due to the use of startling editing techniques borrowed from the Soviet Montage filmmakers, and to Bernard Herrman's bizarre but effective musical score.

In 2004 Gunther Cunningham was brought back as the defensive coach. The most original and influential moment in the film is the "shower scene", which became iconic in pop culture because it was one of the most terrifying scenes ever filmed. As with the loss to the Broncos in the 1997 season, this loss led to a poor following season. One example of the radicalism of Psycho is its storyline: by repeatedly setting up protagonists and then killing them off, Hitchcock plays on audience expectations of Classical storylines, which are then violated. However, the season sputtered by November and the Chiefs lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the playoffs. Psycho's unconventional storytelling and stylized photography and editing show the influence of the French New Wave and the European art films that Hitchcock admired. Three years later, the Chiefs went 13-3 in 2003 and set many records along the way. Psycho is often seen as a turning point in film history, representing the shift from Classical to the more experimental "Post-Classical" film.

Another notable replacement was Priest Holmes at running back. The last scene shows Bates totally taken over by his "mother.". He immediately dropped Elvis Grbac, replacing him with his primary pick for the Rams' quartback, Trent Green. At the end of the film a forensic psychiatrist (Oakland) explains to Lila, Sam and the police that Bates' mother is really dead and that Bates periodically assumes her personality; the dominant half of his personality is his re-imagining of his mother. The Bates personality has no idea that his mother is dead, so has no knowledge of "her" crimes. Louis Rams to the Super Bowl and retiring, Dick Vermeil took over as head coach in 2001 with the statement that it takes three years to get a team ready for the Super Bowl. Only at that moment is the killer revealed to be Norman Bates himself (cross-dressed in his mother's clothing, complete with wig). After coaching the St. Lila goes up to the basement of the Bates' adjacent home only to find the corpse of Bates' mother.

The Chiefs' wins were mostly made by a high scoring offense rather than a powerful defense. Lila and Sam next go to the motel to follow up when the private detective disappears. After the loss of Derrick Thomas, the collapse of the defense was unmistakable. Arbogast traces her to the Bates Motel and eventually meets the same fate as Marion. In two years, Cunningham showed little improvement, going 9-7 and 7-9. Marion's sister Lila (Miles) and boyfriend hire a private detective, Milton Arbogast (Balsam), to find her. Schottenheimer left as head coach, replaced by his defensive coach Gunther Cunningham. The rest of the film deals with the search for Marion.

The following losing seaon with Grbac at quarterback did not help. Bates is horrified when he finds the corpse, but cleans up as if he has done this several times before. The choice to play Grbac over Gannon made many fans angry with Schottenheimer. Unlike Mary from the novel, Marion is not decapitated in the scene. After going 13-2 during the season, Gannon was replaced by Grbac in the playoff game against Denver. She stabs Marion to death in the famous shower scene (with its now trademark score by Bernard Herrmann, featuring the screeching violins). After a loss to Denver, Grbac was injured and Rich Gannon took over. It turns out that Bates' mother is not ill physically, but mentally.

In 1997, he started with Elvis Grbac as quarterback. Although the motel receives few visitors, Norman keeps it open to give him some relief from taking care of his ill mother. Norman's other hobby is taxidermy: birds are his favorite subject. He was also in the midst of a quarterback controversy. She stops in at the Bates motel, run by Norman Bates (Perkins) because it is raining and she keeps drowsing off. Marty Schottenheimer took much of the blame for his failed attempts at clock control (also nicknamed Martyball by his critics). This road was originally the main route, so it has an old motel on it. After going from 13-3 in 1997 and losing the playoff game to the Denver Broncos (10-14), the Chiefs fell to 7-9 in 1998. Just across the state line in California, she trades her car and some cash with a new car because she believes she is being followed; on the way back to Phoenix she misses a turnoff and eventually ends up on a nearly-deserted road.

Since 1992, no NFL team has a better regular season home winning percentage than Kansas City (27-5 (.844) record). Instead of depositing the money she leaves town with it with the intention of asking Sam to marry her. Marty Schottenheimer helped establish six straight playoff appearances, three AFC West championships, nine winning seasons, and 76 consecutive soldout games at Arrowhead. Marion returns to work and receives $40,000 in cash from her boss to deposit at the bank. Peterson hired Marty Schottenheimer as the team's coach. The movie's first scene takes place in a cheap hotel room and shows Marion Crane (Leigh) and her boyfriend Sam Loomis (Gavin) in their undergarments after a Friday afternoon tryst. In 1989, Carl Peterson became the team's new President and General Manager. The first movie starred Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins, Martin Balsam, John Gavin, Vera Miles, and Simon Oakland.

They did not get to the playoffs for 15 straight years. The book had Mary Crane from Dallas, Texas as the leading lady. Since a real Mary Crane exists, Alfred Hitchcock changed her into Marion Crane from Phoenix, Arizona. The Chiefs had only two winning seasons between 1974 and 1986. In 1998 a remake was directed by Gus van Sant, for which he was awarded a Golden Raspberries Award. The team won 43 games between 1966 and 1969. The affecting, subtly humorous screenplay was written by Joseph Stefano, who later went on to be the producer of (and frequent episode writer for) the pioneering mid-1960s science fiction television series The Outer Limits. They earned revenge three years later, upsetting the Minnesota Vikings 23-7. Robert Bloch's pulp novel Psycho was made into a black-and-white feature film in 1960 by Alfred Hitchcock.

As the Chiefs, under coach Hank Stram, the team played in the first Super Bowl, losing 35-10 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. In order to get Psycho made, Hitchcock had to put up the cash himself. Louis Cardinals 14). In 1993, the video-artist Douglas Gordon exhibited a version of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film which was slowed down so that it lasted for 24 hours. Louis Cardinals (Chiefs 24, St. Her killing remains a mystery. The Chiefs' first game at Arrowhead Stadium was against the St. Despite a US$50,000 reward and an international investigation, the case is still unsolved.

Municipal Stadium was demolished in 1976; it is now a community garden. Valerie was killed at night at home by an unknown intruder with a hammer and a knife. In 1971, Municipal Stadium was abandoned in favor of the new Arrowhead Stadium. Percy (R, Il) days before its scheduled airing caused CBS to cancel this plan. The Kansas City Chiefs' (under Dallas Texans name) first stadium was at 22nd and Brooklyn, called "Municipal Stadium". Municipal Stadium opened in 1923 and had 49,002 seats. Senator Charles H. They have the largest presence in the American Football League Hall of Fame, with 24 representatives, and they had just one coach throughout their AFL history, Hall-of-Famer Hank Stram. In 1966, CBS had planned to air Psycho. However, the September 18 murder of Valerie Percy, 21, one of the twin daughters of then-U.S.

The Chiefs dropped the first Super Bowl to the Packers, then pulverized the Vikings 23 - 7 in the final "true" AFL-NFL World Championsip game after the AFL's last season in 1969. Psycho is consistently in the top 25 on the Internet Movie Database's list of top 250 films, was #18 on American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies and #1 on its 100 Years, 100 Thrills, and has been deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. The Texans won the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game against the Houston Oilers, 20 - 17, at the time the longest, and still one of the best professional football championship games ever played. A knife, wielded by Hitchcock himself, plunging into a melon was the source of the sound effect. The Texans/Chiefs franchise was the flagship team of the American Football League, with the most playoff appearances as an AFL team, six (tied with Oakland), the most American Football League Championships (3), and the most Super Bowl appearances, playing in the first Super Bowl, and in the last to be played between League champions. Chocolate sauce, which shows up better than stage blood on black-and-white film, was used as the blood for the infamous shower scene. It is said that Hunt actually considered keeping the team name as it was, and playing as the "Kansas City Texans."[1 (http://www.kcchiefs.com/history/60s/)]. To test the scare factor of the "mother's corpse" prop, Hitchcock placed it in Janet Leigh's dressing room and listened for how loud she screamed when she discovered it.

Bartle was the founder of the Native American-based honor society known as The Tribe of Mic-O-Say within the Boy Scouts of America organization, which earned him the nickname, "The Chief," and was instumental in persuading Lamar Hunt to move his team to Mid-America. Although there is little visible gore portrayed on the screen, the infamous "shower scene" is often regarded as one of the most frightening sequences in cinema history. Roe Bartle. Psycho was the first film to show a toilet being flushed onscreen. The name, "Chiefs" was selected by a fan contest, and is derived from the then-Mayor of Kansas City, H. Psycho was the first film to introduce a single main character and then kill her halfway into the film - a rather shocking turn of events in 1960, with no apparent indication of where the story might go afterwards. The Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City in 1963. Bloch states that he did not realize "how closely the imaginary character I'd created resembled the real Ed Gein both in overt act and apparent motivation" until years later.

The Dallas Texans, as they were known then, defeated the Houston Oilers in a dramatic 1962 AFL championship which went into double overtime. The idea that "the man next door may be a monster unsuspected even in the gossip-ridden microcosm of small-town life" [1] (http://www.darkecho.com/darkecho/horroronline/bloch.html) took root in Bloch's subconscious at that time. The team is owned by Lamar Hunt, who founded the team along with their original league, the American Football League, in 1960. Robert Bloch lived in Weyauwega, Wisconson, close to Ed Gein's stalking grounds in 1957, when the Gein murders were discovered. The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas City, Missouri. Macy as Arbogast, Viggo Mortensen as Sam Loomis, Julianne Moore as Lila Crane, and Robert Forster as the psychiatrist. Jack Steadman (General Manager). Anne Heche plays Marion Crane, with Vince Vaughn as Norman, William H.

Lloyd Burruss. A few small changes are introduced to make explicit the original movie's sexual subtext. Tony Reed. The remake is in colour and features a different cast, but aside from this it is a virtually shot for shot remake that copies Hitchcock's camera movements and editing. Smith. In 1998, Gus Van Sant remade Psycho. T. Bates Motel (1987) is a TV movie in which the motel is taken over by a new, equally psychotic owner.

J. The sequels are generally considered weak and unimaginative in comparison to the original. Gary Barbaro. Anthony Perkins returned to his role in all three sequels, and Vera Miles returned to hers in Psycho II. Psycho IV was written by Joseph Stefano, who wrote the original film. Jerrell Wilson (Punter 1963-77; Chiefs Hall of Fame 1987, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). The film spawned four sequels: Psycho II (1983), Psycho III (1986), and Psycho IV: The Beginning (1990); the latter was a TV movie. Tyrer is a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.).

Jim Tyrer (Tackle 1969 Super Bowl IV Champion; 6-foot-6, 270 pound Tackle would take on two defensive linemen at once. Died shortly after a car accident in 2000). Derrick Thomas (school record with 52 quarterback sacks and 74 tackles behind the line of scrimmage; Finished 10th in the Heisman Trophy voting; Kansas City Chief for eleven years; team career records: 119.5 sacks, 3 safeties and 18 fumble recoveries. Otis Taylor (46-yard touchdown reception in Super Bowl IV, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.).

5, 1980].). Oakland [Oct. Art Still (Career Sacks, 72.5, 1978-87; Season Sacks, 14.5 1980 and 1984; Game Sacks, 4.0 : vs. A member of the All-time All-AFL team, one of only twenty players who were in the American Football League for its entire ten-year existence, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.).

Johnny Robinson (In Super Bowl IV, helped defeat the Vikings, 23-7, picking off a Joe Kapp pass). Christian Okoye (Nigerian; omitted from his Country's Olympic team in track and field; drafted in 1987 by the Chiefs in the second round; Chiefs rushing records, including total yards in a season, attempts in a season, touchdowns in a season, attempts in a single game, 100-yard games in a season, and was the first Chiefs running back to rush for 1,000 yards for more than one season.). Curtis McClinton (scored a touchdown in Super Bowl I). Bill Maas.

Also played for the San Diego Chargers and the Houston Oilers, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Ernie Ladd (Defensive tackle; 1967-1968. Bobby Hunt (1962 [Dallas Texans] - 1967 [Kansas City Chiefs]; Defensive Back, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Holub (started the first world championship game between the AFL and NFL (before it was called the Super Bowl) at linebacker and started Super Bowl IV, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.).

E.J. Headrick played the entire game and the next game. Headrick is a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Sherrill "Psycho" Headrick (Texan and Chief linebacker that withstood pain and injury when he played with a fractured neck vertebrae. All-time AFL leader in all-purpose yards with 12,065, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.).

Abner Haynes (1960 Rookie of the Year and MVP. In June 29, 1983, Joe drowned attempting to rescue two boys from a rain-swollen pit shortly after rescuing one other; posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal and the NCAA Award of Valor.) 37Forever.org (http://www.37forever.org) was formed to teach KC area kids how to swim in honor of the valor that Joe Delaney demonstrated. Joe Delaney (Running back 1981-82, Rookie of the Year 1981, Pro Bowl 1981, College Football Hall of Fame 1997, Chiefs Hall of Fame 2004. Deron Cherry (50 interceptions; 15 career fumble recoveries; Byron White Humanitarian Award for service to his team, community, and country).

Chris Burford (391 Pass Receptions, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). Ed Budde (14 years as a Chief, member of the All-time AFL team, and a member of the American Football League Hall of Fame.). #82 Dante Hall (NFL record returning a kick or a punt for a touchdown for four consecutive weeks; won four consecutive NFL weekly awards). #31 Priest Holmes (NFL record for most touchdowns in a season at 27).

#10 Trent Green. #88 Tony Gonzalez (2004 Season Lead the NFL in receptions with 102). #86 Buck Buchanan (Defense Tackle). #78 Bobby Bell (Linebacker).

#63 Willie Lanier (Linebacker). #36 Mack Lee Hill (Running Back). #33 Stone Johnson (Running Back). #28 Abner Haynes (Running Back).

#16 Len Dawson (Quarterback). #3 Jan Stenerud (Placekicker). Mike Webster (1997; 1989-1990). Head coach of the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs for the entire ten-year history of the AFL.

Post-season record 5-1. Post-season appearances 6. Victories 87. Hank Stram (2003; 1960-1974) Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs coach won three AFL titles.

48-yard field goal, the longest in Super Bowl history, against the Vikings in Super Bowl IV. six postseason All-Star games (four NFL Pro Bowl). 7 field goal attempts in a game. 44 field goals in a season.

Career 409 PATs and 436 field goals attempted. 186 consecutive games played. Only pure kicker in the Hall of Fame. 19-year career. Jan Stenerud (1991; 1967-1979) Placekicker.

Popular for come-from-behind wins, including the 1993 playoffs and the outdueling of Elway in 1994 as a Chief. Joe Montana (2000; 1993-1994) Quarterback. Marv Levy (2001; 1978-1982). 1969 Super Bowl IV Champion.

Second Chief selected to go into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Willie "Contact" Lanier (1986; 1967-1977) Outside linebacker. Started American Football League that was the genesis of modern professional football. Lamar Hunt (1972; 1959-present) Owner.

1). 11th ranked passer in NFL history (retired No. 19-year career, passed for 28,711 yards and 239 touchdowns. MVP of Super Bowl IV.

Two AFL championships. Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1978. Len Dawson (1987; 1963-1975) Quarterback. NAIA All-America in 1962.

First player taken in 1963 American Football League Draft. Buck Buchanan (1990; 1963-1975) Lineman. Bobby Bell (July 30, 1983; 1963-1974) Linebacker. Inducted into the Pro Hall of Fame as a Chief.

Scored the 100th rushing touchdown of his career as a Chief. Marcus Allen (November 9, 2003; 1992-1997) Running Back. December 5, 2004: Trent Green extends team record of consecutive quarterback starts to 60. December 5, 2004: Will Shields extends team record of consecutive starts to 187 (actual consecutive games also a team record of 188).

November 28, 2004: Dante Hall sets team record with 213 kickoff returns. 2003: Will Shields extends franchise record of consecutive starts to 175. 2003: Priest Holmes surpasses Otis Taylor for most career touchdowns by a Chief. November 9, 2003: the Chiefs beat the Cleveland Browns (41-20), winning their ninth straight game which sets a new franchise record for consecutive victories.

2002: Priest Holmes sets the single-season rushing record with 1,615 yards. 2002: Team sets franchise record for most offensive yards with 6,000. 2001: Priest Holmes sets the single-season rushing record with 1,555 yards. 1996: Chiefs have first 4-0 start.

1995: Chiefs make team record sixth consecutive playoff berth. 1990: Derrick Thomas sets team record with 20.0 sacks in a season. October 24, 2004: the Chiefs completed 8 running touchdowns against the Atlanta Falcons, setting the league record for most running touchdowns in a single game. 2003: Priest Holmes sets league record for most touchdowns as well as most rushing touchdowns with 27.

2003: Dante Hall ties league record with 4 kick-returns for touchdowns in a single season. 2003: Morten Andersen has record 316 consecutive scoring games. 2003: Morten Andersen of Kansas City and Gary Anderson of Pittsburg tie for most seaons with 100 or more points with 14. December 22, 2002: Trent Green to Mark Boerigter tied for longest pass completion of 99 yards.

2002: Morten Andersen sets record with 40 field goals over 50 yards in a career. 1998: Chiefs set the record for most penalties (158) and most penalty yardage (1,304) in a season. Kansas City fans like having that record broken in 1998 by John Elway. 1993: Dave Krieg gets record 494 times sacked in a career.

1993: Nick Lowery sets record for most seasons with 100 or more points with 11. November 11, 1990: Derrick Thomas sets league record for most sacks in a game with 7.0. 1975: Len Dawson records 8 seasons leading the league in pass completions. December 25, 1971: Ed Podolak amasses 350 all-purpose yards against the Miami Dolphins, a playoff record.

1969: Len Dawson records 6 consecutive seasons leading the league in pass completions. 1966: Len Dawson ties Johnny Unitas for 4 seasons leading the league in touchdowns.

09-05-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.