JonBenét Ramsey

JonBenét Patricia Ramsey (August 6, 1990 – December 25, 1996) was a child beauty pageant queen who was found murdered in the basement of her family's home in Boulder, Colorado at the age of six the day after Christmas. The crime, which still remains unsolved, attracted intense nationwide media interest. The tantalizing clues of the case have inspired numerous books and articles that attempt to solve the mystery.

JonBenét was born at Northside Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. The name is an amalgam of her father's first and middle names, John Bennett. The family moved to Colorado when she was one year old.

JonBenét held a number of titles, including (in no specific order): Little Miss Charlevoix Michigan, Colorado State All-Star Kids Cover Girl, America's Royal Miss, National Tiny Miss Beauty, Little Miss Merry Christmas, and Little Miss Colorado, Little Miss Sunburst.

JonBenét's grave lies in Saint James Episcopal Cemetery in Marietta, Georgia, next to the grave of Elizabeth Ramsey (d. 1992), a child from John's first marriage who died in an automobile accident. Also buried nearby is JonBenét's grandmother. A total of 12 Ramsey headstones lie in the cemetery.^ 

In fictional portrayals of her life, JonBenét has been played by Dyanne Iandoli, Mackenzie Rosman, and Julia Granstrom.

The murder case

At 5:52AM on December 26, 1996, Patsy Ramsey (JonBenét's mother) telephoned 9-1-1. She told the operator, "we have a kidnapping", and explained that "there's a note left and our daughter is gone". She said she had just gotten up and found the ransom note.

An initial police search of the Ramsey home found nothing. JonBenét's body was found later that day by John Ramsey (JonBenét's father) in a basement room of the home. A garrote made from a length of nylon cord and the handle of a paintbrush had been used to strangle her; her skull had suffered severe blunt trauma; and she may have been sexually assaulted. The "official" cause of death was asphyxia by strangulation associated with craniocerebral trauma.

The police did not find any signs of forced entry into the home.

The note

Investigators determined that the lengthy ransom note was written on a pad of paper that belonged to the Ramsey family. The Sharpie felt-tip pen used to write the note was found in a container on the Ramseys' kitchen counter, along with other pens of the same type.

There were no fingerprints found on the note.

The text of the note has many odd features, among them the $118,000 demanded. Perhaps coincidentally, John Ramsey earned a bonus that year of $118,117.50.

Recent developments

In December 2003, forensic investigators extracted enough material from a mixed blood sample found on the deceased's underwear to establish a DNA profile. The DNA belongs to an unknown male. The DNA was submitted to the FBI's Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a database containing over 1.6 million DNA profiles, mainly from convicted felons. The sample has yet to find a match in the database, though it continues to be checked for partial matches on a weekly basis.


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The sample has yet to find a match in the database, though it continues to be checked for partial matches on a weekly basis. The bodies of some unnamed hostages, believed to be Iraqi, were allegedly found hanging from the walls. The DNA was submitted to the FBI's Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a database containing over 1.6 million DNA profiles, mainly from convicted felons. military stated that, in 20 houses, it found paraphernalia associated with hostage-holding and torture, including shackles, blood-stained walls, and a torture chamber. The DNA belongs to an unknown male. The U.S. In December 2003, forensic investigators extracted enough material from a mixed blood sample found on the deceased's underwear to establish a DNA profile. military invade the town in an effort to quell an insurgency, and it was during this operation that Bigley's cage was discovered.

Perhaps coincidentally, John Ramsey earned a bonus that year of $118,117.50. [3] The November 2004 "Battle of Fallujah" [4] saw the U.S. The text of the note has many odd features, among them the $118,000 demanded. military to be a Sunni Muslim stronghold. There were no fingerprints found on the note. The chicken-wire cage Bigley was filmed in was later reported to have been found in a house in the Iraqi town of Fallujah, a town said by the U.S. The Sharpie felt-tip pen used to write the note was found in a container on the Ramseys' kitchen counter, along with other pens of the same type. The sometimes controversial columnist Mark Steyn had his column pulled from the British Daily Telegraph on October 11, 2004 when in it he stated that Bigley's last words "Tony Blair has not done enough for me" would not be high up on his list of final utterances.

Investigators determined that the lengthy ransom note was written on a pad of paper that belonged to the Ramsey family. The same high-coverage news strategy was notably absent in the case of Margaret Hassan, the Irish-born aid worker, who held Irish, British and Iraqi citizenship, who was kidnapped on October 19, 2004 and killed two weeks later. The police did not find any signs of forced entry into the home. After his death, the British media were criticized for the amount of news coverage his situation had been given. The "official" cause of death was asphyxia by strangulation associated with craniocerebral trauma. The captors attempted to drive Bigley, who was carrying a gun and was disguised, out of town, the reports said, but he was spotted and recaptured at an insurgent checkpoint. A garrote made from a length of nylon cord and the handle of a paintbrush had been used to strangle her; her skull had suffered severe blunt trauma; and she may have been sexually assaulted. News reports [2] published after Bigley's death suggested he had briefly managed to escape from the kidnappers with the help of two MI6 agents of Syrian and Iraqi origin, who paid two of his captors to help him.

JonBenét's body was found later that day by John Ramsey (JonBenét's father) in a basement room of the home. According to some of those who have watched it, there appear to be continuity gaps, and the final scene shows what some have interpreted as a bullet wound to Bigley's head. An initial police search of the Ramsey home found nothing. However, as with the Nick Berg video, the events may not be in real time. She said she had just gotten up and found the ransom note. According to reporters who watched the film, Bigley was wearing an orange jumpsuit, and read out a statement, before one of the kidnappers stepped forward and cut off his head with a knife. She told the operator, "we have a kidnapping", and explained that "there's a note left and our daughter is gone". The kidnappers made a film apparently showing Bigley's killing, and the tape was subsequently posted on Islamist websites and on one "shock" site.

At 5:52AM on December 26, 1996, Patsy Ramsey (JonBenét's mother) telephoned 9-1-1. As of December 2005, his body has not been recovered. . A multi-faith memorial service, attended by Tony Blair and his wife Cherie, was held for him in Liverpool on November 13. In fictional portrayals of her life, JonBenét has been played by Dyanne Iandoli, Mackenzie Rosman, and Julia Granstrom. He was only weeks away from retirement and the birth of his first grandchild. A total of 12 Ramsey headstones lie in the cemetery.^ . His death was first reported on Abu Dhabi television the following day.

Also buried nearby is JonBenét's grandmother. Despite the efforts to save him, Bigley was beheaded on October 7, 2004. 1992), a child from John's first marriage who died in an automobile accident. On October 1, another 100,000 leaflets asking for information about Bigley were distributed by the British Foreign Office in Baghdad. JonBenét's grave lies in Saint James Episcopal Cemetery in Marietta, Georgia, next to the grave of Elizabeth Ramsey (d. I'm just one person.". JonBenét held a number of titles, including (in no specific order): Little Miss Charlevoix Michigan, Colorado State All-Star Kids Cover Girl, America's Royal Miss, National Tiny Miss Beauty, Little Miss Merry Christmas, and Little Miss Colorado, Little Miss Sunburst. He doesn't care about me.

The family moved to Colorado when she was one year old. In the video, Bigley again begged for his life, saying, "Tony Blair is lying. The name is an amalgam of her father's first and middle names, John Bennett. facility in Guantanamo Bay. JonBenét was born at Northside Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. A third video was released on September 29 showing Bigley chained inside a small chicken-wire cage, wearing an orange boiler suit apparently intended to be reminiscent of those worn by inmates at the U.S. The tantalizing clues of the case have inspired numerous books and articles that attempt to solve the mystery. Bigley's family, particularly his brother Paul, was successful, with the help of the Irish government, in eliciting support for Bigley's release from Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, King Hussein of Jordan, and Colonel Gadaffi of Libya, who made public statements.

The crime, which still remains unsolved, attracted intense nationwide media interest. The Muslim Council of Britain condemned the kidnapping, saying it was contrary to the teachings of the Qur'an and sent a senior two-man delegation to Iraq to negotiate on Bigley's behalf. JonBenét Patricia Ramsey (August 6, 1990 – December 25, 1996) was a child beauty pageant queen who was found murdered in the basement of her family's home in Boulder, Colorado at the age of six the day after Christmas. In his home city of Liverpool, Christian and Muslim religious and civic leaders held joint prayer sessions for his safe return. On September 24, 50,000 leaflets prepared by the British Foreign Office, asking for information about Bigley's whereabouts, were distributed in al-Mansour, the wealthy district of Baghdad Bigley had been living in. Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams made two appeals, one on September 30 and a second on October 7.

Higgins made an appeal on al-Jazeera. Irish Labour Party spokesman on foreign affairs Micheal D. It was hoped this status would aid his release, as Ireland did not participate in the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and the Irish Government issued Bigley an Irish passport in absentia, which was shown on al-Jazeera television. Around this time it emerged Bigley's mother, Lil, 86 years old at the time of his abduction, had been born in Dublin and was therefore an Irish citizen; this meant Bigley himself was also an Irish citizen from birth.

Clearly exhausted and highly emotional, Bigley spoke directly to Tony Blair: "I need you to help me now, Mr Blair, because you are the only person on God's earth who can help me." The video was posted on Islamist websites and shown on al Jazeera television. A second video was released on September 22 by Bigley's captors, this time showing Bigley pleading for his life and begging British Prime Minister Tony Blair to save him. government was quick to deny the releases were imminent, putting a further strain on America's claims that it was not an occupying power. However, the U.S.

Ammash could be released immediately, stressing that this was about to happen anyway, as no charges had been brought against the women. Taha and Dr. The Iraqi provisional government stated that Dr. [1].

custody, but it is not known to what extent these reports were out-of-date by the time of Bigley's kidnap. News reports had earlier suggested that other Iraqi women were indeed being held in U.S. Both women participated in Iraq's biological-weapons program, according to the United Nations weapons inspectorate. Huda Salih Mahdi Ammash.

Rihab Taha and U.S.-educated Dr. custody were two so-called high-profile Iraqi scientists, British-educated Dr. The British government issued a statement saying it held no Iraqi women prisoners, and that the only two women known to be in U.S. It was also reported that a Special Air Service (SAS) team had been placed on standby in Iraq in the event that a rescue mission might become possible.

British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw and Prime Minister Tony Blair personally contacted the Bigley family several times to assure them that everything possible was being done, short of direct negotiation with the kidnappers. After Armstrong and Hensley were killed, the British government and media responded by turning Bigley's fate into Britain's major political issue during this period, leading to subsequent claims that the government had become a hostage to the situation, as President Jimmy Carter had arguably done during the 444-day Iran hostage crisis in 1979-81. . After Bigley's death, it emerged that the British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) had launched a rescue operation that had allowed Bigley to escape for a brief period, but he was recaptured at a roadblock, taken back to the Tawhid and Jihad safehouse, and beheaded shortly afterwards.

Using voice-recognition technology, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has claimed that al-Zarqawi personally carried out the beheadings. Videos of the killings were posted on Islamist websites and on at least one U.S.-based "shock" site specializing in violence and pornography. Armstrong was beheaded on September 20 when the deadline expired, Hensley 24 hours later, and Bigley over two weeks later, despite the intervention of the Muslim Council of Britain and the indirect intervention of the British government. The kidnappers said they would kill the men within 48 hours if their demands for the release of Iraqi women prisoners held by coalition forces were not met.

On September 18, the Tawhid and Jihad ("Oneness of God and Holy War") Islamist group, led by Jordanian Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, released a video of the three men kneeling in front of a Tawhid and Jihad banner. All were subsequently beheaded. The three men were civil engineers working for Gulf Supplies and Commercial Services, a company working on reconstruction projects in Iraq. citizens.

Kenneth John Bigley (1942 – October 7, 2004), was a civil engineer from Liverpool, England, who was kidnapped in the al-Mansour district of Baghdad, Iraq on September 16, 2004, along with Jack Hensley and Eugene Armstrong, both U.S.

08-05-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.