Joke

A joke is a short story or short series of words spoken or communicated with the intent of being laughed at or found humorous by the listener or reader. A practical joke differs in that the humour is not verbal, but mainly visual (e.g. putting a custard pie in somebody's face).

Most jokes contain two components: joke setup (for example, "A man walks into a bar...") and a punchline, which, when juxtaposed with the setup, provides the necessary irony to elicit laughter from the audience.

Psychology of jokes

Why we laugh has been the subject of serious academic study, examples being:

  • Sigmund Freud's "Jokes and Their Relationship to the Unconscious".
  • Marvin Minsky in Society of Mind.
  • Edward de Bono in "The mechanism of the mind" and "I am right, you are wrong".

Laughter, the intended human reaction to jokes, is healthful in moderation, uses the stomach muscles, and releases endorphins, natural happiness-inducing chemicals, into the bloodstream.

One of the most complete and informative books on different types of jokes and how to tell them is Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor, which encompasses several broad categories of humor, and gives useful tips on how to tell them, who to tell them to, and ways to change the joke to fit your audience.

Types of jokes

Jokes often depend for humour on the unexpected, the mildly taboo (which can include the distasteful or socially improper), or the playing on stereotypes and other cultural myths. Many jokes fit into more than one category.

Mathematical jokes

Main article: Mathematical joke

There are numerous jokes related to mathematics. Many of them are in-jokes, but may also be understandable by laymen.

A series of them parodies mathematical/logical chains of reason.

  • Mathematical proof:
  • Logic

Jokes in a certain category superficially look like math, but their essence is more akin to chemical composition.

Yo' mama jokes

Main article: The dozens. Jokes of this kind originate in the dozens, an African-American custom with West African roots in which two competitors -- usually males -- go head to head in a competition of comedic, often ribald, trash-talk. The target of the traded insults is most often the opponents' mothers, but can involve other family members as well.

  • Yo mama's so dumb when your dad said it's chilly outside, she ran out with a spoon.
  • Yo mama so dark that she can leave fingerprints on charcoal.
  • Yo mama so fat when she gets on the scale it says to be continued.
  • Yo mama so fat, when her pager goes off, people think she's backing up.
  • Yo mama's glasses are so thick, she can see the future.

Political jokes

Political jokes tell about politicians and heads of states. There are two large categories of this type of jokes. The first one makes fun of a negative attitude to political opponents or to politicians in general. The second one makes fun of political cliches, mottos, catch phrases or simply blunders of politicians.

Examples

A related subcategory is lawyer jokes plays on the commonly-held stereotypes about lawyers.

The following joke circulates for quite some time, with many different versions for <President> and <Other Country>.


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The following joke circulates for quite some time, with many different versions for <President> and <Other Country>. A non-alcoholic version of a Mojito, but using crushed ice, and fresh apple juice instead of rum or soda (club soda). A related subcategory is lawyer jokes plays on the commonly-held stereotypes about lawyers. Also very tasty is a fauxjito (pronounced foe-HEE-toe), a virgin (without the rum) version of the mojito. The second one makes fun of political cliches, mottos, catch phrases or simply blunders of politicians. Add plenty of ice, then add the rum, and top off with soda water. The first one makes fun of a negative attitude to political opponents or to politicians in general. Grind/bruise the mint leaves.

There are two large categories of this type of jokes. Combine lime juice, 4 teaspoons sugar, and a large sprig of mint in the bottom of a glass. Political jokes tell about politicians and heads of states. Another recipe for mojitos from the Paradisus Varadero Resort:. The target of the traded insults is most often the opponents' mothers, but can involve other family members as well. Room should remain for another 3½ shots of soda water, which should be stirred in gently, to ensure that it does not lose its fizz. Main article: The dozens. Jokes of this kind originate in the dozens, an African-American custom with West African roots in which two competitors -- usually males -- go head to head in a competition of comedic, often ribald, trash-talk. Pour the contents of the shaker and the other ½ lime in a tall glass.

Jokes in a certain category superficially look like math, but their essence is more akin to chemical composition. Shake the mixture just enough to bruise the mint leaves — about 5 seconds is fine; the leaves should remain mostly whole. A series of them parodies mathematical/logical chains of reason. Now add five whole mint leaves and two handfuls of ice. Many of them are in-jokes, but may also be understandable by laymen. Shake well until the sugar is dissolved and the mixture is chilled. There are numerous jokes related to mathematics. In a cocktail shaker, mix.

Main article: Mathematical joke. It was featured in the action film Bad Boys II, and in 2002 was used in the James Bond movie Die Another Day. Many jokes fit into more than one category. Rum producer Bacardi popularised an updated version of the drink in the early 2000s. Jokes often depend for humour on the unexpected, the mildly taboo (which can include the distasteful or socially improper), or the playing on stereotypes and other cultural myths. Which was named after Sir Francis Drake. One of the most complete and informative books on different types of jokes and how to tell them is Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor, which encompasses several broad categories of humor, and gives useful tips on how to tell them, who to tell them to, and ways to change the joke to fit your audience. Note: The Mojito is based on an older drink called a "Draquecito".

Laughter, the intended human reaction to jokes, is healthful in moderation, uses the stomach muscles, and releases endorphins, natural happiness-inducing chemicals, into the bloodstream. The Mojito is basically a "Rum Collins" but with mint. Why we laugh has been the subject of serious academic study, examples being:. (5) Soda (club soda) is used to top off all Cuban Mojitos. . If also wish to use crushed ice, then do not use soda as the crushed ice will dilute the Mojito sufficiently. Most jokes contain two components: joke setup (for example, "A man walks into a bar...") and a punchline, which, when juxtaposed with the setup, provides the necessary irony to elicit laughter from the audience. Crushed ice is favoured in English and American Bars.

putting a custard pie in somebody's face). (4) Ice Cubes are used in the Cuban Mojito. A practical joke differs in that the humour is not verbal, but mainly visual (e.g. You can take it upon yourself to pre-dilute this with water, in the form of a syrup or mix the white sugar with the lime juice. A joke is a short story or short series of words spoken or communicated with the intent of being laughed at or found humorous by the listener or reader. (3) in Cuba they use white sugar. Yo mama's glasses are so thick, she can see the future. Lime juice is not meant to make the Mojito a sour drink, but rather freshen it up.

Yo mama so fat, when her pager goes off, people think she's backing up. Pre-squeeze juice beforehand and pour that into the glass. Yo mama so fat when she gets on the scale it says to be continued. (2) some people like to muddle lime fruit in their mojito, but this is not authentic. Yo mama so dark that she can leave fingerprints on charcoal. This is a misnomer, as "yerba buena" simply means "good herb" and refers to many different types of mint. Yo mama's so dumb when your dad said it's chilly outside, she ran out with a spoon. (1) the mint used in a mojito is often referred to as "yerba buena".

Logic

. Garnish with a fresh sprig of Mint. Mathematical proof:
. Mix everything together and top the glass with soda (club soda). Edward de Bono in "The mechanism of the mind" and "I am right, you are wrong". Fill the glass with ice cubes. Marvin Minsky in Society of Mind. add the sugar and lime, and then the rum.

Sigmund Freud's "Jokes and Their Relationship to the Unconscious".
The mint leaves should be gently bruised with a muddler or similar implement in the bottom of an empty tall glass. 1 teaspoon of sugar (3) 1/4 oz fresh lime juice (2) two mint sprigs (not a forest !) (1) crush gently add 1 & 1/2 oz white cuban rum add ice cubes (4) add two oz soda water (5) stir well garnish with a sprig of mint. This is how they prepare Mojitos at "La Bodeguita del Medio":. Ernest Hemingway was fond of the Mojitos at La Bodeguita del Medio in Havana, Cuba, though his recipe had no sugar.

. Mojito (pronounced mo-HEE-toe) is a traditional Cuban cocktail which became quite popular in the United States during the late 1890s. Ice. Soda Water.

Mint Leaves. 3-4 teaspoons of sugar. Lime juice from one lime. 1 1/2 ounces of rum (preferably Havana Club).

3 or 4 cubes of ice. juice from half a lime. Mint Leaves. 1 teaspoon simple syrup or sugar.

½ shot of soda water. 2 shots light rum.

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