Joke

A joke is a short story or short series of words spoken or communicated with the intent of being laughed at or found humorous by the listener or reader. A practical joke differs in that the humour is not verbal, but mainly visual (e.g. putting a custard pie in somebody's face).

Most jokes contain two components: joke setup (for example, "A man walks into a bar...") and a punchline, which, when juxtaposed with the setup, provides the necessary irony to elicit laughter from the audience.

Psychology of jokes

Why we laugh has been the subject of serious academic study, examples being:

  • Sigmund Freud's "Jokes and Their Relationship to the Unconscious".
  • Marvin Minsky in Society of Mind.
  • Edward de Bono in "The mechanism of the mind" and "I am right, you are wrong".

Laughter, the intended human reaction to jokes, is healthful in moderation, uses the stomach muscles, and releases endorphins, natural happiness-inducing chemicals, into the bloodstream.

One of the most complete and informative books on different types of jokes and how to tell them is Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor, which encompasses several broad categories of humor, and gives useful tips on how to tell them, who to tell them to, and ways to change the joke to fit your audience.

Types of jokes

Jokes often depend for humour on the unexpected, the mildly taboo (which can include the distasteful or socially improper), or the playing on stereotypes and other cultural myths. Many jokes fit into more than one category.

Mathematical jokes

Main article: Mathematical joke

There are numerous jokes related to mathematics. Many of them are in-jokes, but may also be understandable by laymen.

A series of them parodies mathematical/logical chains of reason.

  • Mathematical proof:
  • Logic

Jokes in a certain category superficially look like math, but their essence is more akin to chemical composition.

Yo' mama jokes

Main article: The dozens. Jokes of this kind originate in the dozens, an African-American custom with West African roots in which two competitors -- usually males -- go head to head in a competition of comedic, often ribald, trash-talk. The target of the traded insults is most often the opponents' mothers, but can involve other family members as well.

  • Yo mama's so dumb when your dad said it's chilly outside, she ran out with a spoon.
  • Yo mama so dark that she can leave fingerprints on charcoal.
  • Yo mama so fat when she gets on the scale it says to be continued.
  • Yo mama so fat, when her pager goes off, people think she's backing up.
  • Yo mama's glasses are so thick, she can see the future.

Political jokes

Political jokes tell about politicians and heads of states. There are two large categories of this type of jokes. The first one makes fun of a negative attitude to political opponents or to politicians in general. The second one makes fun of political cliches, mottos, catch phrases or simply blunders of politicians.

Examples

A related subcategory is lawyer jokes plays on the commonly-held stereotypes about lawyers.

The following joke circulates for quite some time, with many different versions for <President> and <Other Country>.


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The following joke circulates for quite some time, with many different versions for <President> and <Other Country>. The United States is developing a Littoral Combat Ship, which will be very similar to a corvette. A related subcategory is lawyer jokes plays on the commonly-held stereotypes about lawyers. It is the first operational warship to extensively utilize stealth technology, although other countries, such as Germany, Poland, Russia, and Israel, are developing similar vessels. The second one makes fun of political cliches, mottos, catch phrases or simply blunders of politicians. Possibly the most advanced corvette today is the Swedish Navy's Visby-class corvette. The first one makes fun of a negative attitude to political opponents or to politicians in general. Many can accomadate a small or medium ASW Helicopter.

There are two large categories of this type of jokes. They usually are armed with medium and small caliber guns, surface-to-surface missiles, and surface-to-air missiles, and underwater warfare weapons. Political jokes tell about politicians and heads of states. Typical corvettes today have a displacement between 490 and 2,500 metric tons and measure 55-100 meters in length. The target of the traded insults is most often the opponents' mothers, but can involve other family members as well. Around the same time, navies operated by smaller countries, such as the United Arab Emirates began to realize that their offshore patrol vessels were lacking the ability to defend themselves in a modern war, especially against air attacks. Main article: The dozens. Jokes of this kind originate in the dozens, an African-American custom with West African roots in which two competitors -- usually males -- go head to head in a competition of comedic, often ribald, trash-talk. But since they were smaller and cheaper than frigates and destroyers, they could more effectively combat the kind of small attack craft utizilized in the attack on the USS Cole.

Jokes in a certain category superficially look like math, but their essence is more akin to chemical composition. These ships could defend a country's assets and interests far away from its own shores, with sophisticated weapons and surveillance equipment. A series of them parodies mathematical/logical chains of reason. After the attack on the USS Cole, modern navies began to see the importance of smaller, more maneuverable vessels that could operate close to shore, as well as at sea. Many of them are in-jokes, but may also be understandable by laymen. Later in World War II the Royal Navy introduced the Castle class, some of which remained in service until the mid-1950s. There are numerous jokes related to mathematics. These were officially described as Australian Mine Sweepers, or Bathurst class corvettes and were named after Australian towns.

Main article: Mathematical joke. The Royal Australian Navy built 60 corvettes, including 20 for the Royal Navy (crewed by Australians) and 4 for the Royal Indian Navy. Many jokes fit into more than one category. Their chief duty was to protect convoys in the North Atlantic and on the routes from the UK Murmansk carrying supplies to the Soviet Union. Jokes often depend for humour on the unexpected, the mildly taboo (which can include the distasteful or socially improper), or the playing on stereotypes and other cultural myths. The first were the Flower class (because the Royal Navy ships were named after flowers) though ships in Royal Canadian Navy service took the name of smaller Canadian cities. One of the most complete and informative books on different types of jokes and how to tell them is Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor, which encompasses several broad categories of humor, and gives useful tips on how to tell them, who to tell them to, and ways to change the joke to fit your audience. Future Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, had a hand in it reviving the name "corvette".

Laughter, the intended human reaction to jokes, is healthful in moderation, uses the stomach muscles, and releases endorphins, natural happiness-inducing chemicals, into the bloodstream. The British naval designer William Reed drew up a small ship based on a whale catcher design which could be produced quickly in large numbers. Why we laugh has been the subject of serious academic study, examples being:. The modern corvette appeared during World War II as an easily built patrol and convoy escort vessels. . The orginal corvettes were a form of sloop-of-war. Most jokes contain two components: joke setup (for example, "A man walks into a bar...") and a punchline, which, when juxtaposed with the setup, provides the necessary irony to elicit laughter from the audience. .

putting a custard pie in somebody's face). Almost all modern navies use ships smaller than frigates for coastal duty, but not all of them use the term corvette. A practical joke differs in that the humour is not verbal, but mainly visual (e.g. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate. A joke is a short story or short series of words spoken or communicated with the intent of being laughed at or found humorous by the listener or reader. Yo mama's glasses are so thick, she can see the future.

Yo mama so fat, when her pager goes off, people think she's backing up. Yo mama so fat when she gets on the scale it says to be continued. Yo mama so dark that she can leave fingerprints on charcoal. Yo mama's so dumb when your dad said it's chilly outside, she ran out with a spoon.

Logic

. Mathematical proof:
. Edward de Bono in "The mechanism of the mind" and "I am right, you are wrong". Marvin Minsky in Society of Mind.

Sigmund Freud's "Jokes and Their Relationship to the Unconscious".

07-30-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.