Jeep CJ

The Jeep CJ (or Civilian Jeep) was a commercial version of the famous Military Jeep from World War II. The first CJ (the CJ-2) was introduced in 1944 by Willys, and the same basic vehicle stayed in production through 7 variants and 3 corporate parents until 1986. In fact, a variant of the CJ is still in production today under license. The last CJs, the CJ-7 and CJ-8, were replaced in 1987 by the reworked Jeep Wrangler. The CJ-7 is very popular in the sport of mud racing, both with the stock body or a fiberglass replica.

CJ-2

Although it bore the CJ name, the CJ-2 was not really available at retail. Willys produced less than three dozen CJ-2 Agrijeeps in 1944 and 1945. It was very closely-related to the Military Willys MB, using the same Willys Go Devil engine, but there were some changes. It had larger headlights, a side-mounted spare tire and opening tailgate, and an external fuel cap.

CJ-2A

Lessons learned with the CJ-2 led to the development of the first full-production CJ, the 1945-1949 CJ-2A. Like the CJ-2 and the Military version, the CJ-2A featured a split windshield. An early column shifter and full floating rear axle gave way to the more familiar floor shift T90 and semi-floating rear axle. In the end, 214,202 CJ-2A's were produced.

CJ-3A

The CJ-3A was introduced in 1949, and replaced the CJ-2A by the next year. It featured a one-piece windshield with a vent in the frame. A bare-bones Farm Jeep version was available starting in 1951 with a power takeoff. 131,843 CJ-3A's were produced before the series ended in 1953.

CJ-4

Only one CJ-4 was produced. It used the new Willys Hurricane engine and had an 81-inch wheelbase. It was a test model, but was sold to a factory employee.

CJ-3B

The CJ-3B replaced the CJ-3A in 1953, the same year Willys was sold to Kaiser. It introduced a higher grille and hood to clear the new Willys Hurricane engine. The CJ-3B was produced until 1968 with a total of 155,494 produced, although the design was licensed to a number of international manufacturers, including Mitsubishi of Japan and Mahindra of India. Mitsubishi ceased production of vehicles derived from the CJ-3B design in 1998, but Mahindra continues to produce Jeeps today.

CJ-5

The CJ-5 was influenced by new corporate owner, Kaiser, and the Korean War M38A1 Jeep. It was intended to replace the CJ-3B, but that model continued in production. The CJ-5 repeated this pattern, continuing in production for 3 decades while three newer models appeared. 603,303 CJ-5's were produced between 1954 and 1983.

In 1965, Kaiser bought the casting rights to the Buick 225CID V6 Dauntless and the CJ-5 and CJ-6 got a new engine with 155 hp supplementing the Willys Hurricane engine.

The company was sold to American Motors in 1970, and the GM engine was retired after the 1971 model year. (GM's Buick division repurchased the engine tooling in the early 1970s which served as the powerplant in several GM vehicles.) AMC began using their inline 6 engines, the 232 and 258 and offering one V8 engine - 304CID.

To accommodate the new I6 the fenders and hood were stretched 3" starting in 1972. Other minor drive train changes took place then as well.

In 1976 the tub and frame were modified slightly from earlier versions. The windshield frame also changed meaning that tops from 1955-1975 will not fit a 1976-1983 CJ-5 and vice-versa.

In the early 1980s, the CJ used a "Hurricane"-branded version of the GM Iron Duke I4.

Several special CJ-5 models were produced:

  • 1961-1963 Tuxedo Park Mark III
  • 1969 Camper
  • 1969 462
  • 1970 Renegade I
  • 1971 Renegade II
  • 1972-1983 Renegade Models - featuring a 304CID V8, alloy wheels and a limited-slip differential
  • 1972 Super Jeep
  • 1977-1983 Golden Eagle

CJ-6

The CJ-6 was simply a 20 inch longer-wheelbase (101 in) CJ-5. Introduced in 1955 as a 1956 model, the CJ-6 was never very popular in the United States. Most CJ6 models were sold to Sweden and South America. The U.S. Forest Service put a number CJ-6 Jeeps in to use. Former President Ronald Reagan owned a CJ-6 and used it on his Califorina Ranch. American sales ended in 1975. Just 50,172 had been made when the series went out of production completely in 1981. Just as in the CJ-5, the V6 and V8 engine choices appeared in 1965 and 1972.

CJ-5A and CJ-6A

From 1964-1968 Kaiser elevated the Tuxedo Park from just a trim package to a separate model for the CJ-5A and CJ-6A. A Tuxedo Park Mark IV is signified by a different prefix from a normal CJ-5 with a VIN prefix of 8322, while a normal CJ-5 VIN prefix is 8305 from 1964-1971.

CJ-7

A 1980 CJ-7 appeared in the TV series The Dukes of Hazzard.

The CJ-7 featured a longer 93.4 in wheelbase than the CJ-5. It was introduced in 1976 and 379,299 were built in 11 years of production. The CJ-7 featured a new automatic all wheel drive system called Quadra-Trac, not necessarily known for its strength, as well as a part-time two speed transfer case; an automatic transmission was also an option. Other comfort features were an optional molded hardtop, and steel doors.

CJ-8

The CJ-8 Scrambler was a pickup truck version of the CJ-7, introduced in 1981. It featured a 103 in wheelbase and a pickup bed. Only 27,792 were built in the 6 years of production.

CJ-10

The CJ-10 was a CJ-based pickup truck. Produced from 1981 through 1985, it was sold mainly as an export vehicle, though some were used by the United States Air Force for use as an aircraft pulling vehicle. They featured square headlights like the Jeep Wrangler and an unusual 9-slot grille.

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Image link. Woody Woodward sent him a player's contract dated 2012. They featured square headlights like the Jeep Wrangler and an unusual 9-slot grille. When Trey was born, then-Mariners' G.M. Produced from 1981 through 1985, it was sold mainly as an export vehicle, though some were used by the United States Air Force for use as an aircraft pulling vehicle. Griffey and his wife Melissa have 3 children: George Kenneth III ("Trey"), daughter Taryn Kennedy, and adopted son Tevin Kendall. The CJ-10 was a CJ-based pickup truck. Had the chronic injuries of 2001-2004 not limited his astronomical progress, the discussion could currently be when, not if, Griffey would surpass Hank Aaron's record of 755 career home runs.

Only 27,792 were built in the 6 years of production. If his health remains intact, Junior could reach 600 home runs sometime in the 2007 season, at age 37. It featured a 103 in wheelbase and a pickup bed. Griffey's resurgence was recognized when he was named National League Comeback Player of the Year. The CJ-8 Scrambler was a pickup truck version of the CJ-7, introduced in 1981. Still, his 128 games in 2005 were the most he has played since 2000. Other comfort features were an optional molded hardtop, and steel doors. On September 22, with the Reds out of playoff contention, the team decided to bench him for the rest of the season so he could immediately have arthroscopic surgery on his left knee and a separate operation to repair scars from his 2004 hamstring operation.

The CJ-7 featured a new automatic all wheel drive system called Quadra-Trac, not necessarily known for its strength, as well as a part-time two speed transfer case; an automatic transmission was also an option. Early in September, he strained a tendon in his left foot (an injury unrelated to his past hamstring and calf problems), and was listed as day-to-day for several weeks. It was introduced in 1976 and 379,299 were built in 11 years of production. He ended the season tied with Mickey Mantle, after having passed Jimmie Foxx, Ted Williams, Willie McCovey, Ernie Banks, Eddie Mathews, and Mel Ott in 2005. The CJ-7 featured a longer 93.4 in wheelbase than the CJ-5. Junior's 35 home runs were his highest since his first year with the Reds as Griffey slowly moved up the career home run list. A Tuxedo Park Mark IV is signified by a different prefix from a normal CJ-5 with a VIN prefix of 8322, while a normal CJ-5 VIN prefix is 8305 from 1964-1971. The fluid swing, which depends heavily on excellent lower body strength, returned to its original form, now that Griffey's hamstring and calf problems appear behind him.

From 1964-1968 Kaiser elevated the Tuxedo Park from just a trim package to a separate model for the CJ-5A and CJ-6A. Starting May 1, the 2005 season saw the resurgence of a healthy Griffey. Just as in the CJ-5, the V6 and V8 engine choices appeared in 1965 and 1972. [2]. Just 50,172 had been made when the series went out of production completely in 1981. In April, he hit only .244 with only one homer (on April 30) and nine RBI. American sales ended in 1975. After an intense rehabilitation period, he returned for the 2005 season.

Former President Ronald Reagan owned a CJ-6 and used it on his Califorina Ranch. For several weeks, Griffey's right leg was in a sling that kept the leg at a 90-degree angle, and he was not able to move the leg until late October. Forest Service put a number CJ-6 Jeeps in to use. Shortly after this injury, the Reds' team physician, Timothy Kremchek, devised an experimental surgery dubbed "The Junior Operation" that would use three titanium screws to reattach Griffey's hamstring. The U.S. But there was far more to it than anyone realized at the time. Most CJ6 models were sold to Sweden and South America. He later came out of the game, complaining of "tightness" in the hamstring exacerbated by chilly conditions in San Francisco.

Introduced in 1955 as a 1956 model, the CJ-6 was never very popular in the United States. He slid as he got to the ball, but in the process hyperextended his right leg. The CJ-6 was simply a 20 inch longer-wheelbase (101 in) CJ-5. Griffey was starting in right field for the first time in his 16-year Major League career when he raced toward the gap to try to cut off a ball before it got to the wall. Several special CJ-5 models were produced:. The play in question occurred at SBC Park in a game against the San Francisco Giants. In the early 1980s, the CJ used a "Hurricane"-branded version of the GM Iron Duke I4. Griffey finished the 2004 season on the disabled list after suffering a complete rupture of his right hamstring in San Francisco on August 11.

The windshield frame also changed meaning that tops from 1955-1975 will not fit a 1976-1983 CJ-5 and vice-versa. The fan received many awards from Griffey Jr. In 1976 the tub and frame were modified slightly from earlier versions. He did get his 500th home run ball from a fan who was also there for Father's Day with his dad. Other minor drive train changes took place then as well. However, the injury bug struck again just before the All-Star break; he suffered a partial hamstring tear, knocking him out of the All-Star Game and putting him on the disabled list. To accommodate the new I6 the fenders and hood were stretched 3" starting in 1972. in the stands, a hit that also tied him with his father for career hits with 2,143.

(GM's Buick division repurchased the engine tooling in the early 1970s which served as the powerplant in several GM vehicles.) AMC began using their inline 6 engines, the 232 and 258 and offering one V8 engine - 304CID. Louis Cardinals at Busch Stadium, with his father Ken Sr. The company was sold to American Motors in 1970, and the GM engine was retired after the 1971 model year. The 500th home run came on Father's Day in a game against the St. In 1965, Kaiser bought the casting rights to the Buick 225CID V6 Dauntless and the CJ-5 and CJ-6 got a new engine with 155 hp supplementing the Willys Hurricane engine. In 2004, Griffey avoided major injury during the first half of the season and on June 20 became the 20th player to reach 500 career home runs. 603,303 CJ-5's were produced between 1954 and 1983. Consequently, he is not nearly the ubiquitous presence he once was on cereal boxes, television commercials, and the All-Star Game.

The CJ-5 repeated this pattern, continuing in production for 3 decades while three newer models appeared. Whatever their causes, injuries forced Griffey to miss 260 out of 486 games from 2002 through 2004. It was intended to replace the CJ-3B, but that model continued in production. Many speculate the injuries are a result of a decade of playing on the Kingdome's artificial turf, which players claim is like playing the game on asphalt. The CJ-5 was influenced by new corporate owner, Kaiser, and the Korean War M38A1 Jeep. From 2001 through 2004, Griffey was plagued by various injuries, and the last three of those years saw season-ending injuries. Mitsubishi ceased production of vehicles derived from the CJ-3B design in 1998, but Mahindra continues to produce Jeeps today. Although his statistics during this season were respectable, they were far below his previous level of play, hitting .271 with 40 home runs, and playing 145 games.

The CJ-3B was produced until 1968 with a total of 155,494 produced, although the design was licensed to a number of international manufacturers, including Mitsubishi of Japan and Mahindra of India. The 2000 season began what has generally been seen by the media as a decline in Griffey's superstar status. It introduced a higher grille and hood to clear the new Willys Hurricane engine. However, his contract apparently includes backloaded payments which will be paid until 2024 [1]. The CJ-3B replaced the CJ-3A in 1953, the same year Willys was sold to Kaiser. It was the city in which he had grown up, and Griffey was reportedly very pleased to be playing on his father's former team -- on the open market, Griffey could have made several million dollars more than the contract offered by the small market and notoriously penurious Reds. It was a test model, but was sold to a factory employee. Initially, the future looked extremely bright for him there.

It used the new Willys Hurricane engine and had an 81-inch wheelbase. Griffey ultimately got his wish, and following the 1999 season, he was traded to father's former team, the Cincinnati Reds, for Mike Cameron, Brett Tomko, and Antonio Perez. Only one CJ-4 was produced. Although Griffey has always denied his concern with baseball records, that year it appeared that he had his ambitions set towards breaking Hank Aaron's all-time home run record. 131,843 CJ-3A's were produced before the series ended in 1953. Griffey then stormed angrily to the Mariner dugout telephone, called the Mariners' general manager, and demanded to be traded that day. A bare-bones Farm Jeep version was available starting in 1951 with a power takeoff. In the summer of 1999, it was reported that Griffey hit a ball that would likely have been a home run in the Kingdome, but turned into a long fly-out to center in Safeco.

It featured a one-piece windshield with a vent in the frame. This, combined with Safeco being at sea level, and Seattle's generally dense, moisture-laden atmosphere, helped create a "pitcher friendly" ball park. The CJ-3A was introduced in 1949, and replaced the CJ-2A by the next year. However, much to the players' chagrin, the architects designed a park with a deep center field. In the end, 214,202 CJ-2A's were produced. It's been reported that Griffey, among other Mariners players, requested the architects of Safeco Field bring the fences closer to home plate. An early column shifter and full floating rear axle gave way to the more familiar floor shift T90 and semi-floating rear axle. Also, there was speculation that Griffey was very unhappy with Seattle's new Safeco Field, in which it was much more difficult to maintain the level of power he had while playing in the Kingdome.

Like the CJ-2 and the Military version, the CJ-2A featured a split windshield. Publicly, he expressed frustration over what he believed was a lack of commitment to winning from the management of the Mariners. Lessons learned with the CJ-2 led to the development of the first full-production CJ, the 1945-1949 CJ-2A. Despite Griffey's elite performances, and seemingly bright future in Seattle, he nonetheless became disenchanted with playing for the Mariners. It had larger headlights, a side-mounted spare tire and opening tailgate, and an external fuel cap. That same year, he was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. It was very closely-related to the Military Willys MB, using the same Willys Go Devil engine, but there were some changes. At 29 going on 30, he was easily the youngest player on the list.

Willys produced less than three dozen CJ-2 Agrijeeps in 1944 and 1945. Had the voting been done after 1998, he would have ranked higher. Although it bore the CJ name, the CJ-2 was not really available at retail. This list was compiled during the 1998 season, counting only statistics through 1997. . In 1999, he ranked Number 93 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players. The CJ-7 is very popular in the sport of mud racing, both with the stock body or a fiberglass replica. was one of baseball's most respected and well liked players during the 1990s, as one could routinely see his picture on cereal boxes and television commercials, and he was a mainstay of the All-Star Game during the decade.

The last CJs, the CJ-7 and CJ-8, were replaced in 1987 by the reworked Jeep Wrangler. For these reasons, Ken Griffey, Jr. In fact, a variant of the CJ is still in production today under license. Griffey often made over the shoulder catches, the kind that Willie Mays immortalized during the 1954 World Series, with a play simply known as the Catch. The first CJ (the CJ-2) was introduced in 1944 by Willys, and the same basic vehicle stayed in production through 7 variants and 3 corporate parents until 1986. His abilities in centerfield arguably were paralleled by no one. The Jeep CJ (or Civilian Jeep) was a commercial version of the famous Military Jeep from World War II. Griffey could hit with high average, batting over .300 for seven of the ten years of the 1990s, and hit with power as well, by hitting 422 home runs during the decade.

1977-1983 Golden Eagle. He was a multi-dimensional player during a time when more and more players usually excelled at either hitting or fielding, but rarely both. 1972 Super Jeep. During Griffey's tenure with the Seattle Mariners, he established himself over the years as one of baseball's premier players, with the potential of being considered one of the greatest players ever. 1972-1983 Renegade Models - featuring a 304CID V8, alloy wheels and a limited-slip differential. He won the American League Most Valuable Player award in 1997, hitting .304, with 56 home runs and 147 runs batted in. 1971 Renegade II. Griffey's career began with the Seattle Mariners in 1989.

1970 Renegade I. played on the same team as his father with the Seattle Mariners in 1990 and 1991. 1969 462. Griffey, Jr. 1969 Camper. As a Major League Baseball player he has often led the majors in major hitting statistics, and was awarded a Gold Glove Award for defensive excellence in 10 consecutive seasons, from 1990 to 1999, while playing center field for the Seattle Mariners. 1961-1963 Tuxedo Park Mark III. When he was in high school, he drew raves from Major League scouts for his batting swing, widely regarded as the best of his generation, and effortless fielding prowess.

The younger Griffey played baseball at Moeller High School, a Catholic school in Cincinnati better known for its football program. played for the Cincinnati Reds. He was raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, where his father, Ken Griffey, Sr. .

shares not only the same birthday, but also the same birth place as Hall of Famer Stan Musial. Ken Griffey Jr. George Kenneth Griffey, Jr. (born November 21, 1969 in the Pittsburgh suburb of Donora, Pennsylvania) is an American Major League Baseball player.

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