Hollaback Girl

"Hollaback Girl" is a pop song written by American singer-songwriter Gwen Stefani and producer Pharrell Williams for Stefani's debut solo album, Love. Angel. Music. Baby (2004). The anthemic, beat-driven track was produced by Williams and Chad Hugo of The Neptunes. The central lyrical theme revolves around Stefani's declaration that she "ain't no hollaback girl".

"Hollaback Girl" was released as the third single from Love. Angel. Music. Baby. in the spring of 2005. Despite receiving a mixed reception from critics, it became an international success, peaking at number one in Australia and Canada, number eight in the United Kingdom, and number one in the United States. Besides being Stefani's first number-one single, "Hollaback Girl" was also the first non hip-hop, non American Idol number one hit since late 2001. In the United States, "Hollaback Girl" became the first digital download to exceed sales of one million. As of December 10th 2005, the song was nominated for the 2006 Grammy awards for "Record of the Year" and "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance".

Composition and meaning

Stefani had worked with The Neptunes during the early stages of writing her album. However, a case of writer's block left early collaborations uninspired and unsuccessful. She regained her confidence as the album neared completion, and approached The Neptunes for a second attempt. Stefani and Pharrell Williams wrote two songs together, but Stefani was soon prepared to abandon the effort. Before her departure, Williams called her back into the studio. Stefani commented, "I was tired. I wanted to go home, but he was like, 'Don't leave yet.' So I come back, and he starts playing me his solo album. If something's really good, I get really jealous. So I'm like, 'You are a fricking genius. I can't believe I'm sitting in here with you right now, and you have these songs. We have to write another song.' I'm greedy."[1] Although at the time Stefani felt there were already too many songs for the album, she and Williams completed "Hollaback Girl". Commenting later, Stefani explained, "I did the whole record, but I knew I didn't have my attitude song — my 'this is my history, fuck you because you can't erase it' song. I knew I wanted a song like that."[2]

In "Hollaback Girl", Stefani declares that, although she has been "around the track" a few times, she "ain't no hollaback girl". Near the end of the song, she additionally states that "this shit is bananas", and elaborates on that by asserting, "B-A-N-A-N-A-S." The song contains profanity, using the word "shit" thirty-eight times. The word is excised in the North American and Australian radio and music video versions.

Stefani never explained what the term hollaback girl means. In a line-by-line analysis of the song's lyrics, OC Weekly reviewer Greg Stacy speculated that "Gwen is apparently the captain of the cheerleader squad; she is the girl who 'hollas' the chants, not one of the girls who simply 'hollas' them back". Urban Dictionary claims that hollaback girl means, "someone who allows people to treat him/her like a doormat and walk all over him/her", and credits the term's invention to Stefani. However, "Hollaback" had gained popularity in 2002, when it was featured in the Fabolous hit "Young'n (Holla Back)." After Fabolous sang the hook "Holla back, young'n," the line was immediately followed by background vocals responding with "Whoo-whoo!"

Music

"Hollaback Girl" features few instruments. It is primarily anthemic and beat-driven. Each time the chorus is sung, the number of instruments increases.

It uses a Rick Rubin remix of the late '70s Queen hit single, We Will Rock You which was also used by Jay-Z for his single 99 Problems. Another reference to Queen is made with the ending lyric of a verse 'another one bites the dust', the title of their most disco-influenced song written by bassist John Deacon; the bass riff of this song accompanies the music for the short period while this line is spoken.

Critical response

"Hollaback Girl" had a polarizing effect on music critics. LAUNCHcast's Jennifer Nine described it as a "stomping, stripped-back track",[3] while All Music Guide said that it had the "thumping, minimal beats of The Neptunes."[4] Richard Smirke called it "a trademark Neptunes hip-hop stomp."[5] Rolling Stone was pleased with the song, and in their review for Stefani's Love. Angel. Music. Baby. album, wrote: "Stefani's gum-snapping sass brings out the beast in her beatmasters, especially the Neptunes in 'Hollaback Girl'."[6] Blender listed it as the eleventh best song of 2005.[7]

On the other hand, Jason Damas, in a review for PopMatters, described the song as sounding "almost exactly like Dizzee Rascal", and added, "lyrically, this is where Gwen sinks the lowest here, especially on a breakdown where she repeats, 'This shit is bananas/ B-A-N-A-N-A-S!' several times".[8] Eric Greenwood of DrawerB commented: "[The song is] moronic and embarrassingly tuneless. I’d quote the lyrics, but they’re so bad, I almost feel sorry for her. A 35-year-old woman singing about pom-poms and 'talking shit' in high school betrays such a delusional self-image that it's hard not to be taken aback. And on top of that, The Neptunes' beats are clunky and the production is senselessly bombastic."[9]

Nick Sylvester of Pitchfork insulted the track, referring to it as a "Queen pastiche [...] which has about as much club potential as a 13-year old with a milk moustache and his dad's ID."[10] Maxim was not thrilled with the song either, and in their September 2005 issue, published a list of the 20 Most Annoying Songs Ever; "Hollaback Girl" came in first place. It ranked higher than other number-one singles such as Céline Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" (number three) and the Spice Girls' "Wannabe" (number five).

Chart performance

The single was officially solicited to radio in North America on April 5, 2005, although the music video had been released two weeks earlier, on March 21. "Hollaback Girl" entered the Billboard Hot 100, the main U.S. chart, at number eighty-two, and within six weeks of its release, it had reached the number-one position, making it the fastest-rising single to reach the top in 2005; it also became Stefani's first U.S. number-one. It maintained the number-one for four weeks. The single spent thirty-three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, thirty-one of which were in the top fifty. It was removed from the Hot 100 for the week ending October 29, 2005.

"Hollaback Girl" reaching number one on the Hot 100 made it the first non-R&B, non-hip hop, or non-American Idol song to reach number one since Nickelback's "How You Remind Me" in early 2002. However, some argue that the song achieved this due to its hip hop–influenced production. It peaked at number one on the Billboard Pop 100 for eight weeks, and topped its component chart, the Billboard Pop 100 Airplay, for four weeks. "Hollaback Girl" was a small success in the dance clubs, and only peaked at number fifteen on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart; it performed better on the Dance Radio Airplay by reaching the top five. The song was also a crossover success, and reached number four on the Rhythmic Top 40, and number eight on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. Both positions were the highest that a non-R&B/hip hop solo artist had attained in the 2000s.

Digitally, "Hollaback Girl" also broke many records. It was the best-selling digital download for the latter three weeks of May 2005, and broke the record for the most downloads sold in one week, totaling over 60,000. The record had previously been held by 50 Cent's "Candy Shop", which sold approximately 50,000 downloads. However, Stefani did not hold the record for long, and in September 2005 it was broken by Kanye West's and Jamie Foxx's "Gold Digger". "Hollaback Girl" exceeded one million digital downloads for the week ending October 4, 2005, and was the first single to ever accomplish this; it was certified 5× platinum. Due to its downloads, it reached number one on both digital sales charts, the Hot Digital Songs and Hot Digital Tracks, concurrently.

The success of "Hollaback Girl" was duplicated in Canada, where the song debuted at number twelve on the Canadian Singles Chart. Six weeks after its release, the song reached number one, where it remained for three weeks before descending the chart. It remained in the top forty of the chart for the following four months. In the rest of the world, reaction to "Hollaback Girl" was generally positive, but not as overwhelming as it had been in North America. It was released in Australia on May 23, 2005 and in Europe on June 6, 2005; it debuted at number one in Australia for one week, and also peaked at number one in Iceland for two weeks. However, in the United Kingdom, "Hollaback Girl" did not perform as well as might have been expected from previous releases. The song's predecessors, "What You Waiting For?" and "Rich Girl", had both reached number four. "Hollaback Girl" debuted at number eight, and stalled at the same position the following week. Although its UK success was limited, widespread airplay guaranteed that it remained in the top forty for an additional ten weeks. The single largely was successful across Europe and Asia, and reached the top five in Germany and China, and the top ten in the Netherlands.

Music video

Stefani and her Harajuku Girls in the car, driving to the high school alongside the students.

The music video for "Hollaback Girl" was directed by Paul Hunter and shot in California, United States; it depicts Gwen Stefani spending a day with some students at a local high school. The teenagers first call out to Stefani as she takes photographs of her entourage of colorfully-dressed Harajuku Girls with her HP Harajuku Lovers camera (a Stefani designer edition digicam). Letting out a laugh, Stefani begins to sing, and the students — augmented by a marching band and Japanese cheerleaders — follow Stefani and her Harajuku Girls in a yellow car (with "Hollaback Girl" written on the hood) to the high school's outdoor campus. They stir things up by barging in on a football game, and are later seen at a grocery store, marching down the aisles, throwing cereal and other food products. The video is intercut with sequences filmed against a black background, of Stefani, the Harajuku Girls, and the cheerleaders dancing along to the marching band. The Harajuku Girls visualize the song's bridge by spelling out the word "bananas" with blue and white cue cards. At the end, the Harajuku Girls perform a choreographed dance, in which Stefani rises from the ground with her hands in the air. The camera zooms in on Stefani, and the video is then complete.

"Hollaback Girl" contains a tongue-in-cheek moment which appears frequently throughout the music video. In it, Stefani covers her mouth and looks around whenever she says the word "shit". In the middle of the video, Pharrell Williams, one of the song's coproducers, makes a cameo appearance. "Hollaback Girl" was successful on various video countdowns, including Total Request Live, where it reached the number one position, and was eventually retired from the program fifty days after its first appearance, becoming the first Stefani video to retire. Hollaback Girl also peaked at number one for two non-consecutive weeks on VH1's Top 20 Video Countdown. It debuted at number twenty-nine on Canada's MuchMusic Countdown, and reached number one two and a half months later, where it stayed for two weeks.

On August 28, 2005, "Hollaback Girl" won for Best Choreography in a Video at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards.

Formats and track listings

These are the formats and track listings of major single releases of "Hollaback Girl".

U.S. digital download

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal)

U.S. 12" single 1

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (radio clean version)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—radio clean version)
  4. "Hollaback Girl" (dirty album version)
  5. "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental)
  6. "Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—dirty album version)

U.S. 12" single 2

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—clean)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—radio)
  4. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix)
  5. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—instrumental)
  6. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—a cappella)

European CD single 1

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (album version)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental)
  4. "Hollaback Girl" (CD-ROM video)

European CD single 3

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (album version)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (Tyler Dunphy kardance mix)

Sample


Charts

Week-by-week chart positions (click image to view data in tabular form). "Hollaback Girl" was a number-one hit in the United States, Canada and Australia.

Notes

  1. ^  Nine, Jennifer. Gwen Stefani - 'Love, Angel, Music, Baby' LAUNCHcast. November 25, 2004. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  2. ^  Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Love.Angel.Music.Baby. All Music Guide. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  3. ^  Smirke, Richard. Love. Angel. Music. Baby. PlayLouder. November 23, 2004. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  4. ^  Damas, Jason. GWEN STEFANI - Love.Angel.Music.Baby.. PopMatters. November 29, 2004. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  5. ^  Greenwood, Eric. Gwen Stefani - Love Angel Music Baby. DrawerB. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  6. ^  Sylvester, Nick. Gwen Stefani's Love Angel Music Baby. Pitchfork. November 24, 2004. Retrieved Nov. 3, 2005.
  7. ^  Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'. MTV.com. Retrieved Nov. 19, 2005.
  8. ^  Gwen Stefani "Love Angel Music Baby". Rolling Stone. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2005.
  9. ^  (2006). The 100 Greatest Songs of 2005. Blender (January): 79.
  10. ^  Rolling Stone. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2005.

References

  • Jeckell, Barry A., managing ed. (2005). Billboard.com. Retrieved from http://www.billboard.com on October 30, 2005. Information from Billboard magazine charts.
  • "Hollaback Girl". Contactmusic.com. Retrieved from http://www.contactmusic.com/new/home.nsf/webpages/gwenstefanix28x04x05 on October 30, 2005. Stefani discusses her inspiration for writing "Hollaback Girl".
  • (2005). Top40-Charts.com. Retrieved from http://top40-charts.com on October 30, 2005. International charting information.
  • (2005). MuchMusic.com. Retrieved from http://www.muchmusic.com on November 6, 2005. MuchMusic countdown data.
  • "Gwen Stefani single hits digital platinum". Mp3.com. Retrieved from http://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.htmlhttp://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.html on November 12, 2005. Club favorite "Hollaback Girl" crosses one million digital downloads—the first track ever to hit that mark.
  • "70 Countries Worldwide Number 1 Hit Singles, week of August 5" (2005). Charly-1300. Retrieved from http://charly1300.site.voila.fr/planetcharts.htm on November 12, 2005.
  • "No Doubt" (Nov. 12, 2005). Rock on the Net. ARC Weekly Top 40 information.
  • "Hollaback Girl's spiritual antecedent 'Mickey'". Retrieved from http://www.edisonresearch.com/home/archives/2005/05/index.html on November 15, 2005.
  • "Hollaback Girl". (Nov. 23, 2005). Urban Dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hollaback.
  • "Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'". Retrieved from http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1497721/20050303/story.jhtml on November 23, 2005.

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. The program is watched by more viewers than ABC's Good Morning America Weekend and CBS's Saturday Early Show. These are the formats and track listings of major single releases of "Hollaback Girl". MSNBC's Natalie Morales, Amy Robach, Alison Stewart and Kristine Johnson, along with Today's National Correspondent Melissa Stark report the daily news headlines from the newsdesk. On August 28, 2005, "Hollaback Girl" won for Best Choreography in a Video at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards. Weekend Today is currently hosted by Lester Holt and Campbell Brown with weather reports from Janice Huff on Saturdays and Sean McLaughlin on Sundays. It debuted at number twenty-nine on Canada's MuchMusic Countdown, and reached number one two and a half months later, where it stayed for two weeks. Lyne Pitts is the executive producer of Weekend Today.

Hollaback Girl also peaked at number one for two non-consecutive weeks on VH1's Top 20 Video Countdown. Weekend editions are tailored to the priorities and interests of weekend viewers—offering special series such as "Saturday Today on the Plaza," featuring live performances by the biggest names in music and Broadway outside the studio throughout the summer. "Hollaback Girl" was successful on various video countdowns, including Total Request Live, where it reached the number one position, and was eventually retired from the program fifty days after its first appearance, becoming the first Stefani video to retire. Interaction with the crowd outside the studio is a major part of the program. In the middle of the video, Pharrell Williams, one of the song's coproducers, makes a cameo appearance. In addition, the show offers visitors to New York City a chance to observe firsthand the workings of a live television broadcast with its windowed studio on Rockefeller Plaza. In it, Stefani covers her mouth and looks around whenever she says the word "shit". The weekend broadcasts continue the Today tradition of covering breaking news, interviewing newsmakers, reporting on a variety of popular-culture and human-interest stories, covering health and finance issues and presenting the latest weather reports.

"Hollaback Girl" contains a tongue-in-cheek moment which appears frequently throughout the music video. However, when major events in Washington happen during the morning hours, the program is broadcast from NBC studios in Wasington. The camera zooms in on Stefani, and the video is then complete. The program is broadcast from Studio 1A in Rockefeller Plaza in New York. At the end, the Harajuku Girls perform a choreographed dance, in which Stefani rises from the ground with her hands in the air. Five years later, on August 1, 1992, the Saturday edition made its debut, expanding the broadcast schedule of the Today franchise to seven days a week. The Harajuku Girls visualize the song's bridge by spelling out the word "bananas" with blue and white cue cards. The Sunday edition of NBC News' Today premiered on September 20, 1987.

The video is intercut with sequences filmed against a black background, of Stefani, the Harajuku Girls, and the cheerleaders dancing along to the marching band. However, there are many female hosts waiting to take over including Ann Curry and Campbell Brown. They stir things up by barging in on a football game, and are later seen at a grocery store, marching down the aisles, throwing cereal and other food products. Couric said she hasn't yet made up her mind if she will be leaving or staying with the Today Show. Letting out a laugh, Stefani begins to sing, and the students — augmented by a marching band and Japanese cheerleaders — follow Stefani and her Harajuku Girls in a yellow car (with "Hollaback Girl" written on the hood) to the high school's outdoor campus. Reports say that CBS is offering her 15 million dollars a year plus hosting 60 Minutes. The teenagers first call out to Stefani as she takes photographs of her entourage of colorfully-dressed Harajuku Girls with her HP Harajuku Lovers camera (a Stefani designer edition digicam). Couric can't negotiate a contract until her contract expires in May of 2006.

The music video for "Hollaback Girl" was directed by Paul Hunter and shot in California, United States; it depicts Gwen Stefani spending a day with some students at a local high school. This supposed feud was one of the factors (but certainly not the main factor) that led to speculations of Couric hosting the CBS Evening News as a replacement for Dan Rather. The single largely was successful across Europe and Asia, and reached the top five in Germany and China, and the top ten in the Netherlands. Couric has denied these reports, and says she has been rather hurt by them. Although its UK success was limited, widespread airplay guaranteed that it remained in the top forty for an additional ten weeks. In addition, a few one-show victories by rival ABC Program Good Morning America has fueled rumors of a feud, and some even went so far to suggest that Couric might be replaced in the near future. "Hollaback Girl" debuted at number eight, and stalled at the same position the following week. Some report also suggest that Couric has become a bit too proud (some say obnoxious) because of this, and began to offend Lauer and the rest of the hosts.

The song's predecessors, "What You Waiting For?" and "Rich Girl", had both reached number four. Reports say that this was due to Katie Couric's prominence in the show and the general perception that she is the only person who can guarantee high ratings for the news program. However, in the United Kingdom, "Hollaback Girl" did not perform as well as might have been expected from previous releases. Beginning in 2004, there were rumors that the hosts of Today were in the midst of a feud. It was released in Australia on May 23, 2005 and in Europe on June 6, 2005; it debuted at number one in Australia for one week, and also peaked at number one in Iceland for two weeks. On December 11, 2005, the show marked its 10th year of placing first in the ratings. In the rest of the world, reaction to "Hollaback Girl" was generally positive, but not as overwhelming as it had been in North America. In 1999, a later version of Today called Later Today was launched with hosts Jodi Applegate, Florence Henderson, and Asha Blake; sagging ratings in that final hour caused its cancellation in 2000.

It remained in the top forty of the chart for the following four months. There's an early morning version of the show, called Early Today that now airs on NBC's cable counterpart MSNBC and on many NBC affiliates. Six weeks after its release, the song reached number one, where it remained for three weeks before descending the chart. Other hosts also served between Deborah Norville and Katie Couric. The success of "Hollaback Girl" was duplicated in Canada, where the song debuted at number twelve on the Canadian Singles Chart. Joe Garagiola also hosted the show twice, first from 1967-1973 and then again in the early 1990s. Due to its downloads, it reached number one on both digital sales charts, the Hot Digital Songs and Hot Digital Tracks, concurrently. The hosts of the show include the following: Dave Garroway (1952–1961), John Chancellor (1961–1962), Hugh Downs (1962–1971), Frank McGee and Barbara Walters (1971–1974), Jim Hartz and Barbara Walters (1974–1976), Tom Brokaw and Jane Pauley (1976–1982), Bryant Gumbel and Jane Pauley (1982–1989), Bryant Gumbel and Deborah Norville (1989–1991), Bryant Gumbel and Katie Couric (1991–1997), and Matt Lauer and Katie Couric (1997–present).

"Hollaback Girl" exceeded one million digital downloads for the week ending October 4, 2005, and was the first single to ever accomplish this; it was certified 5× platinum. This segment also airs on WNBC-TV's NewsChannel 4 at 6PM and 11 PM on a monthly basis. However, Stefani did not hold the record for long, and in September 2005 it was broken by Kanye West's and Jamie Foxx's "Gold Digger". "Spanning" is a reel of odd and interesting sports highlights from the past month, with a recorded introduction and closing by Don Pardo. The record had previously been held by 50 Cent's "Candy Shop", which sold approximately 50,000 downloads. One popular monthly feature is "Spanning the World" with WNBC-TV sports anchor Len Berman. It was the best-selling digital download for the latter three weeks of May 2005, and broke the record for the most downloads sold in one week, totaling over 60,000. Stark also acts as host of MSNBC Live.

Digitally, "Hollaback Girl" also broke many records. Melissa Stark is National Correspondent for Today. Both positions were the highest that a non-R&B/hip hop solo artist had attained in the 2000s. Weekend Today host Campbell Brown often subs for Couric. The song was also a crossover success, and reached number four on the Rhythmic Top 40, and number eight on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. Also NBC News correspondent David Gregory has recently been added as substitute host for Matt Lauer. "Hollaback Girl" was a small success in the dance clubs, and only peaked at number fifteen on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart; it performed better on the Dance Radio Airplay by reaching the top five. Morales is also a correspondent for the show.

It peaked at number one on the Billboard Pop 100 for eight weeks, and topped its component chart, the Billboard Pop 100 Airplay, for four weeks. She often subs for Ann Curry and sometimes for Katie Couric. However, some argue that the song achieved this due to its hip hop–influenced production. Natalie Morales can also be considered a member of the Today Show team. "Hollaback Girl" reaching number one on the Hot 100 made it the first non-R&B, non-hip hop, or non-American Idol song to reach number one since Nickelback's "How You Remind Me" in early 2002. Both Roker and Curry have recently started interviewing guests and taking part in other segments in addition to their weather and news duties. It was removed from the Hot 100 for the week ending October 29, 2005. Alexis Glick is a correspondent for Today and appears during the 3rd hour of the program.Gene Shalit is the entertainment critic and Peter Greenberg is the travel editor.

The single spent thirty-three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, thirty-one of which were in the top fifty. Al Roker does weather updates and Ann Curry reads news headlines. It maintained the number-one for four weeks. The show is currently hosted by Katie Couric and Matt Lauer. number-one. He was president of the company from 1953 to 1955 (during which time Today's late-night companion, The Tonight Show , premiered), and then served as chairman of the board for another year. chart, at number eighty-two, and within six weeks of its release, it had reached the number-one position, making it the fastest-rising single to reach the top in 2005; it also became Stefani's first U.S. Today was the brainchild of Pat Weaver, who was then vice-president of NBC.

"Hollaback Girl" entered the Billboard Hot 100, the main U.S. (In summer 2005, CNN reversed the trend, moving its morning show indoors and uptown to the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle.). The single was officially solicited to radio in North America on April 5, 2005, although the music video had been released two weeks earlier, on March 21. Since the premiere of the 1990s set, the morning shows of each of the major broadcast and cable-news networks has moved streetside -- including two of Today's Rockefeller Center neighbors, Fox News's Fox & Friends and CNN's American Morning. It ranked higher than other number-one singles such as Céline Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" (number three) and the Spice Girls' "Wannabe" (number five). However, when major events happen in Washington during the morning, like presidential inaugurations, the show broadcasts from NBC studios in Washington. Nick Sylvester of Pitchfork insulted the track, referring to it as a "Queen pastiche [...] which has about as much club potential as a 13-year old with a milk moustache and his dad's ID."[10] Maxim was not thrilled with the song either, and in their September 2005 issue, published a list of the 20 Most Annoying Songs Ever; "Hollaback Girl" came in first place. Today moved to the current streetside studio in the mid-1990s, providing a link to the show's 1950s street-level set at the old RCA Exhibition Hall, also Rockefeller Plaza.

And on top of that, The Neptunes' beats are clunky and the production is senselessly bombastic."[9]. The studio is located right next to the street and many times the hosts do the weather or other events from outside. A 35-year-old woman singing about pom-poms and 'talking shit' in high school betrays such a delusional self-image that it's hard not to be taken aback. The show broadcasts from Studio 1A in Rockefeller Center, New York, just across the street from NBC headquarters at the GE Building. I’d quote the lyrics, but they’re so bad, I almost feel sorry for her. In other countries the format was copied - most notably in the United Kingdom with the BBC's Breakfast and ITV's Good Morning Britain; and in Canada with Canada AM. On the other hand, Jason Damas, in a review for PopMatters, described the song as sounding "almost exactly like Dizzee Rascal", and added, "lyrically, this is where Gwen sinks the lowest here, especially on a breakdown where she repeats, 'This shit is bananas/ B-A-N-A-N-A-S!' several times".[8] Eric Greenwood of DrawerB commented: "[The song is] moronic and embarrassingly tuneless. It has spawned several other shows of a similar type, including ABC's Good Morning America, CBS's The Early Show.

Baby. album, wrote: "Stefani's gum-snapping sass brings out the beast in her beatmasters, especially the Neptunes in 'Hollaback Girl'."[6] Blender listed it as the eleventh best song of 2005.[7]. Fred Muggs as the show's mascot during the early years), and local news updates. Music. The show successfully blends national news headlines, in-depth interviews with newsmakers, lifestyle features, other light news and gimmicks (including the presence of the chimpanzee J. Angel. Today was the first of its genre when it first signed on with host Dave Garroway. LAUNCHcast's Jennifer Nine described it as a "stomping, stripped-back track",[3] while All Music Guide said that it had the "thumping, minimal beats of The Neptunes."[4] Richard Smirke called it "a trademark Neptunes hip-hop stomp."[5] Rolling Stone was pleased with the song, and in their review for Stefani's Love. Central Time/Mountain Time) on October 2, 2000.

"Hollaback Girl" had a polarizing effect on music critics. Eastern Time/Pacific Time; 6:00–9:00 A.M. Another reference to Queen is made with the ending lyric of a verse 'another one bites the dust', the title of their most disco-influenced song written by bassist John Deacon; the bass riff of this song accompanies the music for the short period while this line is spoken. ET, until NBC expanded it to three hours (7:00–10:00 A.M. It uses a Rick Rubin remix of the late '70s Queen hit single, We Will Rock You which was also used by Jay-Z for his single 99 Problems. For many years it was a two-hour program from 7:00–9:00 A.M. Each time the chorus is sung, the number of instruments increases. Since 1958, Today is tape-delayed for the different time zones.

It is primarily anthemic and beat-driven. Later, Today aired live for five hours a morning, but it was seen for only two hours in each time zone. "Hollaback Girl" features few instruments. When Today started in 1952, it was seen only in the Eastern and Central time zones, broadcasting three hours a morning but seen for only two hours in each time zone. However, "Hollaback" had gained popularity in 2002, when it was featured in the Fabolous hit "Young'n (Holla Back)." After Fabolous sang the hook "Holla back, young'n," the line was immediately followed by background vocals responding with "Whoo-whoo!". . Urban Dictionary claims that hollaback girl means, "someone who allows people to treat him/her like a doormat and walk all over him/her", and credits the term's invention to Stefani. Ironically, the Nine Network's main rival, the Seven Network, tape-delays and broadcasts NBC's Today Show.

In a line-by-line analysis of the song's lyrics, OC Weekly reviewer Greg Stacy speculated that "Gwen is apparently the captain of the cheerleader squad; she is the girl who 'hollas' the chants, not one of the girls who simply 'hollas' them back". The Australian version has aired on that country's Nine Network since 1982. Stefani never explained what the term hollaback girl means. It first aired on January 14, 1952, an entirely new experiment not only in morning television, but also in the combination of hard news and light features. The word is excised in the North American and Australian radio and music video versions. Today (commonly referred to as The Today Show) is a morning news and talk show airing on the NBC television network in the United States. Near the end of the song, she additionally states that "this shit is bananas", and elaborates on that by asserting, "B-A-N-A-N-A-S." The song contains profanity, using the word "shit" thirty-eight times.

In "Hollaback Girl", Stefani declares that, although she has been "around the track" a few times, she "ain't no hollaback girl". I knew I wanted a song like that."[2]. Commenting later, Stefani explained, "I did the whole record, but I knew I didn't have my attitude song — my 'this is my history, fuck you because you can't erase it' song. We have to write another song.' I'm greedy."[1] Although at the time Stefani felt there were already too many songs for the album, she and Williams completed "Hollaback Girl".

I can't believe I'm sitting in here with you right now, and you have these songs. So I'm like, 'You are a fricking genius. If something's really good, I get really jealous. I wanted to go home, but he was like, 'Don't leave yet.' So I come back, and he starts playing me his solo album.

Stefani commented, "I was tired. Before her departure, Williams called her back into the studio. Stefani and Pharrell Williams wrote two songs together, but Stefani was soon prepared to abandon the effort. She regained her confidence as the album neared completion, and approached The Neptunes for a second attempt.

However, a case of writer's block left early collaborations uninspired and unsuccessful. Stefani had worked with The Neptunes during the early stages of writing her album. . As of December 10th 2005, the song was nominated for the 2006 Grammy awards for "Record of the Year" and "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance".

In the United States, "Hollaback Girl" became the first digital download to exceed sales of one million. Besides being Stefani's first number-one single, "Hollaback Girl" was also the first non hip-hop, non American Idol number one hit since late 2001. Despite receiving a mixed reception from critics, it became an international success, peaking at number one in Australia and Canada, number eight in the United Kingdom, and number one in the United States. Baby. in the spring of 2005.

Music. Angel. "Hollaback Girl" was released as the third single from Love. The central lyrical theme revolves around Stefani's declaration that she "ain't no hollaback girl".

The anthemic, beat-driven track was produced by Williams and Chad Hugo of The Neptunes. Baby (2004). Music. Angel.

"Hollaback Girl" is a pop song written by American singer-songwriter Gwen Stefani and producer Pharrell Williams for Stefani's debut solo album, Love. Retrieved from http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1497721/20050303/story.jhtml on November 23, 2005. "Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'". Retrieved from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hollaback.

Urban Dictionary. 23, 2005). (Nov. "Hollaback Girl".

Retrieved from http://www.edisonresearch.com/home/archives/2005/05/index.html on November 15, 2005. "Hollaback Girl's spiritual antecedent 'Mickey'". ARC Weekly Top 40 information. Rock on the Net.

12, 2005). "No Doubt" (Nov. Retrieved from http://charly1300.site.voila.fr/planetcharts.htm on November 12, 2005. Charly-1300.

"70 Countries Worldwide Number 1 Hit Singles, week of August 5" (2005). Club favorite "Hollaback Girl" crosses one million digital downloads—the first track ever to hit that mark. Retrieved from http://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.htmlhttp://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.html on November 12, 2005. Mp3.com.

"Gwen Stefani single hits digital platinum". MuchMusic countdown data. Retrieved from http://www.muchmusic.com on November 6, 2005. MuchMusic.com.

(2005). International charting information. Retrieved from http://top40-charts.com on October 30, 2005. Top40-Charts.com.

(2005). Stefani discusses her inspiration for writing "Hollaback Girl". Retrieved from http://www.contactmusic.com/new/home.nsf/webpages/gwenstefanix28x04x05 on October 30, 2005. Contactmusic.com.

"Hollaback Girl". Information from Billboard magazine charts. Retrieved from http://www.billboard.com on October 30, 2005. Billboard.com.

(2005). Jeckell, Barry A., managing ed. 27, 2005. Retrieved Nov.

^  Rolling Stone. Blender (January): 79.. The 100 Greatest Songs of 2005. ^  (2006).

25, 2005. Retrieved Nov. Rolling Stone. ^  Gwen Stefani "Love Angel Music Baby".

19, 2005. Retrieved Nov. MTV.com. ^  Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'.

3, 2005. Retrieved Nov. November 24, 2004. Pitchfork.

Gwen Stefani's Love Angel Music Baby. ^  Sylvester, Nick. 31, 2005. Retrieved Oct.

DrawerB. Gwen Stefani - Love Angel Music Baby. ^  Greenwood, Eric. 31, 2005.

Retrieved Oct. November 29, 2004. PopMatters. GWEN STEFANI - Love.Angel.Music.Baby.

^  Damas, Jason. 31, 2005. Retrieved Oct. November 23, 2004.

PlayLouder. Baby. Music. Angel.

Love. ^  Smirke, Richard. 31, 2005. Retrieved Oct.

All Music Guide. Love.Angel.Music.Baby. ^  Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. 31, 2005.

Retrieved Oct. November 25, 2004. Gwen Stefani - 'Love, Angel, Music, Baby' LAUNCHcast. ^  Nine, Jennifer.

"Hollaback Girl" (Tyler Dunphy kardance mix). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo). "Hollaback Girl" (album version). "Hollaback Girl" (CD-ROM video).

"Hollaback Girl" (instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo). "Hollaback Girl" (album version). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—a cappella).

"Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix). "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—radio). "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—clean).

"Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal). "Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—dirty album version). "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (dirty album version).

"Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—radio clean version). "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (radio clean version). "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal).

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