Hollaback Girl

"Hollaback Girl" is a pop song written by American singer-songwriter Gwen Stefani and producer Pharrell Williams for Stefani's debut solo album, Love. Angel. Music. Baby (2004). The anthemic, beat-driven track was produced by Williams and Chad Hugo of The Neptunes. The central lyrical theme revolves around Stefani's declaration that she "ain't no hollaback girl".

"Hollaback Girl" was released as the third single from Love. Angel. Music. Baby. in the spring of 2005. Despite receiving a mixed reception from critics, it became an international success, peaking at number one in Australia and Canada, number eight in the United Kingdom, and number one in the United States. Besides being Stefani's first number-one single, "Hollaback Girl" was also the first non hip-hop, non American Idol number one hit since late 2001. In the United States, "Hollaback Girl" became the first digital download to exceed sales of one million. As of December 10th 2005, the song was nominated for the 2006 Grammy awards for "Record of the Year" and "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance".

Composition and meaning

Stefani had worked with The Neptunes during the early stages of writing her album. However, a case of writer's block left early collaborations uninspired and unsuccessful. She regained her confidence as the album neared completion, and approached The Neptunes for a second attempt. Stefani and Pharrell Williams wrote two songs together, but Stefani was soon prepared to abandon the effort. Before her departure, Williams called her back into the studio. Stefani commented, "I was tired. I wanted to go home, but he was like, 'Don't leave yet.' So I come back, and he starts playing me his solo album. If something's really good, I get really jealous. So I'm like, 'You are a fricking genius. I can't believe I'm sitting in here with you right now, and you have these songs. We have to write another song.' I'm greedy."[1] Although at the time Stefani felt there were already too many songs for the album, she and Williams completed "Hollaback Girl". Commenting later, Stefani explained, "I did the whole record, but I knew I didn't have my attitude song — my 'this is my history, fuck you because you can't erase it' song. I knew I wanted a song like that."[2]

In "Hollaback Girl", Stefani declares that, although she has been "around the track" a few times, she "ain't no hollaback girl". Near the end of the song, she additionally states that "this shit is bananas", and elaborates on that by asserting, "B-A-N-A-N-A-S." The song contains profanity, using the word "shit" thirty-eight times. The word is excised in the North American and Australian radio and music video versions.

Stefani never explained what the term hollaback girl means. In a line-by-line analysis of the song's lyrics, OC Weekly reviewer Greg Stacy speculated that "Gwen is apparently the captain of the cheerleader squad; she is the girl who 'hollas' the chants, not one of the girls who simply 'hollas' them back". Urban Dictionary claims that hollaback girl means, "someone who allows people to treat him/her like a doormat and walk all over him/her", and credits the term's invention to Stefani. However, "Hollaback" had gained popularity in 2002, when it was featured in the Fabolous hit "Young'n (Holla Back)." After Fabolous sang the hook "Holla back, young'n," the line was immediately followed by background vocals responding with "Whoo-whoo!"

Music

"Hollaback Girl" features few instruments. It is primarily anthemic and beat-driven. Each time the chorus is sung, the number of instruments increases.

It uses a Rick Rubin remix of the late '70s Queen hit single, We Will Rock You which was also used by Jay-Z for his single 99 Problems. Another reference to Queen is made with the ending lyric of a verse 'another one bites the dust', the title of their most disco-influenced song written by bassist John Deacon; the bass riff of this song accompanies the music for the short period while this line is spoken.

Critical response

"Hollaback Girl" had a polarizing effect on music critics. LAUNCHcast's Jennifer Nine described it as a "stomping, stripped-back track",[3] while All Music Guide said that it had the "thumping, minimal beats of The Neptunes."[4] Richard Smirke called it "a trademark Neptunes hip-hop stomp."[5] Rolling Stone was pleased with the song, and in their review for Stefani's Love. Angel. Music. Baby. album, wrote: "Stefani's gum-snapping sass brings out the beast in her beatmasters, especially the Neptunes in 'Hollaback Girl'."[6] Blender listed it as the eleventh best song of 2005.[7]

On the other hand, Jason Damas, in a review for PopMatters, described the song as sounding "almost exactly like Dizzee Rascal", and added, "lyrically, this is where Gwen sinks the lowest here, especially on a breakdown where she repeats, 'This shit is bananas/ B-A-N-A-N-A-S!' several times".[8] Eric Greenwood of DrawerB commented: "[The song is] moronic and embarrassingly tuneless. I’d quote the lyrics, but they’re so bad, I almost feel sorry for her. A 35-year-old woman singing about pom-poms and 'talking shit' in high school betrays such a delusional self-image that it's hard not to be taken aback. And on top of that, The Neptunes' beats are clunky and the production is senselessly bombastic."[9]

Nick Sylvester of Pitchfork insulted the track, referring to it as a "Queen pastiche [...] which has about as much club potential as a 13-year old with a milk moustache and his dad's ID."[10] Maxim was not thrilled with the song either, and in their September 2005 issue, published a list of the 20 Most Annoying Songs Ever; "Hollaback Girl" came in first place. It ranked higher than other number-one singles such as Céline Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" (number three) and the Spice Girls' "Wannabe" (number five).

Chart performance

The single was officially solicited to radio in North America on April 5, 2005, although the music video had been released two weeks earlier, on March 21. "Hollaback Girl" entered the Billboard Hot 100, the main U.S. chart, at number eighty-two, and within six weeks of its release, it had reached the number-one position, making it the fastest-rising single to reach the top in 2005; it also became Stefani's first U.S. number-one. It maintained the number-one for four weeks. The single spent thirty-three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, thirty-one of which were in the top fifty. It was removed from the Hot 100 for the week ending October 29, 2005.

"Hollaback Girl" reaching number one on the Hot 100 made it the first non-R&B, non-hip hop, or non-American Idol song to reach number one since Nickelback's "How You Remind Me" in early 2002. However, some argue that the song achieved this due to its hip hop–influenced production. It peaked at number one on the Billboard Pop 100 for eight weeks, and topped its component chart, the Billboard Pop 100 Airplay, for four weeks. "Hollaback Girl" was a small success in the dance clubs, and only peaked at number fifteen on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart; it performed better on the Dance Radio Airplay by reaching the top five. The song was also a crossover success, and reached number four on the Rhythmic Top 40, and number eight on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. Both positions were the highest that a non-R&B/hip hop solo artist had attained in the 2000s.

Digitally, "Hollaback Girl" also broke many records. It was the best-selling digital download for the latter three weeks of May 2005, and broke the record for the most downloads sold in one week, totaling over 60,000. The record had previously been held by 50 Cent's "Candy Shop", which sold approximately 50,000 downloads. However, Stefani did not hold the record for long, and in September 2005 it was broken by Kanye West's and Jamie Foxx's "Gold Digger". "Hollaback Girl" exceeded one million digital downloads for the week ending October 4, 2005, and was the first single to ever accomplish this; it was certified 5× platinum. Due to its downloads, it reached number one on both digital sales charts, the Hot Digital Songs and Hot Digital Tracks, concurrently.

The success of "Hollaback Girl" was duplicated in Canada, where the song debuted at number twelve on the Canadian Singles Chart. Six weeks after its release, the song reached number one, where it remained for three weeks before descending the chart. It remained in the top forty of the chart for the following four months. In the rest of the world, reaction to "Hollaback Girl" was generally positive, but not as overwhelming as it had been in North America. It was released in Australia on May 23, 2005 and in Europe on June 6, 2005; it debuted at number one in Australia for one week, and also peaked at number one in Iceland for two weeks. However, in the United Kingdom, "Hollaback Girl" did not perform as well as might have been expected from previous releases. The song's predecessors, "What You Waiting For?" and "Rich Girl", had both reached number four. "Hollaback Girl" debuted at number eight, and stalled at the same position the following week. Although its UK success was limited, widespread airplay guaranteed that it remained in the top forty for an additional ten weeks. The single largely was successful across Europe and Asia, and reached the top five in Germany and China, and the top ten in the Netherlands.

Music video

Stefani and her Harajuku Girls in the car, driving to the high school alongside the students.

The music video for "Hollaback Girl" was directed by Paul Hunter and shot in California, United States; it depicts Gwen Stefani spending a day with some students at a local high school. The teenagers first call out to Stefani as she takes photographs of her entourage of colorfully-dressed Harajuku Girls with her HP Harajuku Lovers camera (a Stefani designer edition digicam). Letting out a laugh, Stefani begins to sing, and the students — augmented by a marching band and Japanese cheerleaders — follow Stefani and her Harajuku Girls in a yellow car (with "Hollaback Girl" written on the hood) to the high school's outdoor campus. They stir things up by barging in on a football game, and are later seen at a grocery store, marching down the aisles, throwing cereal and other food products. The video is intercut with sequences filmed against a black background, of Stefani, the Harajuku Girls, and the cheerleaders dancing along to the marching band. The Harajuku Girls visualize the song's bridge by spelling out the word "bananas" with blue and white cue cards. At the end, the Harajuku Girls perform a choreographed dance, in which Stefani rises from the ground with her hands in the air. The camera zooms in on Stefani, and the video is then complete.

"Hollaback Girl" contains a tongue-in-cheek moment which appears frequently throughout the music video. In it, Stefani covers her mouth and looks around whenever she says the word "shit". In the middle of the video, Pharrell Williams, one of the song's coproducers, makes a cameo appearance. "Hollaback Girl" was successful on various video countdowns, including Total Request Live, where it reached the number one position, and was eventually retired from the program fifty days after its first appearance, becoming the first Stefani video to retire. Hollaback Girl also peaked at number one for two non-consecutive weeks on VH1's Top 20 Video Countdown. It debuted at number twenty-nine on Canada's MuchMusic Countdown, and reached number one two and a half months later, where it stayed for two weeks.

On August 28, 2005, "Hollaback Girl" won for Best Choreography in a Video at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards.

Formats and track listings

These are the formats and track listings of major single releases of "Hollaback Girl".

U.S. digital download

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal)

U.S. 12" single 1

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (radio clean version)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—radio clean version)
  4. "Hollaback Girl" (dirty album version)
  5. "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental)
  6. "Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—dirty album version)

U.S. 12" single 2

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—clean)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—radio)
  4. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix)
  5. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—instrumental)
  6. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—a cappella)

European CD single 1

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (album version)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental)
  4. "Hollaback Girl" (CD-ROM video)

European CD single 3

  1. "Hollaback Girl" (album version)
  2. "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo)
  3. "Hollaback Girl" (Tyler Dunphy kardance mix)

Sample


Charts

Week-by-week chart positions (click image to view data in tabular form). "Hollaback Girl" was a number-one hit in the United States, Canada and Australia.

Notes

  1. ^  Nine, Jennifer. Gwen Stefani - 'Love, Angel, Music, Baby' LAUNCHcast. November 25, 2004. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  2. ^  Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Love.Angel.Music.Baby. All Music Guide. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  3. ^  Smirke, Richard. Love. Angel. Music. Baby. PlayLouder. November 23, 2004. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  4. ^  Damas, Jason. GWEN STEFANI - Love.Angel.Music.Baby.. PopMatters. November 29, 2004. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  5. ^  Greenwood, Eric. Gwen Stefani - Love Angel Music Baby. DrawerB. Retrieved Oct. 31, 2005.
  6. ^  Sylvester, Nick. Gwen Stefani's Love Angel Music Baby. Pitchfork. November 24, 2004. Retrieved Nov. 3, 2005.
  7. ^  Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'. MTV.com. Retrieved Nov. 19, 2005.
  8. ^  Gwen Stefani "Love Angel Music Baby". Rolling Stone. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2005.
  9. ^  (2006). The 100 Greatest Songs of 2005. Blender (January): 79.
  10. ^  Rolling Stone. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2005.

References

  • Jeckell, Barry A., managing ed. (2005). Billboard.com. Retrieved from http://www.billboard.com on October 30, 2005. Information from Billboard magazine charts.
  • "Hollaback Girl". Contactmusic.com. Retrieved from http://www.contactmusic.com/new/home.nsf/webpages/gwenstefanix28x04x05 on October 30, 2005. Stefani discusses her inspiration for writing "Hollaback Girl".
  • (2005). Top40-Charts.com. Retrieved from http://top40-charts.com on October 30, 2005. International charting information.
  • (2005). MuchMusic.com. Retrieved from http://www.muchmusic.com on November 6, 2005. MuchMusic countdown data.
  • "Gwen Stefani single hits digital platinum". Mp3.com. Retrieved from http://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.htmlhttp://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.html on November 12, 2005. Club favorite "Hollaback Girl" crosses one million digital downloads—the first track ever to hit that mark.
  • "70 Countries Worldwide Number 1 Hit Singles, week of August 5" (2005). Charly-1300. Retrieved from http://charly1300.site.voila.fr/planetcharts.htm on November 12, 2005.
  • "No Doubt" (Nov. 12, 2005). Rock on the Net. ARC Weekly Top 40 information.
  • "Hollaback Girl's spiritual antecedent 'Mickey'". Retrieved from http://www.edisonresearch.com/home/archives/2005/05/index.html on November 15, 2005.
  • "Hollaback Girl". (Nov. 23, 2005). Urban Dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hollaback.
  • "Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'". Retrieved from http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1497721/20050303/story.jhtml on November 23, 2005.

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.
. These are the formats and track listings of major single releases of "Hollaback Girl". The number of contiguous configurations for one through seven blocks, counting reflections but not counting rotations is in this table:. On August 28, 2005, "Hollaback Girl" won for Best Choreography in a Video at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards. Lego itself sells a line of sets named "Lego Studios," which contains a Lego web cam (repackaged Logitech USB Quickcam), software to record video on a computer, clear plastic rods which can be used to manipulate minifigures from off-camera, and a minifigure resembling Steven Spielberg. It debuted at number twenty-nine on Canada's MuchMusic Countdown, and reached number one two and a half months later, where it stayed for two weeks. Several webcomics are illustrated with Lego, notably Irregular Webcomic!.

Hollaback Girl also peaked at number one for two non-consecutive weeks on VH1's Top 20 Video Countdown. Director Michel Gondry filmed a live version of the video, digitized the result, and then recreated it entirely with Lego bricks. "Hollaback Girl" was successful on various video countdowns, including Total Request Live, where it reached the number one position, and was eventually retired from the program fifty days after its first appearance, becoming the first Stefani video to retire. Another notable example is the award-winning music video for the song "Fell in Love with a Girl" by the White Stripes. In the middle of the video, Pharrell Williams, one of the song's coproducers, makes a cameo appearance. [2]. In it, Stefani covers her mouth and looks around whenever she says the word "shit". 'Art Craziest Nation' was shown at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, UK.

"Hollaback Girl" contains a tongue-in-cheek moment which appears frequently throughout the music video. The Little Artists have created an entire Modern Art collection in a Lego Gallery. The camera zooms in on Stefani, and the video is then complete. Artists have also used Lego sets with one of the more notorious examples being Polish artist Zbigniew Libera's "Lego Concentration Camp," a collection of mocked-up concentration camp-themed Lego sets.[1]. At the end, the Harajuku Girls perform a choreographed dance, in which Stefani rises from the ground with her hands in the air. For example, the Monty Python and the Holy Grail Special Edition DVD contained a version of the "Camelot" musical sequence redone with Lego minifigures and accessories. The Harajuku Girls visualize the song's bridge by spelling out the word "bananas" with blue and white cue cards. They usually use stop-motion animation.

The video is intercut with sequences filmed against a black background, of Stefani, the Harajuku Girls, and the cheerleaders dancing along to the marching band. Such movies are called "Lego movies", "Brickfilms", or "cinema Lego". They stir things up by barging in on a football game, and are later seen at a grocery store, marching down the aisles, throwing cereal and other food products. One hobby among enthusiasts is to re-create popular scenes from famous movies, using Lego bricks for the scenery and Lego play sets as characters. Letting out a laugh, Stefani begins to sing, and the students — augmented by a marching band and Japanese cheerleaders — follow Stefani and her Harajuku Girls in a yellow car (with "Hollaback Girl" written on the hood) to the high school's outdoor campus. Another novel application of Lego bricks is the combination of bricks and electronic components to obtain a Lego Electronic Lab Kit. The teenagers first call out to Stefani as she takes photographs of her entourage of colorfully-dressed Harajuku Girls with her HP Harajuku Lovers camera (a Stefani designer edition digicam). Because of the high degree of uniformity in Lego bricks, they have also been used in fields such as computer vision, in which knowing the exact dimensions and relative positions of objects is useful for creating test data.

The music video for "Hollaback Girl" was directed by Paul Hunter and shot in California, United States; it depicts Gwen Stefani spending a day with some students at a local high school. A set of software tools called LDraw or Lego Digital Designer can be used to model possible Lego creations in 3D. The single largely was successful across Europe and Asia, and reached the top five in Germany and China, and the top ten in the Netherlands. The website theory.org.uk (by academic David Gauntlett) features Lego versions of social theorists. Although its UK success was limited, widespread airplay guaranteed that it remained in the top forty for an additional ten weeks. Legowars, the generic term for a number of wargames (most notably Brikwars) involving Lego bricks enjoys a cult-like popularity. "Hollaback Girl" debuted at number eight, and stalled at the same position the following week. The site features over 2,000 photographs of Biblical scenes.

The song's predecessors, "What You Waiting For?" and "Rich Girl", had both reached number four. For example, at The Brick Testament "The Reverend" Brendan Powell Smith has built the Bible in Lego pieces. However, in the United Kingdom, "Hollaback Girl" did not perform as well as might have been expected from previous releases. Lego toys have been used in a number of unexpected ways. It was released in Australia on May 23, 2005 and in Europe on June 6, 2005; it debuted at number one in Australia for one week, and also peaked at number one in Iceland for two weeks. A group which calls itself "AFOLs" (for "Adult Fans of Lego") is an important demographic for The Lego Group, which has recently begun reintroducing popular sets from previous years to appeal to this group. In the rest of the world, reaction to "Hollaback Girl" was generally positive, but not as overwhelming as it had been in North America. Photos of many fan creations like these can be seen at Brickshelf and at MOCpages.

It remained in the top forty of the chart for the following four months. One such masterpiece solves a Rubik's Cube through the use of Lego motors and cameras, a task that many humans cannot accomplish. Six weeks after its release, the song reached number one, where it remained for three weeks before descending the chart. Large mosaics, fully functional padlocks and pendulum clocks, a harpsichord and an inkjet printer (built by Google co-founder Larry Page while at the University of Michigan) have been constructed from Lego pieces. The success of "Hollaback Girl" was duplicated in Canada, where the song debuted at number twelve on the Canadian Singles Chart. Some sculptures use hundreds of thousands of pieces and weigh tens of kilograms. Due to its downloads, it reached number one on both digital sales charts, the Hot Digital Songs and Hot Digital Tracks, concurrently. A cult following of people who have used Lego pieces to make sculptures, very large mosaics and complex machines has developed.

"Hollaback Girl" exceeded one million digital downloads for the week ending October 4, 2005, and was the first single to ever accomplish this; it was certified 5× platinum. The Lego Group itself has developed a form of business consultancy fostering creative thinking, called Lego Serious Play, in which team members build metaphors of their organisational experiences using Lego bricks, and work through imaginary scenarios using the visual device of the Lego constructions and by exploring possibilities in a 'serious' form of 'play'. However, Stefani did not hold the record for long, and in September 2005 it was broken by Kanye West's and Jamie Foxx's "Gold Digger". Lego bricks today are used for purposes beyond children's play. The record had previously been held by 50 Cent's "Candy Shop", which sold approximately 50,000 downloads. As of year end 2005, there are 25 LEGO Brand Retail stores in the USA, a number of stores in Europe, and a franchised LEGO store in Abu Dhabi. It was the best-selling digital download for the latter three weeks of May 2005, and broke the record for the most downloads sold in one week, totaling over 60,000. There are also several Lego retail stores, including at Downtown Disney in both the Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resorts and in the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Digitally, "Hollaback Girl" also broke many records. Lego Group operates several Legoland amusement parks in Europe and California. Both positions were the highest that a non-R&B/hip hop solo artist had attained in the 2000s. It also allows advanced participants an opportunity to modify the Lego Mindstorms platform, adding their own sensors and actuators, as well as other mechanical, electrical, electronic and software related systems. The song was also a crossover success, and reached number four on the Rhythmic Top 40, and number eight on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. Lego Mindstorms provides primary and secondary school aged participants of RoboCup Junior an easy and intuitive introduction to robotics. "Hollaback Girl" was a small success in the dance clubs, and only peaked at number fifteen on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart; it performed better on the Dance Radio Airplay by reaching the top five. The international RoboCup Junior autonomous soccer competition involves extensive use of Lego Mindstorms equipment which is often pushed to its limits.

It peaked at number one on the Billboard Pop 100 for eight weeks, and topped its component chart, the Billboard Pop 100 Airplay, for four weeks. A related competition is FIRST Lego League for elementary and middle schools. However, some argue that the song achieved this due to its hip hop–influenced production. The earliest, and likely the largest, is Botball, a national US middle- and high-school competition stemming from the MIT 6270 lego robotics tournament. "Hollaback Girl" reaching number one on the Hot 100 made it the first non-R&B, non-hip hop, or non-American Idol song to reach number one since Nickelback's "How You Remind Me" in early 2002. There are several competitions which use Lego bricks and the RCX, among other microcontrollers, for robotics. It was removed from the Hot 100 for the week ending October 29, 2005. These programmable bricks are sold under the name Lego Mindstorms.

The single spent thirty-three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, thirty-one of which were in the top fifty. There are even special bricks, like the LEGO RCX that can be programmed with a PC to perform very complicated and useful tasks. It maintained the number-one for four weeks. There are also motors, gears, lights, sensors, and cameras available to be used with Lego components. number-one. LEGO recently announced the procurement of worldwide toy rights with the cable TV channel Nickelodeon for building sets with themes from two hit TV shows such as SpongeBob SquarePants and Avatar: The Last Airbender which will be available Summer of 2006. chart, at number eighty-two, and within six weeks of its release, it had reached the number-one position, making it the fastest-rising single to reach the top in 2005; it also became Stefani's first U.S. Sets containing new pieces are released frequently.

"Hollaback Girl" entered the Billboard Hot 100, the main U.S. Since it began producing plastic bricks, the Lego Group has released thousands of play sets themed around space, robots, pirates, vikings, medieval castles, dinosaurs, cities, suburbia, holiday locations, wild west, the Arctic, boats, racing cars, trains, Spider-Man, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Bionicle, and more. The single was officially solicited to radio in North America on April 5, 2005, although the music video had been released two weeks earlier, on March 21. Annual production of Lego bricks averages approximately 20 billion (2 × 1010) per year, or about 600 pieces per second. It ranked higher than other number-one singles such as Céline Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" (number three) and the Spice Girls' "Wannabe" (number five). Brick decorations and packaging is done at plants in Denmark, Switzerland, United States, South Korea and the Czech Republic. Nick Sylvester of Pitchfork insulted the track, referring to it as a "Queen pastiche [...] which has about as much club potential as a 13-year old with a milk moustache and his dad's ID."[10] Maxim was not thrilled with the song either, and in their September 2005 issue, published a list of the 20 Most Annoying Songs Ever; "Hollaback Girl" came in first place. Moulding is done at one of two plants in Denmark and Switzerland.

And on top of that, The Neptunes' beats are clunky and the production is senselessly bombastic."[9]. Manufacturing of Lego bricks occurs at a number of locations around the world. A 35-year-old woman singing about pom-poms and 'talking shit' in high school betrays such a delusional self-image that it's hard not to be taken aback. It is thanks to this care in manufacturing that the Lego Group has maintained such a high degree of quality over the decades; this is one of the main reasons that pieces manufactured over 40 years ago still interlock neatly with pieces manufactured today. I’d quote the lyrics, but they’re so bad, I almost feel sorry for her. According to the Lego Group, its moulding processes are so accurate that only 18 bricks out of every million fail to meet its stringent standards. On the other hand, Jason Damas, in a review for PopMatters, described the song as sounding "almost exactly like Dizzee Rascal", and added, "lyrically, this is where Gwen sinks the lowest here, especially on a breakdown where she repeats, 'This shit is bananas/ B-A-N-A-N-A-S!' several times".[8] Eric Greenwood of DrawerB commented: "[The song is] moronic and embarrassingly tuneless. Worn-out moulds are encased in the foundations of buildings to prevent their falling into competitors' hands.

Baby. album, wrote: "Stefani's gum-snapping sass brings out the beast in her beatmasters, especially the Neptunes in 'Hollaback Girl'."[6] Blender listed it as the eleventh best song of 2005.[7]. Precision-machined, small-capacity moulds are used, and human inspectors meticulously check the output of the moulds, to eliminate significant variations in colour or thickness. Music. Since 1963, Lego pieces are manufactured from a strong, resilient plastic known as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, or ABS. Angel. In order for pieces to have just the right "clutch power", Lego elements are manufactured within a tolerance of 2 micrometres (0.00008 in). LAUNCHcast's Jennifer Nine described it as a "stomping, stripped-back track",[3] while All Music Guide said that it had the "thumping, minimal beats of The Neptunes."[4] Richard Smirke called it "a trademark Neptunes hip-hop stomp."[5] Rolling Stone was pleased with the song, and in their review for Stefani's Love. They cannot be too easy to pull apart, or the result will be Lego creations that are unstable; they cannot be too difficult to pull apart, since the disassembly of one creation in order to build another is part of the Lego appeal.

"Hollaback Girl" had a polarizing effect on music critics. When snapped together, pieces must have just the right amount of "clutch power"; they must stay together until pulled apart. Another reference to Queen is made with the ending lyric of a verse 'another one bites the dust', the title of their most disco-influenced song written by bassist John Deacon; the bass riff of this song accompanies the music for the short period while this line is spoken. Bricks, beams, axles, minifigures, and all other elements in the Lego system are manufactured to an exacting degree of tolerance. It uses a Rick Rubin remix of the late '70s Queen hit single, We Will Rock You which was also used by Jay-Z for his single 99 Problems. Retail Lego sets for young children are compatible with those made for teenagers. Each time the chorus is sung, the number of instruments increases. Lego pieces from 1963 still interlock with pieces made in 2006, despite radical changes in shape and design over the years.

It is primarily anthemic and beat-driven. Since their introduction in 1949, Lego pieces of all varieties have been, first and foremost, part of a system. "Hollaback Girl" features few instruments. Nevertheless, such corporate admonitions are frequently ignored as corporate intervention in the use of language, and the word lego is commonly used not only as a noun to refer to Lego bricks but also as a generic term referring to any kind of interlocking toy brick. However, "Hollaback" had gained popularity in 2002, when it was featured in the Fabolous hit "Young'n (Holla Back)." After Fabolous sang the hook "Holla back, young'n," the line was immediately followed by background vocals responding with "Whoo-whoo!". The company asserts that to protect its brand name, the word Lego must always be used as an adjective, as in "LEGO set," "LEGO products," "LEGO universe," and so forth. Urban Dictionary claims that hollaback girl means, "someone who allows people to treat him/her like a doormat and walk all over him/her", and credits the term's invention to Stefani. "Lego" is officially written in all uppercase letters.

In a line-by-line analysis of the song's lyrics, OC Weekly reviewer Greg Stacy speculated that "Gwen is apparently the captain of the cheerleader squad; she is the girl who 'hollas' the chants, not one of the girls who simply 'hollas' them back". Thank you! Susan Williams, Consumer Services. Stefani never explained what the term hollaback girl means. Please always refer to our bricks as 'LEGO Bricks or Toys' and not 'LEGOS.' By doing so, you will be helping to protect and preserve a brand of which we are very proud and that stands for quality the world over. The word is excised in the North American and Australian radio and music video versions. We would sincerely like your help in keeping it special. Near the end of the song, she additionally states that "this shit is bananas", and elaborates on that by asserting, "B-A-N-A-N-A-S." The song contains profanity, using the word "shit" thirty-eight times. The word LEGO® is a brand name and is very special to all of us in the LEGO Group Companies.

In "Hollaback Girl", Stefani declares that, although she has been "around the track" a few times, she "ain't no hollaback girl". Lego catalogues in the 1970s and 1980s contained a note that read:. I knew I wanted a song like that."[2]. The Lego Group's name has become so synonymous with its flagship toy that many use the words "Lego" (collectively) or "Legos" to refer to the bricks themselves, and even to any plastic bricks resembling Lego bricks, although the Lego Group discourages this as dilution of their trademark. Commenting later, Stefani explained, "I did the whole record, but I knew I didn't have my attitude song — my 'this is my history, fuck you because you can't erase it' song. Over the years many more Lego sets, series, and pieces were created, with many innovative improvements and additions, culminating in the colourful versatile building toys that we know today. We have to write another song.' I'm greedy."[1] Although at the time Stefani felt there were already too many songs for the album, she and Williams completed "Hollaback Girl". It wasn't until 1958 that the modern-day brick design was developed, and it took another five years to find exactly the right material for it.

I can't believe I'm sitting in here with you right now, and you have these songs. Godtfred saw the immense potential in Lego bricks to become a system for creative play, but the bricks still had some problems from a technical standpoint: their "locking" ability was limited, and they were not very versatile. So I'm like, 'You are a fricking genius. It was his conversation with an overseas buyer that struck the idea of a toy system. If something's really good, I get really jealous. By 1954, Christiansen's son, Godtfred, had become the junior managing director of the Lego Group. I wanted to go home, but he was like, 'Don't leave yet.' So I come back, and he starts playing me his solo album. Many of the Lego Group's shipments were returned, following poor sales; it was thought that plastic toys could never replace wooden ones.

Stefani commented, "I was tired. The use of plastic for toy manufacture was not highly regarded by retailers and consumers of the time. Before her departure, Williams called her back into the studio. The blocks snapped together, but not so tightly that they couldn't be pulled apart. Stefani and Pharrell Williams wrote two songs together, but Stefani was soon prepared to abandon the effort. They had several round "studs" on top, and a hollow rectangular bottom. She regained her confidence as the album neared completion, and approached The Neptunes for a second attempt. A few years later, in 1949, Lego began producing similar bricks, calling them "Automatic Binding Bricks." These bricks, manufactured from cellulose acetate, were developed in the spirit of traditional wooden blocks that could be stacked upon one another; however, these plastic bricks could be "locked" together.

However, a case of writer's block left early collaborations uninspired and unsuccessful. Hilary Harry Fisher Page, a child psychologist. Stefani had worked with The Neptunes during the early stages of writing her album. These "Kiddicraft Self-Locking Building Bricks" were designed and patented in the UK by Mr. . In 1947, Ole Kirk and his son Godtfred obtained samples of interlocking plastic bricks produced by the company Kiddicraft. As of December 10th 2005, the song was nominated for the 2006 Grammy awards for "Record of the Year" and "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance". It should be noted, however, that the original, Greek verb "legein" actually has the meaning "put together".

In the United States, "Hollaback Girl" became the first digital download to exceed sales of one million. The Lego Group claims that "Lego" means "I put together" or "I assemble" in Latin, though this is a rather liberal translation; the more accepted and widely used application of the word is "I read". Besides being Stefani's first number-one single, "Hollaback Girl" was also the first non hip-hop, non American Idol number one hit since late 2001. The company name Lego was coined by Christiansen from the Danish phrase leg godt, meaning "play well". Despite receiving a mixed reception from critics, it became an international success, peaking at number one in Australia and Canada, number eight in the United Kingdom, and number one in the United States. Ole Kirk started creating wooden toys in 1932, but it wasn't until 1949 that the famous plastic Lego brick was created. Baby. in the spring of 2005. The Lego Group had humble beginnings in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen, a poor carpenter from Billund, Denmark.

Music. . Angel. The sets are produced by the Lego Group, a privately-held company based in Denmark. "Hollaback Girl" was released as the third single from Love. High production quality and careful attention to detail ensures that Lego pieces can fit together in myriad ways, which is one of the main reasons for the toy's success. The central lyrical theme revolves around Stefani's declaration that she "ain't no hollaback girl". Cars, planes, trains, buildings, castles, sculptures, ships, spaceships, and even working robots are just a few of the many things that can be made with Lego bricks.

The anthemic, beat-driven track was produced by Williams and Chad Hugo of The Neptunes. Lego is a line of toys featuring colourful plastic bricks, gears, minifigures (also called minifigs or mini-figs), and other pieces which can be assembled to create models of almost anything imaginable. Baby (2004). The number 102,981,504 (four more than that figure) is the number of six-piece towers (of a height of six). Music. The figure of 102,981,500 is often given for six pieces, but it is incorrect. Angel. Six eight-stud Lego bricks of the same colour can be put together in 915,103,765 ways, and just three bricks of the same colour offer 1,560 combinations.

"Hollaback Girl" is a pop song written by American singer-songwriter Gwen Stefani and producer Pharrell Williams for Stefani's debut solo album, Love. "Legot" (or "leegot"), plural form of "lego" (or "leego") is also used as a Finnish slang term for human teeth, because of the rectangular shape of the teeth. Retrieved from http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1497721/20050303/story.jhtml on November 23, 2005. "Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'". Retrieved from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hollaback.

Urban Dictionary. 23, 2005). (Nov. "Hollaback Girl".

Retrieved from http://www.edisonresearch.com/home/archives/2005/05/index.html on November 15, 2005. "Hollaback Girl's spiritual antecedent 'Mickey'". ARC Weekly Top 40 information. Rock on the Net.

12, 2005). "No Doubt" (Nov. Retrieved from http://charly1300.site.voila.fr/planetcharts.htm on November 12, 2005. Charly-1300.

"70 Countries Worldwide Number 1 Hit Singles, week of August 5" (2005). Club favorite "Hollaback Girl" crosses one million digital downloads—the first track ever to hit that mark. Retrieved from http://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.htmlhttp://www.mp3.com/stories/1857.html on November 12, 2005. Mp3.com.

"Gwen Stefani single hits digital platinum". MuchMusic countdown data. Retrieved from http://www.muchmusic.com on November 6, 2005. MuchMusic.com.

(2005). International charting information. Retrieved from http://top40-charts.com on October 30, 2005. Top40-Charts.com.

(2005). Stefani discusses her inspiration for writing "Hollaback Girl". Retrieved from http://www.contactmusic.com/new/home.nsf/webpages/gwenstefanix28x04x05 on October 30, 2005. Contactmusic.com.

"Hollaback Girl". Information from Billboard magazine charts. Retrieved from http://www.billboard.com on October 30, 2005. Billboard.com.

(2005). Jeckell, Barry A., managing ed. 27, 2005. Retrieved Nov.

^  Rolling Stone. Blender (January): 79.. The 100 Greatest Songs of 2005. ^  (2006).

25, 2005. Retrieved Nov. Rolling Stone. ^  Gwen Stefani "Love Angel Music Baby".

19, 2005. Retrieved Nov. MTV.com. ^  Gwen Stefani Answers No Doubt Fans With 'Attitude Song'.

3, 2005. Retrieved Nov. November 24, 2004. Pitchfork.

Gwen Stefani's Love Angel Music Baby. ^  Sylvester, Nick. 31, 2005. Retrieved Oct.

DrawerB. Gwen Stefani - Love Angel Music Baby. ^  Greenwood, Eric. 31, 2005.

Retrieved Oct. November 29, 2004. PopMatters. GWEN STEFANI - Love.Angel.Music.Baby.

^  Damas, Jason. 31, 2005. Retrieved Oct. November 23, 2004.

PlayLouder. Baby. Music. Angel.

Love. ^  Smirke, Richard. 31, 2005. Retrieved Oct.

All Music Guide. Love.Angel.Music.Baby. ^  Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. 31, 2005.

Retrieved Oct. November 25, 2004. Gwen Stefani - 'Love, Angel, Music, Baby' LAUNCHcast. ^  Nine, Jennifer.

"Hollaback Girl" (Tyler Dunphy kardance mix). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo). "Hollaback Girl" (album version). "Hollaback Girl" (CD-ROM video).

"Hollaback Girl" (instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix by Diplo). "Hollaback Girl" (album version). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—a cappella).

"Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix—instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (Hollatronix remix). "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—radio). "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal—clean).

"Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal). "Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—dirty album version). "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (dirty album version).

"Hollaback Girl" (a cappella—radio clean version). "Hollaback Girl" (instrumental). "Hollaback Girl" (radio clean version). "Hollaback Girl" (Dancehollaback remix by Tony Kanal).

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