Halliburton

For other uses, see Haliburton.
For information on the early 20th century explorer of the same name, see Richard Halliburton

Halliburton Energy Services NYSE: HAL is a multinational corporation based in Houston, Texas. With revenues exceeding $20.46 (billion U.S. FY 2004) and over 95,000 employees, Halliburton operates in two major business segments. The Energy Services Group provides technical products and services for oil and gas exploration and production. The KBR group is a major construction company of mainly refineries, oilfields & pipelines, and chemical plants.

Business Overview

Energy Services, the company's historical bedrock, includes: drilling & formation evaluation, digital & consulting solutions, production volume optimization, and fluid Systems. This business continues to be profitable, and the company is a world leader in this industry; Schlumberger is the company's closest competitor.

With the acquisition of Dresser Industries in 1998, the Kellogg-Brown & Root division (in 2002 renamed to KBR) was formed by merging Halliburton's Brown & Root (acquired 1962) subsidiary and the M.W. Kellogg division of Dresser (which Dresser had merged with in 1988). KBR is a major international construction company, which is a highly volatile undertaking subject to wild fluctuations in revenue and profit. Asbestos-related litigation from the Kellogg acquisition caused the company to book over $4.0 (billion U.S.) in losses from 2002 through 2004.

As a result of the asbestos-related costs, Halliburton lost approximately $900 million U.S. a year from 2002 through 2004.

At a meeting for investors and analysts in August 2004, a plan was outlined to divest the KBR division through a possible sale, spin-off or initial public offering. Analysts at Deutsche Bank value KBR at up to $2.15 billion, while others believe it could be worth closer to $3 billion by the time management decides what to do with the business in 2005.

History

1919 to 1990

Mr. and Mrs. Erle P. Halliburton first tried to find work cementing oil wells in Burkburnett, Texas then moved their business (New Method Oil Well Cementing Company) to the Healdton field near Ardmore, Oklahoma.

  • 1920: reorganized - Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Company
  • 1921: headquarters - Duncan, Oklahoma
  • 1924: incorporation
  • 1948: New York Stock Exchange listing
  • 1957: acquisition of Welex Jet Services of Fort Worth, Texas
  • 1960: name shortened to Halliburton Company
  • 1961: headquarters - Dallas, Texas
  • 1962: acquisition of Brown and Root of Houston, Texas
  • 1988: acquisition of Geophysical Service Incorporated from Texas Instruments
  • 198?: acquisition of Geosource
  • 198?: Halliburton Logging Services
  • 1982: workforce - 115,000
  • 1982: energy industry decline
  • 1991: workforce - 73,000

1990s

  • In the aftermath of Operation Desert Storm in Kuwait in 1991, Halliburton crews helped bring 320 burning oil wells under control.
  • In the early 1990s Halliburton was found to be in violation of federal trade barriers in Iraq and Libya, having sold these countries dual-use oil drilling equipment and, through its former subsidiary, Halliburton Logging Services, sending six pulse neutron generators to Libya. After having pleaded guilty, the company was fined $1.2 million, with another $2.61 million in penalties.
  • In the Balkans conflict in the 1990s, KBR supported U.S. peacekeeping forces in Bosnia, Croatia and Hungary with food, laundry, transportation and other lifecycle management services.
  • In 1995 Dick Cheney became chairman and CEO
  • In 1998 Halliburton merged with Dresser Industries, which included Kellogg.


2000s

  • On 10 April 2001 the Dresser division (excluding the former Kellogg division) entered an agreement to separate itself once again from Halliburton by management purchasing its equity, the new company to be called Dresser Inc.
  • In 2001 it was reported by The Wall Street Journal that a subsidiary of Halliburton Energy Services called Halliburton Products and Services Ltd. opened an office in Tehran. The company, HPS, operated "behind an unmarked door on the ninth floor of a new north Tehran tower block." Although HPS was incorporated in the Cayman Islands in 1975 and is "non-American", it shares both the logo and name of Halliburton Energy Services and, according to Dow Jones Newswires offers services from Halliburton units world-wide through its Tehran office. Such behaviour, undertaken while Cheney was CEO of Halliburton, may have violated the Trading with the Enemy Act. A Halliburton spokesman, responding to inquiries from Dow Jones, said "This is not breaking any laws. This is a foreign subsidiary and no US person is involved in this. No US person is facilitating any transaction. We are not performing directly in that country." No legal action has been taken against the company or its officials.
  • In 2002, Judicial Watch, a public action lawfirm, filed suit on behalf of shareholders against Halliburton, its current and former directors, and its accounting firm, Arthur Andersen LLP and Arthur Andersen Worldwide, for alleged accounting irregularities, said to be profit inflation by accounting for cost overruns as revenue. The Securities and Exchange Commission investigated the same issue. Halliburton counters that the practice was approved by its accounting firm, Arthur Andersen, and conforms to generally accepted accounting practices. In August, 2004, Halliburton paid a $7.5 million fine to settle the issue.
  • In April 2002, KBR was awarded a $7 million contract to construct steel holding cells at Camp X-Ray. More recently, the subsidiary was awarded a no-bid contract to conduct oil well firefighting in Iraq worth an estimated $1 billion. In May 2003, Halliburton's role under contract with regard to Iraqi oilfields was expanded to include "operation of facilities and distribution of products". [1]
  • In May 2003, Halliburton revealed in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that its KBR subsidiary had paid a Nigerian official $2.4 million in bribes in order to receive favorable tax treatment. [2] [3]
  • As of 2003, Halliburton was still operating in Iran. CNN, in a report entitled "US companies are operating in Iran despite sanctions," reported that a Halliburton spokesperson told the news agency that HPS helps Iran build oil rigs in the country's south.

Iraq Controversy

Wikinews has news related to this article: Civilians testify to Halliburton fraud, coercion

KBR has contracts in Iraq worth up to $18 billion, including a single no-bid contract known as "Restore Iraqi Oil" (RIO) which has an estimated worth of $7 billion.

Today KBR employ over 30,000 men and women in Iraq. Halliburton's work in Iraq is diverse and complicated. In addition to troop support, Halliburton also provides air traffic control support; produces 74 million gallons of water a month for consumption, hygiene and laundry; deploys as many as 700 trucks a day to deliver essentials to American forces; and provides firefighter and crash-rescue services, as well as working to restore Iraqi oil infrastructure.

Despite cronyism allegations, the company's contracts in Iraq are much less profitable than its core energy business. They are expected to have generated more than $13 billion in sales by the time they start to expire in 2006 but most offer low margins - less than 2% on average in 2003 and just 1.4% this year for the logistics work.

Halliburton is the only company mentioned by terrorist Osama bin Laden in an April 2004 tape where he claims that "this is a war [in Iraq] that is benefiting major companies with billions of dollars."

An audit of KBR by The Pentagon’s Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) found $108 million in "questioned costs" and, as of mid-March 2005, said they still had "major" unresolved issues with Halliburton.

Dick Cheney ties

In recent years the company has become the center of many controversies involving the 2003 Iraq War and the company's ties to US Vice President Dick Cheney.

Bill Gertz, defense reporter for The Washington Times, wrote: "Vice President Dick Cheney was chief executive officer of Halliburton from 1995 until 2000, and Democrats repeatedly have tried to link the administration to claims of government favoritism toward the firm." [4].

Cheney retired from the company during the 2000 U.S. presidential election campaign with a severance package worth $20 million.

Cheney's deferred compensation from Halliburton, which appeared on Cheney's 2001 financial disclosure statement, generated an income between $50,000 to $100,000 for the vice president. Dick Cheney also retains 433,000 share-equivalent unexercised stock options at Halliburton.

On the question of Cheney's deferred compensation from Halliburton, officials of the Bush-Cheney campaign said that before entering office in 2001, Cheney bought an insurance policy that guaranteed a fixed amount of deferred payments from Halliburton each year for five years so that the payments would not depend on the company's fortunes. The officials also said he had promised to donate to charity any after-tax profits he made from exercising his stock options. These steps are not unusual for corporate executives who enter government.

Allegations of fraud

Allegations of fraud by Halliburton, specifically with regard to its operations in Iraq, have persisted since before the Iraq War. The associations between U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney and Halliburton, had led many to speculate with regard to improprieties and profiteering from the war.

On June 27, 2005, the Democratic Party held a public committee, aired on C-SPAN 3, at which former civilian employees based in or administering operations in Iraq, testified to specific instances of waste, fraud, and other abuses and irregularities by Halliburton and its subsidiary Kellogg, Brown and Root (KBR).

Among the senators and representatives present at the hearing were Byron Dorgan (presiding), Henry Waxman, Frank Lautenberg, and Mark Dayton.

Among those testifying were Bunny Greenhouse, former Chief Contracting Officer of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Rory Mayberry, former Food Program Manager for Halliburton subsidiary, and Allan Waller, of the Lloyd-Owen International security and operations firm.

Greenhouse, who provided the bulk of testimony, spoke for several minutes about her involvement in the evaluation and crafting of government Army contracts, and explaining how her superiors undermined and dismissed her concerns of illegal business practices. "Ultimately my main was concern was the repeated insistence RIO contract be awarded to KBR without competitive bidding," Greenhouse said. She testified to have been given misinformation in answer to her complaints, saying she was "overtly misled."

Mayberry, still in Iraq, testified by video from questions prepared by the committee. He said that KBR routinely sold expired food rations to the Army.

The recorded interviewer asked, "Are you saying that Halliburton deliberately falsified the number of meals they prepared and then submitted false claims for reimbursement and that they did this to make up for past amounts auditors had disallowed?" Mayberry firmly answered "yes." He said that serving expired food rations was "an everyday occurrence, sometimes every meal." He also explained that Halliburton systematically overcharged for the number of meals as well, saying, "they were charging for 20,000 meals and they were only serving 10,000 meals." Dorgan later commented, "obviously there's no honor here, by a company that would serve outdated food to our troops in Iraq."

Mayberry also claimed would-be whistleblowers were threatened "to be sent to Falluja" and other "places under fire" if they talked to media or governmental oversight officials. In 2003 and 2004, Falluja had been well known as dangerous for foreign troops and civilians. "I personally was sent to Falluja for three weeks. The manager told me that I was being sent away until the auditors were gone, because I had talked to the auditors," Mayberry said.

"The threat of being sent to a camp under fire was their way of keeping us quiet. The employees who talked to auditors were sent to camps under more fire than other camps, and Anaconda." This report led Dorgan and others to voice considerable outrage.

Allan Waller testified to specific examples of how KBR officials had conspired in blocking of Lloyd-Owen fuel transports, and using other coersive means against is competitor. British based Lloyd-Owen has a direct contract with the Iraq government to provide fuel to various parts of the country.

In his introductory remarks, Dorgan explained that Senate Republicans had blocked any attempts at having a formal bi-partisan hearing, resulting in a separate committee.


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In his introductory remarks, Dorgan explained that Senate Republicans had blocked any attempts at having a formal bi-partisan hearing, resulting in a separate committee. He was out for two months. British based Lloyd-Owen has a direct contract with the Iraq government to provide fuel to various parts of the country. Two minutes into the game, Abdul-Jabbar punched Milwaukee's Kent Benson in retaliation for an overly aggressive elbow. Allan Waller testified to specific examples of how KBR officials had conspired in blocking of Lloyd-Owen fuel transports, and using other coersive means against is competitor. The second time he broke his hand was in the opening game of the 1977-78 season. The employees who talked to auditors were sent to camps under more fire than other camps, and Anaconda." This report led Dorgan and others to voice considerable outrage. When he returned after missing the first 16 games of the season, he started wearing protective goggles.

"The threat of being sent to a camp under fire was their way of keeping us quiet. He was bumped hard and got his eye scratched which angered him enough to punch the basket support stanchion. The manager told me that I was being sent away until the auditors were gone, because I had talked to the auditors," Mayberry said. The first time was during a pre-season game in 1974. "I personally was sent to Falluja for three weeks. While remaining virtually injury-free during his NBA career, Abdul-Jabbar broke his hand twice. In 2003 and 2004, Falluja had been well known as dangerous for foreign troops and civilians. Abdul-Jabbar also was successful in suing Miami Dolphins running back Karim Abdul-Jabbar because he felt like Karim was sponging off of the name he made famous by having the Abdul-Jabbar moniker and number 33 on Dolphins jerseys, as a result the younger one had to change his jersey nameplate to simply 'Abdul' while playing for the Dolphins[2].

Mayberry also claimed would-be whistleblowers were threatened "to be sent to Falluja" and other "places under fire" if they talked to media or governmental oversight officials. Abdul-Jabbar has a prescription to smoke marijuana in the state of California, the result of nausea-inducing migraine headaches [1]. The recorded interviewer asked, "Are you saying that Halliburton deliberately falsified the number of meals they prepared and then submitted false claims for reimbursement and that they did this to make up for past amounts auditors had disallowed?" Mayberry firmly answered "yes." He said that serving expired food rations was "an everyday occurrence, sometimes every meal." He also explained that Halliburton systematically overcharged for the number of meals as well, saying, "they were charging for 20,000 meals and they were only serving 10,000 meals." Dorgan later commented, "obviously there's no honor here, by a company that would serve outdated food to our troops in Iraq.". Other books:. He said that KBR routinely sold expired food rations to the Army. It is the history of the 761st Battalion, an all-black tank squadron. Mayberry, still in Iraq, testified by video from questions prepared by the committee. He is also a bestselling author, the latest of his books being Brothers In Arms: The Epic Story of the 761st Tank Battalion, WWII's Forgotten Heroes (Publisher: Broadway 2004, ISBN 0385503385), co-written with Anthony Walton.

She testified to have been given misinformation in answer to her complaints, saying she was "overtly misled.". In addition, Abdul-Jabbar was co-executive producer of the 1994 TV movie, The Vernon Johns Story. "Ultimately my main was concern was the repeated insistence RIO contract be awarded to KBR without competitive bidding," Greenhouse said. He also played himself in Slam Dunk Ernest starring Jim Varney and made a brief non-speaking cameo appearance in another David Zucker comedy, 1998's BASEketball. Greenhouse, who provided the bulk of testimony, spoke for several minutes about her involvement in the evaluation and crafting of government Army contracts, and explaining how her superiors undermined and dismissed her concerns of illegal business practices. Other notable roles include 1978's Game of Death, where his character Hakim fought Bruce Lee's character Billy Lo, and in Stephen King's telemovie version of The Stand. Army Corps of Engineers, Rory Mayberry, former Food Program Manager for Halliburton subsidiary, and Allan Waller, of the Lloyd-Owen International security and operations firm. He had numerous other TV and film roles, often playing himself, such as in the hit Chevy Chase movie Fletch and the ABC sitcom Full House.

Among those testifying were Bunny Greenhouse, former Chief Contracting Officer of the U.S. In 1980, he played co-pilot Roger Murdock in David Zucker's comedy, Airplane!. Among the senators and representatives present at the hearing were Byron Dorgan (presiding), Henry Waxman, Frank Lautenberg, and Mark Dayton. Playing for the Lakers allowed Jabbar to try his hand at acting. On June 27, 2005, the Democratic Party held a public committee, aired on C-SPAN 3, at which former civilian employees based in or administering operations in Iraq, testified to specific instances of waste, fraud, and other abuses and irregularities by Halliburton and its subsidiary Kellogg, Brown and Root (KBR). He has also served as a volunteer coach at Alchesay High School on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Whiteriver, Arizona since 1998. Vice President Dick Cheney and Halliburton, had led many to speculate with regard to improprieties and profiteering from the war. Finally, on September 2, 2005, Abdul-Jabbar returned to the Lakers as a special assistant to Phil Jackson to help develop the team's young center Andrew Bynum.

The associations between U.S. He then worked as a scout for the New York Knicks. Allegations of fraud by Halliburton, specifically with regard to its operations in Iraq, have persisted since before the Iraq War. He was the head coach in 2002 of the Oklahoma Storm of the USBL, but failed in a bid to get the head coach position for Columbia University a year later. These steps are not unusual for corporate executives who enter government. Since he began lobbying for a coaching position in 1995, he had only been able to work as an assistant for the Los Angeles Clippers and the Seattle SuperSonics, helping mentor their young centers, Michael Olowokandi and Jerome James, respectively. The officials also said he had promised to donate to charity any after-tax profits he made from exercising his stock options. This reputation contributed greatly to his lack of coaching opporunities.

On the question of Cheney's deferred compensation from Halliburton, officials of the Bush-Cheney campaign said that before entering office in 2001, Cheney bought an insurance policy that guaranteed a fixed amount of deferred payments from Halliburton each year for five years so that the payments would not depend on the company's fortunes. However, during his playing years, he had developed a reputation of being introverted and sullen, often refusing to speak to the press, leading to the impression that he had nothing to say. Dick Cheney also retains 433,000 share-equivalent unexercised stock options at Halliburton. Abdul-Jabbar had been interested in coaching since his retirement, and given the influence he has had on the league, he had presumed those chances would come easily. Cheney's deferred compensation from Halliburton, which appeared on Cheney's 2001 financial disclosure statement, generated an income between $50,000 to $100,000 for the vice president. After a then-record 20 pro seasons, Abdul- Jabbar retired from the game in 1989, leaving a legacy of professionalism, class, and success. presidential election campaign with a severance package worth $20 million. He was named to the All-Star team even in his final season.

Cheney retired from the company during the 2000 U.S. He averaged over 24 points and 10 rebounds over his career, and maintained a solid level of play well into his late 30s. Bill Gertz, defense reporter for The Washington Times, wrote: "Vice President Dick Cheney was chief executive officer of Halliburton from 1995 until 2000, and Democrats repeatedly have tried to link the administration to claims of government favoritism toward the firm." [4]. Abdul-Jabbar was famous for his "Skyhook" shot, which was notoriously difficult to defend against. In recent years the company has become the center of many controversies involving the 2003 Iraq War and the company's ties to US Vice President Dick Cheney. He was also a pupil of the kung fu master Bruce Lee, studying Lee's Jeet Kune Do style. An audit of KBR by The Pentagon’s Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) found $108 million in "questioned costs" and, as of mid-March 2005, said they still had "major" unresolved issues with Halliburton. While in LA, he started doing yoga in 1976 to improve his flexibility.

Halliburton is the only company mentioned by terrorist Osama bin Laden in an April 2004 tape where he claims that "this is a war [in Iraq] that is benefiting major companies with billions of dollars.". Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was also notable for his physical fitness regimen. They are expected to have generated more than $13 billion in sales by the time they start to expire in 2006 but most offer low margins - less than 2% on average in 2003 and just 1.4% this year for the logistics work. However, he has repeatedly denied any connections to the Nation of Islam, having been converted by a Turkish imam of the Hanafi school of thought, under whom he studied at UCLA. Despite cronyism allegations, the company's contracts in Iraq are much less profitable than its core energy business. He took his Arabic name in 1971, publicly announcing it on May 1 of that year, one day after the Bucks completed a four-game sweep of the Baltimore Bullets (known today as the Washington Wizards) in the NBA Finals. In addition to troop support, Halliburton also provides air traffic control support; produces 74 million gallons of water a month for consumption, hygiene and laundry; deploys as many as 700 trucks a day to deliver essentials to American forces; and provides firefighter and crash-rescue services, as well as working to restore Iraqi oil infrastructure. While at UCLA Abdul-Jabbar converted to Islam.

Halliburton's work in Iraq is diverse and complicated. In 1975, the Bucks traded him and reserve center Walt Wesley to the Los Angeles Lakers, for center Elmore Smith, guard Brian Winters and rookie blue chippers Dave Myers and Junior Bridgeman. Today KBR employ over 30,000 men and women in Iraq. The winner of the coin-flip was the Milwaukee Bucks, where he would play five seasons. KBR has contracts in Iraq worth up to $18 billion, including a single no-bid contract known as "Restore Iraqi Oil" (RIO) which has an estimated worth of $7 billion. On a coin-flip with the Phoenix Suns, he would be the number one pick in the 1969 NBA Draft pick.
. The Harlem Globetrotters offered him $1 million to play them, but he declined.

Halliburton first tried to find work cementing oil wells in Burkburnett, Texas then moved their business (New Method Oil Well Cementing Company) to the Healdton field near Ardmore, Oklahoma. At UCLA, he suffered a scratched left cornea; from then on, he mostly played wearing goggles. Erle P. from UCLA. and Mrs. Alcindor graduated with a B.A. Mr. During his time on the team, UCLA had 88 wins and only two losses.

Analysts at Deutsche Bank value KBR at up to $2.15 billion, while others believe it could be worth closer to $3 billion by the time management decides what to do with the business in 2005. He played for the UCLA Bruins from 1965 to 1969 under coach John Wooden. At a meeting for investors and analysts in August 2004, a plan was outlined to divest the KBR division through a possible sale, spin-off or initial public offering. He led Power Memorial Academy to three straight New York City Catholic championships, a 71-game winning streak, and a 96–6 overall record. a year from 2002 through 2004. . As a result of the asbestos-related costs, Halliburton lost approximately $900 million U.S. Born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr. (usually known as Lew Alcindor), to Cora and Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor in Harlem, New York City, he was a center who grew to 7'2" (2.18 m) tall.

Asbestos-related litigation from the Kellogg acquisition caused the company to book over $4.0 (billion U.S.) in losses from 2002 through 2004. Today, he is a successful coach, author, and part-time actor. KBR is a major international construction company, which is a highly volatile undertaking subject to wild fluctuations in revenue and profit. He is the NBA's all-time leading scorer with 38,387 points. Kellogg division of Dresser (which Dresser had merged with in 1988). Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 in New York City, New York) was a successful high school, collegiate, and professional NBA basketball player. With the acquisition of Dresser Industries in 1998, the Kellogg-Brown & Root division (in 2002 renamed to KBR) was formed by merging Halliburton's Brown & Root (acquired 1962) subsidiary and the M.W. A Season on the Reservation: My Soujourn with the White Mountain Apaches with Stephen Singular (2000) ISBN 0688170773.

This business continues to be profitable, and the company is a world leader in this industry; Schlumberger is the company's closest competitor. Black Profiles in Courage: A Legacy of African-American Achievement with Alan Steinburg (2000) ISBN 0380813416. Energy Services, the company's historical bedrock, includes: drilling & formation evaluation, digital & consulting solutions, production volume optimization, and fluid Systems. Selected from Giant Steps (Writers' Voices) (1999) ISBN 0785799125. . Kareem (1990) ISBN 0394559274. The KBR group is a major construction company of mainly refineries, oilfields & pipelines, and chemical plants. Giant Steps with Peter Knobler (1987) ISBN 0553050443.

The Energy Services Group provides technical products and services for oil and gas exploration and production. #7 in SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003. FY 2004) and over 95,000 employees, Halliburton operates in two major business segments. Field goals made (15,837). With revenues exceeding $20.46 (billion U.S. Field goals attempted (28,307). Halliburton Energy Services NYSE: HAL is a multinational corporation based in Houston, Texas. Minutes (57,446).

CNN, in a report entitled "US companies are operating in Iran despite sanctions," reported that a Halliburton spokesperson told the news agency that HPS helps Iran build oil rigs in the country's south. Holds NBA career record for (in addition to total points):

    . As of 2003, Halliburton was still operating in Iran. First player in NBA history to play 20 seasons. [2] [3]. One of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History (1996). In May 2003, Halliburton revealed in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that its KBR subsidiary had paid a Nigerian official $2.4 million in bribes in order to receive favorable tax treatment. Sports Illustrated magazine's "Sportsman of the Year" (1985).

    [1]. NBA Finals MVP (1971, 1985). In May 2003, Halliburton's role under contract with regard to Iraqi oilfields was expanded to include "operation of facilities and distribution of products". NBA MVP (1971, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1980) (a record 6 times). More recently, the subsidiary was awarded a no-bid contract to conduct oil well firefighting in Iraq worth an estimated $1 billion. Played on NBA champion teams (1971, 1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988). In April 2002, KBR was awarded a $7 million contract to construct steel holding cells at Camp X-Ray. NBA Rookie of the Year (1970).

    In August, 2004, Halliburton paid a $7.5 million fine to settle the issue. NBA:

      . Halliburton counters that the practice was approved by its accounting firm, Arthur Andersen, and conforms to generally accepted accounting practices. Naismith College Player of the Year (1969). The Securities and Exchange Commission investigated the same issue. Most Outstanding Player in NCAA Tournament (1967, 1968, 1969). In 2002, Judicial Watch, a public action lawfirm, filed suit on behalf of shareholders against Halliburton, its current and former directors, and its accounting firm, Arthur Andersen LLP and Arthur Andersen Worldwide, for alleged accounting irregularities, said to be profit inflation by accounting for cost overruns as revenue. Played on three NCAA champion teams (1967, 1968, 1969).

      We are not performing directly in that country." No legal action has been taken against the company or its officials. Three-time First Team All-American (1967-69). No US person is facilitating any transaction. Player of the Year (1967, 1969). This is a foreign subsidiary and no US person is involved in this. College:

        . A Halliburton spokesman, responding to inquiries from Dow Jones, said "This is not breaking any laws. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (May 15, 1995).

        Such behaviour, undertaken while Cheney was CEO of Halliburton, may have violated the Trading with the Enemy Act. Points per Game - 24.6 (12th highest). The company, HPS, operated "behind an unmarked door on the ninth floor of a new north Tehran tower block." Although HPS was incorporated in the Cayman Islands in 1975 and is "non-American", it shares both the logo and name of Halliburton Energy Services and, according to Dow Jones Newswires offers services from Halliburton units world-wide through its Tehran office. Points - 38,387 (highest). opened an office in Tehran. Blocks per Game - 2.57. In 2001 it was reported by The Wall Street Journal that a subsidiary of Halliburton Energy Services called Halliburton Products and Services Ltd. Blocks - 3189 (2nd highest).

        On 10 April 2001 the Dresser division (excluding the former Kellogg division) entered an agreement to separate itself once again from Halliburton by management purchasing its equity, the new company to be called Dresser Inc. Steals per Game -. In 1998 Halliburton merged with Dresser Industries, which included Kellogg. Steals - 1160. In 1995 Dick Cheney became chairman and CEO. Assist per Game - 3.6. peacekeeping forces in Bosnia, Croatia and Hungary with food, laundry, transportation and other lifecycle management services. Assists - 5660 (29th highest).

        In the Balkans conflict in the 1990s, KBR supported U.S. Rebounds per Game - 11.2 (25th highest). After having pleaded guilty, the company was fined $1.2 million, with another $2.61 million in penalties. Rebounds - 17,440 (3rd highest). In the early 1990s Halliburton was found to be in violation of federal trade barriers in Iraq and Libya, having sold these countries dual-use oil drilling equipment and, through its former subsidiary, Halliburton Logging Services, sending six pulse neutron generators to Libya. 3-Point % - 5.6. In the aftermath of Operation Desert Storm in Kuwait in 1991, Halliburton crews helped bring 320 burning oil wells under control. Free Throw % - 72.1.

        1991: workforce - 73,000. Field Goal % - 55.9 (8th highest). 1982: energy industry decline. Games Played - 1560 (2nd highest in NBA history). 1982: workforce - 115,000. Jersey Number - 33. 198?: Halliburton Logging Services.

        198?: acquisition of Geosource. 1988: acquisition of Geophysical Service Incorporated from Texas Instruments. 1962: acquisition of Brown and Root of Houston, Texas. 1961: headquarters - Dallas, Texas.

        1960: name shortened to Halliburton Company. 1957: acquisition of Welex Jet Services of Fort Worth, Texas. 1948: New York Stock Exchange listing. 1924: incorporation.

        1921: headquarters - Duncan, Oklahoma. 1920: reorganized - Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Company.

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