Gummy bears

Gummy Bears are a rubbery-textured confectionery, roughly 2cm long, shaped in the form of little teddy bears.

Selection of gummies

History

The Gummy Bear originates from Germany where it is hugely popular under the name Gummibär (rubber bear). The German company Haribo from Bonn first produced bear-shaped sweets in 1922 and introduced its Gold-Bear product in the 1960s. The success of Gummy Bears has spawned many gummy animals and objects: worms, frogs, hamburgers, cherries, cola bottles, sharks, apples, oranges, and even gummy ampelmenn. Many knockoff gummy bears are available on the market. Trolli is a well-known knockoff gummy manufacturer, and was the first to introduce gummi worms in 1981.

Ingredients

The traditional Gummy Bear is made from sugar, glucose syrup, starch, flavouring, food coloring, citric acid and gelatin. There are also some types of Gummy Bears made with pectin instead of gelatin, making them suitable for vegans.

Depending on the production method, it may be similar to the British confectionery Jelly Babies.

Large sour bears are larger and flatter than Gummi Bears, have a softer texture, and include fumaric acid or other acid ingredients to produce a sour flavor. Some manufacturers produce sour bears with a different texture, based on starch instead of gelatin.

On screen

In the final scene of the film Ferris Bueller's Day Off, a girl on the schoolbus, played by Polly Noonan, offers her downtrodden principal, Mister Rooney, a gummy bear.

Want a gummy bear? They've been in my pocket all day they're real warm and soft

In the 1980s Disney produced a cartoon series called Adventures of the Gummi Bears. The bears on this show, however, were not gummy whatsoever.

In the 2001 film, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, American Gummy Bears are used to represent power, as well as that of a dramatic change over Gummibär and the East Berlin lifestyle. The scene in this musical leads up to the song, "Sugar Daddy."

In the film Jack, Robin Williams' character (who has a disease that causes rapid ageing), offers gummybears to his teacher, played by Jennifer Lopez. She accepts the red ones.

In restaurants

At the end of a meal at Michaelangelo's Restaurant Cafe, in San Francisco, guests are treated to novel albeit unsanitary treat -- a communal bowl of gummy bears.

Breast implants

The consistency of gummy bears has been proposed as ideal for breast implants. "Gummy Bear breast implants" have been on the market since 2005. [1]


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[1]. The program has since been applied to other similar problems in Apple's hardware range. "Gummy Bear breast implants" have been on the market since 2005. Apple says the program is for "repair or replacement of the logic board in iBook models manufactured between May 2001 and October 2003 that are experiencing specific component failure"[4]. The consistency of gummy bears has been proposed as ideal for breast implants. In response to the problem, in January 2004, Apple initiated the "iBook Logic Board Repair Extension Program" [3]", which covers any expense of repairing "affected iBooks for three years"—essentially an extended warranty for the affected products. At the end of a meal at Michaelangelo's Restaurant Cafe, in San Francisco, guests are treated to novel albeit unsanitary treat -- a communal bowl of gummy bears. At one point, a group of users [2] even sought to file a class action suit against Apple.

She accepts the red ones. In late November 2003, a number of iBook users started to report a display problem with their laptops [1]. In the film Jack, Robin Williams' character (who has a disease that causes rapid ageing), offers gummybears to his teacher, played by Jennifer Lopez. Each guide also includes a screw guide that lists the different types of screws and where they go. The scene in this musical leads up to the song, "Sugar Daddy.". iFixit offers a set of FixIt Guides for the iBooks that provide instructions with pictures covering how to get to any internal component. In the 2001 film, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, American Gummy Bears are used to represent power, as well as that of a dramatic change over Gummibär and the East Berlin lifestyle. For comparison, most recent Wintel laptop form factors allow removal of a hard drive caddy after removing one or two screws.

The bears on this show, however, were not gummy whatsoever. To replace or even access the hard drive, about fifty-six screws need to be removed. In the 1980s Disney produced a cartoon series called Adventures of the Gummi Bears. The current iBook enclosure, however, is also notable for being difficult to open. Want a gummy bear? They've been in my pocket all day they're real warm and soft. This does give the keyboard a "spongy" effect though, if the user types with heavy hands. In the final scene of the film Ferris Bueller's Day Off, a girl on the schoolbus, played by Polly Noonan, offers her downtrodden principal, Mister Rooney, a gummy bear. For customer installable parts such as an AirPort (wireless) card or additional memory, installation into an iBook is rather easy, as the keyboard is designed to easily open with two spring-loaded latches that may also be locked with screws if so desired.

Some manufacturers produce sour bears with a different texture, based on starch instead of gelatin. Apple's laptop/portable product line consists of the iBook and PowerBook G4, with the MacBook Pro set to ship in February 2006. Large sour bears are larger and flatter than Gummi Bears, have a softer texture, and include fumaric acid or other acid ingredients to produce a sour flavor. Later, a PowerPC G4 chip and slot loading optical drives were added on October 23, 2003—finally ending Apple’s use of the G3 chip. Depending on the production method, it may be similar to the British confectionery Jelly Babies. A 14-inch model was added to the existing 12-inch models on January 07, 2002 during Macworld Conference & Expo in San Francisco. There are also some types of Gummy Bears made with pectin instead of gelatin, making them suitable for vegans. The iBook design has stayed largely the same since then.

The traditional Gummy Bear is made from sugar, glucose syrup, starch, flavouring, food coloring, citric acid and gelatin. With a few exceptions, white polycarbonate is used in consumer lines such as iMac, eMac and iBook, while anodized aluminum is used for professional products like the Power Mac G5 and PowerBook G4. Trolli is a well-known knockoff gummy manufacturer, and was the first to introduce gummi worms in 1981. The iBook's design, along with elements from its sister product, the PowerBook G4 are currently used in Apple's entire product matrix. Many knockoff gummy bears are available on the market. Apple received industry accolades for brilliant design, which has since been widely copied. The success of Gummy Bears has spawned many gummy animals and objects: worms, frogs, hamburgers, cherries, cola bottles, sharks, apples, oranges, and even gummy ampelmenn. These smaller machines were lighter, had a higher quality 12-inch LCD screen and largely thought to be a superior design.

The German company Haribo from Bonn first produced bear-shaped sweets in 1922 and introduced its Gold-Bear product in the 1960s. Aesthetically, the former iBook's bold colors and radical (much contested) form-factor were abandoned for a crisp white and slim-line form factor. The Gummy Bear originates from Germany where it is hugely popular under the name Gummibär (rubber bear). Essentially, the machine had been reinvented from the very core, with new features and a new design. . A next generation iBook debuted at a press conference in Cupertino on May 1, 2001. Gummy Bears are a rubbery-textured confectionery, roughly 2cm long, shaped in the form of little teddy bears. OS X 10.4 Tiger requires a Firewire port and DVD drive, restricting it to the late-model iBook SE.

Support for these iBooks is built into OS X 10.0 through to 10.3.9. Most iBooks shipped with Mac OS 8.6 or 9.0. This limitation still holds true in all iBooks produced today. Complicated procedures and countless screws had to be removed in order to access any internal components, such as the hard disk and optical drive.

No other modifications could be performed in warranty, and no PCMCIA port existed to provide additional expansion capabilities. The original iBook's only customer installable parts were additional memory and an AirPort card, via two slots under the easily removed keyboard. The original iBook design was discontinued in May 2001, in favor of the new "Dual USB" iBooks. Colors available were "Graphite", "Indigo" and "Key Lime"; FireWire and video out were added as well.

A revision to the iBook brought new colors, directly from the mid-2000 iMac. The line continually received processor, memory, and hard disk upgrades. Despite its drawbacks, the iBook was a sales success. Nevertheless, this version of the iBook, along with many other Macs, could be seen in hit movies and televisions shows.

The iBook was labelled as "clamshell" or "toilet seat" due to the distinctive design. Long rumoured features of touch-screens, and ultra-long battery life were absent. The iBook was heftier than the PowerBook of the time, with lower specifications. Heated debate was made over just about everything—the aesthetics, features, weight, performance, pricing and so on.

Apple released the AirPort wireless base station at the same time. Apple partnered with Lucent in the creation of the iBook's wireless capabilities, setting an industry standard. The first iBook was the first mainstream computer ever to be sold with internal wireless networking, with antenna built around the display bezel, although it still required an optional wireless card installed under the keyboard. To attract sales to schools, the iBooks had power connectors on the underside of the machine that allowed multiple iBooks to be easily charged on a custom-made rack.

The ports were placed uncovered on the side, as a cover was thought to be fragile. USB, Ethernet, and modem ports were standard, as was an optical drive. Like the iMac, the iBook ran a PowerPC G3 chip, and included no legacy Apple interfaces. Apple touted the durability of the casing by demonstrating someone holding on to the iBook jumping off a height (onto cushions).

The target audience included young children, so a carrying handle was built into the hinge. Its marketing slogan was "iMac to go". The design philosophy was influenced by Apple's consumer desktop, iMac, with a large distinctive shape, and translucent clear and coloured plastics. After much speculation, Steve Jobs unveiled the consumer-targeted iBook laptop computer during the keynote presentation of Macworld Conference & Expo, New York on July 21, 1999.

. With the introduction of the Macbook Pro, the iBook line's future may be in doubt, however, as of January 2006, the Apple website store features the two iBooks with the larger (15.4 inch) Macbook Pro priced well above them. Instead of the common market practice of selling yesterday's professional technology to consumers, Apple originally engineered the iBook as a derivative of its professional laptop computer, the PowerBook G3, adopting several key features that had made it an early market success. Following the success of the iMac and its ongoing hardware simplification strategy, Apple Computer introduced the iBook, a laptop computer targeted to consumer and education market segments.

(Other Specifications Same as iBook G4 Late 2004). Both models now feature: 512 MB memory (expandable to 1.5 GB) at 333Mhz; ATI Mobility Radeon 9550 graphics processor with 32 MB video RAM; Sudden Motion Sensor (parks the hard drive head if the iBook is dropped); scrolling trackpad; Bluetooth 2.0+EDR; Slightly faster bus 133Mhz/142Mhz. While the 14-inch display is bigger it is the same resolution as the 12-inch. M9848LL/A: (Retail $1299) 1.42 GHz; 14-inch display; 60 GB hard disk; Slot-Load SuperDrive DVD±RW/CD-RW.

M9846LL/A: (Retail $999) 1.33 GHz; 12-inch display; 40 GB hard disk; Slot-Load Combo Drive DVD-ROM/CD-RW. Still a G4 PowerPC. iBook G4 Mid 2005 (July 26, 2005) - Minor revision

    . Apple originally shipped this with Mac OS X 10.3 Panther but with the release of Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, all current iBooks ship with the more up-to-date operating system.

    The three models are: M9623LL/A (12-inch, 1.2 GHz, combo drive), M9627LL/A (14-inch, 1.33 GHz, combo drive), M9628LL/A (14-inch, 1.33 GHz, super drive). (Other Specifications Same as iBook G4 Early 2004). AirPort Extreme Standard. Slot-load Combo (DVD/CD-RW)/SuperDrive (DVD-R/CD-RW).

    30/60/80 GB Hard Disk. G4 1.2/1.33 GHz. iBook G4 Late 2004 (October 19, 2004) - Minor revision

      . (Other Specifications Same as iBook G4).

      Slot-load SuperDrive (DVD-R) Built to Order Option. G4 1.0/1.2 GHz. iBook G4 Early 2004 (April 19, 2004) - Minor revision

        . Mac OS X 10.3 "Panther".

        Airport Extreme (802.11g, optional). USB 2.0, Firewire 400, Video Out, Ethernet 10/100. Slot-load Combo (CD-RW/DVD-ROM). 30/40/60 GB Hard Disk.

        256 MB RAM. G4 800/933/1000 MHz. 12-inch or 14-inch Active-matrix TFT Display (1024x768 max resolution). iBook G4 (October 22, 2003) - Major revision, processor switch

          .

          (Other Specifications Same as Mid 2002). Mac OS X 10.2. 800/900 MHz. iBook Early 2003 (April 22, 2003) - Minor revision

            .

            (Other Specifications Same as 14-inch). Mac OS X 10.1. 600/700 MHz. iBook Mid 2002 (May 20, 2002) - Minor revision

              .

              (Other Specifications Same as Dual USB Late 2001). 256 MB RAM. 14-inch Active-matrix TFT Display (1024x768 max resolution). iBook 14-inch (January 7, 2002) - New model, larger 14-inch display

                .

                (Other Specifications Same as Dual USB). Mac OS X 10.1. 15 GB Hard Disk (most models). 600 MHz.

                iBook Dual USB Late 2001 (October 16, 2001) - Minor revision

                  . Mac OS 9.1. Airport (802.11b, optional). USB 1.1, Firewire, Video Out, Ethernet.

                  CD/CDRW/DVD/Combo. 10GB Hard Disk. 64 or 128 MB RAM. PowerPC G3 500MHz.

                  12.1-inch Active-matrix TFT Display (1024x768 max resolution). iBook Dual USB (May 1, 2001) - Second Generation iBook

                    . (Other Specifications same as iBook and iBook SE). Mac OS 9.0.4.

                    Airport (802.11b, optional). USB, Firewire, Video Out, Ethernet. CD/DVD-ROM. 10 GB Hard Disk.

                    8 MB ATI Rage 128 Mobility AGP 2x. 64 MB RAM. G3 366/466 MHz. 12.1-inch Active-matrix TFT Display (800x600 max resolution).

                    iBook Firewire/SE (September 13, 2000) - Major revision (Graphite, Indigo, Key-lime)

                      . (Other Specifications Same as iBook). 6GB Hard disk. Mac OS 9.0.2.

                      Expandable to 576 MB (320 MB specified by Apple). 64 MB RAM (soldered to Logic Board). 366 MHz. iBook SE (February 16, 2000) - Minor addition to existing line (Graphite)

                        .

                        Mac OS 8.6. Airport (802.11b, optional). USB, Ethernet. CD-ROM.

                        3 GB Hard Disk. 4 MB ATI Rage Mobility AGP 2x. Expandable to 544 MB (288 MB specified by Apple). 32 MB RAM (soldered to Logic Board).

                        66 MHz bus. PowerPC G3 300 MHz. 12.1-inch Active-matrix TFT Display (800x600 max resolution). iBook (June 21, 1999) - First iBook (Tangerine, Blueberry)

                          .

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