Gummy bears

Gummy Bears are a rubbery-textured confectionery, roughly 2cm long, shaped in the form of little teddy bears.

Selection of gummies

History

The Gummy Bear originates from Germany where it is hugely popular under the name Gummibär (rubber bear). The German company Haribo from Bonn first produced bear-shaped sweets in 1922 and introduced its Gold-Bear product in the 1960s. The success of Gummy Bears has spawned many gummy animals and objects: worms, frogs, hamburgers, cherries, cola bottles, sharks, apples, oranges, and even gummy ampelmenn. Many knockoff gummy bears are available on the market. Trolli is a well-known knockoff gummy manufacturer, and was the first to introduce gummi worms in 1981.

Ingredients

The traditional Gummy Bear is made from sugar, glucose syrup, starch, flavouring, food coloring, citric acid and gelatin. There are also some types of Gummy Bears made with pectin instead of gelatin, making them suitable for vegans.

Depending on the production method, it may be similar to the British confectionery Jelly Babies.

Large sour bears are larger and flatter than Gummi Bears, have a softer texture, and include fumaric acid or other acid ingredients to produce a sour flavor. Some manufacturers produce sour bears with a different texture, based on starch instead of gelatin.

On screen

In the final scene of the film Ferris Bueller's Day Off, a girl on the schoolbus, played by Polly Noonan, offers her downtrodden principal, Mister Rooney, a gummy bear.

Want a gummy bear? They've been in my pocket all day they're real warm and soft

In the 1980s Disney produced a cartoon series called Adventures of the Gummi Bears. The bears on this show, however, were not gummy whatsoever.

In the 2001 film, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, American Gummy Bears are used to represent power, as well as that of a dramatic change over Gummibär and the East Berlin lifestyle. The scene in this musical leads up to the song, "Sugar Daddy."

In the film Jack, Robin Williams' character (who has a disease that causes rapid ageing), offers gummybears to his teacher, played by Jennifer Lopez. She accepts the red ones.

In restaurants

At the end of a meal at Michaelangelo's Restaurant Cafe, in San Francisco, guests are treated to novel albeit unsanitary treat -- a communal bowl of gummy bears.

Breast implants

The consistency of gummy bears has been proposed as ideal for breast implants. "Gummy Bear breast implants" have been on the market since 2005. [1]


This page about Gummi includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Gummi
News stories about Gummi
External links for Gummi
Videos for Gummi
Wikis about Gummi
Discussion Groups about Gummi
Blogs about Gummi
Images of Gummi

[1]. Generally, each series listed above will have its own set of products, although the MSiA and Gundam Models lines, such as High Grade Universal Century may extend across series. "Gummy Bear breast implants" have been on the market since 2005. Categories of products include the Mobile Suit In Action or MSiA action figures, and Gundam Model Kits in several scales and complexity levels. The consistency of gummy bears has been proposed as ideal for breast implants. Other companies produce unofficial toys, models, t-shirts, etc. At the end of a meal at Michaelangelo's Restaurant Cafe, in San Francisco, guests are treated to novel albeit unsanitary treat -- a communal bowl of gummy bears. Bandai, the primary licensee of the Gundam trademark, makes a variety of products for the Gundam fan.

She accepts the red ones. Although not directly related to Gundam, these series incorporate Gundam models as part of the stories:. In the film Jack, Robin Williams' character (who has a disease that causes rapid ageing), offers gummybears to his teacher, played by Jennifer Lopez. There have been so many Mobile Suit units that its impossible to tell a distinct style, however generally Mobile Suits are extremely agile and have an enormous variety of different weapons. The scene in this musical leads up to the song, "Sugar Daddy.". The games units are often separated by being "Super Robots" (powerful mecha that often have near-limitless powers and technology, but have a shorter range of movement), and "Real Robots" (mecha that are physically weak, but have a wide range of movement for the most part). In the 2001 film, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, American Gummy Bears are used to represent power, as well as that of a dramatic change over Gummibär and the East Berlin lifestyle. The Mobile Suit units are considered the representing unit in the "Real Robot" type of mecha.

The bears on this show, however, were not gummy whatsoever. So far, almost every single major Gundam series and then some has made at least one appearance in the series. In the 1980s Disney produced a cartoon series called Adventures of the Gummi Bears. This title was the first in the series history to not have many of the standard characters that have appeared in every game to date such as Amuro. Want a gummy bear? They've been in my pocket all day they're real warm and soft. This changed in Super Robot Wars J for the Game Boy Advance. In the final scene of the film Ferris Bueller's Day Off, a girl on the schoolbus, played by Polly Noonan, offers her downtrodden principal, Mister Rooney, a gummy bear. Some series come and go however, but Amuro Ray, often in the RX-93 Nu Gundam, is a regular character and has actually never missed a single game.

Some manufacturers produce sour bears with a different texture, based on starch instead of gelatin. In fact, there hasn't been a single game which hasn't featured at least one Gundam series and characters. Large sour bears are larger and flatter than Gummi Bears, have a softer texture, and include fumaric acid or other acid ingredients to produce a sour flavor. The Gundam meta verse makes regular appearances in the Super Robot Wars series by Banpresto. Depending on the production method, it may be similar to the British confectionery Jelly Babies. There is also a Half-Life 2 mod called Mech Assault Genesis( http://www.mechag.com ), based on Gundams. There are also some types of Gummy Bears made with pectin instead of gelatin, making them suitable for vegans. Some video games have been converted into comics or novels.

The traditional Gummy Bear is made from sugar, glucose syrup, starch, flavouring, food coloring, citric acid and gelatin. Following the popularity of Gundam, various video games feature original characters previously not found in other media. Trolli is a well-known knockoff gummy manufacturer, and was the first to introduce gummi worms in 1981. Gundam manga is also published in English in Singapore by Chuang Yi. Many knockoff gummy bears are available on the market. The manga narration of the original series is published in English in North America by a variety of companies, such as Viz Communications, Del Rey Manga, and TOKYOPOP, among others. The success of Gummy Bears has spawned many gummy animals and objects: worms, frogs, hamburgers, cherries, cola bottles, sharks, apples, oranges, and even gummy ampelmenn. See main article Gundam Manga and Novels.

The German company Haribo from Bonn first produced bear-shaped sweets in 1922 and introduced its Gold-Bear product in the 1960s. These series are drawings and precise specifications for additional Mobile suit units not found in the original animated material. The Gummy Bear originates from Germany where it is hugely popular under the name Gummibär (rubber bear). Due to the sheer popularity of the Gundam franchise, especially the Mobile Suit design, several Original Design series were published. . For the listing of the series on chronological order of the depicted events, see the individual timelines' pages. Gummy Bears are a rubbery-textured confectionery, roughly 2cm long, shaped in the form of little teddy bears. The following characteristics are distinctive (but not unique) to many Gundams:.

The different series have had different ways of maintaining the tradition, and the only unique feature that all Gundams have in common is the name. In both Gundam F91 and Victory Gundam there are hints of this as people referred to the F91 and the Victory Gundams as 'the super-machines from history', and dubbed them Gundams. Since the story takes place after the biggest time-gap in between continuities in the Universal Century, people probably forgot about the Gundams entirely. In the G-Saviour movie there is no allusions to "Gundam" whatsoever, not even mentioning the word.

The name is used widely outside the animation in the merchandising of Cosmic Era toys and models. Most characters simply refer to these units by their names, such as Duel, Buster, Blitz, Strike, or Aegis, but a select few characters refer to them as Gundams, a trend which started with Kira Yamato and spread to a few close friends, as well as the subordinates of Neo Lorrnoke, who subconsciously remembers the term despite a form of amnesia. In an informal homage to other Gundam series, all of these unique mobilesuits use operating systems with complicated acronyms, and these acronyms always simplify to the word Gundam. However, there are numerous mobile suits which share the properties of Gundams from other series.

In the Cosmic Era works, the word Gundam is never used in an official sense, apart from in the Chinese language translations of the manga. Corin Nander was an ace pilot who was placed under suspended animation as punishment and the color scheme of the Turn A mobile suit reminds him of the Gundam mobile suits from previous eras. In the CC (Seireki) timeline, the name Gundam is given to the White Doll/Turn A mobile suit by Corin Nander. Every Gundam has a unique name that befits the nature of the suit and/or its origins, such as Wing Gundam, Gundam Heavyarms, Sandrock Gundam, Gundam Deathscythe, or Shenlong Gundam.

This alloy gives the Gundams near invincibility. In the After Colony timeline, the word Gundam refers to most mobile suit constructed out of a special alloy, called Gundanium, which can only be mined and produced in space. For example, the Earth Federation in the Universal Century universe used "R" (Renpou, said to be the English equivalent of Federation) to designate their mobile suits, with "X" for experimental units, "GM" (Gundam Mass-producedGeneral Machine) or "GC" for production mobile suits derived from the original V-Project suits and "MS" for mass-produced mobile suits derived from One Year War-era Zeon mobile suits. All Mobile Weapons have serial numbers, usually additions to previous Mobile Weapons in its lineage.

II, Zeta Gundam, Victory Gundam, etc. Afterwards, many powerful mobile suits based on the Gundam's design also carry the name, such as the Gundam Mk. In the Universal Century timeline, Gundam is the name of the Earth Federation's first experimental general-purpose mobile suit, which is incredibly powerful compared to most of the mass-produced models eventually used by either side. Gundam is the name or nickname of several mobile suits or mobile fighters, although some works such as G-Saviour and Mobile Suit Gundam: MS IGLOO do not have units named Gundams.

English-speaking fans have used "Alternate Universe" or "AU" as a nickname for the stories that do not take place within the Universal Century timeline, but this unofficial nickname is not used in Japan. On the survey for the game that would become Gundam True Odyssey, the Cosmic Era series (including Astray) were collectively referred to as "21st Century First Gundam" (a reference to Mobile Suit Gundam, also known as First Gundam). Bandai and Japanese-speaking fans unofficially refer to projects not directly related to the first Gundam series or its staffers (such as Gundam Sentinel and G Gundam) as "Another Gundam" stories, and to projects made after 1989 as "Heisei Gundam" stories. Western calendar) to mean "Correct Century" or "Correct Calendar," but Sunrise itself has not established an English translation for "Seireki" or the English abbreviation expansion for "CC".

English-speaking fans have interpreted "Seireki" (a wordplay homonym of the Japanese term for the A.D. Later series take place in alternate calendars or timelines, which are mostly completely unrelated to the original Universal Century calendar system. Most early Gundam works take place in the Universal Century calendar system, which is considered the most developed. This makes the plot more real: while in early Super Robot series, the hero and cast usually act in the same predictable manner in most episodes, in the various Gundam series the characters' personalities and actions are transformed/developed by the turn of events surrounding them (the best example of this is how the personalities of longtime rivals Amuro Ray and Char Aznable are influenced by their experiences in the Gundam saga).

Finally, most of the stories are basically structured as coming-of-age dramas, where the main protagonist (and sometimes his main antagonist) and most of the cast personalities, points of view, and actions may (or may not) change dramatically as the events on the series unfold. Gundam also features true to life issues and clear political ideas. Politics of war are always lurking in the background, as it is in real wars. With few exceptions, there are no absolute good guys and bad guys; all have their motives.

The narration is always revolving around the emotions of the characters, usually thrown into conflict without much choice and faced with death, destruction and dehumanization. The technology, at least that of the Universal Century, is practical and derived from true science, including Lagrange points in space, the O'Neill cylinder as a living environment, and energy production from helium-3 (Minovsky Physics). they run out of energy and ammunition, they break and malfunction like all machines eventually do. All the machines, including the Gundams, are always depicted realistically i.e.

The main theme of all the various Gundam series is always the harsh depiction of the atrocities of war. Zambot 3 was an earlier program by Tomino which helped develop these ideas. Real Robots (popularly known in English as mech, a re-borrowing of the Japanese abbreviation for the English word "mechanical") differ from their Super Robot forebearers on a few stylistic and thematic points such as attempts at realism in robot design and weaponry, as well as their thematic and ethical roles. Gundam is a turning point in the history of anime and manga, as it is credited for inspiring the Real Robot genre.

Like many of the "mobile suits" appearing in the series, a Gundam is usually piloted from the torso area. However, Gundams are not robots but more extensions of their pilots. Tomino then changed the name to the current title Gundam, suggesting that the name Gundam signifies a power wielding a gun that is strong enough to hold back enemies like a dam holds back floods. The collective Yatate team combined the English word Gun with last syllable of the word Freedom, Dom, to form the word Gundom.

In the early stages of production, there were numerous references to the word freedom, such as the White Base being originally named Freedom's Fortress, the Core Fighter as the Freedom Wing, and the Gunperry named the Freedom Cruiser. The celebrated series was originally titled Freedom Fighter Gunboy or simply Gunboy, because the title robot was armed with a gun and the target demographic was young boys. Mobile Suit Gundam was developed principally by Yoshiyuki Tomino, along with a changing group of Sunrise creators who went under the collective pseudonym "Hajime Yatate". .

The name "Gundam" itself stems from a variety of theoretical sources, most commonly attributed to a need to conform with common giant robot naming conventions during the 1970s. Gundam is the collective term for the Universal Century (UC) series like Mobile Suit Gundam and series in alternative timelines, such as Gundam Wing, made by Sunrise Inc. Gundam is one of the longest running meta-series of anime featuring giant robots. Frog.

Sgt. Plamo-Wars. Plamo-kyo Shiro. Genshiken.

SEED Destiny MSV - variations from the SEED Destiny series. SEED-MSV - variations from the SEED series. V-MSV - variations from the Victory series. F91-MSV - variations from the F-91 movie.

Kunio Okawara's MS Collection (M-MSV) - Kunio Okawara's personal reinterpretations. CCA-MSV - variations from the Char's Counterattack movie. ZZ-MSV - variations from the Double Zeta Gundam series. Z-MSV - variations from the Zeta Gundam series.

MSX, new models for a proposed but never produced new animation series, considered to be official and canonical. Mobile Suit X (1984) - a.ka. MSV, the variations from the One-Year War, considered to be official and canonical. Mobile Suit Variations (1983) - a.k.a.

Mobile Suit Gundam SEED Destiny (TV: 2004). Mobile Suit Gundam MS IGLOO (movies: 2004; OVAs: 2006). Superior Defender Gundam Force (TV: 2003-2004). Mobile Suit Gundam SEED (TV: 2002, compilation specials: 2004).

Gundam Evolve (short clips: 2001-2005). G-Saviour (live action TV movie: 2000). Turn A Gundam (TV: 1999, compilation movies: 2002). New Mobile Report Gundam Wing: Endless Waltz (OVAs: 1997, compilation movie: 1998).

After War Gundam X (TV: 1996). Mobile Suit Gundam: The 08th MS Team (OVAs: 1996). New Mobile Report Gundam Wing (TV: 1995, compilation OVAs: 1996). Mobile Fighter G Gundam (TV: 1994).

Mobile Suit Victory Gundam (TV: 1993). Mobile Suit Gundam 0083: Stardust Memory (OVAs: 1991; compilation movie: 1992). Mobile Suit Gundam F91 (movie: 1991). Mobile Suit Gundam 0080: War in the Pocket (OVAs: 1989).

Mobile Suit Gundam: Char's Counterattack (movie: 1988). Mobile Suit Gundam ZZ (TV: 1986). Mobile Suit Zeta Gundam (TV: 1985; compilation movies: 2005). "Gundam 0079" (a nickname derived from spinoff games and manga and primarily used by English-speaking fans) (TV: 1979; compilation movies: 1981–1982).

"First Gundam" (the nickname applied by Japanese fans once sequels appeared which used the whole phrase in their titles) a.k.a. Mobile Suit Gundam - a.k.a. Superior performance, in comparison to other mobile suits/fighters. Yellow and/or red highlights are often added.

In any given series, at least one Gundam, usually the one piloted by the hero of the story, will have a blue torso and white limbs and head. A prominent red "chin" or goatee, initally thought to be a mere stylistic touch, but is now believed to be a heat vent. Ornament on head resembling a V-shape, sometimes units possess two V-shapes. Face with two human-like eyes, which flash when the unit is activated.

Humanoid form. Each story is not necessarily consistent with other stories within the Super Deformed series or stories outside them. Super Deformed Gundam is a series of super deformed parodies of the Gundam metaseries. has acted as an acronym for a variety of things, see the Mobile Suit Operation System page for details.

In this timeline, G.U.N.D.A.M. "Cosmic Era" refers to the years after the foundation of the first space colonies. Mobile Suit Gundam SEED and Mobile Suit Gundam SEED Destiny take place in the Cosmic Era calendar system. Director Yoshiyuki Tomino intended this as the distant future of all previous calendar systems.

∀ Gundam takes place in the CC (正歴 Seireki) calendar system. After War Gundam X takes place in the After War calendar system; "After War" refers to the years after the conclusion of the 7th Space War, in which the Earth was devastated by massive colony drops. "After Colony" refers to the years after the foundation of the first space colony. New Mobile Report Gundam Wing takes place in the After Colony calendar system.

Mobile Fighter G Gundam takes place in the Future Century calendar system.

08-30-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List