Godzilla

Godzilla, as portrayed during the late Heisei era (Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla, 1994)

Godzilla (ゴジラ - Gojira) is a giant Japanese movie monster (kaiju) first seen in the 1954 Japanese tokusatsu film Gojira, produced by Toho Film Company Ltd. To date, Toho has produced 28 Godzilla films. In 1998 TriStar Pictures produced a nominal remake of the original set in contemporary New York city. A new film is slated to be produced by Advanced Audiovisual Productions. (For a list of these films, see below.)

Godzilla is characterized as amphibious, nearly indestructible and highly regenerative, and breathing a sort of nuclear fire or "heat-ray". The earliest two Godzilla films visually and thematically evoke the US bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the aftermath and human damage of Godzilla's attacks. Although much of Godzilla's significance as an anti-war symbol has been lost in the transition to pop culture, the nuclear breath remains as a visual vestige of the creature's early Cold War politics.

History

Origins

the first Godzilla movie always appilies to all Subsequent movies, most of the time the creature is described as prehistoric, often a surviving dinosaur, and its first attacks on Japan are linked to atomic testing in the Pacific Ocean, including but not limited to using nuclear mutation as an explanation for the creature's great size and strange powers.

  • His iconic design (a charcoal-colored monster-like figure with small pointed ears, rough bumpy scales, powerful tail, and bony colored dorsal fins shaped like maple leaves).
  • He is virtually indestructible, impervious to all modern weaponry.
  • He can release a powerful atomic energy beam, usually blue but in some films red, from his mouth (which is ominously signalled when his dorsal fins glow/flash in the same color as the atomic beam).

The name "Gojira" is a combination of gorira which means "gorilla" and kujira, which means "whale" in Japanese. The name was allegedly originally a nickname of a large worker at Toho Studios. But since Gojira was neither a gorilla nor a whale, the name "Gojira" was devised in a different way for the film's story; Gojira's name was "originally" spelled in katakana (呉爾羅).

Gojira was first released in the United States in 1955 in Japanese-American communities only, under Toho's international title, Godzilla. In 1956, it was adapted by an American company into Godzilla, King of the Monsters (based on Toho's international title), edited and with added, principal scenes featuring Raymond Burr, and this version became an international success. As a result, the monster came to be known as "Godzilla" also in Japan (the belief that American distributors were responsible for the name "Godzilla" is a misconception, since Toho came up with the name for international markets to begin with).

Culture

Godzilla was originally an allegory for the effects of the hydrogen bomb, and the unintended consequences that such weapons might have on Earth. The radioactive contamination of the Japanese fishing boat Daigo Fukuryu Maru through the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear device test on Bikini Atoll, on March 1, 1954 lead to much press coverage in Japan preceding the release of the first movie in 1954. The Versus and Millennium Series have largely continued this concept. Some have pointed out the parallels, conscious or unconscious, between Godzilla's relationship to Japan and that of the United States; first a terrible enemy who causes enormous destruction, but then becoming a good friend and defender in times of peril.

Films have been made over the last five decades, each reflecting the social and political climate in Japan. All but one of the 29 films were produced by Toho: a version was made in 1998 by TriStar Pictures and set in the United States by the directors of Independence Day (ID4) and is somewhat despised by most Godzilla fans. Toho immediately followed it with 1999's Godzilla 2000: Millennium, which began the current series of films, known informally as the Mireniamu or Millennium series.

Much of Godzilla's popularity in the United States can be credited with TV broadcasts of the Toho Studios monster movies during the 1960s and 1970s. The American company UPA contracted with Toho to distribute its monster movies of the time, and UPA continues to hold the license today for the Godzilla films of the 1960s and 1970s. Sony currently holds some of those rights, as well as the rights to every Godzilla film produced from 1991 onward. The Blue Öyster Cult song "Godzilla" also contributed to the popularity of the movies. The creature also made an appearance in a Nike commercial, in which Godzilla went one-on-one with NBA star Charles Barkley.

In 1996, after his then-final appearance in Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, Godzilla received an award for Lifetime Achievement at the MTV Movie Awards. Creator and producer Tomoyuki Tanaka accepted on his behalf via satellite but was joined by "Godzilla" himself.

On his 50th (Japanese) birthday, on 29 November 2004, Godzilla got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The deoxygenation of Tokyo bay, caused by Dr. Serizawa's oxygen destroyer, killed Godzilla at the end of the first movie, dissolving his flesh and bone into nothingness. Nonetheless, Gojira - or Godzilla - returned in a series of films, all from Toho.

In the subsequent films, another of Godzilla's species take his place or Godzilla simply doesn't stay dead (there is some debate about this). In Godzilla 2000, it is discussed that Godzilla possesses a component known as "Organizer G-1", or "Regenerator G-1" in the English version of the film, which allows him to heal from any wound, possibly even regenerate himself from mere fragments. This would make it possible for Godzilla to continue indefinitely, even though he appears to die. Such an ability was used in Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah; where Godzilla's heart beats after Godzilla explodes.

The Japanese version of Godzilla was greatly inspired by the commercial success of King Kong, and the 1953 success of The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms. Godzilla would go on to inspire Gorgo, Gamera, and many others.

Films

Godzilla fires his atomic ray in Destroy All Monsters (1968).

The Godzilla series is generally broken into three eras, reflecting the broader division of daikaiju eiga into the Shōwa era, Heisei era, and Millennium era.

Shōwa Godzilla Series (昭和ゴジラシリーズ) 1954–1975

The initial series of movies is named for the Showa period in Japan (as all of these films were produced before Emperor Hirohito's death in 1989). This Showa timeline spanned from 1954, with Godzilla (1954), to 1975, with Terror of Mechagodzilla. With the exception of the serious Godzilla (1954) and the semi-serious sequels Godzilla Raids Again and Mothra vs. Godzilla, this period also featured a somewhat more lighthearted Godzilla. This tendency started with King Kong vs. Godzilla, which had the highest ticket sales of any Godzilla movie. Starting with Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (made 10 years after the first Godzilla film), Godzilla became a semi-playful antihero, and as years went by, he evolved into an anthropomorphic superhero. The films Son of Godzilla and All Monsters Attack were aimed largely at youthful audiences, featuring the appearance of Godzilla's son, Minya. The Showa period saw the addition of many monsters into the Godzilla continuity, three of which (Mothra, Rodan and Varan) had their own solo movies, as well as a movie for the Toho-ized King Kong. This period featured a rough continuity, although the chronology is confused, as some of the later movies were set in an arbitrary future time, often 1999.

In all films of this original series, Godzilla was 50 meters tall, and weighed 20,000 tons. The American release Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956) incorrectly stated Godzilla's height to be 400 feet, an inaccuracy that lingers today.

Versus Series or Heisei Series (VSシリーズ) 1984–1995

The timeline was revamped in 1984 with The Return of Godzilla; this movie was created as a direct sequel to the 1954 film, and ignores the continuity of the Showa series. Known as the VS Series, (unofficially known to American fans as the "Heisei Series", for the ruling emperor of the time), the continuity ended in 1995's Godzilla vs. Destoroyah after a run of seven films. The reason for the continuity shift was based on a realization that the marketing of the movies had removed the reason it was so loved. When it was discovered that Godzilla was popular with children, sequels were toned down in obvious screen violence, and Godzilla was made out to be a good guy instead of an indestructible, abhorrent mistake of men. However, the further Godzilla was taken away from his roots, the less popular he became. Hence, The Return of Godzilla brought the series back to form.

American Columbia/TriStar Godzilla film, 1998

The only Godzilla movie not made by Toho is the 1998 film Godzilla, directed by Roland Emmerich. Despite being one of the highest grossing films of the year when factoring in overseas profits, the film was widely panned by cult followers of the Godzilla franchise, critics on both sides of the Pacific, and movie-goers in general. The $136 million US boxoffice fell far short of marketing expectations, thus the film is generally viewed as a failure despite turning a profit worldwide.

In the 1998 film, Godzilla had been a reptile mutated after a French atomic test, on a French Polynesian island. Set in New York City and produced by Columbia Pictures, this movie is not considered to be part of any of the three eras of the Godzilla series.

GINO (Godzilla In Name Only)

The monster in the 1998 film has since been dubbed GINO (Godzilla In Name Only) by many Godzilla fans.

GINO is so called for multiple reasons. The most obvious is that the American movie restarts the saga from the beginning, setting the main action in New York City. Another is that it is produced by a different company. However, the biggest change is in the Godzilla character itself. The Godzilla in this movie is almost entirely computer-animated, and bears little resemblance in look or manner to his Japanese counterpart. Instead, he resembles a gigantic bipedal iguana or Komodo dragon. Also, the behavior of the American Godzilla is viewed as running contrary to the long-established Japanese Godzilla traditions. Examples of this changed behavior include the American Godzilla running away and hiding from the military instead of fighting, a lack of radioactive fire-breath, the laying of eggs by Godzilla, and the ease with which the monster is dispatched by the military at the end of the film.

Millennium Series (ミレニアムシリーズ) 1999–2004

The Millennium Series is the official term for the series of Godzilla movies, unofficially called the "Shinsei Series" (or even the "Alternate Reality Series") by American fans, made after the VS Series ended with Godzilla vs. Destoroyah. Unlike the previous two series, this era does not feature a continuous timeline. Only two of the films in this era, Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla and Godzilla: Tokyo SOS, are directly related to one another. The rest follow entirely different timelines. The common theme to this era is that all movies use Godzilla (1954) as the jumping-off point.

Since the films are different, the sizes are different in some cases. Godzilla's most prominent size in this series is 55 meters. The exceptions: In Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack and in the VS series, he was 60 meters to 80, and in Godzilla: Final Wars and Godzilla VS Destoroyah, he was 100 meters (he was supposed to be 50 meters in Final Wars, but budgetary cutbacks in miniature sets forced this size change).

In response to negative fan reaction to the 1998 American Godzilla film, Toho inserted derogatory references to the American film and creature design in two of its Millennium movies. The Gotham attack was referred to in the 2001 movie Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. The monster that had appeared in New York was not, in fact, Godzilla, but an entirely different yet similar monster. In Godzilla: Final Wars (2004) a kaiju named Zilla, of identical to design to the American interpretation of Godzilla, attacks Sydney, Australia. It is later killed by the "true" Godzilla from a hit to the tail, and its radioactive breath.

Filmography

Since 1954, there have been 29 official Godzilla films produced. All of these, with the lone exception of the 23rd, were produced by Toho Studios in Japan. (Please note that the titles listed below are Toho's preferred English titles; for further discussion, see Toho Kingdom.)

Yoshimitsu Banno, director of Godzilla vs. Hedorah, has acquired permission to make a 40-minute film for IMAX theaters, and has secured close to complete funding.

Other media

Television

Putting the Godzilla films' suits and effects crew to further use were several Japanese television shows; Ultraman and some shows inspired by it used the suits occasionally for cameos but Godzilla Island primarily followed the further adventures of the kaiju featured in the films.

  • Ultraman
  • Ultra Q
  • Meteor Man Zone
  • Godzilla Island
  • Monster Planet Of Godzilla

The success of the Godzilla franchise has also spawned two U.S. Saturday morning cartoons, both featuring an investigative scientific team who call upon Godzilla as an ally. The series make several homages to the Shōwa films and several antagonist monsters have been inspired by extant Toho creations.

  • The Godzilla Power Hour
  • Godzilla: The Series

Comics

Several manga have been derived from specific Godzilla films, and both Marvel and Dark Horse have published Godzilla comic book series (1977–1979 and 1987–1999, respectively).

Video games

Godzilla and his fellow monsters have appeared in several video games, including:

  • Godzilla: Monster of Monsters
  • Super Godzilla
  • Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee
  • Godzilla: Domination
  • Godzilla: Save the Earth

References in culture

As with any pop culture icon, Godzilla has been parodied, referenced to and homaged in many movies, TV shows, comic books, internet articles, and so on. Here is a partial list of such references:

  • Featured in the Animaniacs short, "Warners and the Beanstalk" where Yakko tells the Giant, "Would you like it in Japan with Godzilla and Rodan?"(a parody of Green Eggs and Ham) The Giant ignores Yakko's offer resulting in Godzilla burning him with his Atomic breath, and Rodan blowing him away.
  • In the last scene of The Simpsons 10th season finale "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo", Godzilla attacks a plane going from Japan to the USA that the Simpsons are on. Godzilla is distracted by Mothra, Rodan and Gamera, allowing the plane to escape.
Godzilla's cameo in Drawn Together
  • In the episode of the Comedy Central animated reality show parody Drawn Together entitled "Super Nanny", Godzilla plays a minor role as Ling-Ling's conscience (with his size probably meant as a subtle joke to Ling-Ling's cultural responsibility).
  • In The Fairly Oddparents TV movie School's Out: The Musical before the Mayor starts singing it shows Godzilla destroying the city.
  • In Austin Powers in Goldmember, Austin crashes his car into a dinosaur like parade float while in Japan, causing it to roll around the streets uncontrollably. It is identified by a civilian as Godzilla, but another civilian corrects him, stating that it only looks like Godzilla due to copyright issues.
  • Mariah Carey's video for "Boy (I Need You)", which takes place in a futuristic Japanese metropolis, features a yellow, fire-breathing Godzilla-like monster, also brought to life by suitmation.
  • In Olive the Other Reindeer, a show often shown on Cartoon Network during the Christmas season, Olive, Santa, and Santa's reindeer sing a song titled "Merry Christmas After All" while traveling the world delivering presents. However, when they visit Tokyo, Ultraman flies by them, waves, and then starts dancing and singing with Godzilla.
  • There is a Warcraft creature called Gahz'rilla who is a hydra. However, his name gives away that he is a parody of Godzilla.
  • One The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy episode is titled

" Giant Billy and Mandy: All Out Attack"

  • Godzilla has cameoed or inspired likenesses in several other (usually animated) shows:
    • Reign Storm
    • Garfield and Friends
    • Animaniacs
    • Jimmy Neutron
    • Invader Zim
    • Rugrats
    • The Fairly OddParents
  • There is a drink in Malaysia called "Milo Godzilla", consisting of a cup of Milo with ice cream and/or whipped cream on top of it.

Paleontology

At least two prehistoric creatures from the fossil record have been named after Godzilla:

  • Gojirasaurus quayi is a theropod dinosaur that lived in the Triassic Period; a partial skeleton was unearthed in Quay County, New Mexico.
  • Dakosaurus andiniensis, a crocodile from the Jurassic Period, was nicknamed "Godzilla" before being scientifically classified.

This page about Godzilla includes information from a Wikipedia article.
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At least two prehistoric creatures from the fossil record have been named after Godzilla:. 2006. " Giant Billy and Mandy: All Out Attack". Diane Strauss - "The Hot Wheels Newsletter" - Feb. Here is a partial list of such references:. Hot Wheels, A collectors guide - Bob Parker, 2001. As with any pop culture icon, Godzilla has been parodied, referenced to and homaged in many movies, TV shows, comic books, internet articles, and so on. Hot Wheels® has it's fair share of odd models, and these models have become very collectible, selling for high prices on eBay.

Godzilla and his fellow monsters have appeared in several video games, including:. In 2006, Series 2 will consist of 30 models including the '67 Convertible Camaro and Mustang Mach 1. Several manga have been derived from specific Godzilla films, and both Marvel and Dark Horse have published Godzilla comic book series (1977–1979 and 1987–1999, respectively). There was also a 2005 Toy Fair Classics Olds 442 with Spectraflame™ Blue paint. The series make several homages to the Shōwa films and several antagonist monsters have been inspired by extant Toho creations. The Classics version of the Purple Passion was released with Real Rider tires at the San Diego Comic Con. Saturday morning cartoons, both featuring an investigative scientific team who call upon Godzilla as an ally. There were also 1:18 scale Hot Wheels® Classics and Track Sets for the 1:64 scale Classics.

The success of the Godzilla franchise has also spawned two U.S. Each of the 25 cars were released with 7 or 8 different colors. Putting the Godzilla films' suits and effects crew to further use were several Japanese television shows; Ultraman and some shows inspired by it used the suits occasionally for cameos but Godzilla Island primarily followed the further adventures of the kaiju featured in the films. Series 1 from 2005, consisted of 25 models, with all metal bodies and chassis, decked out with Spectraflame™ Paint. Hedorah, has acquired permission to make a 40-minute film for IMAX theaters, and has secured close to complete funding. The Hot Wheels® Classics line was an immediate hit with enthusiasts everywhere. Yoshimitsu Banno, director of Godzilla vs. For the most part it is a relatively inexpensive hobby (when compared with coin collecting, stamp collecting or Barbie collecting.) The price for a Hot Wheels® car really hasn’t changed in almost 40 years, still hanging around $1(USD) for a basic line car.

(Please note that the titles listed below are Toho's preferred English titles; for further discussion, see Toho Kingdom.). Most collectors have a love for cars and since none of us can afford all the old cars or even if we could we wouldn’t have much space to store them, so Hot Wheels fill that void. All of these, with the lone exception of the 23rd, were produced by Toho Studios in Japan. People are collecting everything from only new stuff to only the older Redlines and everything in between. Since 1954, there have been 29 official Godzilla films produced. There are hundreds, probably thousands of web pages dedicated to Hot Wheels® collecting. It is later killed by the "true" Godzilla from a hit to the tail, and its radioactive breath. Each year they offer membership into the Redline Club which gives you first chances at getting the limited edition cars as well as information like pictures of new cars or exclusive Redline Club cars, regular members aren’t privy to.

In Godzilla: Final Wars (2004) a kaiju named Zilla, of identical to design to the American interpretation of Godzilla, attacks Sydney, Australia. In 2001 Mattel saw how much collecting was affecting their sales and put together www.hotwheelscollectors.com as an online way to unite collectors by offering limited edition cars, information about upcoming releases and events, as well as chat and trade boards. The monster that had appeared in New York was not, in fact, Godzilla, but an entirely different yet similar monster. Mike also writes the Tomart's Guide To Hot Wheels®, a book listing history, car descriptions and values and is used by almost every collector to learn more about the hobby and their collection. The Gotham attack was referred to in the 2001 movie Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. Mike has also published the quarterly Hot Wheels® Newsletter since 1986 and was one of the first to unite collectors all over the world. In response to negative fan reaction to the 1998 American Godzilla film, Toho inserted derogatory references to the American film and creature design in two of its Millennium movies. The Hot Wheels® Collectors Nationals rotate among cities outside of California during the spring.

The exceptions: In Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack and in the VS series, he was 60 meters to 80, and in Godzilla: Final Wars and Godzilla VS Destoroyah, he was 100 meters (he was supposed to be 50 meters in Final Wars, but budgetary cutbacks in miniature sets forced this size change). Since then the Conventions are held each year in southern California. Godzilla's most prominent size in this series is 55 meters. The convention used to travel around the country until 2001 when the first Annual Hot Wheels® Collectors Nationals was put together. Since the films are different, the sizes are different in some cases. The first event was the Annual Hot Wheels® Collectors Convention normally held each year in the fall. The common theme to this era is that all movies use Godzilla (1954) as the jumping-off point. Mike Strauss has been widely hailed as the father of Hot Wheels® collecting, he has organized two collectors events each year in some form since 1986.

The rest follow entirely different timelines. Most believe it started with the Treasure Hunts in 1995. Only two of the films in this era, Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla and Godzilla: Tokyo SOS, are directly related to one another. Through out the years most kids collected Hot Wheels® cars but in the last 10 years there has been resurgence in collecting by both kids and adults. Unlike the previous two series, this era does not feature a continuous timeline. List of 2006 Treasure Hunts:. Destoroyah. There were two limited editions: a Honda Civic Si that was only available at the 2005 SEMA convention and the CUL8R with Faster Than Ever (FTE) wheels which was only available by mail.

The Millennium Series is the official term for the series of Godzilla movies, unofficially called the "Shinsei Series" (or even the "Alternate Reality Series") by American fans, made after the VS Series ended with Godzilla vs. The 2006 mainline will consist of 38 First Editions (all realistic), 12 Treasure Hunts, 12 Track Aces, 60 Segment Series, 96 Open Stock Models and 5 Mystery Cars. Examples of this changed behavior include the American Godzilla running away and hiding from the military instead of fighting, a lack of radioactive fire-breath, the laying of eggs by Godzilla, and the ease with which the monster is dispatched by the military at the end of the film. 2006 is turning out to be one of the most highly anticipated years of collecting. Also, the behavior of the American Godzilla is viewed as running contrary to the long-established Japanese Godzilla traditions. List of 2005 Hot Wheels. Instead, he resembles a gigantic bipedal iguana or Komodo dragon. These adjustments reduce friction dramatically, resulting in cars that are "Faster than Ever." These cars were available for a limited time only, from the beginning of October, towards the end of November 2005.

The Godzilla in this movie is almost entirely computer-animated, and bears little resemblance in look or manner to his Japanese counterpart. In 2005, Hot Wheels also unveiled its new "Faster than Ever" line of cars, which had special nickel-plated axles, along with Open-Hole 5 Spoke wheels. However, the biggest change is in the Godzilla character itself. In addition to the 60 new First Editions, Hot Wheels also had the standard 12 Treasure Hunts, 10 Track Aces, 50 Segment Series Cars, 50 Open Stock Models, and 4 Mail-in Volkswagen Promo Cars, plus the special 13th Treasure Hunt, the VW Drag Bus. Another is that it is produced by a different company. In 2005, Hot Wheels® continued with new "extreme" castings for the 2nd year, debuting 40 distorted cars, in addition to 20 "Realistix" models. The most obvious is that the American movie restarts the saga from the beginning, setting the main action in New York City. These vehicles didn't sell as well as other Hot Wheels® cars, and many collectors spat on the new vehicles.

GINO is so called for multiple reasons. These new models included cartoonish vehicles such as the 'Tooned, Blings (square bodies and big wheels), Hardnoze (enlarged fronts), Crooze (stretched out bodies), and Fatbax (Super-wide back tires). The monster in the 1998 film has since been dubbed GINO (Godzilla In Name Only) by many Godzilla fans. In 2004, Hot Wheels® unveiled their "Hot 100" line, comprised of 100 new models. Set in New York City and produced by Columbia Pictures, this movie is not considered to be part of any of the three eras of the Godzilla series. Alec has also designed the updated version of his dad's first Hot Wheels® design, the Whip Creamer II. In the 1998 film, Godzilla had been a reptile mutated after a French atomic test, on a French Polynesian island. Paul Tam's son Alec Tam joined Hot Wheels'® design team in 2000 and still works for Mattel today.

The $136 million US boxoffice fell far short of marketing expectations, thus the film is generally viewed as a failure despite turning a profit worldwide. Starting in 1998, Mattel did not release production numbers of Treasure Hunts. Despite being one of the highest grossing films of the year when factoring in overseas profits, the film was widely panned by cult followers of the Godzilla franchise, critics on both sides of the Pacific, and movie-goers in general. The Treasure Hunt Series was an instant hit, and as a result, production increased to 25,000 units per car in 1996 and 1997. The only Godzilla movie not made by Toho is the 1998 film Godzilla, directed by Roland Emmerich. The initial run consisted of 10,000 units. Hence, The Return of Godzilla brought the series back to form. The Treasure Hunt series was introduced in 1995 with cars that were specially detailed and produced in limited numbers.

However, the further Godzilla was taken away from his roots, the less popular he became. Many new wheels were also introduced. When it was discovered that Godzilla was popular with children, sequels were toned down in obvious screen violence, and Godzilla was made out to be a good guy instead of an indestructible, abhorrent mistake of men. Sales for the series models soared, causing stores across the nation to have shortages. The reason for the continuity shift was based on a realization that the marketing of the movies had removed the reason it was so loved. In 1996, the Model Series was renamed to First Editions, and Treasure Hunt production was boosted to 25,000 units per car. Destoroyah after a run of seven films. 1995 also saw the introduction of the Treasure Hunt Series.

Known as the VS Series, (unofficially known to American fans as the "Heisei Series", for the ruling emperor of the time), the continuity ended in 1995's Godzilla vs. 5 Series were offered. The timeline was revamped in 1984 with The Return of Godzilla; this movie was created as a direct sequel to the 1954 film, and ignores the continuity of the Showa series. 1995 brought a major change to the Hot Wheels® line, where the cars were split up into series, 1 being the 1995 Model Series, which was the series where new cars would appear, and other series being of 4 cars, all were sold in diffrent packages, but had similar paint schemes, and when all 4 were found, they would make up a series. The American release Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956) incorrectly stated Godzilla's height to be 400 feet, an inaccuracy that lingers today. Some strange additions to the Hot Wheels® line were adding the Oldsmobile Aurora the Chevrolet Lumina APV, and the Vector WX-3. In all films of this original series, Godzilla was 50 meters tall, and weighed 20,000 tons. The Blue Cards continued offering realisticly detailed cars based off of cars you would see on the street, which were very popular among collectors, while it didn't sacrifice sales made by kids.

This period featured a rough continuity, although the chronology is confused, as some of the later movies were set in an arbitrary future time, often 1999. The 1990s was the peak for Hot Wheels®. The Showa period saw the addition of many monsters into the Godzilla continuity, three of which (Mothra, Rodan and Varan) had their own solo movies, as well as a movie for the Toho-ized King Kong. These featured realisticly detailed cars based off of cars you would see all over the road at the time. The films Son of Godzilla and All Monsters Attack were aimed largely at youthful audiences, featuring the appearance of Godzilla's son, Minya. In the late 80s, the Blue Card was introduced, which would become the basis of Hot Wheels cars still used today. Starting with Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (made 10 years after the first Godzilla film), Godzilla became a semi-playful antihero, and as years went by, he evolved into an anthropomorphic superhero. Despite the fact that they were very popular, the real riders were short lived, because of high production costs.

Godzilla, which had the highest ticket sales of any Godzilla movie. In 1984, A new style of wheel called Real Riders were introduced, which had real rubber tires. This tendency started with King Kong vs. Hot Wheels® started offering models based off of 80's economy cars, like the Pontiac Fiero or Dodge Omni 024. Godzilla, this period also featured a somewhat more lighthearted Godzilla. in 1981, 2 new wheels were introduced, Hot ones, which were gold painted wheels, and Ultra Hots, which looked like the wheels found on a Renault Fuego or a Mazda 626. With the exception of the serious Godzilla (1954) and the semi-serious sequels Godzilla Raids Again and Mothra vs. What happened in the 1980s for Hot Wheels® sent them in the path of what they are today, just like what the revolutionary Ford Taurus did for the auto industry.

This Showa timeline spanned from 1954, with Godzilla (1954), to 1975, with Terror of Mechagodzilla. Despite this, intrest in the brand didn't drop. The initial series of movies is named for the Showa period in Japan (as all of these films were produced before Emperor Hirohito's death in 1989). In 1975, The Redline Wheel was phased out, with the redlines being erased from the wheels, mostly to cut costs, this is the same reason why the paint of the cars were changed from Mattel's in house "Spectraflame™" colors to plain looking enamal colors with flashy decals. The Godzilla series is generally broken into three eras, reflecting the broader division of daikaiju eiga into the Shōwa era, Heisei era, and Millennium era. The 1973 models are known to be very collectible. Godzilla would go on to inspire Gorgo, Gamera, and many others. 1973 was kind of a "bum" year for Hot Wheels®, very few cars were produced, and most Hot Wheels® sales were accounted by left over 1972 blisters.

The Japanese version of Godzilla was greatly inspired by the commercial success of King Kong, and the 1953 success of The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms. Among the many futuristic designs Tam thought up for Hot Wheels®, some of the collector's favorites include Evil Weevil (a Volkswagen with two engines), Open Fire (an AMC Gremlin with six wheels), Six Shooter (another six wheeled car), and the rare Double Header (co-designed with Larry Wood). Such an ability was used in Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah; where Godzilla's heart beats after Godzilla explodes. Tam continued to work for Mattel until 1973. This would make it possible for Godzilla to continue indefinitely, even though he appears to die. Paul's first design for Hot Wheels® was the Whip Creamer. In Godzilla 2000, it is discussed that Godzilla possesses a component known as "Organizer G-1", or "Regenerator G-1" in the English version of the film, which allows him to heal from any wound, possibly even regenerate himself from mere fragments. Another designer, Paul Tam, joined Larry and Ira.

In the subsequent films, another of Godzilla's species take his place or Godzilla simply doesn't stay dead (there is some debate about this). After 36 years, Larry still works for Hot Wheels®. Nonetheless, Gojira - or Godzilla - returned in a series of films, all from Toho. His first design would be the Tri-Baby. Serizawa's oxygen destroyer, killed Godzilla at the end of the first movie, dissolving his flesh and bone into nothingness. Wood agreed, and by the end of the week, Larry Wood was working at Mattel. The deoxygenation of Tokyo bay, caused by Dr. When Wood found out about Hot Wheels® at a party Rees was holding, Rees offered Wood the job of designing Hot Wheels®.

On his 50th (Japanese) birthday, on 29 November 2004, Godzilla got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They worked together at Ford designing cars. Creator and producer Tomoyuki Tanaka accepted on his behalf via satellite but was joined by "Godzilla" himself. A good friend of Rees' was a man by the name of Larry Wood. Destoroyah, Godzilla received an award for Lifetime Achievement at the MTV Movie Awards. He wanted to work on the Major Matt Mason action figure toy lineup. In 1996, after his then-final appearance in Godzilla vs. Howard Rees, who worked with Ira Gilford, was tired of designing cars.

The creature also made an appearance in a Nike commercial, in which Godzilla went one-on-one with NBA star Charles Barkley. 1970 was another great year for Hot Wheels®. The Blue Öyster Cult song "Godzilla" also contributed to the popularity of the movies. A couple of years ago, a Hot Pink rear-loader Beach Bomb went for auction and was reportedly sold for over $70,000 to legendary Hot Wheels collector Bruce Pascal. Sony currently holds some of those rights, as well as the rights to every Godzilla film produced from 1991 onward. A Rear-loader, in any condition, can go over $15,000. The American company UPA contracted with Toho to distribute its monster movies of the time, and UPA continues to hold the license today for the Godzilla films of the 1960s and 1970s. A regular side-loader Beach Bomb, in mint condition, could be worth between $150 to $600 dollars.

Much of Godzilla's popularity in the United States can be credited with TV broadcasts of the Toho Studios monster movies during the 1960s and 1970s. That final prototype became the production version of the Volkswagen Beach Bomb, now nicknamed the "side-loader" Beach Bomb by collectors. Toho immediately followed it with 1999's Godzilla 2000: Millennium, which began the current series of films, known informally as the Mireniamu or Millennium series. Ira Gilford's assistant Howard Rees and his good friend Larry Wood came up with "sidepods" to widen the bus to work with the Super-Charger. All but one of the 29 films were produced by Toho: a version was made in 1998 by TriStar Pictures and set in the United States by the directors of Independence Day (ID4) and is somewhat despised by most Godzilla fans. Unfortunately, when the bus went through the Super-Charger, the car would spin-out and crash. Films have been made over the last five decades, each reflecting the social and political climate in Japan. During this Hot Wheels® era, Mattel wanted every car to work with the track and make sure that the cars will do every stunt.

Some have pointed out the parallels, conscious or unconscious, between Godzilla's relationship to Japan and that of the United States; first a terrible enemy who causes enormous destruction, but then becoming a good friend and defender in times of peril. The first prototypes do not have these "pods" and have surfboards sticking out of rear window, hence the name "rear-loader". The Versus and Millennium Series have largely continued this concept. The regular version of this modified VW Bus has "pods" on the sides of it. The radioactive contamination of the Japanese fishing boat Daigo Fukuryu Maru through the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear device test on Bikini Atoll, on March 1, 1954 lead to much press coverage in Japan preceding the release of the first movie in 1954. The Volkswagen Rear-Loader Beach Bomb is what some consider, the Holy Grail of Hot Wheels®. Godzilla was originally an allegory for the effects of the hydrogen bomb, and the unintended consequences that such weapons might have on Earth. Splittin' Image, Torero, Turbofire, and Twin Mill were part of the "Show & Go" series and are the very first original in-house designs by Hot Wheels.

As a result, the monster came to be known as "Godzilla" also in Japan (the belief that American distributors were responsible for the name "Godzilla" is a misconception, since Toho came up with the name for international markets to begin with). Some of Hot Wheels' greatest cars, like the Twin Mill and Splittin' Image, came from Ira Gilford's drawing board. In 1956, it was adapted by an American company into Godzilla, King of the Monsters (based on Toho's international title), edited and with added, principal scenes featuring Raymond Burr, and this version became an international success. Gilford, who just had just left Chrysler, quickly accepted the job of designing the next Hot Wheels® models. Gojira was first released in the United States in 1955 in Japanese-American communities only, under Toho's international title, Godzilla. When the company asked him back, he recommended a good friend, Ira Gilford. But since Gojira was neither a gorilla nor a whale, the name "Gojira" was devised in a different way for the film's story; Gojira's name was "originally" spelled in katakana (呉爾羅). As it turned out, the Hot Wheels® brand was a staggering success! Unfortunately, Harry Bentley Bradley didn't think that would be the case and had quit Mattel to go back to the car industry.

The name was allegedly originally a nickname of a large worker at Toho Studios. Packaged along with the cars was matching metal buttons, that could be attached onto a belt so a fellow collector wearing the buttons could show off what cars he had. The name "Gojira" is a combination of gorira which means "gorilla" and kujira, which means "whale" in Japanese. The suspension was redesigned in 1970. the first Godzilla movie always appilies to all Subsequent movies, most of the time the creature is described as prehistoric, often a surviving dinosaur, and its first attacks on Japan are linked to atomic testing in the Pacific Ocean, including but not limited to using nuclear mutation as an explanation for the creature's great size and strange powers. However, the axles were hard to install on the chassis while being assembled and would break off the chassis if very hard pressure was applied. . When the child pushed down onto a car, the axles would bend like a real car.

Although much of Godzilla's significance as an anti-war symbol has been lost in the transition to pop culture, the nuclear breath remains as a visual vestige of the creature's early Cold War politics. The axles were bent into a weird "C"-like shape that was connected to the chassis. The earliest two Godzilla films visually and thematically evoke the US bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the aftermath and human damage of Godzilla's attacks. The working suspension for the cars was simple, but flawed. Godzilla is characterized as amphibious, nearly indestructible and highly regenerative, and breathing a sort of nuclear fire or "heat-ray". Just a simple stamped-on redline around the face of a wheel, the redlines were on Hot Wheels® cars until 1977. (For a list of these films, see below.). A symbol among collectors, the Redline wheels are what gave this era of Hot Wheels® its name; redlines.

A new film is slated to be produced by Advanced Audiovisual Productions. The result was cars that could go up to [scale] 200mph at 1:64 scale. In 1998 TriStar Pictures produced a nominal remake of the original set in contemporary New York city. In order for the cars to go fast on the plastic track, Mattel picked out a cheap, durable, low-friction plastic called Delrin to be placed in between the axle and wheel. To date, Toho has produced 28 Godzilla films. A car in lime green for instance may fetch 1/4 of the price of the same car in pink. Godzilla (ゴジラ - Gojira) is a giant Japanese movie monster (kaiju) first seen in the 1954 Japanese tokusatsu film Gojira, produced by Toho Film Company Ltd. Because Hot Pink was mainly considered a "girls color", it is the most rare color of cars to find and can mean a big difference in price.

Dakosaurus andiniensis, a crocodile from the Jurassic Period, was nicknamed "Godzilla" before being scientifically classified. The Spectraflame™ paint was a transparent, "candy" color paint, that when viewed through polished metal, looked like a dazzling, bright custom paintjob. Gojirasaurus quayi is a theropod dinosaur that lived in the Triassic Period; a partial skeleton was unearthed in Quay County, New Mexico. All of the cars featured Spectraflame™ paint, delrin bearings, redline wheels, and working suspension. There is a drink in Malaysia called "Milo Godzilla", consisting of a cup of Milo with ice cream and/or whipped cream on top of it. The Custom Fleetside was also his original design, based on his heavily customized '64 El Camino. The Fairly OddParents. He had previously worked with Chrysler Corporation on designing a concept car which was built by Mike and Larry Alexander.

Rugrats. However, the Deora, which was directly based on the Dodge Deora concept car, was his original design. Invader Zim. Even though Harry Bentley Bradley was from the car industry, he didn't design the full-fuctioning versions of the real cars. Jimmy Neutron. All of the cars were designed by Harry Bentley Bradley, with the exception of the Custom Volkswagen which was designed by Ira Gilford. Animaniacs. There were sixteen cars (or castings) released in 1968.

Garfield and Friends. Although his executives thought it was a bad idea, the cars were a big success. Reign Storm. Elliot Handler, co-founder of Mattel, decided to produce a line of toy-diecast miniature cars for boys. Godzilla has cameoed or inspired likenesses in several other (usually animated) shows:

    . . One The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy episode is titled. Fat Track was black (in contrast to the regular track's orange color), about four times as wide as regular track, and was intended for Sizzlers.

    However, his name gives away that he is a parody of Godzilla. Sizzlers had a built in motor and a tiny rechargeable battery. There is a Warcraft creature called Gahz'rilla who is a hydra. Accessories included a lap counter and a speedometer. However, when they visit Tokyo, Ultraman flies by them, waves, and then starts dancing and singing with Godzilla. Other sets included a Supercharger that had an electric motor and foam covered wheels that propelled the car around a loop of track as the cars passed through. In Olive the Other Reindeer, a show often shown on Cartoon Network during the Christmas season, Olive, Santa, and Santa's reindeer sing a song titled "Merry Christmas After All" while traveling the world delivering presents. Later sets had both a plastic starting gate and finishing flag which would be tripped by the first car although a visual ascertainment was usually sufficient.

    Mariah Carey's video for "Boy (I Need You)", which takes place in a futuristic Japanese metropolis, features a yellow, fire-breathing Godzilla-like monster, also brought to life by suitmation. A dual set of tracks could be set up and using a starting gate a race could be conducted. It is identified by a civilian as Godzilla, but another civilian corrects him, stating that it only looks like Godzilla due to copyright issues. Motive power was by means of gravity, with the starting end of the course placed higher than the end by means of an included C clamp. In Austin Powers in Goldmember, Austin crashes his car into a dinosaur like parade float while in Japan, causing it to roll around the streets uncontrollably. Mattel also sold plastic track under the Hot Wheels® brand on which the cars rolled and which could be placed to make interesting jumps and loops. In The Fairly Oddparents TV movie School's Out: The Musical before the Mayor starts singing it shows Godzilla destroying the city. Since 1998, Hallsguide has been an accurate source of pricing and information for Hot Wheels® online.

    In the episode of the Comedy Central animated reality show parody Drawn Together entitled "Super Nanny", Godzilla plays a minor role as Ling-Ling's conscience (with his size probably meant as a subtle joke to Ling-Ling's cultural responsibility). A 2004 episode of Antiques Roadshow valued a late 1960s collection of Hot Wheels® cars in their original packaging at roughly $100 each, with some of the more rare models worth $200-$300 each. Godzilla is distracted by Mothra, Rodan and Gamera, allowing the plane to escape. Mattel estimates that 41 million children, grew up playing with the toys, the average collector has over 1,550 cars, and children between the ages of 5 and 15 have an average of 41 cars. In the last scene of The Simpsons 10th season finale "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo", Godzilla attacks a plane going from Japan to the USA that the Simpsons are on. Aside from their popularity as toys, Hot Wheels® cars are also popular collectibles. Featured in the Animaniacs short, "Warners and the Beanstalk" where Yakko tells the Giant, "Would you like it in Japan with Godzilla and Rodan?"(a parody of Green Eggs and Ham) The Giant ignores Yakko's offer resulting in Godzilla burning him with his Atomic breath, and Rodan blowing him away. A majority of castings are diecast metal, however some are cast in plastic.

    Godzilla: Save the Earth. Most Hot Wheels® cars measure about 2½ inches (6 cm) in length, and are approximately 1:64 scale. Godzilla: Domination. It was the primary competitor of Johnny Lightning and Matchbox until 1996, when Mattel acquired rights to the Matchbox brand. Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee. toymaker Mattel in 1968. Super Godzilla. Hot Wheels® is a popular brand of toy automobile, introduced by U.S.

    Godzilla: Monster of Monsters. Dairy Delivery. Godzilla: The Series. 12. The Godzilla Power Hour. Pit Cruiser. Monster Planet Of Godzilla. 11.

    Godzilla Island. C6 Corvette. Meteor Man Zone. 10. Ultra Q. CUL8R. Ultraman. 9.

    He can release a powerful atomic energy beam, usually blue but in some films red, from his mouth (which is ominously signalled when his dorsal fins glow/flash in the same color as the atomic beam). Hummer H3T. He is virtually indestructible, impervious to all modern weaponry. 8. His iconic design (a charcoal-colored monster-like figure with small pointed ears, rough bumpy scales, powerful tail, and bony colored dorsal fins shaped like maple leaves). 69 Dodge Charger. 7.

    67 Mustang. 6. VW Beetle Cup. 5.

    Custom 59 Cadillac. 4. So Fast. 3.

    40 Ford Coupe. 2. Asphalt Assault. 1.

    List of 2004 Hot Wheels. Volkswagen Beach Bomb. Twin Mill. Turbofire.

    Torero. Splittin' Image. Shelby Turbine. Rolls-Royce.

    Mercedes-Benz 280SL. McLaren M6A. Maserati Mistral. Lotus Turbine.

    Lola GT70. Indy Eagle. Ford MK IV. Custom Police Cruiser.

    Custom Continental. Custom AMX. Custom Charger. Classic '57 Bird.

    Classic '36 Ford Coupe. Classic '32 Ford Vicky. Classic '31 Ford Woody. Chaparral 2G.

    Brabham Repco F1. Classic '32 Ford Vicky. Silhouette. Python (designed by Dean Jeffries).

    Hot Heap. Ford J-Car. Deora. Custom Volkswagen.

    Custom T-Bird. Custom Mustang. Custom Fleetside. Custom Firebird.

    Custom Eldorado. Custom Cougar. Custom Corvette. Custom Camaro.

    Custom Barracuda. Beatnik Bandit (designed by Ed Roth).

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