Godzilla

Godzilla, as portrayed during the late Heisei era (Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla, 1994)

Godzilla (ゴジラ - Gojira) is a giant Japanese movie monster (kaiju) first seen in the 1954 Japanese tokusatsu film Gojira, produced by Toho Film Company Ltd. To date, Toho has produced 28 Godzilla films. In 1998 TriStar Pictures produced a nominal remake of the original set in contemporary New York city. A new film is slated to be produced by Advanced Audiovisual Productions. (For a list of these films, see below.)

Godzilla is characterized as amphibious, nearly indestructible and highly regenerative, and breathing a sort of nuclear fire or "heat-ray". The earliest two Godzilla films visually and thematically evoke the US bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the aftermath and human damage of Godzilla's attacks. Although much of Godzilla's significance as an anti-war symbol has been lost in the transition to pop culture, the nuclear breath remains as a visual vestige of the creature's early Cold War politics.

History

Origins

the first Godzilla movie always appilies to all Subsequent movies, most of the time the creature is described as prehistoric, often a surviving dinosaur, and its first attacks on Japan are linked to atomic testing in the Pacific Ocean, including but not limited to using nuclear mutation as an explanation for the creature's great size and strange powers.

  • His iconic design (a charcoal-colored monster-like figure with small pointed ears, rough bumpy scales, powerful tail, and bony colored dorsal fins shaped like maple leaves).
  • He is virtually indestructible, impervious to all modern weaponry.
  • He can release a powerful atomic energy beam, usually blue but in some films red, from his mouth (which is ominously signalled when his dorsal fins glow/flash in the same color as the atomic beam).

The name "Gojira" is a combination of gorira which means "gorilla" and kujira, which means "whale" in Japanese. The name was allegedly originally a nickname of a large worker at Toho Studios. But since Gojira was neither a gorilla nor a whale, the name "Gojira" was devised in a different way for the film's story; Gojira's name was "originally" spelled in katakana (呉爾羅).

Gojira was first released in the United States in 1955 in Japanese-American communities only, under Toho's international title, Godzilla. In 1956, it was adapted by an American company into Godzilla, King of the Monsters (based on Toho's international title), edited and with added, principal scenes featuring Raymond Burr, and this version became an international success. As a result, the monster came to be known as "Godzilla" also in Japan (the belief that American distributors were responsible for the name "Godzilla" is a misconception, since Toho came up with the name for international markets to begin with).

Culture

Godzilla was originally an allegory for the effects of the hydrogen bomb, and the unintended consequences that such weapons might have on Earth. The radioactive contamination of the Japanese fishing boat Daigo Fukuryu Maru through the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear device test on Bikini Atoll, on March 1, 1954 lead to much press coverage in Japan preceding the release of the first movie in 1954. The Versus and Millennium Series have largely continued this concept. Some have pointed out the parallels, conscious or unconscious, between Godzilla's relationship to Japan and that of the United States; first a terrible enemy who causes enormous destruction, but then becoming a good friend and defender in times of peril.

Films have been made over the last five decades, each reflecting the social and political climate in Japan. All but one of the 29 films were produced by Toho: a version was made in 1998 by TriStar Pictures and set in the United States by the directors of Independence Day (ID4) and is somewhat despised by most Godzilla fans. Toho immediately followed it with 1999's Godzilla 2000: Millennium, which began the current series of films, known informally as the Mireniamu or Millennium series.

Much of Godzilla's popularity in the United States can be credited with TV broadcasts of the Toho Studios monster movies during the 1960s and 1970s. The American company UPA contracted with Toho to distribute its monster movies of the time, and UPA continues to hold the license today for the Godzilla films of the 1960s and 1970s. Sony currently holds some of those rights, as well as the rights to every Godzilla film produced from 1991 onward. The Blue Öyster Cult song "Godzilla" also contributed to the popularity of the movies. The creature also made an appearance in a Nike commercial, in which Godzilla went one-on-one with NBA star Charles Barkley.

In 1996, after his then-final appearance in Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, Godzilla received an award for Lifetime Achievement at the MTV Movie Awards. Creator and producer Tomoyuki Tanaka accepted on his behalf via satellite but was joined by "Godzilla" himself.

On his 50th (Japanese) birthday, on 29 November 2004, Godzilla got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The deoxygenation of Tokyo bay, caused by Dr. Serizawa's oxygen destroyer, killed Godzilla at the end of the first movie, dissolving his flesh and bone into nothingness. Nonetheless, Gojira - or Godzilla - returned in a series of films, all from Toho.

In the subsequent films, another of Godzilla's species take his place or Godzilla simply doesn't stay dead (there is some debate about this). In Godzilla 2000, it is discussed that Godzilla possesses a component known as "Organizer G-1", or "Regenerator G-1" in the English version of the film, which allows him to heal from any wound, possibly even regenerate himself from mere fragments. This would make it possible for Godzilla to continue indefinitely, even though he appears to die. Such an ability was used in Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah; where Godzilla's heart beats after Godzilla explodes.

The Japanese version of Godzilla was greatly inspired by the commercial success of King Kong, and the 1953 success of The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms. Godzilla would go on to inspire Gorgo, Gamera, and many others.

Films

Godzilla fires his atomic ray in Destroy All Monsters (1968).

The Godzilla series is generally broken into three eras, reflecting the broader division of daikaiju eiga into the Shōwa era, Heisei era, and Millennium era.

Shōwa Godzilla Series (昭和ゴジラシリーズ) 1954–1975

The initial series of movies is named for the Showa period in Japan (as all of these films were produced before Emperor Hirohito's death in 1989). This Showa timeline spanned from 1954, with Godzilla (1954), to 1975, with Terror of Mechagodzilla. With the exception of the serious Godzilla (1954) and the semi-serious sequels Godzilla Raids Again and Mothra vs. Godzilla, this period also featured a somewhat more lighthearted Godzilla. This tendency started with King Kong vs. Godzilla, which had the highest ticket sales of any Godzilla movie. Starting with Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (made 10 years after the first Godzilla film), Godzilla became a semi-playful antihero, and as years went by, he evolved into an anthropomorphic superhero. The films Son of Godzilla and All Monsters Attack were aimed largely at youthful audiences, featuring the appearance of Godzilla's son, Minya. The Showa period saw the addition of many monsters into the Godzilla continuity, three of which (Mothra, Rodan and Varan) had their own solo movies, as well as a movie for the Toho-ized King Kong. This period featured a rough continuity, although the chronology is confused, as some of the later movies were set in an arbitrary future time, often 1999.

In all films of this original series, Godzilla was 50 meters tall, and weighed 20,000 tons. The American release Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956) incorrectly stated Godzilla's height to be 400 feet, an inaccuracy that lingers today.

Versus Series or Heisei Series (VSシリーズ) 1984–1995

The timeline was revamped in 1984 with The Return of Godzilla; this movie was created as a direct sequel to the 1954 film, and ignores the continuity of the Showa series. Known as the VS Series, (unofficially known to American fans as the "Heisei Series", for the ruling emperor of the time), the continuity ended in 1995's Godzilla vs. Destoroyah after a run of seven films. The reason for the continuity shift was based on a realization that the marketing of the movies had removed the reason it was so loved. When it was discovered that Godzilla was popular with children, sequels were toned down in obvious screen violence, and Godzilla was made out to be a good guy instead of an indestructible, abhorrent mistake of men. However, the further Godzilla was taken away from his roots, the less popular he became. Hence, The Return of Godzilla brought the series back to form.

American Columbia/TriStar Godzilla film, 1998

The only Godzilla movie not made by Toho is the 1998 film Godzilla, directed by Roland Emmerich. Despite being one of the highest grossing films of the year when factoring in overseas profits, the film was widely panned by cult followers of the Godzilla franchise, critics on both sides of the Pacific, and movie-goers in general. The $136 million US boxoffice fell far short of marketing expectations, thus the film is generally viewed as a failure despite turning a profit worldwide.

In the 1998 film, Godzilla had been a reptile mutated after a French atomic test, on a French Polynesian island. Set in New York City and produced by Columbia Pictures, this movie is not considered to be part of any of the three eras of the Godzilla series.

GINO (Godzilla In Name Only)

The monster in the 1998 film has since been dubbed GINO (Godzilla In Name Only) by many Godzilla fans.

GINO is so called for multiple reasons. The most obvious is that the American movie restarts the saga from the beginning, setting the main action in New York City. Another is that it is produced by a different company. However, the biggest change is in the Godzilla character itself. The Godzilla in this movie is almost entirely computer-animated, and bears little resemblance in look or manner to his Japanese counterpart. Instead, he resembles a gigantic bipedal iguana or Komodo dragon. Also, the behavior of the American Godzilla is viewed as running contrary to the long-established Japanese Godzilla traditions. Examples of this changed behavior include the American Godzilla running away and hiding from the military instead of fighting, a lack of radioactive fire-breath, the laying of eggs by Godzilla, and the ease with which the monster is dispatched by the military at the end of the film.

Millennium Series (ミレニアムシリーズ) 1999–2004

The Millennium Series is the official term for the series of Godzilla movies, unofficially called the "Shinsei Series" (or even the "Alternate Reality Series") by American fans, made after the VS Series ended with Godzilla vs. Destoroyah. Unlike the previous two series, this era does not feature a continuous timeline. Only two of the films in this era, Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla and Godzilla: Tokyo SOS, are directly related to one another. The rest follow entirely different timelines. The common theme to this era is that all movies use Godzilla (1954) as the jumping-off point.

Since the films are different, the sizes are different in some cases. Godzilla's most prominent size in this series is 55 meters. The exceptions: In Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack and in the VS series, he was 60 meters to 80, and in Godzilla: Final Wars and Godzilla VS Destoroyah, he was 100 meters (he was supposed to be 50 meters in Final Wars, but budgetary cutbacks in miniature sets forced this size change).

In response to negative fan reaction to the 1998 American Godzilla film, Toho inserted derogatory references to the American film and creature design in two of its Millennium movies. The Gotham attack was referred to in the 2001 movie Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. The monster that had appeared in New York was not, in fact, Godzilla, but an entirely different yet similar monster. In Godzilla: Final Wars (2004) a kaiju named Zilla, of identical to design to the American interpretation of Godzilla, attacks Sydney, Australia. It is later killed by the "true" Godzilla from a hit to the tail, and its radioactive breath.

Filmography

Since 1954, there have been 29 official Godzilla films produced. All of these, with the lone exception of the 23rd, were produced by Toho Studios in Japan. (Please note that the titles listed below are Toho's preferred English titles; for further discussion, see Toho Kingdom.)

Yoshimitsu Banno, director of Godzilla vs. Hedorah, has acquired permission to make a 40-minute film for IMAX theaters, and has secured close to complete funding.

Other media

Television

Putting the Godzilla films' suits and effects crew to further use were several Japanese television shows; Ultraman and some shows inspired by it used the suits occasionally for cameos but Godzilla Island primarily followed the further adventures of the kaiju featured in the films.

  • Ultraman
  • Ultra Q
  • Meteor Man Zone
  • Godzilla Island
  • Monster Planet Of Godzilla

The success of the Godzilla franchise has also spawned two U.S. Saturday morning cartoons, both featuring an investigative scientific team who call upon Godzilla as an ally. The series make several homages to the Shōwa films and several antagonist monsters have been inspired by extant Toho creations.

  • The Godzilla Power Hour
  • Godzilla: The Series

Comics

Several manga have been derived from specific Godzilla films, and both Marvel and Dark Horse have published Godzilla comic book series (1977–1979 and 1987–1999, respectively).

Video games

Godzilla and his fellow monsters have appeared in several video games, including:

  • Godzilla: Monster of Monsters
  • Super Godzilla
  • Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee
  • Godzilla: Domination
  • Godzilla: Save the Earth

References in culture

As with any pop culture icon, Godzilla has been parodied, referenced to and homaged in many movies, TV shows, comic books, internet articles, and so on. Here is a partial list of such references:

  • Featured in the Animaniacs short, "Warners and the Beanstalk" where Yakko tells the Giant, "Would you like it in Japan with Godzilla and Rodan?"(a parody of Green Eggs and Ham) The Giant ignores Yakko's offer resulting in Godzilla burning him with his Atomic breath, and Rodan blowing him away.
  • In the last scene of The Simpsons 10th season finale "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo", Godzilla attacks a plane going from Japan to the USA that the Simpsons are on. Godzilla is distracted by Mothra, Rodan and Gamera, allowing the plane to escape.
Godzilla's cameo in Drawn Together
  • In the episode of the Comedy Central animated reality show parody Drawn Together entitled "Super Nanny", Godzilla plays a minor role as Ling-Ling's conscience (with his size probably meant as a subtle joke to Ling-Ling's cultural responsibility).
  • In The Fairly Oddparents TV movie School's Out: The Musical before the Mayor starts singing it shows Godzilla destroying the city.
  • In Austin Powers in Goldmember, Austin crashes his car into a dinosaur like parade float while in Japan, causing it to roll around the streets uncontrollably. It is identified by a civilian as Godzilla, but another civilian corrects him, stating that it only looks like Godzilla due to copyright issues.
  • Mariah Carey's video for "Boy (I Need You)", which takes place in a futuristic Japanese metropolis, features a yellow, fire-breathing Godzilla-like monster, also brought to life by suitmation.
  • In Olive the Other Reindeer, a show often shown on Cartoon Network during the Christmas season, Olive, Santa, and Santa's reindeer sing a song titled "Merry Christmas After All" while traveling the world delivering presents. However, when they visit Tokyo, Ultraman flies by them, waves, and then starts dancing and singing with Godzilla.
  • There is a Warcraft creature called Gahz'rilla who is a hydra. However, his name gives away that he is a parody of Godzilla.
  • One The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy episode is titled

" Giant Billy and Mandy: All Out Attack"

  • Godzilla has cameoed or inspired likenesses in several other (usually animated) shows:
    • Reign Storm
    • Garfield and Friends
    • Animaniacs
    • Jimmy Neutron
    • Invader Zim
    • Rugrats
    • The Fairly OddParents
  • There is a drink in Malaysia called "Milo Godzilla", consisting of a cup of Milo with ice cream and/or whipped cream on top of it.

Paleontology

At least two prehistoric creatures from the fossil record have been named after Godzilla:

  • Gojirasaurus quayi is a theropod dinosaur that lived in the Triassic Period; a partial skeleton was unearthed in Quay County, New Mexico.
  • Dakosaurus andiniensis, a crocodile from the Jurassic Period, was nicknamed "Godzilla" before being scientifically classified.

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At least two prehistoric creatures from the fossil record have been named after Godzilla:. In India, the word may also refer to a restaurant, since earlier the best restaurants were always situated next to a good hotel. " Giant Billy and Mandy: All Out Attack". In Australia, the word "hotel" often refers to a public house, a drinking establishment which does not necessarily provide accommodations. Here is a partial list of such references:. Examples:. As with any pop culture icon, Godzilla has been parodied, referenced to and homaged in many movies, TV shows, comic books, internet articles, and so on. Hotels also feature in films , television series, songs and even theme park rides.

Godzilla and his fellow monsters have appeared in several video games, including:. It is especially true of crime fiction, farces, and mysteries. Several manga have been derived from specific Godzilla films, and both Marvel and Dark Horse have published Godzilla comic book series (1977–1979 and 1987–1999, respectively). They are perfect for mysterious, anonymous settings where multiple characters may gather in equal positions. The series make several homages to the Shōwa films and several antagonist monsters have been inspired by extant Toho creations. Hotels have often been chosen by authors as the setting of their literary works. Saturday morning cartoons, both featuring an investigative scientific team who call upon Godzilla as an ally. It opened in 717 CE, and features hot springs.

The success of the Godzilla franchise has also spawned two U.S. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the oldest hotel still in operation is the Hoshi Ryokan, in Awazu, Japan. Putting the Godzilla films' suits and effects crew to further use were several Japanese television shows; Ultraman and some shows inspired by it used the suits occasionally for cameos but Godzilla Island primarily followed the further adventures of the kaiju featured in the films. According to About.com, 8 of the top 10 largest hotels are in Las Vegas. Hedorah, has acquired permission to make a 40-minute film for IMAX theaters, and has secured close to complete funding. Third place belongs to the Luxor Hotel, also in Las Vegas, with 4,408 rooms. Yoshimitsu Banno, director of Godzilla vs. The largest single-building hotel is the MGM Grand Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada, with 5,005 rooms.

(Please note that the titles listed below are Toho's preferred English titles; for further discussion, see Toho Kingdom.). In 2000, the First World Hotel, in Genting Highlands, Malaysia, claimed that it was in the process of developing a 6,300-room hotel complex; however, it appears that only about 3,000 rooms have been built and opened to the public. All of these, with the lone exception of the 23rd, were produced by Toho Studios in Japan. It is a resort complex with a number of buildings, but the exact room count has not been independently verified. Since 1954, there have been 29 official Godzilla films produced. The largest hotel in the world is the Ambassador City Jomtien resort, in Jomtien, near Pattaya, Thailand, at 5,100 rooms. It is later killed by the "true" Godzilla from a hit to the tail, and its radioactive breath. However, this title may be taken by the less illustrious Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang at 330 meters (1,083 feet), pending its (perhaps unlikely) completion; it has been under construction since 1987 and was abandoned in 1992.

In Godzilla: Final Wars (2004) a kaiju named Zilla, of identical to design to the American interpretation of Godzilla, attacks Sydney, Australia. The tallest hotel in the world is the Burj al-Arab in Dubai, at 321 meters (1,053 feet). The monster that had appeared in New York was not, in fact, Godzilla, but an entirely different yet similar monster.
. The Gotham attack was referred to in the 2001 movie Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack. The Library Hotel in New York City is unique in that its ten floors are arranged according to the Dewey Decimal System. In response to negative fan reaction to the 1998 American Godzilla film, Toho inserted derogatory references to the American film and creature design in two of its Millennium movies. Its architecture will feature two domes that break the surface and an underwater train tunnel, all made of transparent materials such as glass and acrylic.

The exceptions: In Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack and in the VS series, he was 60 meters to 80, and in Godzilla: Final Wars and Godzilla VS Destoroyah, he was 100 meters (he was supposed to be 50 meters in Final Wars, but budgetary cutbacks in miniature sets forced this size change). Hydropolis is an ambitious project to build a luxury hotel in Dubai, UAE, with 220 suites, all on the bottom of the Persian Gulf, 20 meters (66 feet) below the surface. Godzilla's most prominent size in this series is 55 meters. It only has one room, however, and Jules' Undersea Lodge in Key Largo, Florida, which requires scuba diving, is not much bigger. Since the films are different, the sizes are different in some cases. As of 2005, the only hotel with an underwater room that can be reached without Scuba diving is Utter Inn in Lake Mälaren, Sweden. The common theme to this era is that all movies use Godzilla (1954) as the jumping-off point. Ice hotels, such as the canonical Ice Hotel in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden, melt every spring and are rebuilt out of ice and snow every winter.

The rest follow entirely different timelines. Main article: Ice hotel. Only two of the films in this era, Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla and Godzilla: Tokyo SOS, are directly related to one another. Desert Cave Hotel in Coober Pedy, South Australia and the Cuevas Pedro Antonio de Alarcón (named after the author) in Guadix, Spain, as well as several hotels in Cappadocia, Turkey, are notable for being built into natural cave formations, some with rooms underground. Unlike the previous two series, this era does not feature a continuous timeline. Bill Gates even invested and had a suite built there with satellite internet/phone. Destoroyah. The Ariau Towers near Manaus, Brazil is a well-known hotel, in the middle of the Amazon, on the Rio Negro.

The Millennium Series is the official term for the series of Godzilla movies, unofficially called the "Shinsei Series" (or even the "Alternate Reality Series") by American fans, made after the VS Series ended with Godzilla vs. Some hotels, such as the Costa Rica Tree House in the Gandoca-Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge, Costa Rica, or Treetops Hotel in Aberdares National Park, Kenya, are built with living trees as structural elements, making them treehouses. Examples of this changed behavior include the American Godzilla running away and hiding from the military instead of fighting, a lack of radioactive fire-breath, the laying of eggs by Godzilla, and the ease with which the monster is dispatched by the military at the end of the film. The Burj Al Arab in Dubai, held to be the most luxurious in the world, also merits a mention. Also, the behavior of the American Godzilla is viewed as running contrary to the long-established Japanese Godzilla traditions. Other such establishments include the Beverly Hills Hotel and the Chateau Marmont, both in in California, USA. Instead, he resembles a gigantic bipedal iguana or Komodo dragon. Hotels that enter popular folklore like these two are also often frequented by celebrities, as is the case both with the Ritz and the Chelsea.

The Godzilla in this movie is almost entirely computer-animated, and bears little resemblance in look or manner to his Japanese counterpart. A number of hotels have entered the public concsiousness through popular culture, such as the Ritz Hotel in London, UK ('Putting on The Ritz') and Hotel Chelsea in New York City, subject of a number of songs and also the scene of the alleged stabbing of Nancy Spungen by her boyfriend Sid Vicious. However, the biggest change is in the Godzilla character itself. Another example is the Hotel Sacher in Vienna Austria, home of the Sachertorte. Another is that it is produced by a different company. Other establisments have given name to a particular meal or beverage, as is the case with the Waldorf Astoria in New York City, USA, known for its Waldorf Salad or the Raffles Hotel in Singapore, where the drink Singapore Sling was invented. The most obvious is that the American movie restarts the saga from the beginning, setting the main action in New York City. Most world famous hotels have gained their renown through tradition, by hosting significant events or persons, such as Schloss Cecilienhof in Potsdam, Germany, which derives its fame from the so-called Potsdam Conference of the World War II allies Winston Churchill, Harry Truman and Joseph Stalin in 1945.

GINO is so called for multiple reasons.
. The monster in the 1998 film has since been dubbed GINO (Godzilla In Name Only) by many Godzilla fans. As this market is typically corporate travelers, the market segment is referral-rich, non-seasonal, high-yielding and repeat, and therefore one which boutique hotel operators target as their primary source of income. Set in New York City and produced by Columbia Pictures, this movie is not considered to be part of any of the three eras of the Godzilla series. Of the total travel market a small percentage are discerning travelers, who place a high importance on privacy, luxury and service delivery. In the 1998 film, Godzilla had been a reptile mutated after a French atomic test, on a French Polynesian island. Many boutique hotels have on site dining facilities, and the majority offer bars and lounges which may also be open to the general public.

The $136 million US boxoffice fell far short of marketing expectations, thus the film is generally viewed as a failure despite turning a profit worldwide. Guest services are attended to by 24 hour hotel staff. Despite being one of the highest grossing films of the year when factoring in overseas profits, the film was widely panned by cult followers of the Godzilla franchise, critics on both sides of the Pacific, and movie-goers in general. Although usually considerably smaller than a mainstream hotel (ranging from 3 to 100 guest rooms) boutique hotels are generally fitted with telephony and wi-fi Internet connections, honesty bars and often cable/pay TV. The only Godzilla movie not made by Toho is the 1998 film Godzilla, directed by Roland Emmerich. Typically boutique hotels are furnished in a themed, stylish and/or aspirational manner. Hence, The Return of Godzilla brought the series back to form. Boutique hotels differentiate themselves from larger chain or branded hotels by providing an exceptional and personalized level accommodation, services and facilities.

However, the further Godzilla was taken away from his roots, the less popular he became. "Boutique Hotel" is a term originating in North America to describe intimate, usually luxurious or quirky hotel environments. When it was discovered that Godzilla was popular with children, sequels were toned down in obvious screen violence, and Godzilla was made out to be a good guy instead of an indestructible, abhorrent mistake of men. For the sake of greater comparability, rating systems have been introduced, with the one to five stars classification being most common. The reason for the continuity shift was based on a realization that the marketing of the movies had removed the reason it was so loved. Due to the enormous increase in tourism worldwide during the last decades of the 20th century, standards, especially those of smaller establishments, have improved considerably. Destoroyah after a run of seven films. The cost and quality of hotels are usually indicative of the range and type of services available.

Known as the VS Series, (unofficially known to American fans as the "Heisei Series", for the ruling emperor of the time), the continuity ended in 1995's Godzilla vs. However, in Japan the capsule hotel supplies minimal facilities and room space. The timeline was revamped in 1984 with The Return of Godzilla; this movie was created as a direct sequel to the 1954 film, and ignores the continuity of the Showa series. In the United Kingdom a hotel is required by law to serve food and drinks to all-comers within certain stated hours; to avoid this requirement it is not uncommon to come across "private hotels" which are not subject to this requirement. The American release Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956) incorrectly stated Godzilla's height to be 400 feet, an inaccuracy that lingers today. Food and drink may be supplied by a mini-bar (which often includes a small refrigerator) containing snacks and drinks (to be paid for on departure), and tea and coffee making facilities (cups, spoons, an electric kettle and sachets containing instant coffee, tea bags, sugar, and creamer or milk). In all films of this original series, Godzilla was 50 meters tall, and weighed 20,000 tons. Other features found may be a telephone, an alarm clock, a TV, and broadband Internet connectivity.

This period featured a rough continuity, although the chronology is confused, as some of the later movies were set in an arbitrary future time, often 1999. Basic accommodation of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand only has largely been replaced by rooms with en-suite bathrooms and climate control. The Showa period saw the addition of many monsters into the Godzilla continuity, three of which (Mothra, Rodan and Varan) had their own solo movies, as well as a movie for the Toho-ized King Kong. The circumflex replaces the 's' once preceding the 't' in the earlier hostel spelling, which over time received a new, but closely related meaning. The films Son of Godzilla and All Monsters Attack were aimed largely at youthful audiences, featuring the appearance of Godzilla's son, Minya. The French spelling (with the circumflex) was once also used in English, but is now rare. Starting with Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (made 10 years after the first Godzilla film), Godzilla became a semi-playful antihero, and as years went by, he evolved into an anthropomorphic superhero. The word hotel derives from the French hôtel, which originally referred to a French version of a townhouse, not a place offering accommodation (in contemporary usage, hôtel has the meaning of "hotel", and hôtel particulier is used for the old meaning).

Godzilla, which had the highest ticket sales of any Godzilla movie. . This tendency started with King Kong vs. Hotels differ from motels in that most motels have drive-up, exterior entrances to the rooms, while hotels tend to have interior entrances to the rooms, making them safer and more relaxing to people. Godzilla, this period also featured a somewhat more lighthearted Godzilla. Some hotels have conference services and encourage groups to hold conventions and meetings at their location. With the exception of the serious Godzilla (1954) and the semi-serious sequels Godzilla Raids Again and Mothra vs. Hotels often provide a number of additional guest services such as a restaurant, a swimming pool or childcare.

This Showa timeline spanned from 1954, with Godzilla (1954), to 1975, with Terror of Mechagodzilla. A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging, usually on a short-term basis and especially for tourists. The initial series of movies is named for the Showa period in Japan (as all of these films were produced before Emperor Hirohito's death in 1989). Hotel. The Godzilla series is generally broken into three eras, reflecting the broader division of daikaiju eiga into the Shōwa era, Heisei era, and Millennium era. The Overlook Hotel from The Shining. Godzilla would go on to inspire Gorgo, Gamera, and many others. "Hollywood Tower Hotel" (ride at Disney-MGM Studios, Orlando, Florida).

The Japanese version of Godzilla was greatly inspired by the commercial success of King Kong, and the 1953 success of The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms. Hotel Rwanda. Such an ability was used in Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah; where Godzilla's heart beats after Godzilla explodes. Cyril Hare's Suicide Excepted. This would make it possible for Godzilla to continue indefinitely, even though he appears to die. At Bertram's Hotel. In Godzilla 2000, it is discussed that Godzilla possesses a component known as "Organizer G-1", or "Regenerator G-1" in the English version of the film, which allows him to heal from any wound, possibly even regenerate himself from mere fragments. A Caribbean Mystery.

In the subsequent films, another of Godzilla's species take his place or Godzilla simply doesn't stay dead (there is some debate about this). Agatha Christie's Evil Under the Sun. Nonetheless, Gojira - or Godzilla - returned in a series of films, all from Toho. "Hotel California". Serizawa's oxygen destroyer, killed Godzilla at the end of the first movie, dissolving his flesh and bone into nothingness. Hotelier. The deoxygenation of Tokyo bay, caused by Dr. White Horse Inn.

On his 50th (Japanese) birthday, on 29 November 2004, Godzilla got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Fawlty Towers. Creator and producer Tomoyuki Tanaka accepted on his behalf via satellite but was joined by "Godzilla" himself. The Hotel New Hampshire. Destoroyah, Godzilla received an award for Lifetime Achievement at the MTV Movie Awards. Tipton Hotel on Disney Channel's "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody". In 1996, after his then-final appearance in Godzilla vs. Plaza Suite.

The creature also made an appearance in a Nike commercial, in which Godzilla went one-on-one with NBA star Charles Barkley. Room Service. The Blue Öyster Cult song "Godzilla" also contributed to the popularity of the movies. Grand Hotel. Sony currently holds some of those rights, as well as the rights to every Godzilla film produced from 1991 onward. The American company UPA contracted with Toho to distribute its monster movies of the time, and UPA continues to hold the license today for the Godzilla films of the 1960s and 1970s.

Much of Godzilla's popularity in the United States can be credited with TV broadcasts of the Toho Studios monster movies during the 1960s and 1970s. Toho immediately followed it with 1999's Godzilla 2000: Millennium, which began the current series of films, known informally as the Mireniamu or Millennium series. All but one of the 29 films were produced by Toho: a version was made in 1998 by TriStar Pictures and set in the United States by the directors of Independence Day (ID4) and is somewhat despised by most Godzilla fans. Films have been made over the last five decades, each reflecting the social and political climate in Japan.

Some have pointed out the parallels, conscious or unconscious, between Godzilla's relationship to Japan and that of the United States; first a terrible enemy who causes enormous destruction, but then becoming a good friend and defender in times of peril. The Versus and Millennium Series have largely continued this concept. The radioactive contamination of the Japanese fishing boat Daigo Fukuryu Maru through the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear device test on Bikini Atoll, on March 1, 1954 lead to much press coverage in Japan preceding the release of the first movie in 1954. Godzilla was originally an allegory for the effects of the hydrogen bomb, and the unintended consequences that such weapons might have on Earth.

As a result, the monster came to be known as "Godzilla" also in Japan (the belief that American distributors were responsible for the name "Godzilla" is a misconception, since Toho came up with the name for international markets to begin with). In 1956, it was adapted by an American company into Godzilla, King of the Monsters (based on Toho's international title), edited and with added, principal scenes featuring Raymond Burr, and this version became an international success. Gojira was first released in the United States in 1955 in Japanese-American communities only, under Toho's international title, Godzilla. But since Gojira was neither a gorilla nor a whale, the name "Gojira" was devised in a different way for the film's story; Gojira's name was "originally" spelled in katakana (呉爾羅).

The name was allegedly originally a nickname of a large worker at Toho Studios. The name "Gojira" is a combination of gorira which means "gorilla" and kujira, which means "whale" in Japanese. the first Godzilla movie always appilies to all Subsequent movies, most of the time the creature is described as prehistoric, often a surviving dinosaur, and its first attacks on Japan are linked to atomic testing in the Pacific Ocean, including but not limited to using nuclear mutation as an explanation for the creature's great size and strange powers. .

Although much of Godzilla's significance as an anti-war symbol has been lost in the transition to pop culture, the nuclear breath remains as a visual vestige of the creature's early Cold War politics. The earliest two Godzilla films visually and thematically evoke the US bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the aftermath and human damage of Godzilla's attacks. Godzilla is characterized as amphibious, nearly indestructible and highly regenerative, and breathing a sort of nuclear fire or "heat-ray". (For a list of these films, see below.).

A new film is slated to be produced by Advanced Audiovisual Productions. In 1998 TriStar Pictures produced a nominal remake of the original set in contemporary New York city. To date, Toho has produced 28 Godzilla films. Godzilla (ゴジラ - Gojira) is a giant Japanese movie monster (kaiju) first seen in the 1954 Japanese tokusatsu film Gojira, produced by Toho Film Company Ltd.

Dakosaurus andiniensis, a crocodile from the Jurassic Period, was nicknamed "Godzilla" before being scientifically classified. Gojirasaurus quayi is a theropod dinosaur that lived in the Triassic Period; a partial skeleton was unearthed in Quay County, New Mexico. There is a drink in Malaysia called "Milo Godzilla", consisting of a cup of Milo with ice cream and/or whipped cream on top of it. The Fairly OddParents.

Rugrats. Invader Zim. Jimmy Neutron. Animaniacs.

Garfield and Friends. Reign Storm. Godzilla has cameoed or inspired likenesses in several other (usually animated) shows:

    . One The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy episode is titled.

    However, his name gives away that he is a parody of Godzilla. There is a Warcraft creature called Gahz'rilla who is a hydra. However, when they visit Tokyo, Ultraman flies by them, waves, and then starts dancing and singing with Godzilla. In Olive the Other Reindeer, a show often shown on Cartoon Network during the Christmas season, Olive, Santa, and Santa's reindeer sing a song titled "Merry Christmas After All" while traveling the world delivering presents.

    Mariah Carey's video for "Boy (I Need You)", which takes place in a futuristic Japanese metropolis, features a yellow, fire-breathing Godzilla-like monster, also brought to life by suitmation. It is identified by a civilian as Godzilla, but another civilian corrects him, stating that it only looks like Godzilla due to copyright issues. In Austin Powers in Goldmember, Austin crashes his car into a dinosaur like parade float while in Japan, causing it to roll around the streets uncontrollably. In The Fairly Oddparents TV movie School's Out: The Musical before the Mayor starts singing it shows Godzilla destroying the city.

    In the episode of the Comedy Central animated reality show parody Drawn Together entitled "Super Nanny", Godzilla plays a minor role as Ling-Ling's conscience (with his size probably meant as a subtle joke to Ling-Ling's cultural responsibility). Godzilla is distracted by Mothra, Rodan and Gamera, allowing the plane to escape. In the last scene of The Simpsons 10th season finale "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo", Godzilla attacks a plane going from Japan to the USA that the Simpsons are on. Featured in the Animaniacs short, "Warners and the Beanstalk" where Yakko tells the Giant, "Would you like it in Japan with Godzilla and Rodan?"(a parody of Green Eggs and Ham) The Giant ignores Yakko's offer resulting in Godzilla burning him with his Atomic breath, and Rodan blowing him away.

    Godzilla: Save the Earth. Godzilla: Domination. Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee. Super Godzilla.

    Godzilla: Monster of Monsters. Godzilla: The Series. The Godzilla Power Hour. Monster Planet Of Godzilla.

    Godzilla Island. Meteor Man Zone. Ultra Q. Ultraman.

    He can release a powerful atomic energy beam, usually blue but in some films red, from his mouth (which is ominously signalled when his dorsal fins glow/flash in the same color as the atomic beam). He is virtually indestructible, impervious to all modern weaponry. His iconic design (a charcoal-colored monster-like figure with small pointed ears, rough bumpy scales, powerful tail, and bony colored dorsal fins shaped like maple leaves).

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