Gene Vincent

Gene Vincent, real name Eugene Vincent Craddock (February 11, 1935 - October 12, 1971) was an American rockabilly musician, best known for his hit "Be-Bop-A-Lula". He started playing in various country bands in Norfolk, Virginia after leaving the Navy with a permanent leg injury. He signed at Capitol Records with his backing band The Blue Caps.

After "Be-Bop-A-Lula" became a huge hit in 1956, Gene Vincent & the Blue Caps were unable to follow it up with mainstream success in spite of critically acclaimed songs like "Bluejean Bop" and "Race with the Devil". The group's only other hit was "Lotta Lovin'" (1957). Vincent also became one of the first rock stars to star in a film, The Girl Can't Help It. By the 1960s, Vincent's career had mostly ended in the US, though he maintained an audience in Europe, especially England and France.

Gene Vincent is interred in the Eternal Valley Memorial Park, Newhall, California.


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Gene Vincent is interred in the Eternal Valley Memorial Park, Newhall, California. On December 15, 1943, at age 39, Waller died aboard an eastbound train in the vicinity of Kansas City, Missouri, following a west coast engagement. By the 1960s, Vincent's career had mostly ended in the US, though he maintained an audience in Europe, especially England and France. This song, a searing treatment of racism, black and white, calls into question the accusations of "shallow entertainment" levelled at both Armstrong and Waller. Vincent also became one of the first rock stars to star in a film, The Girl Can't Help It. With Razaf he wrote "What Did I Do (To Be So Black and Blue)?" 1929 which became a hit for Louis Armstrong. The group's only other hit was "Lotta Lovin'" (1957). He also appeared in several feature films and short subject films, most notably "Stormy Weather" in 1943.

After "Be-Bop-A-Lula" became a huge hit in 1956, Gene Vincent & the Blue Caps were unable to follow it up with mainstream success in spite of critically acclaimed songs like "Bluejean Bop" and "Race with the Devil". Waller also made a successful tour of the British Isles in the late 1930's, and appeared in one of the earliest BBC Television broadcasts. He signed at Capitol Records with his backing band The Blue Caps. His weight and drinking are believed to have contributed to his death. He started playing in various country bands in Norfolk, Virginia after leaving the Navy with a permanent leg injury. His nickname came about because he weighed nearly 300 pounds (136 kg). Gene Vincent, real name Eugene Vincent Craddock (February 11, 1935 - October 12, 1971) was an American rockabilly musician, best known for his hit "Be-Bop-A-Lula". He collaborated with the Tin Pan Alley lyricist Andy Razaf and had a commercially successful career, which according to some music critics eclipsed his great musical talent.

Among his songs are "Squeeze Me" 1919, "Ain't Misbehavin'" 1929, "Blue Turning Grey Over You" 1930, "Honeysuckle Rose" 1929, "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling" 1929, and "Jitterbug Waltz" 1942. Before his solo career, he played with many performers, from Erskine Tate to Bessie Smith, but his greatest success came with his own five- or six-piece combo, "Fats Waller and his Rhythm". He was an excellent pianist--now usually considered one of the very best who ever played in the stride style--but his songwriting and his lovable, roguish stage personality ("One never knows, do one?") overshadowed his playing. Johnson introduced Waller to the world of rent parties (a party with a piano player, designed to help pay the rent by charging the guests), and soon he developed a performing career.

Johnson. Waller studied classical piano and organ before apprenticing himself to legendary Harlem stride pianist James P. He was born Thomas Wright Waller in New York City. Fats Waller (May 21, 1904 - December 15, 1943) was an African-American jazz pianist, organist, composer and comedic entertainer.

Download sample of "It's a Sin to Tell a Lie" by Fats Waller.

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