Frame

A frame or framework is a structural system or a skeleton that supports other components of the object. It is used in this basic sense in art, construction, and mechanical engineering, and the expression 'frame' for eyeglasses.

  • in art, a picture frame is a solid border around a picture or painting
  • a space frame in construction
  • a beehive frame
  • in mechanical engineering, a bicycle frame, for instance
  • frames are often called after a shape they resemble, e.g. an A-frame, often used as a caning -, whipping - or flogging frame, used for securing the victim of physical punishment (either standing with his hands tied where the side bars meet above him, or to bend over the shorter cross-bar)

The word also has many extended, metaphorical meanings in various fields:

  • in spinning, a frame is a mechanical device with many spindles for spinning multiple threads simultaneously, as in spinning frame, dressing frame, or water frame
  • one of the film frames or video frames composing a film or video
    • a complete image, or the set of all picture elements representing it, in video display
    • in video compression different frames –- called I-frames, P-frames, B-frames, and D-frames –- are used for motion compensation
  • reframing in film and programming
  • in telecommunications, a data frame is a transmitted packet
  • in computer science, a stack frame
  • the frame element in HTML; see HTML element#Frames
  • the frame problem in artificial intelligence, a data structure for representing a stereotyped situation
  • Semantic frames in cognitive science, linguistics, or communication theory
  • a frame tale in literature
  • a narrative frame in literature, film, or storytelling
  • a frame of reference in physics
  • in mathematics, a frame is an abstract concept on a manifold, generalising frame of reference to a basis for the tangent bundle varying from point to point. See vierbein for an orthonormal frame. Also projective frame.
  • also in mathematics, a frame can refer to a complete Heyting algebra
  • each player's turn in bowling games
  • the connection between lead and follow in partner dancing. See frame (dance)
  • in law, to frame someone is to make it look as if they committed a crime when they in fact did not commit said crime, as in the title of the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit; see frameup.
  • in psychology, Framing (psychology)
  • one complete game of snooker; a match usually comprises at least three frames.

The Frames is also the name of an Irish rock band, fronted by Glen Hansard.


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. main article: Game classification. The Frames is also the name of an Irish rock band, fronted by Glen Hansard. Types of one-player games include:. The word also has many extended, metaphorical meanings in various fields:. One-person games or one-player games are sometimes called solitaire games, but this term can be easily confused with the peg game and the card game of same name. It is used in this basic sense in art, construction, and mechanical engineering, and the expression 'frame' for eyeglasses. When games like chess and go are played professionally, they take on many of the characteristics of a sport.

A frame or framework is a structural system or a skeleton that supports other components of the object. Games amuse the players; sports amuse a broader public; in advanced material cultures, sports can be played by paid professionals. one complete game of snooker; a match usually comprises at least three frames. The concept of fandom began with sports fans. in psychology, Framing (psychology). Communities often align themselves with players of sports, who in a sense represent that community; they often align themselves against their opponents, or have traditional rivalries. in law, to frame someone is to make it look as if they committed a crime when they in fact did not commit said crime, as in the title of the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit; see frameup. Most sports can have spectators.

See frame (dance). Sports often require special equipment and playing fields or prepared grounds dedicated to their practice, a fact that often makes necessary the involvement of a community beyond the players themselves. the connection between lead and follow in partner dancing. For cultural anthropologists, the distinction between games and sports hinges on community involvement. each player's turn in bowling games. Generally, sports are athletic in nature, and have an element of physical prowess, but then so do many games. also in mathematics, a frame can refer to a complete Heyting algebra. There is no clear line of demarcation between games and sports.

Also projective frame. They are associated with cultures that place a high value on personal responsibility, keeping one's word, and maintaining personal standing in the face of misfortune; in other words, with "cultures of honor". See vierbein for an orthonormal frame. Games of chance appear at a variety of levels of material culture; what they seem to share generally is a sense of economic insecurity. in mathematics, a frame is an abstract concept on a manifold, generalising frame of reference to a basis for the tangent bundle varying from point to point. They are associated with hierarchical societies that place a high value on obedience. a frame of reference in physics. They often require special equipment to be played.

a narrative frame in literature, film, or storytelling. They are associated with cultures that possess a written language: not surprising, since most strategy games are based on mathematics and feature the manipulation of symbols. a frame tale in literature. Games of strategy require a higher material basis. Semantic frames in cognitive science, linguistics, or communication theory. They are associated with cultures that place a high value on individual performance and prowess. the frame problem in artificial intelligence, a data structure for representing a stereotyped situation. Games of pure skill are likely the oldest sort of game, and are found in all cultures, regardless of their level of material culture.

the frame element in HTML; see HTML element#Frames. Baseball Hall of Famer Casey Stengel underscored this point when he remarked, "I had many years when I was not so successful as a ballplayer, as it is a game of skill.". in computer science, a stack frame. In addition to these basic classifications, there are mixed games; such as football, partly a game of skill and partly a game of strategy; poker, partly a game of strategy and partly a game of chance; and baseball, which combines elements of all three. in telecommunications, a data frame is a transmitted packet. They divide games broadly into:. reframing in film and programming. While many different subdivisions have been proposed, anthropologists classify games under three major headings, and have drawn some conclusions as to the social bases that each sort of game requires.

in video compression different frames –- called I-frames, P-frames, B-frames, and D-frames –- are used for motion compensation. Games, being a characteristic human activity strongly determined by custom and the frequent subjects of folklore, have been the subject of anthropological investigations. a complete image, or the set of all picture elements representing it, in video display. No pitch is a ball or a strike until it has been labelled as such by an appropriate authority, the plate umpire, whose judgment on this matter cannot be challenged within the current game. one of the film frames or video frames composing a film or video

    . While the strike zone target is governed by the rules of the game, it epitomizes the category of things that exist only because people have agreed to treat them as real. in spinning, a frame is a mechanical device with many spindles for spinning multiple threads simultaneously, as in spinning frame, dressing frame, or water frame. Stanley Fish, looking for a clear example of the sorts of social constructions, cited the balls and strikes of baseball as example.

    an A-frame, often used as a caning -, whipping - or flogging frame, used for securing the victim of physical punishment (either standing with his hands tied where the side bars meet above him, or to bend over the shorter cross-bar). Games were important to Wittgenstein's later thought; he held that language was itself a game, consisting of tokens governed by rough-and-ready rules that arise by convention and are not strict. frames are often called after a shape they resemble, e.g. In Philosophical Investigations, philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein argued that the concept "game" could not be contained by any single definition, but that games must be looked at as a series of definitions that share a "family resemblance" to one another. in mechanical engineering, a bicycle frame, for instance. Things such as how they were invented and why are all matters of the human races of knowledge not yet understood today in the 21st century. a beehive frame. Although Games have been played for thousands of years, many people do not know as much as we believe about them.

    a space frame in construction. There are an enormous variety of games; for specific information about different types of games, see the links at the end of this article. in art, a picture frame is a solid border around a picture or painting. All through human history, people have played games to entertain themselves and others. Taking an action that falls outside the rules generally constitutes a foul or cheating. Most often involve competition among two or more players.

    Games can involve one player acting alone, or two or more players acting cooperatively. Some courtship displays by some species of bird, such as the Black Grouse, appear to have a component which, from an anthropolgical view, might appear to be a game in which there are clearly winners and losers. Our inability to observe and understand such games should not be taken as a confirmation that they do not exist. It would, for example, seem incongruous that large brained species such as many Cetaceans and the larger hominids did not play games.

    Non-human animal species may, however, engage in games whose rules and sophistication may be of such a nature as to be incapable of detection by humans in their present state of knowledge. The existence of rules and criteria that decide the outcome of games imply that games require intelligence of a significant degree of sophistication. Whether some animals are intelligent enough to game is debatable, though a game has ritualistic elements (such as rules and procedures) that are voluntarily acted upon, rather than as a result of instinct. Although many animals play, only humans confirmably have games.

    . Games are played primarily for entertainment or enjoyment, but may also serve as exercise or in an educational, simulational or psychological role. This can be defined by either a goal that the players try to reach, or some set of rules that determines what the players can or can not do. A game is an (often, but not always recreational) activity involving one or more players.

    Word games. Win-win games. Wargames. Unclassified games.

    Traditional games. Theater games. Tile-based games. Table-top games.

    String games. Street games. Spoken games. Singing games.

    Role-playing games. Quizzes. Puzzles. Pub games.

    Political games. Playground games. Play-by-mail games. Pencil and paper games.

    Parlour games. Party games. Open gaming. New Games.

    Mental Games. Mathematical games. Locative games. Letter games.

    Guessing games. Group-dynamic games. Global Positioning System-based games. Games of status.

    Games of strategy. Games of skill. Games of physical skill. Games of physical activity.

    Games of logic. Games of dare. Games of chance. Game shows.

    Economics games. Educational games. Drinking games. Dice games.

    Creative games. Counting-out games. Conversation games. MMORPGs.

    MUDs. Online skill-based games. Internet games

      . Computer puzzle games.

      Computer board games. Computer and video games

        . Clapping games. Children's games.

        Casino games. Collectible card games. Card games

          . Car games.

          Business games. Board games. Ball games. Alternate reality game.

          Online Flash Games. solitaire card games. most types of puzzles (logical, mechanical, mathematical, etc.). juggling.

          most computer and video games. many arcade games. Games of chance, such as craps, snakes and ladders and poker. Games of strategy, such as checkers, go, or tic-tac-toe;.

          Games of skill, such as hopscotch and target shooting;.

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