Elgin Baylor

Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, DC) was one of the most graceful and acrobatic forwards to ever play the game of basketball playing 13 seasons for the NBA's Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers.

Elgin Baylor played college basketball at the College of Idaho and Seattle University, leading the SU Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958 (where they lost to the Kentucky Wildcats). Following his junior season, Baylor joined the Minneapolis Lakers for the 1958-1959 season and moving with them to Los Angeles in 1960.

In 1959, Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and from the 1960-61 to the 1962-63 seasons, he averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals eight times (although never winning). Baylor was a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and went to the NBA All-Star Game 11 times.

Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963-64 season and, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same player, never averaging above 30 points per game again. During Baylor's career, the Lakers were a consistently powerful team, but were continuously overshadowed by the Boston Celtics dynasty of the time.

Baylor finally retired during the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. He finished his career with an astonishing 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games.

In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86-135 record and retired following the 1978-79 season. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers as the team's vice president of basketball operations, where he still is today.

In 1977, Baylor was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame and in 1980 he was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team and again in 1996, he was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team.

Baylor ranked #11 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003.


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Baylor ranked #11 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003. Below is a chronological filmography. In 1977, Baylor was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame and in 1980 he was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team and again in 1996, he was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team. Louis, and Channing Gray, arts writer for the Providence (RI) Journal. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers as the team's vice president of basketball operations, where he still is today. Gray was survived by his wife, Kathie Russo, three children, and his brothers Rockwell Gray, an English professor in St. In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86-135 record and retired following the 1978-79 season. It was reported that Gray was working on a new monologue at the time of his death, and that the subject matter of the piece – the Ireland car crash and his subsequent attempts to recover from his injuries – might have triggered his final bout of depression.

He finished his career with an astonishing 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games. In light of a suicide attempt in 2002, and the fact that his mother had taken her own life in 1967, suicide was the suspected cause of death. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. On March 7, 2004, the New York City medical examiner's office reported that at 3:00 Spalding Gray's body had been pulled from the East River. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. In January 2004, Gray, known to suffer bouts of depression in part as a result of these injuries, was declared missing. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. In June 2001 he suffered severe injuries in a car crash whilst on holiday in Ireland.

Baylor finally retired during the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. True to form, Gray wrote a monologue about his experiences writing the book, entitled Monster in a Box. During Baylor's career, the Lakers were a consistently powerful team, but were continuously overshadowed by the Boston Celtics dynasty of the time. In the early 1990s, Gray published his autobiography, Impossible Vacation. Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963-64 season and, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same player, never averaging above 30 points per game again. He also appeared in a Broadway revival of Thornton Wilder's Our Town. Baylor was a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and went to the NBA All-Star Game 11 times. He was a founding member of the experimental theater company The Wooster Group.

In 1959, Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and from the 1960-61 to the 1962-63 seasons, he averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals eight times (although never winning). He attracted some attention from postmodernist critics over the extent of the overlap between his off-stage self and his on-stage persona, and was sometimes criticised as exploitative for the way he appropriated the fortunes or misfortunes of others for material for his monologues. Following his junior season, Baylor joined the Minneapolis Lakers for the 1958-1959 season and moving with them to Los Angeles in 1960. He based the monologue on his experiences in Southeast Asia while filming a small part in the 1984 movie The Killing Fields. Elgin Baylor played college basketball at the College of Idaho and Seattle University, leading the SU Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958 (where they lost to the Kentucky Wildcats). After a few minor cinema roles and appearing in a number of forgettable pornographic films with titles like The Farmer's Daughter and Little Orphan Dusty, Gray first achieved national prominence with his film Swimming to Cambodia, a filmed version of one of his monologues. Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, DC) was one of the most graceful and acrobatic forwards to ever play the game of basketball playing 13 seasons for the NBA's Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers. .

Born in Barrington, Rhode Island, he was best known for his performance monologues, which deal with events from his own life in a style characterised by humor, paranoia and acute self-consciousness. actor, screenwriter and playwright. Spalding Gray (June 5, 1941 – about January 10, 2004) was a U.S. 1970 Cowards – Actor: Radical.

1972 Love-In '72 – Actor: Radical at party. 1973 The Farmer's Daughter – Actor: George. 1976 Little Orphan Dusty – Actor. 1978 Maraschino Cherry.

1983 Variety. 1984 Almost You – Actor: Travel Agent. 1984 Hard Choices – Actor: Terry Norfolk. 1984 The Killing Fields – Actor: United States consul.

1985 The Communists Are Comfortable (And Three Other Stories). 1986 True Stories – Actor: Earl Culver. Rodney. 1986 Seven Minutes in Heaven – Actor: Dr.

1987 Swimming to Cambodia – Actor: Himself; Also: Screenwriter. Richard Milstein. 1988 Beaches – Actor: Dr. 1988 Spalding Gray: Terrors of Pleasure.

Cardew. 1988 Stars and Bars – Actor: Rev. Peter Epstein. 1988 Clara's Heart – Actor: Dr.

1989 The Image – Actor: Frank Goodrich. 1989 Heavy Petting. 1991 To Save a Child – Actor: Hobart. 1991 Monster in a Box – Actor: Himself; Also: Screenwriter.

Erdman. 1992 Straight Talk – Actor: Dr. Mungo. 1993 King of the Hill – Actor: Mr.

1993 Zelda. 1993 Twenty Bucks – Actor: Priest. Spalding. 1993 The Pickle – Actor: Dr.

1994 The Paper – Actor: Paul Bladden. 1995 Beyond Rangoon – Actor: Jeremy Watt. 1995 Bad Company – Actor: Walter Curl. 1995 Hoogste Tijd – Actor: Jack's Father.

1996 Glory Daze. 1996 Buckminster Fuller: Thinking Out Loud. 1996 Gray's Anatomy – Actor: Himself; Also: Screenwriter. 1996 Diabolique – Actor: Simon Veatch.

1997 Bliss – Actor: Alfred. 1997 Drunks – Actor: Louis. Jennings. 1999 Coming Soon – Actor: Mr.

2001 Revolution #9 – Actor: Scooter McCrae. Miranda. 2001 Julie Johnson – Actor: Mr. 2001 How High – Actor: Professor Jackson.

Geisler. 2001 Kate and Leopold – Actor: Dr.

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