Elgin Baylor

Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, DC) was one of the most graceful and acrobatic forwards to ever play the game of basketball playing 13 seasons for the NBA's Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers.

Elgin Baylor played college basketball at the College of Idaho and Seattle University, leading the SU Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958 (where they lost to the Kentucky Wildcats). Following his junior season, Baylor joined the Minneapolis Lakers for the 1958-1959 season and moving with them to Los Angeles in 1960.

In 1959, Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and from the 1960-61 to the 1962-63 seasons, he averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals eight times (although never winning). Baylor was a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and went to the NBA All-Star Game 11 times.

Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963-64 season and, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same player, never averaging above 30 points per game again. During Baylor's career, the Lakers were a consistently powerful team, but were continuously overshadowed by the Boston Celtics dynasty of the time.

Baylor finally retired during the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. He finished his career with an astonishing 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games.

In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86-135 record and retired following the 1978-79 season. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers as the team's vice president of basketball operations, where he still is today.

In 1977, Baylor was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame and in 1980 he was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team and again in 1996, he was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team.

Baylor ranked #11 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003.


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Baylor ranked #11 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003. Frazier also was one of the "new breed" of athletes that emerged in the 1960s, such as Joe Namath and Dick Allen. In 1977, Baylor was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame and in 1980 he was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team and again in 1996, he was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team. In 1996, he was elected to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers as the team's vice president of basketball operations, where he still is today. In 1987, Walt Frazier was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86-135 record and retired following the 1978-79 season. That's when Frazier would steal the ball with his quick hands.

He finished his career with an astonishing 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games. He believed that if he did that, the player would think Frazier wasn't playing defense and would be more relaxed. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. Instead he liked to play defense but seem like he wasn't playing defense. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. When asked about his defensive success, he answered that he doesn't believe in contact defense. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. He would make sudden steals and suprise the offense.

Baylor finally retired during the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. Frazier was also one of the first players to make stealing the ball an art form. During Baylor's career, the Lakers were a consistently powerful team, but were continuously overshadowed by the Boston Celtics dynasty of the time. Patrick Ewing would eventually break most of those records, but Frazier's assists record still stands. Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963-64 season and, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same player, never averaging above 30 points per game again. Frazier held team records for most games (759), minutes played (28,995), field goals attempted (11,669), field goals made (5,736), free throws attempted (4,017), free throws made (3,145), assists (4,791) and points (14,617). Baylor was a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and went to the NBA All-Star Game 11 times. With Frazier, the Knicks captured the NBA championships in 1970 and 1973.

In 1959, Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and from the 1960-61 to the 1962-63 seasons, he averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals eight times (although never winning). He was an NBA All-Star seven times, and was the MVP of the 1975 NBA All-Star Game. Following his junior season, Baylor joined the Minneapolis Lakers for the 1958-1959 season and moving with them to Los Angeles in 1960. He was named to the NBA All-Rookie Team in 1968. Elgin Baylor played college basketball at the College of Idaho and Seattle University, leading the SU Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958 (where they lost to the Kentucky Wildcats). Frazier was drafted by the New York Knicks, where he picked up his nickname of "Clyde". Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, DC) was one of the most graceful and acrobatic forwards to ever play the game of basketball playing 13 seasons for the NBA's Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers. Frazier was named MVP of the 1967 tournament.

In 1967, with Frazier playing at point guard, SIU won the National Invitation Tournament (NIT), beating Marquette University 71-56. In 1966, he was academically ineligible for basketball. In 1965, Frazier led SIU to the NCAA Division II Tournament only to lose in the finals to Evansville 85-82 in overtime. He was named a Division II All-American in 1964 and 1965.

Frazier wasted no time in becoming one of the premier collegiate basketball players in the country. Frazier chose to attend Southern Illinois University (SIU) in Carbondale, Illinois. Due to policies of racial segregation, major colleges in Georgia, such as Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia as well as all other major universities in the south, did not admit African-Americans. After having a great career at David Howard High School in Atlanta, Frazier's choices for furthering his career were limited.

He is currently a spokesman for Just For Men hair products and a color commentator for telecasts of New York Knicks' games. Walter "Clyde" Frazier (born March 29, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a former basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

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