Elgin Baylor

Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, DC) was one of the most graceful and acrobatic forwards to ever play the game of basketball playing 13 seasons for the NBA's Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers.

Elgin Baylor played college basketball at the College of Idaho and Seattle University, leading the SU Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958 (where they lost to the Kentucky Wildcats). Following his junior season, Baylor joined the Minneapolis Lakers for the 1958-1959 season and moving with them to Los Angeles in 1960.

In 1959, Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and from the 1960-61 to the 1962-63 seasons, he averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals eight times (although never winning). Baylor was a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and went to the NBA All-Star Game 11 times.

Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963-64 season and, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same player, never averaging above 30 points per game again. During Baylor's career, the Lakers were a consistently powerful team, but were continuously overshadowed by the Boston Celtics dynasty of the time.

Baylor finally retired during the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. He finished his career with an astonishing 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games.

In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86-135 record and retired following the 1978-79 season. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers as the team's vice president of basketball operations, where he still is today.

In 1977, Baylor was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame and in 1980 he was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team and again in 1996, he was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team.

Baylor ranked #11 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003.


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Baylor ranked #11 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003. Directed by skateboarder turned documentary producer Stacey Peralta (best known for the skating documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys), Riding Giants includes interviews with many of the surfers mentioned in this article. In 1977, Baylor was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame and in 1980 he was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team and again in 1996, he was named to the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team. Jeff Clark and Maverick's are featured in the 2004 film Riding Giants, which documents the history of big wave surfing. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers as the team's vice president of basketball operations, where he still is today. On this day Powerlines Productions was born. In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86-135 record and retired following the 1978-79 season. On this memorable swell they joined forces and produced the mini documentary 'twelveleven'.

He finished his career with an astonishing 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games. On December 11, 1998, during a big Northwest open ocean swell reaching 20-25 feet, Curt Myers was shooting from the water and Eric was shooting from land. Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA Championship that season, something that Baylor never achieved. Meanwhile Curt Myers, another local filmmaker, had produced 'Shifting Peaks' and 'Heavy Water' 94/95. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins. In 1998 he produced another big wave documentary 'Twenty Feet Under'. His retirement resulted in two great ironies. Eric's first movie was 'High Noon at Low Tide' 1994/2005.

Baylor finally retired during the 1971-72 season because of his nagging knee problems. This would be the genesis of the Powerlines Productions empire that showcases big wave surfing around the Globe. During Baylor's career, the Lakers were a consistently powerful team, but were continuously overshadowed by the Boston Celtics dynasty of the time. Eric was shooting for his community access television show 'Powerlines Surf-Spots'. Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963-64 season and, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same player, never averaging above 30 points per game again. On that sunny day Jeff Clark paddled out with Dave Schmidt and Tom Powers. Baylor was a 10-time All-NBA First Team selection and went to the NBA All-Star Game 11 times. Nelson in February of 1990.

In 1959, Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and from the 1960-61 to the 1962-63 seasons, he averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, leading the Lakers to the NBA Finals eight times (although never winning). The first video images were shot by Eric W. Following his junior season, Baylor joined the Minneapolis Lakers for the 1958-1959 season and moving with them to Los Angeles in 1960. The 2005 winner was Anthony Tashnick. Elgin Baylor played college basketball at the College of Idaho and Seattle University, leading the SU Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958 (where they lost to the Kentucky Wildcats). In 2004, with Darryl Virostko, Matt Ambrose, Evan Slater, Anthony Tashnick, Peter Mel, and Grant Washburn placing in spots first through sixth. Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, DC) was one of the most graceful and acrobatic forwards to ever play the game of basketball playing 13 seasons for the NBA's Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers. The second competition was held the following year and put Darryl Virostko, Kelly Slater, Tony Ray, Peter Mel, Zach Wormhoudt, and Matt Ambrose in first through sixth places.

The competition resulted in Darryl Virostko ("Flea"), Richard Schmidt, Ross Clarke-Jones, and Peter Mel taking first, second, third, and fourth places, respectively. The first big-wave surfing contest at Maverick's was held in 1999. Foo's death gave Maverick's more publicity and also prompted the formation of the Maverick's Water Patrol. A few hours later his body was found floating just under the surface.

Hawaiian big-wave legend Mark Foo died when he caught an edge on a midsize wave and fell. Unfortunately, the occasion is remembered for its tragic outcome. As news of Maverick's spread, many big-wave surfers came and surfed the new break. Over the next couple years, more photos of Maverick's began showing up in surfing magazines, and before long, filmmaker Gary Mederios released a movie about Maverick's, Waves of Adventure in the Red Triangle.

This event triggered a flood of interest in Maverick's as surfers realized that world-class big waves could be found in California. In 1990, a photo of Maverick's taken by Steve Tadin, a friend of Clark, was published in Surfer magazine. John Raymond, from Pacifica, and Mark Renneker, from San Francisco, surfed Maverick's a few days later. The next two people to surf at Maverick's, on January 22, 1990, in the company of Clark, were Dave Schmidt (brother of big wave legend Richard Schmidt) and Tom Powers, both from Santa Cruz.

The popular opinion of the time was that there simply were no large waves in California. Other than a few close friends who had paddled out and seen Maverick's themselves, no one believed in its existence. For the next 15 years, Clark continued surfing Maverick's alone. He was successful, catching a number of left-breaking waves, the first person to tackle Maverick's head-on.

One day in 1975, with the waves topping out at 10 to 12 feet, the safest conditions possible for trying out the surf, Clark paddled out alone to face Maverick's. He spent time watching the break, and saw the possibility of riding Hawaii-sized waves right there in Northern California. Jeff Clark, growing up near Pillar Point, learned about Maverick's at an early age, that it was too dangerous to surf. It became known as "Maverick's Point", and later simply "Maverick's".

They decided to name the point after Maverick, who seemed to have gotten the most out of the experience. The riders had limited success that day, surfing the tail end of the break and generally deeming the conditions too dangerous. Finding the conditions too unsafe for the dog, Matienzo paddled back in and tied Maverick to the car bumper, before rejoining the others. The trio left Maverick on shore, but he swam out and caught up with them.

Maverick was used to swimming out with his owner, or with Matienzo, while they were out surfing. With them was a white-haired german shepherd named Maverick, owned by a roommate of Matienzo. In early March of 1961, three surfers, Alex Matienzo, Jim Thompson, and Dick Knottmeyer, decided to try the distant waves off Pillar Point. .

An invitation-only contest is held there every few winters, depending on wave conditions. Very few riders become big wave surfers; and of those, only a select few are willing to risk the hazardous conditions at Maverick's. Mavericks is a destination for some of the world's premier big wave surfers. The break is caused by an unusually-shaped underwater rock formation.

After a strong winter storm has occurred in the northern Pacific Ocean, waves can routinely crest at over 25 feet (8m) and top out at over 50 feet (15m). It is located approximately one-half mile (0.8km) from shore in Pillar Point Harbor, just north of Half Moon Bay. Maverick's or Mavericks is a world-famous surfing location in Northern California. Matt Warshaw: Maverick's: the story of big-wave surfing, Chronicle Books, ISBN 081182652X.

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