Eddie Bauer

Eddie Bauer is an outdoor clothing and sporting goods chain. Headquartered in Redmond, Washington and a subsidiary of Eddie Bauer Holdings (formerly Spiegel, Inc.), the company was founded in Seattle in 1920 as "Eddie Bauer's Sport Shop" by its namesake, Eddie Bauer (1899 – 1986), who invented the first down parka in 1936 (U.S. Design Patent 119,122)[1]. Bauer retired and sold the company in 1968; General Mills bought Eddie Bauer in 1971, and Spiegel bought it from General Mills in 1988.

In 2003, Spiegel, Inc., entered bankruptcy. The Spiegel catalog and all other assets were sold, except for Eddie Bauer. In May 2005, Spiegel, Inc., emerged from bankruptcy under the name "Eddie Bauer Holdings" and owned primarily by Commerzbank.

Eddie Bauer's flagship store is in downtown Seattle's Pacific Place mall.

Trivia

Eddie Bauer has a contract with the Ford Motor Company to implement signature interior design on the Ford Explorer, Ford Bronco, Ford Excursion, Ford Expedition, and Ford F-150. Ford vehicles that feature the Eddie Bauer insignia have special seat styling features including signature stitching).



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. Many popular Fleer sets (like "Ultra"), have continued without skipping a year or dramatically changing their design. Ford vehicles that feature the Eddie Bauer insignia have special seat styling features including signature stitching). In late 2005 Upper Deck began producing basketball and football cards under it's acquired Fleer name. Eddie Bauer has a contract with the Ford Motor Company to implement signature interior design on the Ford Explorer, Ford Bronco, Ford Excursion, Ford Expedition, and Ford F-150. In 2004, Fleer announced that it would cease all productions of trading cards. Eddie Bauer's flagship store is in downtown Seattle's Pacific Place mall. Fleer and another company, Donruss, were thus allowed to begin making cards in 1981.

In May 2005, Spiegel, Inc., emerged from bankruptcy under the name "Eddie Bauer Holdings" and owned primarily by Commerzbank. After several years of litigation, the court ordered the union to offer group licenses for baseball cards to companies other than Topps. The Spiegel catalog and all other assets were sold, except for Eddie Bauer. Topps refused, and Fleer then sued both Topps and the MLBPA to break the Topps monopoly. In 2003, Spiegel, Inc., entered bankruptcy. In April 1975, Fleer asked for Topps to waive its exclusive rights and allow Fleer to produce stickers, stamps, or other small items featuring active baseball players. Bauer retired and sold the company in 1968; General Mills bought Eddie Bauer in 1971, and Spiegel bought it from General Mills in 1988. The union, also fearing that it would cut into existing royalties from Topps sales, then rejected the proposal.

Design Patent 119,122)[1]. Topps passed on the opportunity, indicating that it did not think the product would be successful. Headquartered in Redmond, Washington and a subsidiary of Eddie Bauer Holdings (formerly Spiegel, Inc.), the company was founded in Seattle in 1920 as "Eddie Bauer's Sport Shop" by its namesake, Eddie Bauer (1899 – 1986), who invented the first down parka in 1936 (U.S. By now, the MLBPA had settled its differences with Topps and reached an agreement that gave Topps a right of first refusal on such offers. Eddie Bauer is an outdoor clothing and sporting goods chain. Fleer returned to the union in September 1974 with a proposal to sell 5-by-7-inch satin patches of players, somewhat larger than normal baseball cards. Since this was so far in the future, Fleer declined the proposal.

The MLBPA was in a dispute with Topps over player contracts, and offered Fleer the exclusive rights to market cards of most players starting in 1973, when many of Topps's contracts would expire. In 1968, Fleer was approached by the Major League Baseball Players Association, a recently organized players' union, about obtaining a group license to produce cards. The decision gave Topps an effective monopoly of the baseball card market. However, Fleer chose not to pursue such options and instead sold its remaining player contracts to Topps for $395,000 in 1966.

The Commission concluded that because the contracts only covered the sale of cards with gum, competition was still possible by selling cards with other small, low-cost products. A hearing examiner ruled against Topps in 1965, but the Commission reversed this decision on appeal. The complaint focused on the baseball card market, alleging that Topps was engaging in unfair competition through its aggregation of exclusive contracts. The company now turned its efforts to supporting an administrative complaint filed against Topps by the Federal Trade Commission.

This left Fleer with no product in either baseball or football. In 1964, however, Philadelphia Gum secured the rights for NFL cards and Topps took over the AFL. The next year reverted to the status quo, with Fleer covering the AFL and Topps the NFL. In 1961, each company produced cards featuring players from both leagues.

Fleer produced a set for the AFL while Topps cards covered the established National Football League. Meanwhile, Fleer took advantage of the emergence of the American Football League in 1960 to begin producing football cards. However, Topps still held onto the rights of most players and the set was not particularly successful. Wills and Jimmy Piersall served as player representatives for Fleer, helping to bring others on board.

This 67-card set included a number of stars, including 1962 National League MVP Maury Wills (then holder of the modern record for stolen bases in a season), who had elected to sign with Fleer instead of Topps. The company did not produce new cards the next year, but continued selling the 1961 set while it focused on signing enough players to produce a set featuring active players in 1963. One set was produced in 1960 and a second in 1961. However, Fleer continued to produce baseball cards by featuring Williams with other mostly retired players in a Baseball Greats series.

Williams was nearing the end of his career and retired after the 1960 season. Fleer was unable to include other players because another company, Topps, had signed most active baseball players to exclusive contracts. It began by signing baseball star Ted Williams to a contract in 1959 and sold an 80-card set oriented around highlights of his career. Well-established as a gum and candy company, Fleer followed some of its competitors into the business of selling sports cards.

One negative aspect associated with Fleer's bankruptcy is that many sports card collectors now own redemption cards for autographs and memorabilia that may not be able to be redeemed. Competitor Upper Deck won the Fleer name, as well as their die cast toy business, at a price of $6.1 million. The move included the auction of the Fleer trade name, as well as other holdings. By early July, in a move similar to declaring bankruptcy, the company began to liquidate its assets to repay creditors.

In late May 2005, news circulated that Fleer was suspending its trading card operations immediately. In 1998, 70-year-old Dubble Bubble was acquired by Canadian company Concord Confections and Concord, in turn, was acquired by Chicago-based Tootsie Roll Industries in 2004. In 1995, Fleer acquired the trading card company SkyBox International and it closed its Philadelphia plant(where Dubble Bubble was made for 67 years). Fleer became known as a maker of sports cards, and has also produced some non-sports trading cards.

Its pink color set a tradition for nearly all bubble gums to follow. In 1928, Fleer employee Walter Diemer improved the Blibber-Blubber formulation to produce the first commercially successful bubblegum, Dubble Bubble. Unfortunately, while this gum was capable of being blown into bubbles, in other respects it was vastly inferior to regular chewing gum, and Blibber-Blubber was never marketed to the public. Fleer originally developed a bubblegum formulation called Blibber-Blubber in 1906.

Bought out by comic-book empire Marvel in 1992, it is now a part of Upper Deck. Fleer in the mid-19th century, was the first company to successfully manufacture bubblegum. The Fleer Corporation, founded by Frank H.

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