Dora the Explorer

Dora the Explorer (left) and Boots are the series' protagonists. The Grumpy Old Troll lives under a bridge and requires Dora and Boots to solve a riddle in order to cross it.

Dora the Explorer is an American animated television series for preschool-age children that is broadcast on Nickelodeon in the United States. A pilot episode for this series aired in 1999. Dora the Explorer became a regular series in 2000. The show was created by Chris Gifford, Valerie Walsh, and Eric Weiner. The series not only on Nick, but also on CBS on Saturday mornings and Noggin as well.

Characters

Dora

Dora the Explorer tells the story of Dora Marquez, a seven-year old Latina who ventures forth on various simple but important quests. Dora's exact national origin remains vague because no specific Latin American country is ever mentioned. In any case, Dora speaks both Spanish and English. The location of Dora's home is also vague (however, most episodes show palm trees and mountains in the background so it is likely to be California or Mexico). Dora involves the other protagonists and the viewer of the show in the quest. At the end of each episode, Dora celebrates the completion of the quest with a song ("We Did It") and asks what the viewer's favorite obstacle or encounter was. Dora is voiced by Kathleen Herles. Dora's name is taken from the Spanish word Exploradora, which means explorer.

Boots

Dora's sidekick and best friend is Boots, a talking monkey who is 5½ years old. He wears red boots and loves to hold Dora's hand. Boots is voiced by Harrison Chad.

Swiper

Dora's quests are often complicated by a villainous fox named Swiper. Swiper is a masked thief. He usually attempts to steal an item which is necessary for Dora and Boots to complete their quest. In order to prevent Swiper from stealing whatever item Dora and Boots are carrying at the time, Dora first asks the audience if they see Swiper, then she leads them in saying, "Swiper, no swiping!" three times. In response, Swiper disappointedly snaps his fingers and says, "Oh, man!". However, if Dora and Boots fail to repeat the phrase in time, Swiper steals the item, throws it somewhere and gloats, "You're too late!" Dora and Boots must then retrieve the item so the quest can continue. Sometimes the retrieval of the item is itself the quest. Swiper is voiced by Marc Weiner.

Diego

Some more recently produced episodes have introduced Dora's cousin Diego, voiced by Felipe Dieppa. Diego is an intrepid young animal rescue worker and sometimes partners with Dora in her adventures. He has proved popular enough that Nickelodeon introduced a separate Diego series entitled Go, Diego, Go! in 2005.

Other characters

Other recurring human characters include Dora's mother (mami), father (papi), and grandmother (abuela). There are a number of minor, recurring animal characters such as Señor Tucan, Isa the iguana, Benny the bull, and Tico the squirrel. These characters can speak either Spanish or English. Additionally, the show features a number of anthropomorphic props, notably Dora's fat and ever-hungry backpack and the always-talking map. Sometimes there are also locomotives, boats and automobiles with speaking roles.

Educational value

The episodes are used to demonstrate and practice skills such as decision-making, following directions, mathematics (usually counting), music, physical coordination, and Anglo-Spanish bilingualism. While geography isn't directly taught, the concept of using a map to find one's way around is.

Dora the Explorer is currently still being produced. Dora and her companions are the subject of numerous books and other merchandise for children. The show is generally in English, although it is peppered with simple Spanish phrases in an effort to give young viewers a rather limited multicultural experience.

Foreign language versions of Dora the Explorer

As with most animated series made in the US, Dora the Explorer has been dubbed into many languages all over the world. The simplicity and repetitious nature of the episodes make this series especially well-suited for learning important phrases in a foreign language.

Spanish dub

In the Spanish language version, Dora la Exploradora, broadcast on the Telemundo network, Dora and Boots are speaking Spanish and other protagonists speaking and answering in English. Some Spanish episodes are available to US customers on VHS, and some DVDs have a Spanish track (including Dora's Egg Hunt).

French dub

In the French language version, Dora l'exploratrice, broadcast on the private French TV channel TF1, the bilingualism is Anglo-French, with Dora and Boots speaking French and other protagonists speaking and answering in English. Some French episodes are available to US customers on VHS from http://www.amazon.ca.

Japanese dub

In the Japanese language version, broadcast on Nick Japan, the bilingualism is Anglo-Japanese, with Dora and Boots speaking Japanese and other protagonists speaking and answering in English.

German dub

In the German language version, broadcast on the recently restarted German branch of Nickelodeon, the bilingualism is Anglo-German, analogously to the French and Japanese Version.

Irish dub

In the Irish language version, broadcast on the Irish Language station TG4, the bilingualism is Irish-Spanish, with Dora and Boots speaking in Irish and some other characters speaking Spanish as in the original.

Dutch dub

In the Dutch language version, broadcast on Nickelodeon (TV channel), the bilingualism is Dutch-English.

Dora the Explorer merchandise

Currently Cheerios is offering free Dora the Explorer the Game CDROMs in specially marked packages. However, customers in Quebec will only be able to use the French version. Also, there are many action figures and playsets available in many markets.

Trivia

Dora the Explorer became the first Latina balloon character in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, November 24th, 2005. It was the 79th anniversary of the parade.

Popularity

On one episode of Foster's Home for Imaginary friends, there is a Dora parody that Eduardo watches called Lauren is Explorin'.


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On one episode of Foster's Home for Imaginary friends, there is a Dora parody that Eduardo watches called Lauren is Explorin'. He is then reborn (albeit in a currently unknown fashion). It was the 79th anniversary of the parade. In the same vein, Jordan Collier (note his initials JC), whose intentions and methods are also grey, is killed by a sniper, and after his funeral, his body miraculously disappears. Dora the Explorer became the first Latina balloon character in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, November 24th, 2005. While Isabelle might sometimes seem like a Christ-like figure, she is certainly not. Also, there are many action figures and playsets available in many markets. The baby Isabelle, believed by some to be the future savior of mankind, has no qualms about violently killing people who get in her way.

However, customers in Quebec will only be able to use the French version. The show's content has subtle Christian undertones, although not in a way that one would take it to be proselytizing. Currently Cheerios is offering free Dora the Explorer the Game CDROMs in specially marked packages. The 4400 people who disappear do so in a rapture like fashion. In the Dutch language version, broadcast on Nickelodeon (TV channel), the bilingualism is Dutch-English. The name of the show itself might be an allusion to the belief held by Jehovah's Witnesses that only 144,000 people will be allowed into heaven. In the Irish language version, broadcast on the Irish Language station TG4, the bilingualism is Irish-Spanish, with Dora and Boots speaking in Irish and some other characters speaking Spanish as in the original. One former member of the 4400 Center accused it of making him take endless for-pay classes until he was bankrupted, at which point he was ejected from the program; Scientology has had similar accusations pointed at it.

In the German language version, broadcast on the recently restarted German branch of Nickelodeon, the bilingualism is Anglo-German, analogously to the French and Japanese Version. The 4400 Center targets celebrities for inclusion and promotes them through the program faster than non-celebrity members; the Church of Scientology definitely intentionally draws celebrities with its "Celebrity Centers". In the Japanese language version, broadcast on Nick Japan, the bilingualism is Anglo-Japanese, with Dora and Boots speaking Japanese and other protagonists speaking and answering in English. The 4400 Center includes technological devices strapped onto its members during courses, similar to Scientology's E-Meters. Some French episodes are available to US customers on VHS from http://www.amazon.ca. At least one 4400 Center attendee has had his psychological medication confiscated, much as the Church of Scientology is opposed to psychology and its medications. In the French language version, Dora l'exploratrice, broadcast on the private French TV channel TF1, the bilingualism is Anglo-French, with Dora and Boots speaking French and other protagonists speaking and answering in English. The 4400 Center promises supernatural abilities to those who follow its training through for-pay courses, much as the Church of Scientology promises, though Scientology is not as forthcoming about its promises of supernatural powers.

Some Spanish episodes are available to US customers on VHS, and some DVDs have a Spanish track (including Dora's Egg Hunt). The 4400 Center run by Jordan Collier seems intended to resemble the real-world Church of Scientology. In the Spanish language version, Dora la Exploradora, broadcast on the Telemundo network, Dora and Boots are speaking Spanish and other protagonists speaking and answering in English. Production of a third season is scheduled to begin in Vancouver in early 2006, and will be premiering in the summer. The simplicity and repetitious nature of the episodes make this series especially well-suited for learning important phrases in a foreign language. This serum neutralized the charge so the inhibitor isn't able to cross membranes and can be flushed out of the body. As with most animated series made in the US, Dora the Explorer has been dubbed into many languages all over the world. A serum was created that contained pure promicin.

The show is generally in English, although it is peppered with simple Spanish phrases in an effort to give young viewers a rather limited multicultural experience. It's a binding protein. Dora and her companions are the subject of numerous books and other merchandise for children. It entered the brain through facilitated diffusion. Dora the Explorer is currently still being produced. The promicin-inhibitor would piggyback on glucose. While geography isn't directly taught, the concept of using a map to find one's way around is. This plot element uses the "Ten Percent Myth", which modern science has disproven..

The episodes are used to demonstrate and practice skills such as decision-making, following directions, mathematics (usually counting), music, physical coordination, and Anglo-Spanish bilingualism. Promicin's behavior and effect are unpredictable, potentially giving any ability. Sometimes there are also locomotives, boats and automobiles with speaking roles. Every 4400 produces a fifth neurotransmitter called Promicin that enables him or her to use parts of the cerebellum no human has ever had access to. Additionally, the show features a number of anthropomorphic props, notably Dora's fat and ever-hungry backpack and the always-talking map. Apparently the body produces four main neurotransmitters that control and regulate everything. These characters can speak either Spanish or English. The abilities of the 4400 derive from activating dormant neural pathways.

There are a number of minor, recurring animal characters such as Señor Tucan, Isa the iguana, Benny the bull, and Tico the squirrel. Several other members of the 4400 feature in specific storylines:. Other recurring human characters include Dora's mother (mami), father (papi), and grandmother (abuela). The main characters are:. He has proved popular enough that Nickelodeon introduced a separate Diego series entitled Go, Diego, Go! in 2005. The series follows the lives and stories of a select few of the 4400. Diego is an intrepid young animal rescue worker and sometimes partners with Dora in her adventures. (It worked on the majority of the group, but not those who were later seen with powers.) The inhibitor caused a potentially fatal immune system condition in the returnees, forcing the government to inject all surviving returnees with replacement promicin; it is hinted that all of them will now exhibit powers.

Some more recently produced episodes have introduced Dora's cousin Diego, voiced by Felipe Dieppa. The government, afraid of what this large group would do with such power, secretly dosed all 4400 with a promicin inhibitor. Swiper is voiced by Marc Weiner. At the end of the second season, it was revealed that all 4400 had a new neurotransmitter called "promicin" in their brains; it was this which gave some of them their powers. Sometimes the retrieval of the item is itself the quest. At the end of the first season, we learn that the 4400 were abducted, not by aliens, but by someone in Earth's future, and that they were returned in order to prevent some sort of catastrophe. However, if Dora and Boots fail to repeat the phrase in time, Swiper steals the item, throws it somewhere and gloats, "You're too late!" Dora and Boots must then retrieve the item so the quest can continue. In addition, one of the 4400 had become pregnant between her disapperance and return.

In response, Swiper disappointedly snaps his fingers and says, "Oh, man!". More significantly, a small number of the returnees begin to manifest paranormal abilities, such as telekinesis, telepathy, precognition, and much stranger ones. In order to prevent Swiper from stealing whatever item Dora and Boots are carrying at the time, Dora first asks the audience if they see Swiper, then she leads them in saying, "Swiper, no swiping!" three times. Most have trouble trying to get their lives back on track after being separated from their world for years. He usually attempts to steal an item which is necessary for Dora and Boots to complete their quest. (A real-life NTAC now exists as well; however, it is specifically part of the Secret Service division of the Department of Homeland Security, and the "C" stands for "Center" instead of "Command".). Swiper is a masked thief. The series mainly follows two of them, as well as their immediate superior:.

Dora's quests are often complicated by a villainous fox named Swiper. There are a multitude of agents assigned to the case. Boots is voiced by Harrison Chad. NTAC (National Threat Assessment Command), a division of the Department of Homeland Security, is formed in response to the return of the 4400. He wears red boots and loves to hold Dora's hand. . Dora's sidekick and best friend is Boots, a talking monkey who is 5½ years old. After their return, none have aged, all are disoriented, and they remember nothing between the time of their disappearance and their return.

Dora's name is taken from the Spanish word Exploradora, which means explorer. All of the 4,400 had disappeared at various points starting from 1941 in a beam of white light. Dora is voiced by Kathleen Herles. In the pilot episode, what is originally thought to be a comet deposits a group of exactly four thousand, four hundred people in the Seattle, Washington region. At the end of each episode, Dora celebrates the completion of the quest with a song ("We Did It") and asks what the viewer's favorite obstacle or encounter was. The series is filmed in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Dora involves the other protagonists and the viewer of the show in the quest. The 4400 is produced by Paramount Network Television in Association with Sky Television for Sky One, Renegade 83 and American Zoetrope for USA Network.

The location of Dora's home is also vague (however, most episodes show palm trees and mountains in the background so it is likely to be California or Mexico). The theme song of the show is "A Place in Time" written by Robert Phillips & Tim Paruskewitz, performed by Amanda Abizaid. In any case, Dora speaks both Spanish and English. It stars Joel Gretsch and Jacqueline McKenzie. Dora's exact national origin remains vague because no specific Latin American country is ever mentioned. It was created and written by Scott Peters and René Echevarria. Dora the Explorer tells the story of Dora Marquez, a seven-year old Latina who ventures forth on various simple but important quests. Production on thirteen new episodes for a third season has begun for a summer 2006 premiere.

. It began as a miniseries of five episodes, which aired weekly from July 11 to August 8, 2004; a second season of twelve episodes began airing on June 5, 2005 and concluded on August 28, 2005. The series not only on Nick, but also on CBS on Saturday mornings and Noggin as well. The 4400 is a science fiction program on the USA Network, Space: The Imagination Station and Sky One. The show was created by Chris Gifford, Valerie Walsh, and Eric Weiner. New Zealand: TV3 (New Zealand). Dora the Explorer became a regular series in 2000. Turkey: CNBC-e.

A pilot episode for this series aired in 1999. Brazil: NBC's Universal Channel. Dora the Explorer is an American animated television series for preschool-age children that is broadcast on Nickelodeon in the United States. Norway: TV3. The Netherlands: Talpa. United States: USA Network.

United Kingdom: Sky One. Germany: ProSieben. France: M6. Australia: Network Ten.

Switzerland: TSR. Canada: Space. [1]. Early marketing for the series included stencilled graffiti in public places across San Francisco, Houston, and Boston raising ire among residents.

The second season was aired weekly but taken off air halfway through the season, but continued to air in New Zealand. In Australia and New Zealand the first series was shown as a miniseries of 3 episodes. Vehicles from DaimlerChrysler's Chrysler Group, such as the Dodge Durango and Chrysler 300, appear frequently in the show being driven by members of NTAC. Nate McCullough, disappeared September 8, 2000.

Werner Loecher, disappeared April 19,1973. Matthew Lombard, disappeared May 30,1977. Rose Woodard, disappeared December 1,1991. Paranormal abilities: Increases the levels of adrenaline or other hormones (causing elevated levels of rage) in males within a certain radius through sonic means.

Kim, disappeared February 2, 1998. T.J. Laurel Bryce, disappeared January 7, 1982. Sara James, disappeared November 5, 1971.

(Deceased). Roger Wolcott, disappeared March 6, 1987. Paranormal abilities: Could heal fetuses in utero (but causes progressive damage to self). Edwin Mayuya, aka Edwin Musinga, doctor, disappeared February 24, 1996.

(Deceased) Paranormal abilities: sores on hands released plague-like disease (airborne, disappears in about half an hour, goes through biohazard gear). Jean DeLynn Baker, disappeared October 27, 1999. Paranormal abilities: Unlocked artistic potential in certain students in her classes. Heather Tobey, school teacher, disappeared March 2, 1974.

Eric Papequash, disappeared August 5, 1955. (Deceased) Paranormal abilities: Could revive dead plants. Mary Deneville, disappeared August 4, 1999. Given to her by the future so she can develop a relationship with Tom Baldwin to sustain him through the "coming troubles.".

Paranormal abilities: Ability to create an alternate reality. Artist (and debatably museum director). Alana Mareva, disappeared September 5, 2001. He was shot during apprehension, but lived.

The ability does cause Orson to suffer nosebleeds, and he has shown an inability to control this power. glass, bones). Paranormal abilities: Telekinesis of a magnitude to cause tremors in immediate vicinity and shatter objects (e.g. Insurance Salesman and partner in Kensington & Bailey.

Orson Bailey, disappeared June 11, 1979, from Tacoma, WA. Paranormal abilities: Saliva contains an agent that rapidly accelerates the metabolism of others. A telemarketer. Trent Appelbaum, disappeared May 18, 1989.

Paranormal abilities: Is able to hear the thoughts of others. A baseball player. Gary Navarro,disappeared January 5, 1973. Paranormal abilities: Ability to compel others to help her build a device, the plans for which have been planted in her head.

A mental patient. Tess Doerner, disappeared April 3, 1955. Paranormal abilities: Mind control/suggestion via speech. Captured and imprisoned in soundproof cell.

Oliver Knox, disappeared August 22, 1983, from Friday Harbor, WA, a suspected serial killer. Paranormal abilities: Enhanced reflexes and strength. A supermarket employee (Deceased). Carl Morrisey, disappeared February 16, 2003, from Seattle, WA.

Note that many of these powers duplicate those from among the 4400. Paranormal abilities: Telepathic communication (with Lily Moore, Richard Tyler, and Jordan Collier), mind control, materialization projection, alteration (Jordan Collier's injury, Lily Moore's first daughter's spleen) and/or acceleration of biological growth (the growth of berries in one episode and herself in the Season 2 finale), precognition (warned Lily of a bomb before it exploded), telekinesis (the bending trees in the final scene of Season 1). At the end of the season finale she ages considerably and shows up in Shawn's office, naked. As the only 4400 not affected by the ability-inhibitor, she provides blood used to heal Shawn Farrell and consequently all 4400s, activating their abilities.

Technically not one of "The 4400" returned (she was still in the womb at the time of the count). Isabelle Tyler-Moore, born post-return, daughter of Richard Tyler and Lily Moore. Also, after being assassinated, he disappears and reappears alive at the very end of the second season finale. Possibly enhanced power of suggestion over other people, but this could just be a personality trait.

Paranormal abilities: unknown. Jordan Collier, disappeared April 10, 2002, from Seattle, WA area, a former real estate mogul. Paranormal abilities: precognition. Maia Rutledge, disappeared March 3, 1946, at age 8, from Crescent City, CA.

Paranormal abilities: Healer and life taker. Shawn Farrell, disappeared April 22, 2001, at age 17, from Highland Beach, WA. Paranormal abilities: None Known. Returned pregnant, but not by Brian, rather by Richard Tyler.

At time of abduction, married to Brian Moore, mother to Heidi Moore. Louis, MO. Lily Moore, disappeared in 1993, at age 26, from St. Paranormal abilities: apparent telekinesis.

Father of Lily Moore's second daughter, Isabelle. At the time, in a relationship with Lily Moore's grandmother, Lily Bonham. Louis, MO. Originally from St.

Richard Tyler, disappeared May 11, 1951, at age 29, while in South Korea during the Korean War. Ryland is succeeded by Nina Jarvis in season two, but he takes his role back as a guest star on the 11th and 12th (season finale) episodes of season two. Dennis Ryland: Baldwin's and Skouris's supervisor and director of the Seattle bureau of NTAC during season one. In the first episode of season 2, Diana adopts Maia Rutledge.

The eight-year old pre-cog Maia asks to move in with her at some point in season 1. Diana Skouris: Tom's partner. Kyle was in a coma for three years, and after being awoken is troubled by blackouts. Tom Baldwin: Baldwin's nephew is Shawn Farrell; Shawn was with Baldwin's son Kyle Baldwin during the abduction.

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