Dodge Dakota

The Dakota is a midsize pickup truck from DaimlerChrysler's Dodge brand. It was introduced in 1987 alongside the redesigned Dodge Ram 50. The Dakota was nominated for the North American Truck of the Year award for 2000.

The Dakota has always been sized above the compact (Ford Ranger, Chevrolet S-10) and below the full-sized (Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado) pickups and Dodge's own Ram. It is a conventional design with body-on-frame construction and leaf spring/live axle rear end. The Dakota has also long been the only midsize pickup with an optional V8 engine. One notable feature was the Dakota's rack and pinion steering, a first in work trucks.

1987

The first generation of the Dakota was produced from 1987 through 1996. Straight-4 and V6 engines were offered along with either a 5-speed manual or 4-speed automatic transmission. Four wheel drive was available only with the V6. Both 6.5 ft (2 m) and 8 ft (2.4 m) beds were offered. Fuel injection was added to the 3.9 L V6 for 1988 but the output remained the same.

1989 saw the unusual Dakota convertible. The first convertible pickup since the Ford Model T, it featured a fixed roll bar and complicated manual top. Just 2,482 were sold that first year. Another important addition that year was Carroll Shelby's V8-powered Shelby Dakota, his first rear wheel drive vehicle in two decades.

An extended "Club Cab" model was added for 1990, still with two doors. This model allowed the Dakota to boast capacity for six passengers, although the rear seat was best suited for children and shorter adults.

For 1991, the front of the Dakota received a more aerodynamic grille and hood, and Dodge added the 5.2 L V8 as an option, inspired by the earlier Shelby Dakota option. This engine produced 170 hp (127 kW). Both of the V-configuration engines were updated to Magnum specs the next year, providing a tremendous power boost.

In 1996, the first generation's final year, the K-based 2.5 L I4 engine was out of production and had been considered vastly underpowered compared to the competition, so Dodge borrowed the Jeep 2.5 L I4 (rated at 120 hp) and installed it as the base engine in the Dakota. It was the only major change for 1996, and would be carried over as the base engine in the new, larger 1997 model.

Engines:

  • 1987-1988 - 2.2 L K I4, SOHC, 96 hp (72 kW)
  • 1987-1991 - 3.9 L LA V6, 125 hp (93 kW)
  • 1989-1995 - 2.5 L K I4, 99 hp (74 kW)
  • 1991 - 5.2 L LA V8, 170 hp (127 kW)
  • 1992-1993 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 180 hp (134 kW)
  • 1991-1993 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • 1994-1996 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW)
  • 1994-1996 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 220 hp (164 kW)
  • 1996 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW)

1997

The second-generation Dakota was built from 1997 through 2004. It inherited the semi truck look of the larger Ram but remained largely the same underneath. 1998 saw the introduction of the R/T model with the big 5.9 L 250 hp (186 kW) Magnum V8.

Four-door "Quad-Cab" models were added for 2000 with a slightly shorter bed, 63.1 in (160.2 cm), but riding on the Club Cab's 130.9 in (332.5 cm) wheelbase. The smaller V8 was replaced by a new high-tech V8 as well.

2002 was the final year for the four-cylinder engine in the Dakota, as Chrysler was ending production of the former AMC design. Most buyers ordered the V6 or V8 engines, which were considerably more powerful and, in the case of the V6, which was made standard for 2003, nearly as fuel-efficient with a manual transmission.

2004 was the end of the old OHV V6 and the big R/T V8.

Engines:

  • 1997-2002 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • 1997-2003 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW)
  • 1997-1999 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • 1998-2003 - 5.9 L Magnum V8, 250 hp (186 kW)
  • 2000-2004 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (175 kW)
  • 2004 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW)

2005

The redesigned 2005 Dakota shares its platform with the new Dodge Durango SUV. This model is 3.7 in longer and 2.7 in wider, and features a new front and rear suspension, and rack-and-pinion steering. There are one V6 and two V8 engines available: The standard engine is a 3.7 L PowerTech V6 (specs below). Two 4.7 L V8 engines are available as well. The Dakota is built at Warren Truck Assembly in Warren, Michigan.

Engines:
  • 2005 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW) at 5200 rpm and 235 ft·lbf (319 N·m) at 4000 rpm
  • 2005 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (172 kW) at 4400 rpm and 290 ft·lbf (393 N·m) at 3600 rpm
  • 2005 - 4.7 L HO PowerTech V8, 260 hp (194 kW) at 5200 rpm and 310 ft·lbf (420 N·m) at 5200 rpm

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The Dakota is built at Warren Truck Assembly in Warren, Michigan. Donruss also produced kids' favorite Bub's Daddy Bubble Gum [1] also [2], available during the 1970s. Two 4.7 L V8 engines are available as well. In 2006 Donruss/Leaf/Playoff will not be producing baseball cards because their license to do so has not been renewed by the MLBPA (Major League Baseball Player's Association). There are one V6 and two V8 engines available: The standard engine is a 3.7 L PowerTech V6 (specs below). Among them have been Dragon Ball Z, InuYasha, and Yu Yu Hakusho. This model is 3.7 in longer and 2.7 in wider, and features a new front and rear suspension, and rack-and-pinion steering. Donruss also produces anime related trading card games.

The redesigned 2005 Dakota shares its platform with the new Dodge Durango SUV. Donruss diversified in the early 1990s into football and hockey trading cards, and briefly discontinued its baseball card line during 1999 and 2000, returning in 2001. Engines:. During the same time frame, Donruss reduced its production, making its cards from the mid-1980s slightly more scarce than its earlier sets. 2004 was the end of the old OHV V6 and the big R/T V8. In 1983, Donruss was purchased by a Finnish company, who also bought candy producer Leaf Candy Company and merged the two firms. Most buyers ordered the V6 or V8 engines, which were considerably more powerful and, in the case of the V6, which was made standard for 2003, nearly as fuel-efficient with a manual transmission. However, even though both Donruss and Fleer printed their sets on higher quality bleached paper and with sharper photographs, Topps remained the industry leader.

2002 was the final year for the four-cylinder engine in the Dakota, as Chrysler was ending production of the former AMC design. Donruss returned for 1982 with a larger set, printed on heavier card stock and, given more time to market, a much smaller number of printing errors. The smaller V8 was replaced by a new high-tech V8 as well. Donruss responded by including three pieces of a jigsaw puzzle in its baseball card packs in place of gum. Four-door "Quad-Cab" models were added for 2000 with a slightly shorter bed, 63.1 in (160.2 cm), but riding on the Club Cab's 130.9 in (332.5 cm) wheelbase. During 1981 and 1982, Topps sought, successfully, to block Donruss and Fleer from selling baseball cards with bubble gum. 1998 saw the introduction of the R/T model with the big 5.9 L 250 hp (186 kW) Magnum V8. Both the Donruss and Fleer offerings were riddled with printing errors, which caused variations for collectors when they were fixed.

It inherited the semi truck look of the larger Ram but remained largely the same underneath. Riding the coattails of Fleer's victory in the courts ending Topps' monopoly on the baseball card market, Donruss secured a license in the winter of 1980 and rushed a set of baseball cards onto the market for 1981. The second-generation Dakota was built from 1997 through 2004. Since the entertainment market was not stable, Donruss sought to enter the lucrative baseball card market. Engines:. During the 1950s and 1960s the company grew, selling non-sports trading cards, before being bought by General Mills in 1969. It was the only major change for 1996, and would be carried over as the base engine in the new, larger 1997 model. The name is a conglomeration of the first names of its founders, Donald and Russell Weiner, who founded it in 1954.

In 1996, the first generation's final year, the K-based 2.5 L I4 engine was out of production and had been considered vastly underpowered compared to the competition, so Dodge borrowed the Jeep 2.5 L I4 (rated at 120 hp) and installed it as the base engine in the Dakota. Its Super Bubble is a popular brand of gum, and its line of baseball cards has been popular since its debut in 1981. Both of the V-configuration engines were updated to Magnum specs the next year, providing a tremendous power boost. brand of bubble gum and trading card. This engine produced 170 hp (127 kW). Donruss is a U.S. For 1991, the front of the Dakota received a more aerodynamic grille and hood, and Dodge added the 5.2 L V8 as an option, inspired by the earlier Shelby Dakota option.

This model allowed the Dakota to boast capacity for six passengers, although the rear seat was best suited for children and shorter adults. An extended "Club Cab" model was added for 1990, still with two doors. Another important addition that year was Carroll Shelby's V8-powered Shelby Dakota, his first rear wheel drive vehicle in two decades. Just 2,482 were sold that first year.

The first convertible pickup since the Ford Model T, it featured a fixed roll bar and complicated manual top. 1989 saw the unusual Dakota convertible. Fuel injection was added to the 3.9 L V6 for 1988 but the output remained the same. Both 6.5 ft (2 m) and 8 ft (2.4 m) beds were offered.

Four wheel drive was available only with the V6. Straight-4 and V6 engines were offered along with either a 5-speed manual or 4-speed automatic transmission. The first generation of the Dakota was produced from 1987 through 1996. .

One notable feature was the Dakota's rack and pinion steering, a first in work trucks. The Dakota has also long been the only midsize pickup with an optional V8 engine. It is a conventional design with body-on-frame construction and leaf spring/live axle rear end. The Dakota has always been sized above the compact (Ford Ranger, Chevrolet S-10) and below the full-sized (Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado) pickups and Dodge's own Ram.

The Dakota was nominated for the North American Truck of the Year award for 2000. It was introduced in 1987 alongside the redesigned Dodge Ram 50. The Dakota is a midsize pickup truck from DaimlerChrysler's Dodge brand. 2005 - 4.7 L HO PowerTech V8, 260 hp (194 kW) at 5200 rpm and 310 ft·lbf (420 N·m) at 5200 rpm.

2005 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (172 kW) at 4400 rpm and 290 ft·lbf (393 N·m) at 3600 rpm. 2005 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW) at 5200 rpm and 235 ft·lbf (319 N·m) at 4000 rpm. 2004 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW). 2000-2004 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (175 kW).

1998-2003 - 5.9 L Magnum V8, 250 hp (186 kW). 1997-1999 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW). 1997-2003 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW). 1997-2002 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW).

1996 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW). 1994-1996 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 220 hp (164 kW). 1994-1996 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW). 1991-1993 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW).

1992-1993 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 180 hp (134 kW). 1991 - 5.2 L LA V8, 170 hp (127 kW). 1989-1995 - 2.5 L K I4, 99 hp (74 kW). 1987-1991 - 3.9 L LA V6, 125 hp (93 kW).

1987-1988 - 2.2 L K I4, SOHC, 96 hp (72 kW).

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