Dodge Dakota

The Dakota is a midsize pickup truck from DaimlerChrysler's Dodge brand. It was introduced in 1987 alongside the redesigned Dodge Ram 50. The Dakota was nominated for the North American Truck of the Year award for 2000.

The Dakota has always been sized above the compact (Ford Ranger, Chevrolet S-10) and below the full-sized (Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado) pickups and Dodge's own Ram. It is a conventional design with body-on-frame construction and leaf spring/live axle rear end. The Dakota has also long been the only midsize pickup with an optional V8 engine. One notable feature was the Dakota's rack and pinion steering, a first in work trucks.

1987

The first generation of the Dakota was produced from 1987 through 1996. Straight-4 and V6 engines were offered along with either a 5-speed manual or 4-speed automatic transmission. Four wheel drive was available only with the V6. Both 6.5 ft (2 m) and 8 ft (2.4 m) beds were offered. Fuel injection was added to the 3.9 L V6 for 1988 but the output remained the same.

1989 saw the unusual Dakota convertible. The first convertible pickup since the Ford Model T, it featured a fixed roll bar and complicated manual top. Just 2,482 were sold that first year. Another important addition that year was Carroll Shelby's V8-powered Shelby Dakota, his first rear wheel drive vehicle in two decades.

An extended "Club Cab" model was added for 1990, still with two doors. This model allowed the Dakota to boast capacity for six passengers, although the rear seat was best suited for children and shorter adults.

For 1991, the front of the Dakota received a more aerodynamic grille and hood, and Dodge added the 5.2 L V8 as an option, inspired by the earlier Shelby Dakota option. This engine produced 170 hp (127 kW). Both of the V-configuration engines were updated to Magnum specs the next year, providing a tremendous power boost.

In 1996, the first generation's final year, the K-based 2.5 L I4 engine was out of production and had been considered vastly underpowered compared to the competition, so Dodge borrowed the Jeep 2.5 L I4 (rated at 120 hp) and installed it as the base engine in the Dakota. It was the only major change for 1996, and would be carried over as the base engine in the new, larger 1997 model.

Engines:

  • 1987-1988 - 2.2 L K I4, SOHC, 96 hp (72 kW)
  • 1987-1991 - 3.9 L LA V6, 125 hp (93 kW)
  • 1989-1995 - 2.5 L K I4, 99 hp (74 kW)
  • 1991 - 5.2 L LA V8, 170 hp (127 kW)
  • 1992-1993 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 180 hp (134 kW)
  • 1991-1993 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • 1994-1996 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW)
  • 1994-1996 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 220 hp (164 kW)
  • 1996 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW)

1997

The second-generation Dakota was built from 1997 through 2004. It inherited the semi truck look of the larger Ram but remained largely the same underneath. 1998 saw the introduction of the R/T model with the big 5.9 L 250 hp (186 kW) Magnum V8.

Four-door "Quad-Cab" models were added for 2000 with a slightly shorter bed, 63.1 in (160.2 cm), but riding on the Club Cab's 130.9 in (332.5 cm) wheelbase. The smaller V8 was replaced by a new high-tech V8 as well.

2002 was the final year for the four-cylinder engine in the Dakota, as Chrysler was ending production of the former AMC design. Most buyers ordered the V6 or V8 engines, which were considerably more powerful and, in the case of the V6, which was made standard for 2003, nearly as fuel-efficient with a manual transmission.

2004 was the end of the old OHV V6 and the big R/T V8.

Engines:

  • 1997-2002 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • 1997-2003 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW)
  • 1997-1999 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • 1998-2003 - 5.9 L Magnum V8, 250 hp (186 kW)
  • 2000-2004 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (175 kW)
  • 2004 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW)

2005

The redesigned 2005 Dakota shares its platform with the new Dodge Durango SUV. This model is 3.7 in longer and 2.7 in wider, and features a new front and rear suspension, and rack-and-pinion steering. There are one V6 and two V8 engines available: The standard engine is a 3.7 L PowerTech V6 (specs below). Two 4.7 L V8 engines are available as well. The Dakota is built at Warren Truck Assembly in Warren, Michigan.

Engines:
  • 2005 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW) at 5200 rpm and 235 ft·lbf (319 N·m) at 4000 rpm
  • 2005 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (172 kW) at 4400 rpm and 290 ft·lbf (393 N·m) at 3600 rpm
  • 2005 - 4.7 L HO PowerTech V8, 260 hp (194 kW) at 5200 rpm and 310 ft·lbf (420 N·m) at 5200 rpm

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The Dakota is built at Warren Truck Assembly in Warren, Michigan.
. Two 4.7 L V8 engines are available as well. Some claim to prefer the taste, citing the portafilter preserves crema. There are one V6 and two V8 engines available: The standard engine is a 3.7 L PowerTech V6 (specs below). The bottomless portafilter serves as a tool to analyze evenness of grind distribution and tamping, as more volume of espresso will flow from low-density areas of the coffee puck. This model is 3.7 in longer and 2.7 in wider, and features a new front and rear suspension, and rack-and-pinion steering. A recent North American brewing trend came with the invention of the bottomless portafilter, that is, a portafilter without the bottom half, exposing the basket and causing the espresso to not contact metal during the extraction process.

The redesigned 2005 Dakota shares its platform with the new Dodge Durango SUV. Most prefer to pull espresso shots directly right into a pre-heated demitasse or shot glass, to maintain the ideal temperature of the espresso. Engines:. Varying the fineness of the grind, the amount of pressure used to tamp the grinds, or the pump pressure itself can be used to bring the extraction time into this ideal zone. 2004 was the end of the old OHV V6 and the big R/T V8. An ideal double shot of espresso should take 20-25 seconds to arrive, timed from when the machine's pump is first turned on. Most buyers ordered the V6 or V8 engines, which were considerably more powerful and, in the case of the V6, which was made standard for 2003, nearly as fuel-efficient with a manual transmission. This process produces a rich, almost syrupy beverage by extracting and emulsifying the oils in the ground coffee.

2002 was the final year for the four-cylinder engine in the Dakota, as Chrysler was ending production of the former AMC design. High-quality espresso machines control the temperature of the brew water within a few degrees of the ideal. The smaller V8 was replaced by a new high-tech V8 as well. Water cooler than the ideal zone causes sourness; hotter than the ideal zone causes bitterness. Four-door "Quad-Cab" models were added for 2000 with a slightly shorter bed, 63.1 in (160.2 cm), but riding on the Club Cab's 130.9 in (332.5 cm) wheelbase. When the brew process is begins, pressurized water at 90±5°C (200±9°F) and approximately 900 kPa (130 PSI) is forced into the grouphead and through the ground coffee in the portafilter. 1998 saw the introduction of the R/T model with the big 5.9 L 250 hp (186 kW) Magnum V8. The portafilter (or group handle) holds the filter-basket and is locked under the grouphead's diffusion block.

It inherited the semi truck look of the larger Ram but remained largely the same underneath. The espresso is then tamped, or compressed with approximately 30 lbf (130 N) of force into a densely packed puck of espresso. The second-generation Dakota was built from 1997 through 2004. To pull a shot of espresso, a metal filter-basket is filled with either 7-10 grams or 12-18 grams of ground coffee for a single shot (30mL) or double shot (60mL), respectively. Engines:. The act of producing a shot of espresso is colloquially termed "pulling" a shot, deriving from lever-style espresso machines that required pulling a long handle to produce a shot. It was the only major change for 1996, and would be carried over as the base engine in the new, larger 1997 model. The knowledge required in making the finest espresso is considered to be a craft, similar to artisan baking.

In 1996, the first generation's final year, the K-based 2.5 L I4 engine was out of production and had been considered vastly underpowered compared to the competition, so Dodge borrowed the Jeep 2.5 L I4 (rated at 120 hp) and installed it as the base engine in the Dakota. A professional operator of such a machine is called a barista. Both of the V-configuration engines were updated to Magnum specs the next year, providing a tremendous power boost. Popularization of the internet also facilitated the spread of information and dispell many myths on how to properly brew espresso. This engine produced 170 hp (127 kW). They can be found in department stores, online vendors and specialty stores. For 1991, the front of the Dakota received a more aerodynamic grille and hood, and Dodge added the 5.2 L V8 as an option, inspired by the earlier Shelby Dakota option. Home espresso machines have also increased in popularity with the general rise of interest in espresso.

This model allowed the Dakota to boast capacity for six passengers, although the rear seat was best suited for children and shorter adults. Long and complicated drink orders became the punchline of many jokes aimed at making fun of how finicky and obsessive coffee drinkers can be. An extended "Club Cab" model was added for 1990, still with two doors. The influence of Starbucks has widely diverted from the Italian style of coffee, by adding syrups, whipped cream, flavour extracts, soy milk and different spices to their drinks. Another important addition that year was Carroll Shelby's V8-powered Shelby Dakota, his first rear wheel drive vehicle in two decades. Hanging out at a coffee bar sipping little cups of espresso became hip and trendy. Just 2,482 were sold that first year. Americans learned that there are completely new styles of coffee other than the ordinary "cup of Joe".

The first convertible pickup since the Ford Model T, it featured a fixed roll bar and complicated manual top. With the rise of coffee chains such as Starbucks, Seattle's Best Coffee, and others, coffee drinks rose in popularity in non-traditional markets. 1989 saw the unusual Dakota convertible. Espresso is the most popular type of coffee in Argentina and southern Europe, notably Italy, Portugal and Spain, and is also popular throughout Europe and the Americas. Fuel injection was added to the 3.9 L V6 for 1988 but the output remained the same. Other. Both 6.5 ft (2 m) and 8 ft (2.4 m) beds were offered. Americano.

Four wheel drive was available only with the V6. Milk. Straight-4 and V6 engines were offered along with either a 5-speed manual or 4-speed automatic transmission. Espresso. The first generation of the Dakota was produced from 1987 through 1996. It is rarely ordered by Italians. . The phrase 'American Coffee' (spoken in English) is widely understood, as is the commonly used term 'Long Black'.

One notable feature was the Dakota's rack and pinion steering, a first in work trucks. A similar alternative, an espresso mixed with hot water, is known as caffè americano. The Dakota has also long been the only midsize pickup with an optional V8 engine. What is considered plain coffee in the United States is normally not brewed in Italy. It is a conventional design with body-on-frame construction and leaf spring/live axle rear end. Ordering a coffee (un caffè in Italian) means ordering an espresso; this confuses foreigners in Italy and Italians abroad alike. The Dakota has always been sized above the compact (Ford Ranger, Chevrolet S-10) and below the full-sized (Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado) pickups and Dodge's own Ram. a coffee made at express speed.

The Dakota was nominated for the North American Truck of the Year award for 2000. with the flavours 'expressed' from coffee grounds under pressure
3. It was introduced in 1987 alongside the redesigned Dodge Ram 50. a coffee made expressly for one person
2. The Dakota is a midsize pickup truck from DaimlerChrysler's Dodge brand. The term espresso refers to the brewing method and combines all 3 meanings of the word express.
1. 2005 - 4.7 L HO PowerTech V8, 260 hp (194 kW) at 5200 rpm and 310 ft·lbf (420 N·m) at 5200 rpm. .

2005 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (172 kW) at 4400 rpm and 290 ft·lbf (393 N·m) at 3600 rpm. Espresso is also the foundation for other drinks, such as lattes, cappuccinos, macchiatos, and mochas. 2005 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW) at 5200 rpm and 235 ft·lbf (319 N·m) at 4000 rpm. Crema has elements of both emulsion and foam colloid. 2004 - 3.7 L PowerTech V6, 210 hp (157 kW). It is composed of oils, proteins and sugars. 2000-2004 - 4.7 L PowerTech V8, 230 hp (175 kW). A distinguishing factor of properly brewed espresso is the presence of crema, a reddish-brown foam which floats on the surface of the espresso.

1998-2003 - 5.9 L Magnum V8, 250 hp (186 kW). Espresso is chemically complex and volatile, with many of its chemical components degrading from oxidation or loss of temperature. 1997-1999 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW). The qualitative definition of espresso includes a viscous, honey-like consistency, a higher amount of dissolved solids than drip coffee per relative volume, and is served in small amounts known as single or double shots. 1997-2003 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW). Espresso and the modern espresso machine was developed and popularized in Italy from the beginning of the 20th century to the postwar period. 1997-2002 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW). Espresso (Italian) is a flavorful coffee beverage brewed by forcing hot water under high pressure through finely ground coffee.

1996 - 2.5 L AMC I4, 120 hp (90 kW).
. 1994-1996 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 220 hp (164 kW). Cubano (Cuban): Sugar is added to the espresso grounds during brewing for a sweet taste. 1994-1996 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 175 hp (131 kW). Corretto (corrected): Some sort of liquor added. 1991-1993 - 5.2 L Magnum V8, 230 hp (172 kW). Dead Eye: a cup of American coffee with three shots of espresso in it.

1992-1993 - 3.9 L Magnum V6, 180 hp (134 kW). Also known as Slingblade. 1991 - 5.2 L LA V8, 170 hp (127 kW). Black Eye: a cup of American coffee with two shots of espresso in it. 1989-1995 - 2.5 L K I4, 99 hp (74 kW). Also known as Shot in the Dark or Depth Charge. 1987-1991 - 3.9 L LA V6, 125 hp (93 kW). Red Eye: a cup of American coffee with a shot of espresso in it.

1987-1988 - 2.2 L K I4, SOHC, 96 hp (72 kW). Cafè Tobio: Two shots of espresso with an equal amount of American Coffee. Americano (American): Diluted with hot water, similar to drip-brew coffee. Affogato (drowned): Served over ice cream. Mocha: normally, a latte blended with chocolate.

Cortado: espresso "cut" (from the Spanish and Portuguese cortar) with a small amount of warm milk to reduce the acidity. Latte: an espresso based drink with a volume of milk, from 6-12oz (180-360mL)total volume, with less foam than a cappuccino. Cappuccino: traditionally, a drink of 1/3 espresso, 1/3 steamed milk, 1/3 microfoam. Con panna (with cream): With whipped cream on top.

Macchiato (marked): steamed milk is put into the cup first, and the shots are added on top. Expresso: a common French variation which is sometimes colloquially used in English speaking countries. Doppio (double): Two shots of espresso in one cup. Lungo (long): More water (about double) is let through the ground coffee, yielding a weaker taste 40ml.

Ristretto (restricted): With less water, yielding a stronger taste 10-20ml. In most countries, espresso is used solely. Caffè Espresso: the formal Italian term.

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