Detroit Pistons

The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area.

Founded: 1941 as Ft. Wayne Zollner Pistons in National Basketball League; joined Basketball Association of America (forerunner of the NBA) in 1948; relocated to Detroit in 1957.
Formerly known as: Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons (1941-48), Fort Wayne Pistons (1948-57)
Home Arena: The Palace of Auburn Hills
Owner: Bill Davidson
Uniform colors: Red, white and blue
Logo design: A basketball with "PISTONS" superimposed upon it.
Mascot: Hooper
NBL Championships: 1944, 1945 (in Fort Wayne)
NBA Eastern Division Championships: 1954, 1955 (in Fort Wayne)
NBA Central Division Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 2002, 2003, 2005
NBA Eastern Conference Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 2004, 2005
NBA Championships: 1989, 1990, 2004
2004-2005 Record: 54-28


Franchise history

The franchise was founded in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana by Fred Zollner, owner of a General Motors subsidiary that manufactored pistons. It is the oldest existing franchise in the NBA. Led by star forward George Yardley, the Fort Wayne Pistons were a popular franchise and appeared in the NBA Finals in 1954 and 1955, losing both times. In 1957, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, a much larger city that did not have an NBA franchise; the Detroit Gems had folded after one season of existence. The new Detroit Pistons played in Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons, then moved to Cobo Arena. The franchise was a consistent disappointment, struggling on both the court and the box office. In 1974, Zollner sold the team to Bill Davidson, who remains the team's owner. Displeased with the team's location in downtown Detroit, Davidson moved it to the suburb of Pontiac in 1978, where it played in the mammoth Silverdome, a structure built for professional football. (The Silverdome was the home of the NFL's Detroit Lions at the time.)

The franchise's fortunes finally began to turn in 1981, when it drafted point guard Isiah Thomas out of Indiana University. In early 1982, it acquired center Bill Laimbeer and guard Vinnie Johnson. The three, along with later aquisitions Joe Dumars, Rick Mahorn, and Dennis Rodman, formed the core of a team that would rise to the top of the league. With their physical style of play, and intensity with opponents, the Pistons gained the nickname "Bad Boys." Coach Chuck Daly took the team to the NBA Finals three consecutive years (1988-90) and won NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. The team moved into the lavish Palace of Auburn Hills in 1988 and remains there today.

The franchise went through a lengthy transitional period as its key players either retired or left. Though Grant Hill emerged as a gifted player, the team was unable to win a playoff series, losing to the Orlando Magic in 1996, the Atlanta Hawks in 1997 and 1999, and the Miami Heat in 2000. In the summer of 2000, Hill indicated his intentions to leave to Orlando, and Dumars – appointed the franchise's president of basketball operations that year – dealt Hill to the Magic in return for a pair of largely unheralded players. One of them, Ben Wallace, would prove to be a cornerstone for the franchise's revamped roster. Under Dumars's leadership, the Pistons have since surrounded Wallace with rising stars Chauncey Billups, Richard "Rip" Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. Coached by Hall of Fame inductee Larry Brown, the Pistons returned to prominence, winning the 2004 NBA championship.

Current season

On November 19, 2004, the Detroit Pistons were involved in a massive brawl at the Palace of Auburn Hills during a losing home game against the Indiana Pacers. After fouling Pistons' Ben Wallace, Pacer Ron Artest was hit by a cup while lying down on the scorer's table. This caused Artest to rush into the stands and attack some fans. Other Pacers such as Jermaine O'Neal fought with fans who had walked onto the court. A month later, five Pacers and seven fans were charged after being involved in the "basketbrawl."

See also: The Malice at The Palace.

Presently, the Pistons are considered a strong contender to win a second consecutive title in 2005. Seeded second in the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, they defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 4-1 and then rallied from a 2-1 deficit to finish off the Indiana Pacers 4-2. In the conference finals, the Pistons again fell behind, three games to two, but then won the final two games to defeat the Miami Heat and become Eastern Conference Champions. In the process, the Pistons became the first team to win a game 7 on the road since the L.A. Lakers did so at the Sacramento Kings in 2002.

The Pistons are currently facing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, the first two games of which were played at the SBC Center in San Antonio. Games 3 and 4 and 5 will be played at The Palace of Auburn Hills, and games 6 and (if necessary) 7 will be in San Antonio. The Spurs have won the first two games, and Detroit the second to, all by margins of 15 to 31 points. Game 5 is scheduled for Sunday, June 19th at The Palace of Auburn Hills at 9 P.M. Eastern on ABC.

Current Roster

Starters

  • SF - #22 Tayshaun Prince (Kentucky)
  • PF - #36 Rasheed Wallace (North Carolina)
  • C - #3 Ben Wallace (Virginia Union)
  • SG - #32 Richard "Rip" Hamilton (UConn)
  • PG - #1 Chauncey Billups (Colorado)

Reserves

  • G - #30 Carlos Arroyo (Florida Int'l)
  • C - #41 Elden Campbell (Clemson) - free agent
  • G-F - #20 Carlos Delfino (Argentina)
  • F - #12 Ronald Dupree (LSU)
  • F - #8 Darvin Ham (Texas Tech) - free agent
  • G - #10 Lindsey Hunter (Jackson State)
  • G - #5 Horace Jenkins (William Paterson) - restricted free agent
  • F-C - #24 Antonio McDyess (Alabama)
  • C - #31 Darko Miličić (Serbia)

Players of note

Basketball Hall of Fame Members:

  • Dave Bing
  • Bob Lanier
  • Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach)
  • Isiah Thomas
  • Chuck Daly (Inducted as Coach)

Not to be forgotten:

  • Adrian Dantley
  • Grant Hill
  • Rick Mahorn
  • Dennis Rodman
  • John Salley
  • Jerry Stackhouse

Retired numbers:

  • 2 Chuck Daly (never played in the NBA; represents the two NBA championship teams he coached)
  • 4 Joe Dumars
  • 11 Isiah Thomas
  • 15 Vinnie Johnson
  • 16 Bob Lanier
  • 21 Dave Bing
  • 40 Bill Laimbeer

Coaches and others

Basketball Hall of Fame Members:

  • Larry Brown
  • Chuck Daly
  • Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach)
  • Gregory Johnson

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Basketball Hall of Fame Members:. In 2003, the father-son combo of manager Bob Boone and third baseman Aaron Boone was broken when Bob was relieved and the upset Aaron traded to the New York Yankees. Reserves. Riverfront Stadium was demolished in 2002, paving the way for the Great American Ball Park. Starters. In 1999 they won 96 games, but lost to the New York Mets in a one game playoff. Eastern on ABC. By 1995 the Reds were in the NLCS again, but lost to the Atlanta Braves.

Game 5 is scheduled for Sunday, June 19th at The Palace of Auburn Hills at 9 P.M. Led by Chris Sabo, Barry Larkin, Eric Davis & Billy Hatcher in the field and by Jose Rijo, Tom Browning and the Nasty Boys of Rob Dibble, Norm Charlton and Randy Myers on the mound, the Reds took out the Pirates in the NLCS & swept the shocked Oakland Athletics in four straight. The Spurs have won the first two games, and Detroit the second to, all by margins of 15 to 31 points. They started off 35-12 and maintained their lead throughout the year. Games 3 and 4 and 5 will be played at The Palace of Auburn Hills, and games 6 and (if necessary) 7 will be in San Antonio. In 1990 the Reds under new manager Lou Pinella shocked baseball by leading the NL West from wire-to-wire. The Pistons are currently facing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, the first two games of which were played at the SBC Center in San Antonio. In 1989, Pete Rose was banned from baseball by Commissioner Bart Giamatti, who declared Rose guilty of "conduct detrimental to baseball." Controversy also swirled around Reds owner Marge Schott who was accused several times of ethnic and racial slurs.

Lakers did so at the Sacramento Kings in 2002. Among the highlights, Pete Rose became the all-time hits leader, Tom Browning threw a perfect game, and Chris Sabo was the 1988 National League Rookie of the Year. In the process, the Pistons became the first team to win a game 7 on the road since the L.A. From 1985 to 1989 the Reds finished second 4 times. In the conference finals, the Pistons again fell behind, three games to two, but then won the final two games to defeat the Miami Heat and become Eastern Conference Champions. By the end of 1984, Pete Rose was hired to be the Reds player-manager. Seeded second in the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, they defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 4-1 and then rallied from a 2-1 deficit to finish off the Indiana Pacers 4-2. In 1984 Dave Parker & Tony Pérez were in Cincinnati uniforms.

Presently, the Pistons are considered a strong contender to win a second consecutive title in 2005. In 1984 the Reds began to move up, depending on trades and some minor leaguers. See also: The Malice at The Palace. Johnny Bench retired in 1983. A month later, five Pacers and seven fans were charged after being involved in the "basketbrawl.". In 1981 the Reds had the best overall record in baseball, but thanks to a mid-season players' strike, they finished second in the division in both of the half-seasons that were created; to commemorate this, a team photo was taken, accompanied by a banner that read "Baseball's Best Record 1981." By 1982 the Reds were a shell of the original Red Machine; they lost 100 games that year. Other Pacers such as Jermaine O'Neal fought with fans who had walked onto the court. The Reds did manage to win the 1979 NL West behind the pitching of Tom Seaver.

This caused Artest to rush into the stands and attack some fans. By 1979 Tony Pérez, Don Gullett, Pete Rose, Sparky Anderson, Gary Nolan, and others had left the Reds. On November 19, 2004, the Detroit Pistons were involved in a massive brawl at the Palace of Auburn Hills during a losing home game against the Indiana Pacers. After fouling Pistons' Ben Wallace, Pacer Ron Artest was hit by a cup while lying down on the scorer's table. The last four years of the '70s brought turmoil and change. Coached by Hall of Fame inductee Larry Brown, the Pistons returned to prominence, winning the 2004 NBA championship. The Reds became the first NL team in 50 years to win back-to-back World Series championships. Under Dumars's leadership, the Pistons have since surrounded Wallace with rising stars Chauncey Billups, Richard "Rip" Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. The New York Yankees never really caught up to the Reds, who won the series in four straight.

One of them, Ben Wallace, would prove to be a cornerstone for the franchise's revamped roster. The Reds won the NL title from the Philadelphia Phillies, winning Game 3 in their last at-bat. In the summer of 2000, Hill indicated his intentions to leave to Orlando, and Dumars – appointed the franchise's president of basketball operations that year – dealt Hill to the Magic in return for a pair of largely unheralded players. In 1976, the Reds swept throughout the NL West and proceeded to go 9-0 in the playoffs. Though Grant Hill emerged as a gifted player, the team was unable to win a playoff series, losing to the Orlando Magic in 1996, the Atlanta Hawks in 1997 and 1999, and the Miami Heat in 2000. Joe Morgan's RBI single in Game 7 gave the Reds their first championship in 35 years. The franchise went through a lengthy transitional period as its key players either retired or left. After a few close-calls either way, Carlton Fisk hit one off the foul pole in left to give the Red Sox a 7-6 win.

The team moved into the lavish Palace of Auburn Hills in 1988 and remains there today. The Reds were up 6-3 with 5 outs left when the Red Sox tied the game on former Red Bernie Carbo's three-run home run. With their physical style of play, and intensity with opponents, the Pistons gained the nickname "Bad Boys." Coach Chuck Daly took the team to the NBA Finals three consecutive years (1988-90) and won NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. Game 6 is still one of the most memorable games played. The three, along with later aquisitions Joe Dumars, Rick Mahorn, and Dennis Rodman, formed the core of a team that would rise to the top of the league. Splitting the first four games, the Reds took Game 5. In early 1982, it acquired center Bill Laimbeer and guard Vinnie Johnson. In the World Series, the Boston Red Sox were the opponents.

The franchise's fortunes finally began to turn in 1981, when it drafted point guard Isiah Thomas out of Indiana University. They swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in three games to win the NL pennant. (The Silverdome was the home of the NFL's Detroit Lions at the time.). In 1975, the Reds won 108 games and won the NL West. Displeased with the team's location in downtown Detroit, Davidson moved it to the suburb of Pontiac in 1978, where it played in the mammoth Silverdome, a structure built for professional football. The Reds won 98 games in 1974 but finished second. In 1974, Zollner sold the team to Bill Davidson, who remains the team's owner. The Reds won a third NL West crown in 1973 but lost the NL pennant to the New York Mets.

The franchise was a consistent disappointment, struggling on both the court and the box office. Six of the seven games were won by one run, but the A's won in seven. The new Detroit Pistons played in Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons, then moved to Cobo Arena. The 1972 Reds won the NL West and defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in an exciting five-game playoff series; the Reds played the Oakland Athletics in the World Series. In 1957, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, a much larger city that did not have an NBA franchise; the Detroit Gems had folded after one season of existence. After the disastrous 1971 season (the only season of the '70s during which the Reds finished with a losing record) the Reds reloaded by trading Lee May and Tommy Helms for Joe Morgan, Jack Billingham, César Gerónimo, and Denis Menke. Led by star forward George Yardley, the Fort Wayne Pistons were a popular franchise and appeared in the NBA Finals in 1954 and 1955, losing both times. By time the club got to the World Series, however, the Reds pitching staff had run out of gas and the veteran Baltimore Orioles beat the Reds in five.

It is the oldest existing franchise in the NBA. The Reds breezed through the 1970 season, won the NL West and captured the NL pennant. The franchise was founded in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana by Fred Zollner, owner of a General Motors subsidiary that manufactored pistons. Gary Nolan, Jim Merritt, and Jim McGlothlin led a pitching staff which also contained veteran Tony Cloninger and youngsters Wayne Simpson and Don Gullett.
. Johnny Bench, Lee May, Tony Pérez, Pete Rose and Bobby Tolan were the early Red Machine offensive leaders. The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area. The Reds began the season winning 70 of their first 100 games.

Gregory Johnson. Riverfront Stadium, a 52,000 seat multi-purpose venue on the shores of the Ohio River opened its doors. Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach). Together with general manager Bob Howsam, the Reds began the 1970s with a bang. Chuck Daly. In 1970, little known George "Sparky" Anderson was hired to manage the Reds. Larry Brown. In its place, a new stadium, and a new Reds dynasty.

40 Bill Laimbeer. The Reds' final game at Crosley Field, home to over 4500 baseball games, was played on June 24, 1970. 21 Dave Bing. All this set up for a fantastic run known as the Big Red Machine. 16 Bob Lanier. The farm system produced players such as Jim Maloney (the Reds pitching ace of the 1960s), Pete Rose, Tony Pérez, Johnny Bench and Gary Nolan. 15 Vinnie Johnson. In 1964, they lost the pennant by one game.

11 Isiah Thomas. They won 98 games in 1962 (paced by Purkey's 23) but finished 3rd. 4 Joe Dumars. The rest of the 1960s were successful on the field, but didn't produce any championships. 2 Chuck Daly (never played in the NBA; represents the two NBA championship teams he coached). However for the Reds, 1961 was the year New York Yankee Roger Maris hit 61 HR and they took the Reds in 5 games in the World Series. Jerry Stackhouse. The Reds captured the 1961 NL pennant, holding off the Los Angeles Dodgers & the San Francisco Giants.

John Salley. Pitchers Joey Jay, Jim O'Toole and Bob Purkey led the staff. Dennis Rodman. By 1961, Robinson was joined by Vada Pinson, Wally Post, Gordy Coleman and Gene Freese. Rick Mahorn. Led by NL Rookie of the Year Frank Robinson, the Reds hit 221 HR to tie the NL record. Grant Hill. By 1956, the Reds began the most successful portion of their clubs history.

Adrian Dantley. The rest of the offense was a collection of over-the-hill players & not-ready-for-prime time youngsters. Chuck Daly (Inducted as Coach). Ted Kluszewski was the NL home run leader in 1954. Isiah Thomas. Ewell "The Whip" Blackwell was the main pitching stalwart before arm problems cut short his career. Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach). In 1944, Joe Nuxhall, age 15, pitching for the Reds on loan from Hamilton High School, became the youngest person ever to play in a major league game -- a record that still stands today.

Bob Lanier. Throughout the remainder of the 1940s and the early 1950s, Cincinnati finished mostly in the second division. Dave Bing. World War II and age finally caught up with the Reds. C - #31 Darko Miličić (Serbia). In 1940, they repeated as NL Champions and for the first time in 21 years, the Reds captured a World Series beating the Detroit Tigers 4 games to 3. F-C - #24 Antonio McDyess (Alabama). The Reds were swept by the New York Yankees in four straight.

G - #5 Horace Jenkins (William Paterson) - restricted free agent. By 1939 they were National League champions. G - #10 Lindsey Hunter (Jackson State). By 1938 the Reds were out of the second division finishing fourth. F - #8 Darvin Ham (Texas Tech) - free agent. Ernie Lombardi was named the National League's Most Valuable Player in 1938, First baseman Frank McCormick was the 1940 NL MVP. Other position players included Harry Craft, Lonny Frey, Ival Goodman and Lew Riggs. F - #12 Ronald Dupree (LSU). The offense came around in the late 1930s.

G-F - #20 Carlos Delfino (Argentina). Thanks to Vander Meer, Paul Derringer, and shortstop-turned-pitcher Bucky Walters, the Reds had a solid pitching staff. C - #41 Elden Campbell (Clemson) - free agent. Johnny Vander Meer became the only pitcher in major league history to throw back-to-back no-hitters in 1938. G - #30 Carlos Arroyo (Florida Int'l). Crosley Field (formerly Redland Field) became the host of the first night game in 1935. PG - #1 Chauncey Billups (Colorado). The Reds throughout the 1930s became a team of "firsts".

SG - #32 Richard "Rip" Hamilton (UConn). McPhail began to develop the Reds' minor league system and expanded the Reds' base. C - #3 Ben Wallace (Virginia Union). had also started WLW radio and the Crosley Broadcasting Company in Cincinnati and was doing quite well as a civic leader. PF - #36 Rasheed Wallace (North Carolina). Crosly produced radios, refrigerators and other household items, bought the Reds out of bankruptcy in 1933 and hired Larry McPhail to be the General Manager. Powell Crosley Jr. SF - #22 Tayshaun Prince (Kentucky). Powell Crosley Jr., a electronics magnate who with his brother Lewis M.

By 1931 the team was bankrupt, thanks to the Great Depression, and Redland Field was in a state of disrepair. Eppa Rixey, Dolf Luque and Pete Donahoe were pitching stars; the offense never quite lived up to the pitching. In the remainder of the 1920s and early 1930s the Reds were second division dwellers for most of those years. By 1920, the "Black Sox" scandal put an asterisk by the Reds first championship.

The Reds finished ahead of John McGraw's New York Giants, and then won the world championship in 8 games over the Chicago White Sox. The 1919 team had hitting stars led by Edd Roush and Heinie Groh while the pitching staff was led by Hod Eller and Harry "Slim" Sallee, a lefthander. The 1918 team finished 4th, and then new manager Pat Moran led the Reds to a NL pennant in 1919. By the late 1910s the Reds began to come out of the second division.

In 1912 Redland Field, built on the corner of Findlay and Western on the city's west side opened for the Reds. In 1911, Bob Bescher stole 81 bases which is still a team record. Seymour's .377 average in 1905 was the first individual batting crown won by a Red. At the turn of the century, the Reds (shortened from the Red Stockings so not to be confused with the Boston AL entry, now shortened to Red Sox) had hitting stars like Sam Crawford and Cy Seymour.

The Red Stockings wandered through the remainder of the 1890s signing local stars & aging veterans. By some accounts, the AA team switched leagues in 1890; by other accounts, the AA team folded the same year the new NL team started, and the new team simply signed many of the AA team's star players. When the American Association, a rival league, began play in 1882, it included a team from Cincinnati, which was also called the Red Stockings. (In 1871, Harry Wright took most of his best players to Boston, and founded the Boston Red Stockings, now known as the Atlanta Braves.) The Red Stockings were a charter member of the National League in 1876, but was expelled from the league later, in part for violating league rules by serving beer to fans at games.

Early stars for the Red Stockings included the Wrights, George and Harry. The Red Stockings won 130 games in a row between 1869 & 1870, before the Brooklyn Atlantics defeated the Red Stockings. The original Cincinnati Red Stockings, baseball's first openly all-professional team, was founded in 1869. They are in the Central Division of the National League.

The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Billings Mustangs
GCL Reds. Sarasota Reds
Dayton Dragons. Chattanooga Lookouts.

Louisville Bats. National League
. Pitching saves: Jeff Brantley, 44 (1996). Pitching ERA: Harry McCormick, 1.52 (1882).

Pitching strikeouts: Mario Soto, 274 (1982). Pitching wins: Will White, 43 (1883). Strikeouts: Adam Dunn, 195 (2004) [MLB record]. Walks: Joe Morgan, 132 (1975).

Hitting streak: Pete Rose, 44 games (1978). Stolen bases: Hugh Nicol, 138 (1887). Total bases: George Foster, 388 (1977). Extra-Base hits: Frank Robinson, 92 (1962).

Triples: John Reilly, 26 (1890). Doubles: Frank Robinson and Pete Rose, 51 (1962 and 1978). Singles: Pete Rose, 181 (1973). Hits: Pete Rose, 230 (1973).

Runs: Bid McPhee, 134 (1886). Runs batted in: George Foster, 149 (1977). Home runs: George Foster, 52 (1977). Batting average: Cy Seymour, .377 (1905).

Harry Wright (2005). George Wright (2005). Will White (2004). Billy Werber (1961).

Bucky Walters (1958). Johnny Vander Meer (1958). Johnny Temple (1965). Mario Soto (2001).

Cy Seymour (1998). Edd Roush (1960). Frank Robinson (1978). Eppa Rixey (1959).

Jose Rijo (2005). Bob Purkey (1974). Wally Post (1965). Vada Pinson (1977).

Tony Perez (1998). Jim O'Toole (1970). Joe Nuxhall (1968). Gary Nolan (1983).

Billy Myers (1966). Joe Morgan (1987). Bid McPhee (2002). Roy McMillan (1971).

Bill McKechnie (1967). Mike McCormick (1966). Frank McCormick (1958). Jim Maloney (1973).

Jerry Lynch (1987). Dolf Luque (1967). Red Lucas (1965). Ernie Lombardi (1958).

Brooks Lawrence (1976). Larry Kopf (1965). Ted Kluszewski (1962). Fred Hutchinson (1965).

Dummy Hoy (2003). Bob Howsam (2004). Tommy Helms (1979). Bubbles Hargrave (1962).

Noodles Hahn (1963). Don Gullett (2002). Heinie Groh (1963). Ken Griffey (2004).

Wayne Granger (1982). Ival Goodman (1959). Giles (1969). Warren C.

Lonny Frey (1961). George Foster (2003). Bob Ewing (2001). Pete Donohue (1964).

Paul Derringer (1958). Eric Davis (2005). Jake Daubert (1966). Hughie Critz (1962).

Sam Crawford (1968). Harry Craft (1963). Dave Concepcion (2000). Gordy Coleman (1972).

Clay Carroll (1980). Leo Cardenas (1981). Smoky Burgess (1975). Rube Bressler (1963).

Ewell Blackwell (1960). Jack Billingham (1984). Johnny Bench (1986). Gus Bell (1964).

Sparky Anderson (2000). 42 Jackie Robinson (retired throughout baseball). 24 Tony Pérez. 20 Frank Robinson.

18 Ted Kluszewski. 10 Sparky Anderson.   8 Joe Morgan.   5 Johnny Bench.

  1 Fred Hutchinson. 72 Mike Stefanski (bullpen catcher]]. 55 Mark Berry (third base). 41 Jerry Narron (bench).

47 Tom Hume (bullpen). 35 Don Gullett (pitching). 49 Chris Chambliss (hitting). 53 Randy Whisler (first base).

Coaches

    . 12 Dave Miley. Manager
      .

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