Detroit Pistons

The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area.

Founded: 1941 as Ft. Wayne Zollner Pistons in National Basketball League; joined Basketball Association of America (forerunner of the NBA) in 1948; relocated to Detroit in 1957.
Formerly known as: Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons (1941-48), Fort Wayne Pistons (1948-57)
Home Arena: The Palace of Auburn Hills
Owner: Bill Davidson
Uniform colors: Red, white and blue
Logo design: A basketball with "PISTONS" superimposed upon it.
Mascot: Hooper
NBL Championships: 1944, 1945 (in Fort Wayne)
NBA Eastern Division Championships: 1954, 1955 (in Fort Wayne)
NBA Central Division Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 2002, 2003, 2005
NBA Eastern Conference Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 2004, 2005
NBA Championships: 1989, 1990, 2004
2004-2005 Record: 54-28


Franchise history

The franchise was founded in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana by Fred Zollner, owner of a General Motors subsidiary that manufactored pistons. It is the oldest existing franchise in the NBA. Led by star forward George Yardley, the Fort Wayne Pistons were a popular franchise and appeared in the NBA Finals in 1954 and 1955, losing both times. In 1957, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, a much larger city that did not have an NBA franchise; the Detroit Gems had folded after one season of existence. The new Detroit Pistons played in Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons, then moved to Cobo Arena. The franchise was a consistent disappointment, struggling on both the court and the box office. In 1974, Zollner sold the team to Bill Davidson, who remains the team's owner. Displeased with the team's location in downtown Detroit, Davidson moved it to the suburb of Pontiac in 1978, where it played in the mammoth Silverdome, a structure built for professional football. (The Silverdome was the home of the NFL's Detroit Lions at the time.)

The franchise's fortunes finally began to turn in 1981, when it drafted point guard Isiah Thomas out of Indiana University. In early 1982, it acquired center Bill Laimbeer and guard Vinnie Johnson. The three, along with later aquisitions Joe Dumars, Rick Mahorn, and Dennis Rodman, formed the core of a team that would rise to the top of the league. With their physical style of play, and intensity with opponents, the Pistons gained the nickname "Bad Boys." Coach Chuck Daly took the team to the NBA Finals three consecutive years (1988-90) and won NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. The team moved into the lavish Palace of Auburn Hills in 1988 and remains there today.

The franchise went through a lengthy transitional period as its key players either retired or left. Though Grant Hill emerged as a gifted player, the team was unable to win a playoff series, losing to the Orlando Magic in 1996, the Atlanta Hawks in 1997 and 1999, and the Miami Heat in 2000. In the summer of 2000, Hill indicated his intentions to leave to Orlando, and Dumars – appointed the franchise's president of basketball operations that year – dealt Hill to the Magic in return for a pair of largely unheralded players. One of them, Ben Wallace, would prove to be a cornerstone for the franchise's revamped roster. Under Dumars's leadership, the Pistons have since surrounded Wallace with rising stars Chauncey Billups, Richard "Rip" Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. Coached by Hall of Fame inductee Larry Brown, the Pistons returned to prominence, winning the 2004 NBA championship.

Current season

On November 19, 2004, the Detroit Pistons were involved in a massive brawl at the Palace of Auburn Hills during a losing home game against the Indiana Pacers. After fouling Pistons' Ben Wallace, Pacer Ron Artest was hit by a cup while lying down on the scorer's table. This caused Artest to rush into the stands and attack some fans. Other Pacers such as Jermaine O'Neal fought with fans who had walked onto the court. A month later, five Pacers and seven fans were charged after being involved in the "basketbrawl."

See also: The Malice at The Palace.

Presently, the Pistons are considered a strong contender to win a second consecutive title in 2005. Seeded second in the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, they defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 4-1 and then rallied from a 2-1 deficit to finish off the Indiana Pacers 4-2. In the conference finals, the Pistons again fell behind, three games to two, but then won the final two games to defeat the Miami Heat and become Eastern Conference Champions. In the process, the Pistons became the first team to win a game 7 on the road since the L.A. Lakers did so at the Sacramento Kings in 2002.

The Pistons are currently facing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, the first two games of which were played at the SBC Center in San Antonio. Games 3 and 4 and 5 will be played at The Palace of Auburn Hills, and games 6 and (if necessary) 7 will be in San Antonio. The Spurs have won the first two games, and Detroit the second to, all by margins of 15 to 31 points. Game 5 is scheduled for Sunday, June 19th at The Palace of Auburn Hills at 9 P.M. Eastern on ABC.

Current Roster

Starters

  • SF - #22 Tayshaun Prince (Kentucky)
  • PF - #36 Rasheed Wallace (North Carolina)
  • C - #3 Ben Wallace (Virginia Union)
  • SG - #32 Richard "Rip" Hamilton (UConn)
  • PG - #1 Chauncey Billups (Colorado)

Reserves

  • G - #30 Carlos Arroyo (Florida Int'l)
  • C - #41 Elden Campbell (Clemson) - free agent
  • G-F - #20 Carlos Delfino (Argentina)
  • F - #12 Ronald Dupree (LSU)
  • F - #8 Darvin Ham (Texas Tech) - free agent
  • G - #10 Lindsey Hunter (Jackson State)
  • G - #5 Horace Jenkins (William Paterson) - restricted free agent
  • F-C - #24 Antonio McDyess (Alabama)
  • C - #31 Darko Miličić (Serbia)

Players of note

Basketball Hall of Fame Members:

  • Dave Bing
  • Bob Lanier
  • Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach)
  • Isiah Thomas
  • Chuck Daly (Inducted as Coach)

Not to be forgotten:

  • Adrian Dantley
  • Grant Hill
  • Rick Mahorn
  • Dennis Rodman
  • John Salley
  • Jerry Stackhouse

Retired numbers:

  • 2 Chuck Daly (never played in the NBA; represents the two NBA championship teams he coached)
  • 4 Joe Dumars
  • 11 Isiah Thomas
  • 15 Vinnie Johnson
  • 16 Bob Lanier
  • 21 Dave Bing
  • 40 Bill Laimbeer

Coaches and others

Basketball Hall of Fame Members:

  • Larry Brown
  • Chuck Daly
  • Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach)
  • Gregory Johnson

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Basketball Hall of Fame Members:. Washington has larger and whiter suburbs than it did in the 60s, so some analysts believe this will be a less important factor than in the past. Reserves. Some analysts [2] (http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=3844360) have pointed out that Washington is primarily an African-American city (59%), but that African-Americans generally support baseball less than whites. Past Washington Senators teams have blamed poor attendance partially on lack of attendance by African-Americans. Starters. Major League Baseball does not express such doubts, and proponents of the move argue that the failure of previous franchises has more to do with poor business decisions and financial management on the part of their owners than with any lack of popular support in the region itself. Eastern on ABC. Due to the past history of Washington franchises (See Washington Senators), there are doubts about whether Washington will actually be a better market for a pro baseball team than Montréal long term.

Game 5 is scheduled for Sunday, June 19th at The Palace of Auburn Hills at 9 P.M. Mayor Williams signed the stadium financing package on December 30. The Spurs have won the first two games, and Detroit the second to, all by margins of 15 to 31 points. Despite this, the council passed an amended plan on December 21, 2004, that proved slightly more financially favorable to the city, while remaining acceptable to MLB. Games 3 and 4 and 5 will be played at The Palace of Auburn Hills, and games 6 and (if necessary) 7 will be in San Antonio. When the council voted on December 14 to require 50 percent private financing for any new stadium, MLB ceased promotional activities for the Nationals and announced that they would consider looking for a new market. The Pistons are currently facing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, the first two games of which were played at the SBC Center in San Antonio. City Council sought to change details of the financing for a new stadium MLB sought for the Nationals (see following section on "The Ballpark Controversy").

Lakers did so at the Sacramento Kings in 2002. During December 2004, the move to Washington itself was called into question when the D.C. In the process, the Pistons became the first team to win a game 7 on the road since the L.A. [1] (http://www.economist.com/opinion/displayStory.cfm?story_id=3930510). In the conference finals, the Pistons again fell behind, three games to two, but then won the final two games to defeat the Miami Heat and become Eastern Conference Champions. Some controversy arises over the fact that the city is helping finance a $581 million dollar stadium without state or county support, despite the fact that a large portion of the fan base, if it materializes, will be drawn from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs. Seeded second in the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, they defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 4-1 and then rallied from a 2-1 deficit to finish off the Indiana Pacers 4-2. An opinion poll conducted by the Washington Post found that approximately two-thirds of District residents oppose the mayor's stadium plan.

Presently, the Pistons are considered a strong contender to win a second consecutive title in 2005. Three Council members who supported Mayor Anthony Williams's plan were ousted in September's Democratic party primary. See also: The Malice at The Palace. The ballpark proposal is controversial; many city residents oppose government subsidies for a multi-billion-dollar private business and would prefer the land and money to focus on schools rather than a ballpark. A month later, five Pacers and seven fans were charged after being involved in the "basketbrawl.". City Council. Other Pacers such as Jermaine O'Neal fought with fans who had walked onto the court. The team's relocation to Washington had been contingent on a financing plan for the Nationals' stadium — a plan that had been the subject of much debate on the D.C.

This caused Artest to rush into the stands and attack some fans. Under the terms of the deal, television and radio broadcast rights to Nationals games are been handled by the Orioles franchise, who formed a new network (Mid-Atlantic Sports Network) to produce and distribute the games for both franchises on both local affiliates and cable/satellite systems. On November 19, 2004, the Detroit Pistons were involved in a massive brawl at the Palace of Auburn Hills during a losing home game against the Indiana Pacers. After fouling Pistons' Ben Wallace, Pacer Ron Artest was hit by a cup while lying down on the scorer's table. On March 31, 2005, a deal was struck between Peter Angelos and Major League Baseball in order to protect the Orioles against any financial harm the Nationals might present to the Orioles' market (Washington is approximately 35 miles south of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, where the Orioles have played their home games since 1992). Coached by Hall of Fame inductee Larry Brown, the Pistons returned to prominence, winning the 2004 NBA championship. Louis Browns, to move to Baltimore in 1953). Under Dumars's leadership, the Pistons have since surrounded Wallace with rising stars Chauncey Billups, Richard "Rip" Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. Obtaining the Orioles' cooperation was essential: the Baltimore and Washington regions had always been considered part of the same market, one which the Orioles' had had exclusive control over since 1972 (the original Washington Senators had waived their exclusivity rights to the region to allow the Orioles, then the St.

One of them, Ben Wallace, would prove to be a cornerstone for the franchise's revamped roster. From 1972 to 2004, the Orioles were the sole MLB franchise in the Baltimore-Washington metropolis. In the summer of 2000, Hill indicated his intentions to leave to Orlando, and Dumars – appointed the franchise's president of basketball operations that year – dealt Hill to the Magic in return for a pair of largely unheralded players. The move was announced despite opposition from Baltimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos. Though Grant Hill emerged as a gifted player, the team was unable to win a playoff series, losing to the Orlando Magic in 1996, the Atlanta Hawks in 1997 and 1999, and the Miami Heat in 2000. The frontrunners are a group called the Washington Baseball Club, and the speculative cost is between $200 and $300 million dollars. The franchise went through a lengthy transitional period as its key players either retired or left. The league must also decide who will be allowed to purchase the franchise.

The team moved into the lavish Palace of Auburn Hills in 1988 and remains there today. In addition, on November 15, 2004, a lawsuit by the former team owners against MLB and former majority owner Jeffrey Loria was struck down by arbitrators, ending legal moves to keep the Expos in Montréal. With their physical style of play, and intensity with opponents, the Pistons gained the nickname "Bad Boys." Coach Chuck Daly took the team to the NBA Finals three consecutive years (1988-90) and won NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. The move was approved by the owners of the other teams in a 29–1 vote on December 3 (Baltimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos cast the sole dissenting vote). The three, along with later aquisitions Joe Dumars, Rick Mahorn, and Dennis Rodman, formed the core of a team that would rise to the top of the league. in 2005. In early 1982, it acquired center Bill Laimbeer and guard Vinnie Johnson. On September 29, 2004, MLB officially announced that the Expos would move to Washington D.C.

The franchise's fortunes finally began to turn in 1981, when it drafted point guard Isiah Thomas out of Indiana University. In the decision-making process, Selig added Las Vegas, Nevada to the list of potential Expos homes. (The Silverdome was the home of the NFL's Detroit Lions at the time.). Some of the choices included Washington D.C., San Juan, Monterrey, Mexico, Portland, Oregon, Northern Virginia, and Norfolk, Virginia. Displeased with the team's location in downtown Detroit, Davidson moved it to the suburb of Pontiac in 1978, where it played in the mammoth Silverdome, a structure built for professional football. Meanwhile, the league actively looked for a relocation site. In 1974, Zollner sold the team to Bill Davidson, who remains the team's owner. The players' union initially rejected continuing the San Juan arrangement for the 2004 season, but later relented.

The franchise was a consistent disappointment, struggling on both the court and the box office. Some commentators like Peter Gammons have accused MLB of having "a conflict of interest," and of deliberately scuttling the team's chances in order to strengthen the case for relocation. The new Detroit Pistons played in Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons, then moved to Cobo Arena. The Marlins eventually became the World Series' winner in 2003. In 1957, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, a much larger city that did not have an NBA franchise; the Detroit Gems had folded after one season of existence. The decision to deny the franchise any chance to draw from its farm system, however, dashed the Expos' playoff chances. Led by star forward George Yardley, the Fort Wayne Pistons were a popular franchise and appeared in the NBA Finals in 1954 and 1955, losing both times. Up to this point attendance had been increasing.

It is the oldest existing franchise in the NBA. All teams have this right around the end of August. The franchise was founded in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana by Fred Zollner, owner of a General Motors subsidiary that manufactored pistons. The budget was some $35 million dollars.
. However, MLB decided that it could not afford an extra $50,000 to call-up players from its minor leagues. The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area. Led by Vladimir Guerrero, the Expos launched a spirited battle to lead the Wild Card race over the Florida Marlins.

Gregory Johnson. Thanks in part to the San Juan games, the Expos were able to draw over a million fans at home in 2003 for the first time since 1998. Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach). Despite being a considerably smaller facility (it seats approximately 19,000) than Montréal's Olympic Stadium, Bithorn regularly outdrew the attendance in Montréal. Chuck Daly. In 2003, the team played 22 of its home games at Hiram Bithorn Stadium in San Juan, Puerto Rico, despite having the highest percentage attendance increase in 2002 to go with a second place finish in the National League East. Larry Brown. As a result of this, the Expos survived. Major League Baseball named Frank Robinson manager and Omar Minaya as vice-president and general manager.

40 Bill Laimbeer. The Minnesota Twins, who were also facing contraction, initiated legal maneuvers that ultimately led to a collective bargaining agreement between MLB and its players association which prohibited "contraction" through 2006. 21 Dave Bing. On February 14, 2002, after a 30-0 vote, Major League Baseball formed a Delaware partnership (Expos Baseball, LP) to buy the Expos for $120,000,000 USD with the intent of eliminating the franchise. 16 Bob Lanier. On November 7, 2001, Commissioner Bud Selig announced that Major League Baseball would undergo a contraction of two teams, after a 28-2 vote by the owners (it should be noted that Montreal was one of the two dissenting votes). 15 Vinnie Johnson. Attendance in the 2001 season was usually fewer than 10,000 people.

11 Isiah Thomas. Jeffrey Loria, the last owner prior to the team's purchase by Major League Baseball, made some personnel moves, however the future of the franchise in Montréal never appeared strong. 4 Joe Dumars. Montréal was often cited as an example of a small-market team, unable to compete with teams in bigger markets such as New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, and therefore no longer a viable competitor. 2 Chuck Daly (never played in the NBA; represents the two NBA championship teams he coached). However, they continued their losing trend by posting a 67-95 record in 2004 after losing superstar Vladimir Guerrero to free agency during the previous offseason. Jerry Stackhouse. The Expos lost most of their star players through free agency and trades since the 1994 season and have produced poor records since except for a second place finish in 1996 and a few respectable seasons in 2002 and 2003.

John Salley. With a very talented group of players, including outfielders Larry Walker, Moisés Alou and Marquis Grissom and pitchers Ken Hill, John Wetteland and a young Pedro Martínez, the Expos had the best record in major league baseball, 74-40 when the strike forced the cancelation of the remainder of the season. Dennis Rodman. 1994 proved to be heart-breaking for the Expos. Rick Mahorn. The Expos had several mediocre years in the mid 1980s under manager Buck Rodgers, but rebuilt and under manager Felipe Alou, who took the position midway through the 1992 season, finished second in the National League East in both 1992 and 1993. Grant Hill. They defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 3-2 in the divisional series, but lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers 3-2 in the National League Championship Series. Montréal was led through these years by a core group of young players, including catcher Gary Carter, outfielders Tim Raines and Andre Dawson, third baseman Larry Parrish and pitchers Steve Rogers and Bill Gullickson.

Adrian Dantley. They would post five consecutive winning seasons, including their only division championship, in the split season of 1981. Chuck Daly (Inducted as Coach). In 1979 they posted their first winning record with a 95-65 record, under manager Dick Williams. Isiah Thomas. The Expos suffered through 10 straight losing seasons under their first manager, Gene Mauch (1969-1975) and three other managers. Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach). They were named for Expo 67, a world's fair that was held in Montréal. Their home stadium was to be that fair's Autostade, but that plan was rejected and they settled upon Jarry Park, in Montréal.

Bob Lanier. The Montréal Expos joined the National League in 1969, along with the San Diego Padres. Dave Bing. Main article: Montreal Expos. C - #31 Darko Miličić (Serbia). near the Anacostia River and with views of the Capitol building. F-C - #24 Antonio McDyess (Alabama). The new stadium will be located in Southeast D.C.

G - #5 Horace Jenkins (William Paterson) - restricted free agent. Kennedy Memorial Stadium until 2007 when a new facility will (tentatively) be completed for their use. G - #10 Lindsey Hunter (Jackson State). The Nationals will play at Robert F. F - #8 Darvin Ham (Texas Tech) - free agent. Currently, the Nationals are a member of the National League's Eastern Division. F - #12 Ronald Dupree (LSU). Coincidentally, the last time a MLB team moved to a new city was in 1972, when the previous franchise to operate in the DC area, the Washington Senators, moved to Texas, becoming the Texas Rangers.

G-F - #20 Carlos Delfino (Argentina). Prior to this move, the team was known as the Montréal Expos. C - #41 Elden Campbell (Clemson) - free agent. from Montréal, Québec, Canada after the completion of the 2004 MLB season. G - #30 Carlos Arroyo (Florida Int'l). The team relocated to Washington, D.C. PG - #1 Chauncey Billups (Colorado). The Washington Nationals are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Washington, D.C.

SG - #32 Richard "Rip" Hamilton (UConn). Gulf Coast Nationals. C - #3 Ben Wallace (Virginia Union). Potomac Nationals
Savannah Sand Gnats
Vermont Expos. PF - #36 Rasheed Wallace (North Carolina). Harrisburg Senators. SF - #22 Tayshaun Prince (Kentucky). New Orleans Zephyrs.

National League
. Pitching saves: John Wetteland, 43 (1993). Pitching ERA: Pedro Martínez, 1.90 (1997). Pitching strikeouts: Pedro Martinez, 305 (1997).

Pitching wins: Ross Grimsley, 20 (1978). Strikeouts: Andrés Galarraga, 169 (1990). Walks: Ken Singleton, 123 (1973). Hitting streak: Vladimir Guerrero, 31 games (2000).

Stolen bases: Ron LeFlore, 97 (1980). Total bases: Vladimir Guerrero, 379 (2000). Extra-Base hits: Vladimir Guerrero, 84 (1999). Triples: Tim Raines, Rodney Scott and Mitch Webster, 13 (1985, 1980 and 1986).

Doubles: Mark Grudzielanek, 54 (1997). Hits: Vladimir Guerrero, 206 (2002). Runs: Tim Raines, 133 (1983). Runs batted in: Vladimir Guerrero, 131 (2000).

Home runs: Vladimir Guerrero, 44 (2000). Batting average: Vladimir Guerrero, 345 (2000). 42 Jackie Robinson (retired throughout baseball). 30 Tim Raines.

10 Rusty Staub. 10 Andre Dawson.   8 Gary Carter. 33 Jack Voigt (roving).

37 Dave Huppert (third base). 12 Don Buford (first base). 14 Eddie Rodriguez (bench). 16 Bob Natal (bullpen).

17 Tom McCraw (hitting). Claire (pitching). 46 Randy St. Coaches

    .

    20 Frank Robinson. Manager

      . Ron Darling - tv (2005). Mel Proctor - tv (2005).

      David Shea - radio (2005). Charlie Slowes - radio (2005). Tony Perez. Gary Carter.

      Chad Cordero recorded the save for Washington. Liván Hernández threw eight shutout innings, and Vinny Castilla was denied the chance to hit for the cycle when Diamondback reliever Lance Cormier hit him with a pitch in the bottom of the eighth; Castilla needed only a single to complete the cycle. 45,596 fans were in attendance, including former Senators, players and Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig. Presidents by throwing out the ceremonial first pitch on opening day in Washington, exactly 95 years after William Howard Taft started the tradition at Griffith Stadium.

      President George W. Bush kept up a tradition of sitting U.S. On April 14, 2005, the Washington Nationals won their first regular season home game at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C, by a score of 5-3 against the Arizona Diamondbacks. The win came in their second game of the season and was highlighted by Wilkerson's hit for the cycle. On April 6, 2005, the Washington Nationals won their first-ever regular season game by beating the Phillies, 7-3.

      Outfielder Termel Sledge hit the team's first home run in that contest. On April 4 2005, Brad Wilkerson had the honor of being the first batter for the Washington Nationals and he promptly responded with the first hit in the new team's history. Nevertheless, Kenny Lofton hit a three-run homer and Jon Lieber pitched 5-2/3 effective innings, leading the home team Philadelphia Phillies to an 8-4 victory over the new Nationals at Citizens Bank Park. On October 3, 2004, the New York Mets defeated Montréal 8-1 at Shea Stadium, in the final game the franchise existed as the Montréal Expos. On September 29, 2004, the Expos played their final game in Montréal, a 9-1 loss to the Florida Marlins before 31,395 fans at Olympic Stadium.

      Jones' blast was also the first MLB home run hit outside the United States. Louis Cardinals in the Expos' first home victory as a franchise at Jarry Park. On April 14, 1969, Mack Jones hit a three-run home run and two-run triple that highlighted an 8-7 win over the St.

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