Detroit Pistons

The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area.

Founded: 1941 as Ft. Wayne Zollner Pistons in National Basketball League; joined Basketball Association of America (forerunner of the NBA) in 1948; relocated to Detroit in 1957.
Formerly known as: Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons (1941-48), Fort Wayne Pistons (1948-57)
Home Arena: The Palace of Auburn Hills
Owner: Bill Davidson
Uniform colors: Red, white and blue
Logo design: A basketball with "PISTONS" superimposed upon it.
Mascot: Hooper
NBL Championships: 1944, 1945 (in Fort Wayne)
NBA Eastern Division Championships: 1954, 1955 (in Fort Wayne)
NBA Central Division Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 2002, 2003, 2005
NBA Eastern Conference Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 2004, 2005
NBA Championships: 1989, 1990, 2004
2004-2005 Record: 54-28


Franchise history

The franchise was founded in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana by Fred Zollner, owner of a General Motors subsidiary that manufactored pistons. It is the oldest existing franchise in the NBA. Led by star forward George Yardley, the Fort Wayne Pistons were a popular franchise and appeared in the NBA Finals in 1954 and 1955, losing both times. In 1957, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, a much larger city that did not have an NBA franchise; the Detroit Gems had folded after one season of existence. The new Detroit Pistons played in Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons, then moved to Cobo Arena. The franchise was a consistent disappointment, struggling on both the court and the box office. In 1974, Zollner sold the team to Bill Davidson, who remains the team's owner. Displeased with the team's location in downtown Detroit, Davidson moved it to the suburb of Pontiac in 1978, where it played in the mammoth Silverdome, a structure built for professional football. (The Silverdome was the home of the NFL's Detroit Lions at the time.)

The franchise's fortunes finally began to turn in 1981, when it drafted point guard Isiah Thomas out of Indiana University. In early 1982, it acquired center Bill Laimbeer and guard Vinnie Johnson. The three, along with later aquisitions Joe Dumars, Rick Mahorn, and Dennis Rodman, formed the core of a team that would rise to the top of the league. With their physical style of play, and intensity with opponents, the Pistons gained the nickname "Bad Boys." Coach Chuck Daly took the team to the NBA Finals three consecutive years (1988-90) and won NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. The team moved into the lavish Palace of Auburn Hills in 1988 and remains there today.

The franchise went through a lengthy transitional period as its key players either retired or left. Though Grant Hill emerged as a gifted player, the team was unable to win a playoff series, losing to the Orlando Magic in 1996, the Atlanta Hawks in 1997 and 1999, and the Miami Heat in 2000. In the summer of 2000, Hill indicated his intentions to leave to Orlando, and Dumars – appointed the franchise's president of basketball operations that year – dealt Hill to the Magic in return for a pair of largely unheralded players. One of them, Ben Wallace, would prove to be a cornerstone for the franchise's revamped roster. Under Dumars's leadership, the Pistons have since surrounded Wallace with rising stars Chauncey Billups, Richard "Rip" Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. Coached by Hall of Fame inductee Larry Brown, the Pistons returned to prominence, winning the 2004 NBA championship.

Current season

On November 19, 2004, the Detroit Pistons were involved in a massive brawl at the Palace of Auburn Hills during a losing home game against the Indiana Pacers. After fouling Pistons' Ben Wallace, Pacer Ron Artest was hit by a cup while lying down on the scorer's table. This caused Artest to rush into the stands and attack some fans. Other Pacers such as Jermaine O'Neal fought with fans who had walked onto the court. A month later, five Pacers and seven fans were charged after being involved in the "basketbrawl."

See also: The Malice at The Palace.

Presently, the Pistons are considered a strong contender to win a second consecutive title in 2005. Seeded second in the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, they defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 4-1 and then rallied from a 2-1 deficit to finish off the Indiana Pacers 4-2. In the conference finals, the Pistons again fell behind, three games to two, but then won the final two games to defeat the Miami Heat and become Eastern Conference Champions. In the process, the Pistons became the first team to win a game 7 on the road since the L.A. Lakers did so at the Sacramento Kings in 2002.

The Pistons are currently facing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, the first two games of which were played at the SBC Center in San Antonio. Games 3 and 4 and 5 will be played at The Palace of Auburn Hills, and games 6 and (if necessary) 7 will be in San Antonio. The Spurs have won the first two games, and Detroit the second to, all by margins of 15 to 31 points. Game 5 is scheduled for Sunday, June 19th at The Palace of Auburn Hills at 9 P.M. Eastern on ABC.

Current Roster

Starters

  • SF - #22 Tayshaun Prince (Kentucky)
  • PF - #36 Rasheed Wallace (North Carolina)
  • C - #3 Ben Wallace (Virginia Union)
  • SG - #32 Richard "Rip" Hamilton (UConn)
  • PG - #1 Chauncey Billups (Colorado)

Reserves

  • G - #30 Carlos Arroyo (Florida Int'l)
  • C - #41 Elden Campbell (Clemson) - free agent
  • G-F - #20 Carlos Delfino (Argentina)
  • F - #12 Ronald Dupree (LSU)
  • F - #8 Darvin Ham (Texas Tech) - free agent
  • G - #10 Lindsey Hunter (Jackson State)
  • G - #5 Horace Jenkins (William Paterson) - restricted free agent
  • F-C - #24 Antonio McDyess (Alabama)
  • C - #31 Darko Miličić (Serbia)

Players of note

Basketball Hall of Fame Members:

  • Dave Bing
  • Bob Lanier
  • Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach)
  • Isiah Thomas
  • Chuck Daly (Inducted as Coach)

Not to be forgotten:

  • Adrian Dantley
  • Grant Hill
  • Rick Mahorn
  • Dennis Rodman
  • John Salley
  • Jerry Stackhouse

Retired numbers:

  • 2 Chuck Daly (never played in the NBA; represents the two NBA championship teams he coached)
  • 4 Joe Dumars
  • 11 Isiah Thomas
  • 15 Vinnie Johnson
  • 16 Bob Lanier
  • 21 Dave Bing
  • 40 Bill Laimbeer

Coaches and others

Basketball Hall of Fame Members:

  • Larry Brown
  • Chuck Daly
  • Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach)
  • Gregory Johnson

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Basketball Hall of Fame Members:. See also Category:Minnesota Twins players. Reserves. Although Minneapolis appears at first glance to be a "small market" city (3 million residents of the associated metropolitan area), the team routinely draws fans from as far away as Montana and Wyoming. Starters. The impact of the Twins on the Upper Midwest should not be underestimated. Eastern on ABC. In fact, in addition to the Twins, the Vikings and Gophers both have new stadium proposals in various stages of development.

Game 5 is scheduled for Sunday, June 19th at The Palace of Auburn Hills at 9 P.M. The Dome is thought to be an increasingly poor fit for all three of its major tenants (the Twins, the Vikings and the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers football team). The Spurs have won the first two games, and Detroit the second to, all by margins of 15 to 31 points. However, attempts to spur interest and push legislative efforts towards a new stadium have repeatedly failed. Games 3 and 4 and 5 will be played at The Palace of Auburn Hills, and games 6 and (if necessary) 7 will be in San Antonio. In particular, the Twins receive no revenue from luxury suite leasing (as those are owned by co-tenant Minnesota Vikings) and only a small percentage of concessions sales; also, the percentage of season-ticket-quality seats in the Metrodome is said to be very low compared to other stadiums. The Pistons are currently facing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, the first two games of which were played at the SBC Center in San Antonio. The Twins wish to replace the Metrodome with a new ballpark within the next half decade, claiming that the Metrodome generates too little revenue for the Twins to be competitive.

Lakers did so at the Sacramento Kings in 2002. Their streak of three straight division titles, along with some bitterly fought games, have helped to create an intense rivalry with the Chicago White Sox during the 2004 and 2005 seasons. In the process, the Pistons became the first team to win a game 7 on the road since the L.A. Threatened with closure by league contraction in 2002, the team battled back to reach the American League Championship Series before being eliminated 4-1 by that year's eventual World Series Champion Anaheim Angels. In the conference finals, the Pistons again fell behind, three games to two, but then won the final two games to defeat the Miami Heat and become Eastern Conference Champions. From <! daterange+ ->2002 to 2004<!- daterange- ->, the Twins compiled their longest streak of consecutive league/division championships ever (previous were the 1924 World Champion-1925 AL Champion Senators and the 1969–70 Twins). Seeded second in the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, they defeated the Philadelphia 76ers 4-1 and then rallied from a 2-1 deficit to finish off the Indiana Pacers 4-2. Things turned around, and in <! daterange+ ->2001 to 2004<!- daterange- ->, the Twins compiled the longest streak of consecutive winning seasons since moving to Minnesota, going 85-77 in 2001, 94-67 in 2002, 90-72 in 2003 and 92-70 in 2004.

Presently, the Pistons are considered a strong contender to win a second consecutive title in 2005. After 1992, the Twins again fell into an extended slump, posting a losing record each year through 2000. See also: The Malice at The Palace. 1991 was also the first time any team finishing last in its division the previous year advanced to the World Series, with both the Twins and Braves accomplishing this unprecedented feat. A month later, five Pacers and seven fans were charged after being involved in the "basketbrawl.". Paul native) Jack Morris. Other Pacers such as Jermaine O'Neal fought with fans who had walked onto the court. All three Series were decided in seven games, with the latter series ending in a dramatic 10-inning, 1-0 shutout by Series MVP (and St.

This caused Artest to rush into the stands and attack some fans. In both of these World Series, the home team won each game, which had never occurred prior to 1987. On November 19, 2004, the Detroit Pistons were involved in a massive brawl at the Palace of Auburn Hills during a losing home game against the Indiana Pacers. After fouling Pistons' Ben Wallace, Pacer Ron Artest was hit by a cup while lying down on the scorer's table. Louis Cardinals to win the 1987 World Series, then later defeated the Atlanta Braves to win the 1991 World Series. Coached by Hall of Fame inductee Larry Brown, the Pistons returned to prominence, winning the 2004 NBA championship. The Twins defeated the St. Under Dumars's leadership, the Pistons have since surrounded Wallace with rising stars Chauncey Billups, Richard "Rip" Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. After several losing seasons in the Dome, the arrival of 1980s superstars Kent Hrbek and Kirby Puckett electrified the team and sent them to two World Series in five years.

One of them, Ben Wallace, would prove to be a cornerstone for the franchise's revamped roster. The 1982 season brought the team indoors, into the Metrodome, which is in downtown Minneapolis near the Mississippi River. In the summer of 2000, Hill indicated his intentions to leave to Orlando, and Dumars – appointed the franchise's president of basketball operations that year – dealt Hill to the Magic in return for a pair of largely unheralded players. The Mall of America now occupies the spot where the "Old Met" stood. Though Grant Hill emerged as a gifted player, the team was unable to win a playoff series, losing to the Orlando Magic in 1996, the Atlanta Hawks in 1997 and 1999, and the Miami Heat in 2000. Through 1981, the team played its games at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, a suburb south of the Twin Cities. The franchise went through a lengthy transitional period as its key players either retired or left. The team continued to post winning records through 1971, but then entered a decade-long slump.

The team moved into the lavish Palace of Auburn Hills in 1988 and remains there today. They were defeated in the World Series by the Los Angeles Dodgers, but the championship drive cemented the team's relationship with the people of Minnesota. With their physical style of play, and intensity with opponents, the Pistons gained the nickname "Bad Boys." Coach Chuck Daly took the team to the NBA Finals three consecutive years (1988-90) and won NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. The Twins were eagerly greeted in Minnesota when they arrived in 1961, and they advanced to the World Series in 1965, driven by the exciting play of superstar first baseman Harmon Killebrew. The three, along with later aquisitions Joe Dumars, Rick Mahorn, and Dennis Rodman, formed the core of a team that would rise to the top of the league. This fact is reinforced by the stylized TC logo worn on road caps, and by their mascot, TC Bear. In early 1982, it acquired center Bill Laimbeer and guard Vinnie Johnson. Paul (and, presumably, the entire state).

The franchise's fortunes finally began to turn in 1981, when it drafted point guard Isiah Thomas out of Indiana University. The "Minnesota" designation, instead of "Minneapolis", comes from the fact that the team is intended to represent the "Twin" Cities of Minneapolis-St. (The Silverdome was the home of the NFL's Detroit Lions at the time.). Team nickname: Nats, short for Nationals. Also sometimes called Griffs by inventive headline writers, in reference to the club owner. Displeased with the team's location in downtown Detroit, Davidson moved it to the suburb of Pontiac in 1978, where it played in the mammoth Silverdome, a structure built for professional football. One of the songs from the musical, You Gotta Have Heart, is frequently played at baseball games. In 1974, Zollner sold the team to Bill Davidson, who remains the team's owner. The plot features a middle-aged man named Joe Hardy who sells his soul to the Devil so the Washington Senators can win the pennant.

The franchise was a consistent disappointment, struggling on both the court and the box office. The longtime competitive struggles of the team were fictionalized in the book The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant, which became the Broadway musical and movie Damn Yankees. The new Detroit Pistons played in Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons, then moved to Cobo Arena. The team played its games at Griffith Stadium, sharing it with the Homestead Grays of the Negro Leagues (who played some of their games there). In 1957, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, a much larger city that did not have an NBA franchise; the Detroit Gems had folded after one season of existence. [1] (http://www.snopes.com/sports/baseball/castro.asp). Led by star forward George Yardley, the Fort Wayne Pistons were a popular franchise and appeared in the NBA Finals in 1954 and 1955, losing both times. It is falsely claimed that prior to the Cuban revolution, Fidel Castro tried out for the Senators as a pitcher during the early 1950s.

It is the oldest existing franchise in the NBA. During one portion of its history, the team was so notoriously inept that it inspired San Francisco Chronicle columnist Charley Dryden to joke: "Washington: First in war, first in peace, and last in the American League." This was a play on Light Horse Harry Lee's remembrance of George Washington: "First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen." The team's difficulties on the field also inspired the book The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant (see below). The franchise was founded in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana by Fred Zollner, owner of a General Motors subsidiary that manufactored pistons. That, along with its poor early years, resulted in the team being remembered mostly for its failures rather than its successes.
. After that, the team fell into mediocrity quickly. The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the Detroit, Michigan metropolitan area. During the period <! daterange+ ->1907 to 1927<!- daterange- ->, the team's line up boasted the presence of Walter "The Big Train" Johnson and they won the 1924 World Series. They also appeared in the 1925 and 1933 Series and came very close in 1945.

Gregory Johnson. They and their expansion-replacement in 1961 would remain officially the "Senators" for good, although space-saving headline writers continued to refer to them as "Nats" frequently. Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach). In 1959 the word "Senators" finally appeared on their shirts. Chuck Daly. By the 1950s, "Nationals" was pretty much passe. Larry Brown. Baseball guides even said "Nationals or Senators" when listing the nickname.

40 Bill Laimbeer. Newspaper articles for decades used the names "Senators" and "Nationals" (or "Nats") interchangeably, often within the same article. 21 Dave Bing. Otherwise, the jerseys either read "Washington" or carried a plain block "W". 16 Bob Lanier. During <! daterange+ ->1905 to 1906<!- daterange- -> the team actually wore "Nationals" on their jerseys. 15 Vinnie Johnson. The Washington ballclub was known by two nicknames, the Nationals and the Senators, for most of its history prior to moving to Minnesota.

11 Isiah Thomas. The Blues were champions of the Western League in 1898, taking the league by a game-and-a-half from the Indianapolis Hoosiers. 4 Joe Dumars. Byron "Ban" Johnson, president of the Western League, changed the name to the American League in 1900 and major league status was awarded a year later. 2 Chuck Daly (never played in the NBA; represents the two NBA championship teams he coached). The Kansas City Blues were a charter member of a the Western League, a minor league at the time. Jerry Stackhouse. in 1901 when the American League was formed, and played there through the 1960 season.

John Salley. The franchise originated in Kansas City, Missouri in 1894, moved to Washington, D.C. Dennis Rodman. Bear is the Twins' mascot, introduced in 2001. Rick Mahorn. T.C. Grant Hill. The club has several well-known, harmless hazing rituals, such as requiring the most junior relief pitcher on the team to carry water and snacks to the bullpen in a bright pink Barbie backpack and many of its players, both past and present, are notorious pranksters.

Adrian Dantley. The party atmosphere of the Twins clubhouse after a win is well-known, the team's players unwinding with loud rock music (usually the choice of the winning pitcher) and video games. Chuck Daly (Inducted as Coach). Former manager Tom Kelly and current manager Ron Gardenhire run and encourage a hard-nosed, fundamentals-first attitude toward playing and winning baseball games. Isiah Thomas. The Twins are affectionately known among their fans as the "Twinkies." Despite the cream-puff sound of that nickname, the Twins have a reputation as a hard-working, hard-playing club. Earl Lloyd (inducted as a contributor, not as a player or coach). The team and its famous (or infamous) domed ballpark, the Metrodome, were featured in the 1994 motion picture Little Big League.

Bob Lanier. The team is owned by Minneapolis businessman Carl Pohlad, the third owner of the club (following Clark Griffith and his son Calvin). Dave Bing. They are in the Central Division of the American League. C - #31 Darko Miličić (Serbia). The Minnesota Twins is a Major League Baseball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. F-C - #24 Antonio McDyess (Alabama). Elizabethton Twins
Gulf Coast League Twins.

G - #5 Horace Jenkins (William Paterson) - restricted free agent. Fort Myers Miracle
Beloit Snappers. G - #10 Lindsey Hunter (Jackson State). New Britain Rock Cats. F - #8 Darvin Ham (Texas Tech) - free agent. Rochester Red Wings. F - #12 Ronald Dupree (LSU). American League
.

G-F - #20 Carlos Delfino (Argentina). Pitching saves: Eddie Guardado, 45 (2002). C - #41 Elden Campbell (Clemson) - free agent. Pitching ERA: Walter Johnson, 1.14 (1.14). G - #30 Carlos Arroyo (Florida Int'l). Pitching strikeouts: Walter Johnson, 313 (1910). PG - #1 Chauncey Billups (Colorado). Pitching wins: Walter Johnson, 36 (1913).

SG - #32 Richard "Rip" Hamilton (UConn). Strikeouts: Bobby Darwin, 145 (1972). C - #3 Ben Wallace (Virginia Union). Walks: Eddie Yost, 151 (1956). PF - #36 Rasheed Wallace (North Carolina). Hitting streak: Ken Landreaux, 31 games (1980). SF - #22 Tayshaun Prince (Kentucky). Stolen bases: Chuck Knoblauch, 62 (1997).

Extra-Base hits: Tony Oliva, 84 (1964). Triples: Goose Goslin and Christian Guzman, 20 (1925 and 2000). Doubles: Mickey Vernon, 51 (1966). Singles: Sam Rice, 182 (1925).

Hits: Rod Carew, 239 (1977). Runs: Chuck Knoblauch, 140 (1996). Runs batted in: Harmon Killebrew, 140 (1969). Home runs: Harmon Killebrew, 49 (1964 and 1969).

Batting average: Rod Carew, .388 (1977). 44 Bob Casey. 42 Jackie Robinson (retired throughout baseball). 34 Kirby Puckett.

29 Rod Carew. 14 Kent Hrbek.   6 Tony Oliva.   3 Harmon Killebrew.

Bob Casey, the public address announcer for the first 44 years of Twins baseball (<! daterange+ ->1961 to 2004<!- daterange- ->). Frank Viola. Zoilo Versalles. CÚsar Tovar.

Kevin Tapani. Rich Rollins. Jeff Reardon. Pierzynski.

A.J. Jim Perry. Camilo Pascual. Tony Oliva.

Joe Niekro. Al Newman. Jack Morris. Doug Mientkiewicz.

Shane Mack. Gene Larkin. Chuck Knoblauch. Tom Kelly.

Jim Kaat. Kent Hrbek. Brian Harper. Eddie Guardado.

Mudcat Grant. Dan Gladden. Greg Gagne. Gary Gaetti.

Scott Erickson. Chili Davis. Tom Brunansky. Bert Blyleven.

Juan Berenguer. Bob Allison. Rick Aguilera. Tom Kelly and Paul Molitor often work with the Twins in scouting and assistant coach roles, though neither are in the dugout during games.

Note

    . 46 USA Scott Ullger (batting). 13 USA Jerry White (first base). 43 USA Rick Stelmaszek (bullpen).

    62 USA Al Newman (third base).   9 USA Steve Liddle (bench). 40 USA Rick Anderson (pitching). Coaches

      .

      35 USA Ron Gardenhire. Manager

        . Dave Winfield. Kirby Puckett.

        Paul Molitor. Harmon Killebrew. Walter Johnson. Steve Carlton.

        Rod Carew.

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